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All Disney Animated Theatrical Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Remember those shelves and shelves of Disney classics you used to have on VHS – the spines of their spongy plastic cases promising adventures with foxes and cats, lions and bears, princesses and puppets? They’re all on Disney+. (Except for Song of the South, because well, that one’s never going to see the light of zip-a-dee-ay again.) To celebrate this access to all the best Disney movies, we went ahead and compiled a list of every Disney animated film and ranked them the best way we know how: By Tomatometer.

We’ve been strict with our rules; we’re talking Disney animated movies, and excluding Pixar, and movies also had to be theatrically released in order to qualify. Plus, the movies had to be fully animated, which means you won’t find live-action/animation hybrid movies like Bedknobs and Broomsticks nor Song of the South on the list. You will find the studio’s earliest animated offerings: the one that started it all – Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs – and the ones whose box office receipts might have made a weaker-willed studio impresario end it quickly (Pinocchio, Fantasia). You’ll also find rousing adventures (Jungle Book, Sword In the Stone), make a foray into the experimental years (Black Cauldron, Oliver and Company), resurface in the second golden age (Aladdin, The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King), fall back into the second dark age (Treasure Planet, Home on the Range), and come back up again for some digital fun (Bolt, Big Hero 6) before coming full circle with the princesses (Tangled, Frozen, Moana). Except you won’t do it in that order, of course, because Disney’s Tomatometer highs and lows are spread across the decades.

So, Meter Meter on the wall, who’s the Freshest of them all? Find out in our guide to the Best Disney Animated Movies, ranked by Tomatometer!

MORE ON DISNEY: The Best Disney+ Shows and Original Movies | 100 Best Movies on Disney+ | All Star Wars Movies Ranked | All MCU Movies RankedAll Pixar Movies Ranked

#71
#71
Adjusted Score: 20760%
Critics Consensus: This inferior rehash of The Jungle Book should have gone straight to video.
Synopsis: Wild child Mowgli (Haley Joel Osment) has grown fidgety with his life in a rural village. So he sneaks back... [More]
Directed By: Steve Trenbirth

#70

Planes (2013)
25%

#70
Adjusted Score: 29462%
Critics Consensus: Planes has enough bright colors, goofy voices, and slick animation to distract some young viewers for 92 minutes -- and probably sell plenty of toys in the bargain -- but on nearly every other level, it's a Disney disappointment.
Synopsis: Dusty is a small-town plane who dreams of one day competing as a high-flying air racer. However, poor Dusty has... [More]
Directed By: Klay Hall

#69

Doug's 1st Movie (1999)
26%

#69
Adjusted Score: 25801%
Critics Consensus: Doug's 1st Movie may entertain very young fans of its main character, but essentially amounts to a forgettable feature-length episode of his show.
Synopsis: Doug and his pal, Skeeter, befriend a creature created by toxins that were dumped into Lucky Duck Lake.... [More]
Directed By: Maurice Joyce

#68

Chicken Little (2005)
36%

#68
Adjusted Score: 42282%
Critics Consensus: Disney expends more effort in the technical presentation than in crafting an original storyline.
Synopsis: Young Chicken Little (Zach Braff) throws his small town into panic by claiming the sky is falling. Unable to find... [More]
Directed By: Mark Dindal

#67

Brother Bear (2003)
37%

#67
Adjusted Score: 41346%
Critics Consensus: Brother Bear is gentle and pleasant if unremarkable Disney fare, with so-so animation and generic plotting.
Synopsis: Kenai (Joaquin Phoenix) is a young Indian brave with a particular distaste for bears. When his brother Sitka (D.B. Sweeney)... [More]

#66
#66
Adjusted Score: 47509%
Critics Consensus: Although it's too flat and formulaic to measure up against the best family-friendly fare, Planes: Fire and Rescue is a passable diversion for much younger viewers.
Synopsis: Dusty (Dane Cook), the famous racing airplane, learns that his engine is damaged, so he must shift gears and find... [More]
Directed By: Bobs Gannaway

#65
#65
Adjusted Score: 48081%
Critics Consensus: With its forgettable songs and lackluster story, this new Pan will surely entertain kids, but will feel more like a retread to adults.
Synopsis: Wendy is all grown up, with children of her own, and as the blitzkrieg rages, she calms them with tales... [More]
Directed By: Robin Budd

#64
#64
Adjusted Score: 54460%
Critics Consensus: Atlantis provides a fast-paced spectacle, but stints on such things as character development and a coherent plot.
Synopsis: An inexperienced young adventurer becomes the key to unraveling an ancient mystery when he joins up with a group of... [More]
Directed By: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

#63

Bambi II (2006)
50%

#63
Adjusted Score: 24469%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After the death of his mother, a fawn (Alexander Gould) develops a deeper bond with his noble father (Patrick Stewart).... [More]
Directed By: Brian Pimental

#62

Oliver & Company (1988)
50%

#62
Adjusted Score: 53473%
Critics Consensus: Predictable and stodgy, Oliver & Company isn't one of Disney's best, though its colorful cast of characters may be enough to entertain young viewers looking for a little adventure.
Synopsis: In this animated update of the classic "Oliver Twist" tale, Oliver (Joey Lawrence) is an orphaned kitten taken in by... [More]
Directed By: George Scribner

#61
#61
Adjusted Score: 56368%
Critics Consensus: Though Home on the Range is likeable and may keep young children diverted, it's one of Disney's more middling titles, with garish visuals and a dull plot.
Synopsis: To save their owner's farm, three cows (Roseanne Barr, Judi Dench, Jennifer Tilly) try to capture a notorious rustler and... [More]
Directed By: Will Finn, John Sanford

#60

Robin Hood (1973)
54%

#60
Adjusted Score: 55319%
Critics Consensus: One of the weaker Disney adaptations, Robin Hood is cute and colorful but lacks the majesty and excitement of the studio's earlier efforts.
Synopsis: An amiable rooster called Alan-a-Dale (Roger Miller) tells stories and sings songs of the heroic Robin Hood (Brian Bedford) and... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Reitherman

#59
#59
Adjusted Score: 56344%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious but flawed, The Black Cauldron is technically brilliant as usual, but lacks the compelling characters of other Disney animated classics.
Synopsis: In the land of Prydain, lowly pig herder Taran (Grant Bardsley) dreams of becoming a gallant knight. Young Taran receives... [More]
Directed By: Ted Berman, Richard Rich

#58

Pocahontas (1995)
55%

#58
Adjusted Score: 58349%
Critics Consensus: Pocahontas means well, and has moments of startling beauty, but it's largely a bland, uninspired effort, with uneven plotting and an unfortunate lack of fun.
Synopsis: This is the Disney animated tale of the romance between a young American Indian woman named Pocahontas (Irene Bedard) and... [More]

#57

A Goofy Movie (1995)
59%

#57
Adjusted Score: 60097%
Critics Consensus: A Goofy Movie offers enough of its titular ingredient to satisfy younger viewers, even if most parents will agree that this beloved character deserves better.
Synopsis: Though Goofy always means well, his amiable cluelessness and klutzy pratfalls regularly embarrass his awkward adolescent son, Max. When Max's... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Lima

#56
#56
Adjusted Score: 62160%
Critics Consensus: Though basically a TV cartoon stretched out to movie-length, Recess has enough successful jokes and smart writing to make it a worthwhile view.
Synopsis: The school year is finally over, and T.J. Detweiler is looking forward to a fun-filled summer. Boredom quickly sets in... [More]
Directed By: Chuck Sheetz

#55

The Tigger Movie (2000)
62%

#55
Adjusted Score: 64671%
Critics Consensus: Tigger Movie may lack the technological flash and underlying adult sophistication of other recent animated movies, but it's fun and charming.
Synopsis: Winnie the Pooh, Piglet, Owl, Kanga, Roo, and Rabbit are preparing a suitable winter home for Eeyore, the perennially dejected... [More]
Directed By: Jun Falkenstein

#54

Make Mine Music (1946)
64%

#54
Adjusted Score: 63454%
Critics Consensus: This collection of musical-themed shorts doesn't reach the artistic heights of Fantasia, but it's well animated and mostly good fun.
Synopsis: The 10 Disney shorts include "All the Cats Join In" and "The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met."... [More]

#53

The Aristocats (1970)
64%

#53
Adjusted Score: 65978%
Critics Consensus: Though The Aristocats is a mostly middling effort for Disney, it is redeemed by terrific work from its voice cast and some jazzy tunes.
Synopsis: When a retired opera singer leaves her inheritance to her cat, Duchess (Eva Gabor), and three kittens, the woman's butler... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Reitherman

#52

Dinosaur (2000)
64%

#52
Adjusted Score: 68795%
Critics Consensus: While Dinosaur's plot is generic and dull, its stunning computer animation and detailed backgrounds are enough to make it worth a look.
Synopsis: This is the story of Aladar (D.B. Sweeney), an iguanodon dinosaur raised by a family of lemurs. Their world is... [More]

#51
#51
Adjusted Score: 67430%
Critics Consensus: A decent take on the legend of King Arthur, The Sword in the Stone suffers from relatively indifferent animation, but its characters are still memorable and appealing.
Synopsis: This Disney adaptation of the classic fable chronicles King Arthur's humble beginnings. As an orphaned child, Arthur, who was then... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Reitherman

#50
#50
Adjusted Score: 66471%
Critics Consensus: Though it doesn't quite live up to its title, Fun and Fancy Free has its moments, and it's a rare opportunity to see Mickey, Donald, and Goofy together.
Synopsis: Ventriloquist Edgar Bergen introduces cartoons: "Bongo," about a unicycling circus bear, and "Mickey and the Beanstalk."... [More]

#49
#49
Adjusted Score: 72853%
Critics Consensus: Meet the Robinsons is a visually impressive children's animated film marked by a story of considerable depth.
Synopsis: Boy genius Lewis gives up hope of retrieving his latest invention, which was stolen by Bowler Hat Guy, then a... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Anderson

#48

Treasure Planet (2002)
69%

#48
Adjusted Score: 73649%
Critics Consensus: Though its characterizations are weaker than usual, Treasure Planet offers a fast-paced, beautifully rendered vision of outer space.
Synopsis: The legendary "loot of a thousand worlds" inspires an intergalactic treasure hunt when 15-year-old Jim Hawkins stumbles upon a map... [More]
Directed By: John Musker, Ron Clements

#47
#47
Adjusted Score: 71777%
Critics Consensus: The Fox and the Hound is a likeable, charming, unassuming effort that manages to transcend its thin, predictable plot.
Synopsis: After his mother is killed, Tod the fox (Mickey Rooney) is taken in by the kindly Widow Tweed (Jeanette Nolan).... [More]

#46
#46
Adjusted Score: 72160%
Critics Consensus: Wholesome and charming entertainment for young children.
Synopsis: In this animated feature, Piglet (John Fiedler) is the smallest of all his friends, which doesn't account for his big... [More]
Directed By: Francis Glebas

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 72405%
Critics Consensus: Though its story is second-rate, The Rescuers Down Under redeems itself with some remarkable production values -- particularly its flight scenes.
Synopsis: Cody (Adam Ryen), a boy living in the Australian outback, frees a rare golden eagle from a trap. When an... [More]
Directed By: Hendel Butoy, Mike Gabriel

#44
Adjusted Score: 73992%
Critics Consensus: Disney's take on the Victor Hugo classic is dramatically uneven, but its strong visuals, dark themes, and message of tolerance make for a more-sophisticated-than-average children's film.
Synopsis: An animated Disney adventure follows disfigured Quasimodo (Tom Hulce), the bell-ringer of Notre Dame Cathedral, who bides his time locked... [More]
Directed By: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

#43

Melody Time (1948)
73%

#43
Adjusted Score: 35395%
Critics Consensus: Melody Time is a charming musical anthology film that's expertly crafted and filled with high-spirited numbers.
Synopsis: Many animated tales are set to a rousing array of music from the 1940s from the likes of Roy Rogers,... [More]

#42
#42
Adjusted Score: 77059%
Critics Consensus: Despite its short running time, Teacher's Pet is a witty and irreverent family film.
Synopsis: In this animated musical, Spot (Nathan Lane) is a snarky blue-furred dog whose greatest desire is to be transformed into... [More]
Directed By: Timothy Björklund

#41

Peter Pan (1953)
79%

#41
Adjusted Score: 81740%
Critics Consensus: Though it doesn't delve deeply into the darkness of J.M. Barrie's tale, Peter Pan is a heartwarming, exuberant film with some great tunes.
Synopsis: In this Disney animated film, Wendy (Kathryn Beaumont) and her two brothers are amazed when a magical boy named Peter... [More]

#40

Frozen II (2019)
78%

#40
Adjusted Score: 97970%
Critics Consensus: Frozen II can't quite recapture the showstopping feel of its predecessor, but it remains a dazzling adventure into the unknown.
Synopsis: Elsa the Snow Queen has an extraordinary gift -- the power to create ice and snow. But no matter how... [More]
Directed By: Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee

#39
#39
Adjusted Score: 81711%
Critics Consensus: The Great Mouse Detective may not rank with Disney's classics, but it's an amiable, entertaining picture with some stylishly dark visuals.
Synopsis: Rodent supersleuth Basil and his bumbling partner must thwart evil Ratigan's plot to depose the Mouse Queen.... [More]

#38
#38
Adjusted Score: 82279%
Critics Consensus: A charming and delightful walk through the Hundred Acres Woods for young viewers.
Synopsis: Winnie the Pooh (Jim Cummings), Piglet (John Fiedler), Tigger and Roo (Nikita Hopkins) search for a mysterious and fearsome creature.... [More]
Directed By: Frank Nissen

#37

The Rescuers (1977)
81%

#37
Adjusted Score: 82947%
Critics Consensus: Featuring superlative animation, off-kilter characters, and affectionate voice work by Bob Newhart and Eva Gabor, The Rescuers represents a bright spot in Disney's post-golden age.
Synopsis: Bernard (Bob Newhart) and Miss Bianca (Eva Gabor), two New York City mice, are members of the Rescue Aid Society,... [More]

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: 85194%
Critics Consensus: A good introduction to Lewis Carroll's classic, Alice in Wonderland boasts some of the Disney canon's most surreal and twisted images.
Synopsis: Lewis Carroll's beloved fantasy tale is brought to life in this Disney animated classic. When Alice (Kathryn Beaumont), a restless... [More]

#35

Fantasia 2000 (1999)
81%

#35
Adjusted Score: 84374%
Critics Consensus: It provides an entertaining experience for adults and children alike.
Synopsis: "Fantasia/2000" continues and builds upon Walt Disney's original idea with the creation of a new musical program interpreted by a... [More]

#34

Hercules (1997)
84%

#34
Adjusted Score: 86112%
Critics Consensus: Fast-paced and packed with dozens of pop culture references, Hercules might not measure up with the true classics of the Disney pantheon, but it's still plenty of fun.
Synopsis: Disney tackles Greek mythology in this animated feature. Hercules (Tate Donovan), a son of gods, was snatched as a baby... [More]
Directed By: Ron Clements, John Musker

#33
#33
Adjusted Score: 93380%
Critics Consensus: The warmth of traditional Disney animation makes this occasionally lightweight fairy-tale update a lively and captivating confection for the holidays.
Synopsis: Hardworking and ambitious, Tiana (Anika Noni Rose) dreams of one day opening the finest restaurant in New Orleans. Her dream... [More]
Directed By: Ron Clements, John Musker

#32

Mulan (1998)
86%

#32
Adjusted Score: 90109%
Critics Consensus: Exploring themes of family duty and honor, Mulan breaks new ground as a Disney film, while still bringing vibrant animation and sprightly characters to the screen.
Synopsis: Fearful that her ailing father will be drafted into the Chinese military, Mulan (Ming-Na Wen) takes his spot -- though,... [More]
Directed By: Barry Cook, Tony Bancroft

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 89849%
Critics Consensus: The Emperor's New Groove isn't the most ambitious animated film, but its brisk pace, fresh characters, and big laughs make for a great time for the whole family.
Synopsis: Arrogant young Emperor Kuzco is transformed into a llama by his power-hungry advisor -- the devious diva Yzma. Stranded in... [More]
Directed By: Mark Dindal

#30

Lilo & Stitch (2002)
86%

#30
Adjusted Score: 90576%
Critics Consensus: Edgier than traditional Disney fare, Lilo and Stitch explores issues of family while providing a fun and charming story.
Synopsis: A tale of a young girl's close encounter with the galaxy's most wanted extraterrestrial. Lilo is a lonely Hawaiian girl... [More]

#29

Wreck-It Ralph (2012)
87%

#29
Adjusted Score: 94085%
Critics Consensus: Equally entertaining for both kids and parents old enough to catch the references, Wreck-It Ralph is a clever, colorful adventure built on familiar themes and joyful nostalgia.
Synopsis: Arcade-game character Wreck-It Ralph (John C. Reilly) is tired of always being the "bad guy" and losing to his "good... [More]
Directed By: Rich Moore

#28
Adjusted Score: 60512%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Scrooge McDuck finds a magic lamp with Huey, Dewey and Louie and their girlfriend, Webby.... [More]

#27

The Jungle Book (1967)
88%

#27
Adjusted Score: 90820%
Critics Consensus: With expressive animation, fun characters, and catchy songs, The Jungle Book endures as a crowd-pleasing Disney classic.
Synopsis: In this classic Walt Disney animation based on Rudyard Kipling's book, Mowgli, an abandoned child raised by wolves, has his... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Reitherman

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 103604%
Critics Consensus: Ralph Breaks the Internet levels up on its predecessor with a funny, heartwarming sequel that expands its colorful universe while focusing on core characters and relationships.
Synopsis: Video game bad guy Ralph and fellow misfit Vanellope von Schweetz must risk it all by traveling to the World... [More]
Directed By: Phil Johnston, Rich Moore

#25

Sleeping Beauty (1959)
89%

#25
Adjusted Score: 93010%
Critics Consensus: This Disney dreamscape contains moments of grandeur, with its lush colors, magical air, one of the most menacing villains in the Disney canon.
Synopsis: Filled with jealousy, the evil witch Maleficent (Eleanor Audley) curses Princess Aurora (Mary Costa) to die on her 16th birthday.... [More]
Directed By: Clyde Geronimi

#24

Tarzan (1999)
89%

#24
Adjusted Score: 92832%
Critics Consensus: Disney's Tarzan takes the well-known story to a new level with spirited animation, a brisk pace, and some thrilling action set-pieces..
Synopsis: In this Disney animated tale, the orphaned Tarzan (Tony Goldwyn) grows up in the remote African wilderness, raised by the... [More]
Directed By: Chris Buck, Kevin Lima

#23

Bolt (2008)
89%

#23
Adjusted Score: 96468%
Critics Consensus: Bolt is a pleasant animated comedy that overcomes the story's familiarity with strong visuals and likable characters.
Synopsis: The days of canine superstar Bolt (John Travolta) are filled with danger and intrigue ... until the cameras stop rolling.... [More]

#22

Tangled (2010)
89%

#22
Adjusted Score: 97636%
Critics Consensus: While far from Disney's greatest film, Tangled is a visually stunning, thoroughly entertaining addition to the studio's classic animated canon.
Synopsis: When the kingdom's most-wanted bandit, Flynn Rider (Zachary Levi), hides in a convenient tower, he immediately becomes a captive of... [More]
Directed By: Nathan Greno, Byron Howard

#21

Winnie the Pooh (2011)
90%

#21
Adjusted Score: 95357%
Critics Consensus: Short, nostalgic, and gently whimsical, Winnie the Pooh offers young audiences -- and their parents -- a sweetly traditional family treat.
Synopsis: Three stories inspired by A.A. Milne add up to a very busy day for Winnie the Pooh (Jim Cummings) and... [More]

#20

Big Hero 6 (2014)
90%

#20
Adjusted Score: 98662%
Critics Consensus: Agreeably entertaining and brilliantly animated, Big Hero 6 is briskly-paced, action-packed, and often touching.
Synopsis: Robotics prodigy Hiro (Ryan Potter) lives in the city of San Fransokyo. Next to his older brother, Tadashi, Hiro's closest... [More]
Directed By: Don Hall, Chris Williams

#19

Frozen (2013)
90%

#19
Adjusted Score: 100194%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully animated, smartly written, and stocked with singalong songs, Frozen adds another worthy entry to the Disney canon.
Synopsis: When their kingdom becomes trapped in perpetual winter, fearless Anna (Kristen Bell) joins forces with mountaineer Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) and... [More]
Directed By: Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee

#18

Bambi (1942)
91%

#18
Adjusted Score: 96249%
Critics Consensus: Elegantly animated and deeply touching, Bambi is an enduring, endearing, and moving Disney classic.
Synopsis: In a classic Disney animation, a fawn named Bambi joins his new friends, a young rabbit named Thumper and a... [More]
Directed By: David Hand

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 98046%
Critics Consensus: A nostalgic charmer, Lady and the Tramp's token sweetness is mighty but the songs and richly colored animation are technically superb and make for a memorable experience.
Synopsis: This Disney animated classic follows a pampered cocker spaniel named Lady (Barbara Luddy) whose comfortable life slips away once her... [More]

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 97885%
Critics Consensus: The Little Mermaid ushered in a new golden era for Disney animation with warm and charming hand-drawn characters and catchy musical sequences.
Synopsis: In Disney's beguiling animated romp, rebellious 16-year-old mermaid Ariel (Jodi Benson) is fascinated with life on land. On one of... [More]
Directed By: Ron Clements, John Musker

#15

Encanto (2021)
90%

#15
Adjusted Score: 99795%
Critics Consensus: Encanto's setting and cultural perspective are new for Disney, but the end result is the same -- enchanting, beautifully animated fun for the whole family.
Synopsis: The Madrigals are an extraordinary family who live hidden in the mountains of Colombia in a charmed place called the... [More]
Directed By: Jared Bush, Byron Howard

#14

The Lion King (1994)
93%

#14
Adjusted Score: 102876%
Critics Consensus: Emotionally stirring, richly drawn, and beautifully animated, The Lion King is a pride within Disney's pantheon of classic family films.
Synopsis: This Disney animated feature follows the adventures of the young lion Simba (Jonathan Taylor Thomas), the heir of his father,... [More]
Directed By: Roger Allers, Rob Minkoff

#13
Adjusted Score: 94831%
Critics Consensus: This Disney two-fer may not be the most reverent literary adaptation, but it's remarkably crafted and emotionally resonant.
Synopsis: Two animated adaptations of classic literature make up this Disney film. In "The Wind in the Willows," wealthy Mr. Toad... [More]

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 103564%
Critics Consensus: Enchanting, sweepingly romantic, and featuring plenty of wonderful musical numbers, Beauty and the Beast is one of Disney's most elegant animated offerings.
Synopsis: An arrogant young prince (Robby Benson) and his castle's servants fall under the spell of a wicked enchantress, who turns... [More]
Directed By: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 108633%
Critics Consensus: Another gorgeously animated, skillfully voiced entry in the Disney canon, Raya and the Last Dragon continues the studio's increased representation while reaffirming that its classic formula is just as reliable as ever.
Synopsis: Long ago, in the fantasy world of Kumandra, humans and dragons lived together in harmony. But when sinister monsters known... [More]

#10

Fantasia (1940)
95%

#10
Adjusted Score: 100171%
Critics Consensus: A landmark in animation (and a huge influence on the medium of music video), Disney's Fantasia is a relentlessly inventive blend of the classics with phantasmagorical images.
Synopsis: Released in 1940, represented Disney's boldest experiment to date. Bringing to life his vision of blending animated imagery with classical... [More]

#9

Aladdin (1992)
95%

#9
Adjusted Score: 100911%
Critics Consensus: A highly entertaining entry in Disney's renaissance era," Aladdin is beautifully drawn, with near-classic songs and a cast of scene-stealing characters.
Synopsis: When street rat Aladdin frees a genie from a lamp, he finds his wishes granted. However, he soon finds that... [More]
Directed By: Ron Clements, John Musker

#8

Moana (2016)
95%

#8
Adjusted Score: 112963%
Critics Consensus: With a title character as three-dimensional as its lush animation and a story that adds fresh depth to Disney's time-tested formula, Moana is truly a family-friendly adventure for the ages.
Synopsis: An adventurous teenager sails out on a daring mission to save her people. During her journey, Moana meets the once-mighty... [More]
Directed By: John Musker, Ron Clements

#7

Cinderella (1950)
97%

#7
Adjusted Score: 101071%
Critics Consensus: The rich colors, sweet songs, adorable mice and endearing (if suffering) heroine make Cinderella a nostalgically lovely charmer.
Synopsis: With a wicked stepmother (Eleanor Audley) and two jealous stepsisters (Rhoda Williams, Lucille Bliss) who keep her enslaved and in... [More]

#6

Dumbo (1941)
98%

#6
Adjusted Score: 102679%
Critics Consensus: Dumbo packs plenty of story into its brief runtime, along with all the warm animation and wonderful music you'd expect from a Disney classic.
Synopsis: A young circus elephant is born with comically large ears and given the cruel nickname Dumbo. One day at a... [More]
Directed By: Ben Sharpsteen

#5
Adjusted Score: 102959%
Critics Consensus: With plenty of pooches and a memorable villain (Cruella De Vil), this is one of Disney's most enduring, entertaining animated films.
Synopsis: In a Disney animation classic, Dalmatian Pongo is tired of his bachelor-dog life. He spies lovely Perdita and maneuvers his... [More]

#4
Adjusted Score: 99669%
Critics Consensus: With its involving story and characters, vibrant art, and memorable songs, Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs set the animation standard for decades to come.
Synopsis: The Grimm fairy tale gets a Technicolor treatment in Disney's first animated feature. Jealous of Snow White's beauty, the wicked... [More]
Directed By: David Hand

#3

Zootopia (2016)
98%

#3
Adjusted Score: 115777%
Critics Consensus: The brilliantly well-rounded Zootopia offers a thoughtful, inclusive message that's as rich and timely as its sumptuously state-of-the-art animation -- all while remaining fast and funny enough to keep younger viewers entertained.
Synopsis: From the largest elephant to the smallest shrew, the city of Zootopia is a mammal metropolis where various animals live... [More]
Directed By: Byron Howard, Rich Moore

#2
Adjusted Score: 76079%
Critics Consensus: Perhaps the most faithful of Disney's literary adaptations, this cute, charming collection of episodes captures the spirit of A.A. Milne's classic stories.
Synopsis: Sebastian Cabot narrates the adventures of bumbling bear Winnie the Pooh as he battles a nest of vicious bees over... [More]

#1

Pinocchio (1940)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 106171%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious, adventurous, and sometimes frightening, Pinocchio arguably represents the pinnacle of Disney's collected works -- it's beautifully crafted and emotionally resonant.
Synopsis: When the woodworker Geppetto (Christian Rub) sees a falling star, he wishes that the puppet he just finished, Pinocchio (Dickie... [More]

Ron Clements and John Musker started the classic Disney Renaissance with their directing of The Little Mermaid, the film that ended an artistic downturn for Disney Animation Studios that set in during the 1970s. And this Friday, the director duo are tasked with continuing the current Disney renaissance with Moana, a 16-year old’s journey in search of a demigod to save her island people. In this week’s gallery, we rank every official Disney Animation Studios release (barring Pixar and the oeuvre of Circle 7 Animation and such) since 1986, the year of Clements/Musker’s first movie, The Great Mouse Detective.

Following a sluggish fall season, November kicks off with a bang this weekend with two high profile films both reaching for the number one spot while appealing to vastly different audiences. Paramount and DreamWorks target kids with the animated comedy Bee Movie from Jerry Seinfeld while Universal goes after adult audiences with its crime drama American Gangster which pits Denzel Washington against Russell Crowe. With little overlap in business, the overall North American box office should surge and finally beat out year-ago levels leading to a solid kickoff for the holiday movie season.

A decade after conquering the television world, Jerry Seinfeld aims to take over the land of film with Bee Movie. The PG-rated toon tells the story of a bee that must try to save his world from those nasty humans that take their honey. Also lending vocal talents are Renee Zellweger, Matthew Broderick, John Goodman, Oprah Winfrey, and Chris Rock who snagged the coveted ‘and’ credit for what amounts to about 60 seconds of dialogue. Timing for the Paramount/DreamWorks release is as good as it gets. Not only is early November a hot time for kids movies to score at the box office but the marketplace has suffered a virtual drought when it comes to family-friendly entertainment this fall with The Game Plan being the only major contender. Parents are dying to take their kids to something else, anything else.

Bee Movie falls into the lucrative category of digitally animated comedies about talking creatures featuring the voice of a popular comedian. Last November’s Happy Feet with Robin Williams opened to $41.5M, the previous year’s Chicken Little bowed to $40M, and 2004’s Shark Tale debuted with $47.6M. Bee has the slick animation and funny situations that kids like but also features humor that adults will enjoy too so it will play to a broad audience. And the millions of Seinfeld fans that have had nothing but DVD box sets every Thanksgiving will finally have some new material they can check out from their favorite comic. Critics have not been very kind but that should not affect the grosses that much. The studio’s marketing blitz will be enough to make children demand a trip to the local megaplex. With a highly commercial product, no competition for the family audience, and an ultrawide launch in over 3,500 theaters, Bee Movie could win the box office battle this weekend and gross about $42M.


Jerry Seinfeld’s Bee Movie

Boasting a much higher bodycount this weekend is Ridley Scott‘s American Gangster starring Denzel Washington and Russell Crowe which will shoot up some solid numbers from adult audiences. The R-rated drama tells the true story of Harlem drug kingpin Frank Lucas who built up a mammoth empire selling heroin. Crowe plays the detective out to shut him down. Starpower from the three names, all of whom have won or been nominated for Oscars multiple times, will be the driving force at the turnstiles. Universal’s $90M+ production also has garnered strong reviews which will help the cause and has been backed by an effective marketing push. The running time of nearly two hours and forty minutes will cut back on the amount of times each auditorium can play the film. Even multiplexes that double-screen the picture will probably run out of seats on Friday and Saturday nights.

Gangster should play out like a Denzel movie more than anything else since his box office track record is the strongest and has more consistency than those of Scott and Crowe. Having scored ten career number one openings to date, Washington has seen his top bow come from last year’s Inside Man which debuted to $29M and a $10,275 average. Last fall’s organized crime hit The Departed opened to $26.9M and a $8,912 average and makes for a good comparison given its genre, starpower, acclaim, rating, and length. Gangster will attract a larger African American audience than Scorsese‘s award winner did so an opening north of $30M seems likely. Appeal to men and women will be equally strong. Many adult dramas have struggled at the box office this fall but American Gangster has the firepower to go out there and pull in paying audiences. Plus the weekend’s other major offerings will not eat into its customer base by too much. Heading into 3,054 theaters, American Gangster might debut with around $34M this weekend.


Washington and Crowe in American Gangster

After starring in the year’s second highest grossing horror film 1408, John Cusack hits the big screen again in the family drama Martian Child. The PG-rated film finds the actor playing a writer whose adopted son claims to be from Mars. Parents looking for a movie that they can see with their kids this weekend will be lining up for Jerry and his insect pals so Child will face an uphill battle. New Line hopes that there will be room in the marketplace for a live-action pic for kids but even The Game Plan in its sixth session will be a force to be reckoned with. Invading over 2,000 theaters, Martian Child might take in roughly $6M.


John Cusack in The Martian Child

Following its strong top spot launch, the horror flick Saw IV is sure to fall hard on the second weekend. Sophomore drops amounted to 47% for Saw II and 56% for Saw III and the decline should get even larger for the fourth installment. A 60% plunge would give Lionsgate about $13M for the frame and a ten-day cume of $51M.

Look for a better hold from Steve Carell‘s dramedy Dan in Real Life. The Buena Vista title enjoyed a solid average and has generated good word-of-mouth. The weekend’s new releases may not provide too much competition so a decline of 35% could result. That would put Dan at around $7.5M for a total of $22M after ten days.

LAST YEAR: Crashing into multiplexes on a tidal wave of buzz was the raunchy comedy Borat which only debuted in 837 theaters but scored a potent top spot bow of $26.5M for a sizzling average of $31,607. The Fox blockbuster was the only film in 2006 to hit number one while playing in less than 2,000 venues. Final grosses reached $128.5M domestically and over $260M worldwide. Two new kidpics split the family audience and followed in second and third. Disney’s Tim Allen sequel The Santa Clause 3 bowed to $19.5M on its way to $84.5M while Paramount’s animated comedy Flushed Away debuted close behind with $18.8M before finishing with $64.5M. Falling to fourth was Saw III with $14.8M for Lionsgate while the Warner Bros. crime thriller The Departed rounded out the top five with $7.7M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com,

It’s a box office battle royale at the multiplexes this weekend as two guys in penguin suits fight over the number one spot with their new releases.

Warner Bros. offers the animated kids movie "Happy Feet" while Sony counters with the latest James Bond adventure "Casino Royale." Each has a legitimate shot at reaching number one and will play to different audiences. Meanwhile, two-time chart-topper "Borat" plans to stick around and cause trouble (and collect more lawsuits) despite the arrival of two new heavy hitters.

Yet another computer-animated film featuring talking animals hits the big screen this weekend in the form of "Happy Feet" which tells the story of Mumble, a young penguin who can’t sing like all his other classmates can, but can dance up a storm with his toe-tapping skills. The PG-rated film features the voices of Robin Williams, Elijah Wood, Nicole Kidman, Hugh Jackman, and Brittany Murphy and is directed by George Miller ("Babe"). Warner Bros. will offer dozens of Imax runs simultaneously with the standard launch of the film which will give the grosses a nice little boost.


The penguins return in animated form in "Happy Feet."

The weekend before the Thanksgiving holiday frame has always been a potent one for films that play to kids. Although "Happy Feet" has a story that wanders from one genre to the next, its dazzling digital animation should please audiences. Plus, Williams is in top form voicing two different characters who together provide about 95% of the film’s comedy. Last year, the Oscar-winning actor lent his pipes to Fox’s "Robots" which opened with $36M thanks to the star wattage he brings to a big toon vehicle. "Feet" should be able to debut above that mark.

The marketing push behind "Happy" has been colossal as the studio is hoping for big things from its little penguin. Kids and moms have been bombarded with promotion everywhere they go and awareness with that key demo is sky high. But crossover potential to teens and young adults in questionable. This is not like "The Incredibles" or "Shrek" where every teenager is pumped up and ready to buy tickets. There is also solid competition for the family audience in the current marketplace as "The Santa Clause 3" and "Flushed Away" are set to collect $20M or more worth of ticket sales from the exact same crowd this weekend. But penguin power could edge out Bond’s guns as "Happy Feet" will have around 400 more theaters, a shorter running time, and more starpower. Opening in 3,804 theaters, the animated film might take in about $40M this weekend.

Sony and MGM try to restart one of the most successful film franchises in history with "Casino Royale," the latest James Bond action-adventure tale. Daniel Craig replaces the wildly popular Pierce Brosnan in the role of Agent 007 in the first new installment in the series in four years. Martin Campbell, who directed the former Remington Steele in his first Bond pic "Goldeneye," gets another chance to break in a rookie into one of the industry’s most iconic roles. In the U.S., Craig is practically an unknown actor and with no famous co-stars, "Casino Royale" cannot rely upon starpower to drive in audiences. Instead, it will look to the marquee value of the franchise as well as to reviews from critics which so far have been glowing and even better than what the studio could have hoped for. Many find Craig to be the best Bond ever.


New Bond, same wardrobe in "Casino Royale."

Each of Brosnan’s first three Bond films had the secret agent’s famous digits branded into its opening weekend gross figure. "Goldeneye" opened to $26,205,007 on this same weekend in 1995, "Tomorrow Never Dies" premiered to $25,143,007 in December 1997 when it faced the launch of "Titanic," and "The World is Not Enough" launched with $35,519,007 when the franchise returned to the weekend before Thanksgiving in 1999. No telling if Sony will follow suit with "Casino" and insert Bond’s trademark number into the final opening weekend tally. 2002’s "Die Another Day," the last film in the series, raised the bar even higher debuting to $47.1M on its way to a $160.9M domestic take and $415M worldwide haul.

"Casino Royale" is not likely to reach that bar in its first weekend. With Brosnan gone and many fans not sure yet if they want to try out this new blondie, the debut frame could suffer a bit. Action fans had a routine of going to see a Brosnan Bond film every couple of winters, plus the addition of Halle Berry, who was red hot from her Oscar win that year, boosted the film’s star quotient. "Royale" could have greatly benefited by casting at least one big star to help keep its hold on its fan base. Nevertheless, with no other action movies in the marketplace, "Casino" has almost no direct competition. And its Texas Hold ‘Em storyline could appeal to young men addicted to poker.

But the box office world has changed much since "Die Another Day." Nowadays, action movies that rely on stunts instead of special effects often struggle to attract audiences. Competing globe-trotting spy flick "Mission: Impossible III," which appeals to much the same audience, bowed to an underwhelming $47.7M last May while playing in over 4,000 theaters against no competition. Sure, the Tom Cruise backlash may have contributed. But today’s audiences get plenty of high-quality action for free on network television and want a lot more bang for the buck if they’re expected to pay top dollar at the multiplexes. Also impacting "Casino’s" potential is its long running time which clocks in at nearly two and a half hours. That’s a good 45 minutes longer than "Happy Feet" meaning each screen can accommodate one extra penguin showing per day.

Sony has backed its latest blockbuster with a sizable marketing push. Strong word-of-mouth could allow it to hang on in the long term. But early skepticism may lead many adult moviegoers to a wait-and-see approach as they figure out whether this Bond is worth it. Diving into 3,434 theaters, "Casino Royale" might gross about $38M for the weekend. With recent Bond flicks making 60-70% of their loot from outside of North America, international prospects look sensational over the coming weeks.

Universal quietly tosses the R-rated comedy "Let’s Go To Prison" into the marketplace on Friday hoping to tap into young men in search of bold humor. Directed by Bob Odenkirk, the jailhouse laugher boasts a cast fit for a straight-to-DVD release – Dax Shephard, Will Arnett, and Chi McBride. In this revenge comedy, a felon makes life hell for the son of the judge who sentenced him to the slammer. The marketing push has not been very strong and with "Borat" stealing away the same audience, it will be an uphill battle to find paying customers. Opening in 1,495 cells, "Let’s Go To Prison" might lock down only $5M over the weekend.


"Let’s Go to Prison" for some reason was not screened for the press.

Confusing audiences in nearly 500 theaters across the country this weekend will be "After Dark Horrorfest – 8 Films to Die For." For one weekend only, this collection of B-grade fright flicks will play in theaters with moviegoers having the choice of which films they want to see. These include such titles as "The Gravedancers," Takashi Shimizu‘s "Reincarnation," and "Wicked Little Things" plus a special Sunday night presentation of "Snoop Dogg’s Hood of Horror" as the ninth creepy tale. To generate interest, After Dark is promoting this as a special event for horror fans featuring films that they were not supposed to see. To fill the dead space on screen between Sunday and Wednesday when many new Thanksgiving weekend films open, theaters will get to run "encore presentations of audience favorites."

In limited release, more potential candidates for awards season make their way into theaters. Fox Searchlight unleashes Richard Linklater‘s newest creation "Fast Food Nation" in 321 theaters across the major markets. The R-rated ensemble pic stars Greg Kinnear, Wilmer Valderrama, Ethan Hawke, and Patricia Arquette in an expose of the American junk food biz.


The stars of "Fast Food Nation."

MGM and The Weinstein Co. go back to June 5, 1968 with the political drama "Bobby" examining the lives of those inside the Ambassador Hotel on the day Senator Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated. Another large cast takes to the screen including Anthony Hopkins, Laurence Fishburne, Elijah Wood, Lindsay Lohan, Sharon Stone, Helen Hunt, Demi Moore, William H. Macy, Heather Graham, Ashton Kutcher, Martin Sheen, and son Emilio Estevez who also serves as writer/director. "Bobby" platforms in solo engagements in New York and Los Angeles on Friday and expands nationally next Wednesday.


Emilio Estevez directs and stars in "Bobby."

Packing films with stars seems to be the way to go as showcased again by the film industry comedy "For Your Consideration" from writer/director Christopher Guest ("Best in Show," "A Mighty Wind"). Eugene Levy, Michael McKean, Catherine O’Hara, Parker Posey, Ricky Gervais, and Fred Willard team up for a story about the wackiness that results when a small indie film attracts Oscar buzz for its cast members. Warner Independent Pictures will debut "Consideration" on Friday in ten U.S. markets plus three Canadian cities before expanding next Wednesday into major cities across North America.


More Christopher Guest satire in "For Your Consideration."

After stumbling into the number one spot two weeks ago, "Borat" will have to settle for being bumped a couple of spots this time thanks to the frame’s two new heavyweights. "Casino Royale" will provide some competition but "Happy Feet" should have no effect on the raunchy comedy’s war of terror on the nation’s multiplexes. Midweek business is still very strong so a 35% drop to about $18M could occur. That would give "Borat" a hefty $94M in 17 days and could possibly allow it to crack the $100M mark by Turkey Day.

Disney’s "The Santa Clause 3" and Paramount’s "Flushed Away" have been chart buddies for two weeks now, but the pair of kidpics might have a chance to swap positions this weekend. Both will take direct hits thanks to the arrival of the new penguin pic, but "Flushed" seems to be holding up a bit better. This weekend, we may see it drop 35% to $11M raising its total to $53M. "Santa," meanwhile, may fall 40% to around $10M for a $53M cume as well.

Will Ferrell saw a respectable showing for his new comedy "Stranger Than Fiction," but most of that crowd will be opting for Sony’s other offering this weekend – James Bond. A 45% drop might occur giving the flick $7.5M over the sophomore session and a ten-day tally of $24M.

LAST YEAR: Warner Bros. destroyed the competition with the latest installment of its enduring franchise – "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire." The fourth wizard flick bowed to a jaw-dropping $102.3M making it the fourth-biggest opening weekend in history, at the time. "Goblet" was a big winner grossing $290M domestically and a towering $892M worldwide making it the second highest grossing "Potter" pic. Debuting far back in second place, but with solid results of its own, was Fox’s Johnny Cash drama "Walk the Line" with $22.3M. The Joaquin PhoenixReese Witherspoon film went on to capture $119.5M plus an Oscar for Reese. Rounding out the top five were Disney’s "Chicken Little" with $14.7M, The Weinstein Company’s "Derailed" with $6.5M, and Sony’s "Zathura" with $5.1M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

This weekend, multiplexes hope to cram in lots of moviegoers thanks to a wide selection of new films. Six movies open or expand nationally on Friday making for what will be one of the most competitive weekends of the holiday season.

Adult audiences looking for a laugh can see Will Ferrell in a more mature role in "Stranger Than Fiction." The female vote will be split with daughters going for a scare with Sarah Michelle Gellar in "The Return" while their mothers can spend the evening with Russell Crowe in the romantic comedy "A Good Year." The action flick "Harsh Times" rounds out the menu of new releases targeting young men.

In addition, the cross-continent drama "Babel" expands across the country after two weeks of stellar results in limited release. Despite all the new opponents entering the field, reigning box office incumbent "Borat" will go fully national in an attempt to be re-elected for a second term as commander-in-chief. Rarely does a November weekend have so many new offerings. The fight for screens and moviegoer attention will be fierce. Not every film will survive so some casualties will be left behind on the battlefield by the end of the frame.

After battling Sacha Baron Cohen with race cars last summer in "Talladega Nights," Will Ferrell once again takes on the British comedian at the box office with "Stranger Than Fiction" which will try to stop the seemingly unstoppable "Borat" machine. In the PG-13 film, the funnyman plays an agent with the IRS who begins to hear a voice narrating his life and his every move. Emma Thompson provides the voice while Maggie Gyllenhaal, Dustin Hoffman, and Queen Latifah co-star. Directed by Marc Forster ("Finding Neverland," "Monster’s Ball"), "Stranger" takes an A-list comedian and puts him in a more mature and serious film that still has some comedic elements. That means that the 14-year-old boys who powered "Talladega Nights" to a $47M opening will take a pass this time around.

When Jim Carrey went arthouse, he saw "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind" open to $8.2M with a $6,042 average and "Man on the Moon" bow to $7.5M with a $3,615 average. Adam Sandler‘s "Spanglish" debuted to $8.8M and a $3,617 average. It can often be a tough sell to take a comedian known mostly for mainstream comedies and put him into a more mature film, even if it still has laughs. "Stranger Than Fiction" might find it difficult to pull in teens and young adults, but mature adults will have interest. Reviews have been generally good and the concept makes the film stand out in the current marketplace. Competition for adults will come from both "Babel" and "A Good Year" while "Borat" will continue to steal away millions of moviegoers looking for a good laugh. Launching in 2,264 theaters, "Stranger Than Fiction" might open with roughly $16M.


Will Ferrell screaming at a bus in "Stranger Than Fiction."

Halloween may have passed but those in search of a scare, and were disappointed that "The Grudge 2" did not have Sarah Michelle Gellar in a full role, will have a chance to see their favorite vampire slayer in the new supernatural thriller "The Return." With a commercially friendly PG-13 rating, the spookfest finds Gellar playing a young businesswoman guided by mysterious forces to avenge her own death from a previous life. In the horror genre, Gellar is a bonafide star and can pull in teens and young adults. But with so many fright sequels cramming into theaters recently during the pre-pumpkin period, many genre fans might be all scared out by now. Luckily for "The Return," competition will not be too fierce as nothing else is exciting teenage girls at the moment. The marketing push has been decent, but in many ways it does not stand out as something special or unique that is worth seeing right away. Opening in 1,986 theaters, "The Return" might gross around $8M over the weekend.


Sarah Michelle Gellar, padding her horror credentials in "The Return."

Russell Crowe reteams with his "Gladiator" director Ridley Scott for a trip to a new genre (romantic comedy) in "A Good Year." The PG-13 film finds the former Maximus playing a financial guru who finds women and wine at a french vineyard he inherits. Talk about a tough sell. On paper, the Scott-Crowe combo is box office gold, only they chose to try out a type of film that will repel fans who spent $187.7M on the 2000 Best Picture Oscar winner. Plus the Fox release has no notable female star to boost its potential. Add to that the bad buzz that "Year" received at the Toronto Film Festival plus the mostly negative reviews from critics, and it surely will have its work cut out for it. Could this be "All the King’s Men" all over again?

"A Good Year" stands as that rare film which reunites an Oscar-caliber director with an Oscar-winning actor that earns bad reviews and lukewarm studio support. Crowe’s last film "Cinderella Man" bowed to $18.3M from 2,812 theaters for a $6,515 average in June of last year and was considered an underperformer. The actor’s latest picture lacks the Ron Howard film’s strong critical support, added starpower from Renee Zellweger, and sizable push from Universal. "A Good Year" should play mostly to adult female audiences as the male appeal is low. That makes "Babel" and "Stranger Than Fiction," which have better cross-gender appeal, direct competitors this weekend for mature couples. Opening in 2,066 theaters, "A Good Year" could find itself with about $8M this weekend and a rough road ahead.


Russell Crowe and Ridley Scott enter chick flick territory with "A Good Year."

Still in the top ten with "The Prestige," Christian Bale comes back for double duty in the new action thriller "Harsh Times" from MGM. The R-rated film from the writer of "Training Day" finds the Caped Crusader playing an ex-Army Ranger enlisting with the LAPD who still has ties into the crime world in South Central. "Harsh" will play to urban audiences and should skew male but will find the marketplace difficult to navigate with bigger titles like "Borat" and "Saw III" already doing strong business with that demo. Bale lacks the drawing power of Denzel Washington in his Oscar-winning role in "Training Day" so the grosses should not be in the same ballpark. A moderate national release in over 900 theaters will also limit the potential. "Harsh Times" will have to fight hard in order to crack the top ten and could finish the frame with around $3M.


Christian Bale as a psychopath in "Harsh Times."

Among holdovers, all eyes will be on "Borat" this weekend. Can the Kazakh superstar spend another weekend at number one? Following its robust $26.5M bow from 837 theaters, the Sacha Baron Cohen starrer has delivered solid midweek results grossing over $3M on both Monday and Tuesday. Now, Fox will expand the raunchy comedy on Friday by more than tripling the run to 2,565 theaters allowing everyone to have easy access to the most-talked-about film of the season. Word-of-mouth has been encouraging and "Borat" might even reach the Holy Grail of the box office – repeat business.

Last weekend’s potent average of $31,607 will certainly come crashing down since the film will be in more theaters and most of the hardcore fans have now already seen it. But the buzz is still hot and the Uzbekistan-hating TV journalist is now trying to crossover into new audience segments not initially sold on the concept last week. With the frame’s new films all a mixed bag without a surefire smash among them, "Borat" looks ready to retain its hold on the number one spot. A weekend gross of around $24M could result giving Fox a stellar $62M in only ten days.


"Kazakhstan is the greatest…"

Another cross-cultural film with a five-letter title starting with a B expanding over the weekend is "Babel" starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett. Paramount Vantage has attracted scorching results in limited release for two weeks and is now hoping that moviegoers nationwide are ready for the acclaimed drama. Last weekend, "Babel" popped into the Top 20 with a stellar $26,264 average from 35 locations. On Friday, the R-rated film expands to over 1,200 sites and should continue to play to an upscale adult audience.

"Babel" is likely to play to the same crowd that powered last December’s "Syriana" to a $11.7M bow from 1,752 theaters for a $6,699 average. That film had more theaters and a star, George Clooney, who is despised by many American moviegoers for his political beliefs. On the other hand, Pitt can cheat on his wife and father a baby with another woman, and the public still can’t get enough of him. That’s pure starpower. But "Babel" is not the type of commercial role that Pitt attracts large crowds to. Still, the average should be solid so given its level of distribution, "Babel" could gross about $10M this weekend.


Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, looking rather disheveled in "Babel."

Disney and Paramount went head to head last weekend with competing kidpics and split the family vote in half pretty evenly. "Flushed Away" is getting better word-of-mouth and is offering audiences something new so its decline might be smaller than that of "The Santa Clause 3." Kid movies opening in early November typically have good legs and enjoy strong second weekend holds. Sophomore drops for recent films of the genre include 21% for last year’s "Chicken Little," 29% for 2004’s "The Incredibles," 15% for 2003’s "Elf," and 15% for 2002’s "The Santa Clause 2." This weekend, "Clause 3" might drop by 25% and "Flushed" could wash away 20% leaving each with a three-day tally in the neighborhood of $15M. That would push ten-day cumes to roughly $39M a piece for the Mouse House pic and the rat toon.

LAST YEAR: Disney’s poultry toon "Chicken Little" stayed at number one for a second weekend with an impressive $31.7M. Three new releases followed within a tight range. Sony’s big-budget kidpic "Zathura" bowed in second with $13.4M on its way to a disappointing $28.2M. Jennifer Aniston was close behind with her thriller "Derailed" which opened to $12.2M. The Weinstein Co. release went on to gross a moderate $36M. Paramount’s urban action pic "Get Rich or Die Tryin’" debuted in fourth place with a $12M weekend and $17.7M over five days. The 50 Cent starrer finished its run with $31M. Rounding out the top five was the military drama "Jarhead" which tumbled 58% to $11.7M. Premiering to sensational results was the period film "Pride & Prejudice" which grossed $2.9M from only 215 theaters for a sizzling $13,326 average. The Focus release went on to become an awards contender and took in $38.4M making it the top-grossing pic among the weekend’s new films.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

A pair of new family films aimed at kids will duke it out for the top spot this weekend while a bumbling reporter from the former Soviet Union will cause a commotion for a more adult crowd.

Disney unleashes "The Santa Clause 3," Paramount counters with its own kidpic "Flushed Away," and Fox lets loose its outrageous comedy "Borat." Together, the three new releases should provide some zing to the North American box office.

Kris Kringle takes on Jack Frost in Disney’s latest family pic "The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause" which the studio hopes will win the weekend’s battle of the kidpics. With a tame G rating, the Tim Allen film finds the former "Home Improvement" star trying to get back to his winning ways at the box office with a new chapter of his most successful franchise. Martin Short joins the cast as Frost. Allen crapped out at the multiplexes this past summer when his kidpic "Zoom" crashed and burned with only $4.5M on opening weekend. He needs to prove that he can still sell tickets.

The studio has had great luck with its "Santa Clause" franchise and its launching pad of early November. The first film in 1994 bowed to $19.3M on its way to $144.8M while the 2002 sequel opened to $29M heading to a $139.2M final. The gimmick just isn’t as interesting anymore. However, this time of year is typically active for the family audience and there could be room for both new pics to find their audiences. Still many of the same people will be torn between the two and will not have time to see both. Disney and Paramount would have been wise to open their films at least a week apart instead of on top of each other. Opening in more than 3,000 theaters, "The Santa Clause 3" could debut with about $22M.


Tim Allen is back for a third "Santa Clause."

Parents looking for another kind of battle this weekend can pick the claymation film "Flushed Away" which presents a pampered pet mouse against a slimey sewer rat having fun in each other’s world. The PG-rated film is produced by DreamWorks and released by its new parent Paramount. Ian McKellen, Hugh Jackman, and Kate Winslet provide their voices. "Flushed Away’s" biggest challenge, of course, will be from stiff competition from the opening of an established franchise film like "Clause 3." Reviews have been quite good so the studio is hoping that many adults will find "Flushed" to be the more original and entertaining choice and choose it instead. DreamWorks scored a $16M bow last fall for the critical darling "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" and could approach the same territory here. The marketing push for the new film has been stronger, but the competition will cancel out that added benefit. Opening in roughly 3,250 locations, "Flushed Away" might debut to about $16M.


Hugh Jackman provides the voice of Roddy in "Flushed Away."

Sacha Baron Cohen hits theaters on Friday in one of the season’s most-talked-about films, "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan." Box office expectations are all over the map for Fox’s R-rated comedy and it’s anyone’s guess how it will play out as there is no real film in history it can be compared to. The studio has executed a brilliant marketing campaign over the past several months with teaser posters of the fake journalist sparking curiousity with those not familiar with the character from Britain’s "Da Ali G Show" which has also found a home in the U.S on HBO. The Toronto International Film Festival screening brought the buzz to a whole new level with its outrageous red carpet premiere, projector snafus, and overwhelmingly warm response. Publicity stunts this fall with Kazakh government officials also helped "Borat" leap from the entertainment page to the front page reaching an audience that would otherwise be tough to reach. Reviews have been glowing with many critics calling it the funniest film in years.

The studio is releasing "Borat" in moderate national release with 837 theaters hoping to keep the product limited in the beginning. Sell outs combined with the expected positive word-of-mouth should fuel even more excitement justifying an expansion next week. The "Ali G" crowd will be out in full force so strong business should result from young men. That means that the second weekend of "Saw III" will provide some tough competition. Reports indicate that awareness is not too high in the middle of the country, but that should not be the case with the college crowd. Young adults want bold envelope-pushing films to see like the "Jackass" pics and "Borat" will play to much of that crowd. But is this only a blue-state film? Some thought that would be the case for 2004’s "Fahrenheit 9/11" before it opened to a surprising first place finish with $23.9M from only 868 theaters.


A scene of cultural learnings in "Borat."

"Borat’s" humor has the potential to go beyond the immature set and play to CNN-watching adults. Many will be offended and will never be converted. But a very strong average is assured this weekend and long-term success is likely too since there will be no other movie out there that comes close to resembling this picture. For the opening weekend, "Borat" might gross around $11M for an average north of $10,000.

"Saw III" should be the only holdover likely to still put a dent into the box office. Second weekend declines for the previous installments in the franchise were 39% for the first pic and 47% for last year’s "Saw II." Even with no competition for the horror crowd, a hefty drop should occur. Look for the third torture flick to get sliced in half which would give it around $17M for the frame and $61M in ten days.

LAST YEAR: Disney led the frame with its non-Pixar digital toon "Chicken Little" which debuted to a cool $40M. The animated film went on to gross $135.4M. Opening with strength in the runnerup spot was Universal’s war drama "Jarhead" with $27.7M on its way to $62.7M. "Saw II" dropped to third with $16.9M in its second weekend. Fourth place went to "The Legend of Zorro" with $10M while Meryl Streep‘s "Prime" rounded out the top five with $5.1M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

This week’s wide releases include a group of zoo creatures that reconnect with their roots ("The Wild") and another installment of the genre-spoofing "Scary Movie" series ("Scary Movie 4"). What do the critics say?

A fourth "Scary Movie" is hitting theaters; this time it’s parodying "War of the Worlds," "Saw," and an obscure but terrifying slasher flick called "Brokeback Mountain." A lot of people like these movies — heck, they have made four of them — but those people aren’t generally movie critics; the scribes are calling this latest installment a hit-or-miss affair. But, if you’re in the market for this kind of thing, you should know that "Scary Movie 4," at 44 percent on the Tomatometer, currently stands as the second-best reviewed film in the series, behind the original (52 percent).

Four animals bust out of the zoo in search of their natural habitats, only to fall into the clutches of a buffoonish-but-dangerous animal cult leader. If the plot description for "The Wild" sounds a tad familiar, that’s because it’s essentially the same as last summer’s not-so-red-hot "Madagascar" (55 percent on the Tomatometer). It’s amazing that, given the seemingly limitless potential of CGI, the scribes are already accusing new animated films of being derivative. The critics also say "The Wild" is noisy and busy without being particularly funny or engaging. At 17 percent on the Tomatometer, "The Wild" is the second-worst reviewed CGI film to date, only outranking "Doogal," which is at five percent.

On to America’s favorite game: Banana Kid correctly guessed "The Benchwarmers" would end up with a 12 percent on the Tomatometer. Unfortunately, no one came particularly close to "Phat Girlz‘" not-great-but-not-terrible Tomatometer of 31 percent.

Scary Movies:
——————
52% — Scary Movie (2000)
11% — Scary Movie 2 (2001)
39% — Scary Movie 3 (2003)

Recent CGI Films:
———————–
60% — Ice Age: The Meltdown (2006)
5% — Doogal (2006)
46% — Hoodwinked (2006)
37% — Chicken Little (2005)
27% — Valiant (2005)

Buena Vista Home Entertainment’s "Chicken Little" easily crossed the road to the top spot on the national DVD sales chart for the week ended March 26, while New Line Home Entertainment’s "A History of Violence" remained the nation’s No. 1 rental for the second consecutive week.

According to Nielsen VideoScan data, "Chicken Little," the animated take on the classic sky-is-falling tale that grossed more than $135 million in theaters, outsold second-ranked "Dreamer: Inspired by a True Story," from Dreamworks Home Entertainment, by a nearly 4-to-1 margin.

Five other new releases bowed in the First Alert top 20: Genius Products’ "Derailed" at No. 4, Sony Pictures Home Entertainment’s "Capote" at No. 5, Paramount Pictures Home Entertainment’s complete seventh-season set of television’s "South Park" at No. 9, Lionsgate’s "In the Mix" at No. 10, and Paramount’s "Mind of Mencia: Uncensored Season 1" at No. 19.

The previous week’s top DVD seller, Warner Home Video’s "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire," slipped to No. 3, while "A History of Violence" fell from No. 2 to No. 7.

Lionsgate’s "Crash" slipped to No. 13 from No. 9 the previous week, but the acclaimed film about race relations, which won the Oscar for best picture, has been in the First Alert top 20 for 16 weeks.

In rental stores, "A History of Violence" took in an additional $7.7 million its second week out to bring its total take so far to $17 million, or more than half its total box office earnings.

"Derailed" made a surprisingly strong showing, bowing at No. 2 on Home Media Retailing’s video rental chart for the week ended March 26 with estimated rental earnings of $6.6 million, 18% of its theatrical gross. The film, from The Weinstein Company, earned $36 million in theaters.

Despite its Oscar buzz, "Capote" could muster only a No. 3 debut on the rental chart, with earnings of $5.6 million, while "Chicken Little" clucked in at No. 7, with $3.9 million.

Author: THOMAS K. ARNOLD, Home Media Retailing

Low budget horror film “Alone in the Dark” took home the industry’s biggest booby prize as Hollywood’s annual anti-Oscars, The Stinkers Bad Movie Awards, dished out awards in 24 competition categories. The dishonors came courtesy of the Los Angeles-based Bad Cinema Society, a panel of movie critics and film fans which annually awards Hollywood’s worst films and performances.

Though “Alone in the Dark” didn’t receive the most awards, it managed to beat the field in four major categories, including worst film of the year, worst director (Uwe Boll, who some critics and fans have likened to legendary bad movie maker Ed Wood), worst actress (Tara Reid), and worst special effects.

The top award winner for 2005, with five Stinkers, was “Son of the Mask,” New Line’s ill-conceived follow-up to the Jim Carrey mega-hit “The Mask.” The mind-numbing sequel, which was inexplicably still produced after Carrey refused to participate in the project, took honors for Worst Actor (Jamie Kennedy), Worst Sequel, and Worst Couple (Kennedy and anyone forced to co-star with him). The film was also named 2005’s foulest family film.

Jessica Simpson picked up three awards for her portrayal of Daisy Duke in the big screen remake of the TV series “The Dukes of Hazzard.” Her warbling of “These Boot Are Made For Walkin’” earned her a Stinker for worst song in a movie. She was also named worst supporting actress of the year and can lay claim to having sported the most annoying fake accent in a movie.

Media target Paris Hilton, who had a small role in the horror remake “House of Wax,” came away unscathed by the society. Mentioned as a worst supporting actress on other year-end lists, the hotel heiress did not make the final cut on the more selective Stinkers ballot. "To get on the Stinkers ballot you are judged on your performance, not your tabloid persona,” said Stinkers Bad Movie Awards co-founder Michael Lancaster. “Anyone that would put Paris Hilton on a list of the five worst supporting actresses in 2005 didn’t see a lot of movies in 2005."

The Stinkers ballot featured five worst film candidates that any other year would have been winners or at the very least runners-up in their own right. Proof positive that 2005 will go down as one of the worst film years on record. One category (worst song) had ten nominees, tying a Stinker record. “Hollywood just doesn’t seem to understand that what’s keeping paying customers away is the bad product they hype. You can’t just keep advertising that bad films are the funniest films of the year. Eventually the lies will catch up with you,” said Bad Cinema Society co-founder Ray Wright. He warned that 2006 was gearing up to be more of the same. “We’ve already had another film by Uwe Boll [BloodRayne] released and we will be all over ‘The Pink Panther.’”

With more than 50 sequels and remakes lined up for release in the next year, it’s safe to say that Hollywood has run out of ideas.” Added Lancaster, “I think the public has finally caught on to what we’ve been saying for years — that a lot of what Hollywood sells is not worth the price of an admission ticket. I love that people are avoiding some of these overhyped films like the plague.”

Lancaster and Wright say the film that earned the most Stinkers for 2005 (“Son of the Mask”) is a perfect example of a Hollywood system gone horribly wrong. “I can’t for the life of me imagine how this project got approved. I think the minute Jim Carrey passes on this you say, ‘let’s not make the sequel.’ Now I guess we can all see how New Line is spending their ‘Lord of the Rings’ profits,” said Lancaster.

The Stinkers Bad Movie Awards have been featured in Entertainment Weekly, USA TODAY, the Los Angeles Times, and on the BBC, CNN, as well as in a slew of regional and international newspapers and magazines. The group’s website has received nearly two million hits.

Complete list of winners and nominees for 2005:

WORST FILM
Alone in the Dark

WORST SENSE OF DIRECTION (Stop them before they direct again!)
Uwe Boll (Alone in the Dark)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
Jamie Kennedy (Son of the Mask)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
Tara Reid (Alone in the Dark)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Tyler Perry (as Madea) (Diary of a Mad Black Woman)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Jessica Simpson (The Dukes of Hazzard)

WORST SCREENPLAY FOR A FILM GROSSING MORE THAN $100 MILLION*
*using Hollywood math
Fantastic Four

MOST PAINFULLY UNFUNNY COMEDY
Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo

WORST SONG OR SONG PERFORMANCE IN A FILM OR ITS END CREDITS
These Boots Are Made For Walkin’ (Jessica Simpson) (The Dukes of Hazzard)

MOST INTRUSIVE MUSICAL SCORE
Son of the Mask

LESS THAN DYNAMIC DUO
Samuel L. Jackson and Eugene Levy (The Man)

WORST ON-SCREEN COUPLE
Jamie Kennedy and anyone forced to co-star with him (Son of the Mask)

MOST ANNOYING FAKE ACCENT
MALE: Norm MacDonald (Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo)
FEMALE: Jessica Simpson (The Dukes of Hazzard)

LEAST "SPECIAL" SPECIAL EFFECTS
Alone in the Dark

WORST REMAKE
Yours, Mine and Ours

WORST SEQUEL
Son of the Mask

WORST RESURRECTION OF A "CLASSIC" TV SERIES
The Honeymooners

THE SPENCER BRESLIN AWARD (FOR WORST PERFORMANCE BY A CHILD)
Adrian Alonso (The Legend of Zorro)

WORST CHILD ENSEMBLE
Yours, Mine and Ours

FOULEST FAMILY FILM
Son of the Mask

LEAST SCARY HORROR MOVIE
The Fog

MOST OVERRATED FILM
Syriana

WORST ANIMATED FILM
Chicken Little

For full nominee lists and more awards, stop by the Stinkers official website!

The traditional logic that says "famous people always die in threes" was backed up with a vengeance this past weekend as we lost a trio of talented, prolific, and well-admired character actors. Don Knotts, Darren McGavin, and Dennis Weaver all passed away over the weekend, which is sad news for movie fans the world over. We take solace in the fact that each man was more than 80 years of age when he died, and also that they all left behind a whole lot of movie-land memories.

Although best known as Barney Fife on "The Andy Griffith Show" and as Ralph Furley on "Three’s Company," Don Knotts was certainly no stranger to the silver screen. Following his debut in 1958’s "No Time for Sergeants," Don went on to appear in a string of comedies with titles like "The Incredible Mr. Limpet" (1964), "The Ghost and Mr. Chicken" (1966), and "The Reluctant Astronaut" (1967). Mr. Knotts appeared in a string of Disney comedies in the 1970s, including "The Apple Dumpling Gang" (1975), "Gus" (1976), and "Herbie Goes to Monte Carlo" (1977). He also contributed a memorable supporting turn in 1998’s "Pleasantville" and just last year delivered a rather amusing voice performance in Disney’s "Chicken Little." The lovable comedian passed away at the age of 82.

Also best known for his work on the small screen (especially as "Kolchak: The Night Stalker"), celebrated character actor Darren McGavin put together an impressive big-screen reumé as the decades ticked by. Veteran of dozens of TV productions, Mr. McGavin is probably most beloved by moviegoers as the befuddled father figure in 1984’s "A Christmas Story," although he also added a rascally spark to films like "The Natural" (1984), "Raw Deal" (1986), "Dead Heat" (1988), and "Billy Madison" (1995). Mr. McGavin was a few months shy of his 84th birthday when he passed away.

After working mainly in Westerns throughout the 1950s and ’60s, Dennis Weaver had a career jolt in 1971 by starring in a TV movie that was written by Richard Matheson and directed by a first-timer named Steven Spielberg. "Duel" has since gone on to become a certifiable cult classic, thanks in large part to Mr. Weaver’s stellar performance as a mild-mannered nobody who’s pursued across the desert by an evil giant truck. Although the actor chose to stick mainly with television fare, he also did some fine work in films like "Touch of Evil" (1958), "The Gallant Hours" (1960), and "Duel at Diablo" (1966). Mr. Weaver was also 83 when he died.

(The pic is from "Hot Lead and Cold Feet" (1978), one of two Disney comedies in which Don Knotts and Darren McGavin co-starred. The other was "No Deposit, No Return" (1976). Thanks to Cinematical for digging up the vintage snapshot.)

Whenever I share a new Top Ten List or Critic’s Group Nomination list, I’m always extra careful to be fair and respectful of other peoples’ opinions. But after seeing what the "People’s Choice Awards" handed out for 2005’s movies, I just can’t contain myself. It’s simply too hilarious.

According to CNN, "the nominations were determined by editors at Entertainment Weekly, the People’s Choice production team and a panel of pop culture fans. Winners were determined by Internet voting."

So here are the peoples’ choices:

Favorite Female Movie Star: Sandra Bullock
Also nominated: Angelina Jolie & Nicole Kidman

(Ms. Bullock appeared in two films in 2005: the ensemble drama "Crash" and the stunningly awful "Miss Congeniality 2: Armed and Fabulous.")

Favorite Male Movie Star: Johnny Depp
Also nominated: Nicolas Cage & Samuel L. Jackson

(OK, no real complaint here, even if applauding the awesomeness of Johnny Depp has grown a little old-hat by now. JD did have a great ’05 tho, starring in "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," "Corpse Bride," and "The Libertine.")

Favorite Leading Lady: Reese Witherspoon
Also nominated: Cameron Diaz & Renee Zellweger

(So does this mean Reese isn’t a "movie star"?)

Favorite Leading Man: Brad Pitt
Also nominated: Jamie Foxx & Adam Sandler

(Just for "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" alone? OK, peoples. Better than the alternatives, anyway.)

Favorite Female Action Star: Jennifer Garner
Also nominated: Angelina Jolie & Catherine Zeta-Jones

(Well this just makes no freakin’ sense at all. The only action movie Ms. Garner appeared in last year was "Elektra," which nobody went to see because it sucked. And yet enough people saw it to make it their "choice.")

Favorite Male Action Star: Matthew McConaughey
Also nominated: Brad Pitt & The Rock

(For "Sahara"? Did nobody SEE the lead actor in "Batman Begins"?)

Favorite On-Screen Matchup: Vince Vaughn & Owen Wilson in "Wedding Crashers"
Also nominated: Angelina Jolie & Brad Pitt in "Mr. & Mrs. Smith" and Chris Rock & Adam Sandler in "The Longest Yard"

(I’m really glad they said "On-Screen," otherwise I’d assume Vince and Owen are lovers.)

Favorite Movie Comedy: "Wedding Crashers"
Also nominated: "Hitch" & "The Longest Yard"

(Raise your hand if you honestly think "Wedding Crashers" is funnier than "The 40-Year-Old Virgin," which somehow didn’t even earn a nomination.)

Favorite Family Movie: "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory"
Also nominated: "Chicken Little" & "Madagascar
"

(Another decent pick, although "Wallace & Gromit" would have been nominated if the average American didn’t think British films come with subtitles.)

Favorite Movie Drama: "Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith"
Also nominated: "Batman Begins" & "Coach Carter"

Favorite Movie: "Star Wars: Episode III: Revenge of the Sith"
Also nominated: "Batman Begins" & "Hitch"

(OK, I’ll let ’em get away with the overall movie pick since "Sith" was huge at the box office and I really dug it a whole lot, but … BEST DRAMA??? The "American public" chose Star Wars freakin’ 3 as best drama??? Oh, people. You must stop. Why make the U.S. even more of a global laughing stock? "Brokeback Mountain" is a drama. "Good Night, and Good Luck." is a drama! "Munich," "A History of Violence," "Crash," "Walk the Line," and alllll of THESE MOVIES are dramas. Sorry, but I figure a working knowledge of genre classifications is a minimum requirement if you’re going to vote on any sort of movie poll … even one this painfully silly. Next year they’ll give "BloodRayne" best musical.)

My apologies to the folks on the People’s Choice payroll for my derisive mockery, but c’mon, you guys made it way too easy. And I challenge anyone to explain to me how "Star Wars 3" qualifies as a drama.

The Hollwood Reporter brings news of a new pitch that’s been sold from "Chicken Little" screenwriters Ron Friedman & Steve Bencich to Disney, and it can basically be summed up in three words: Monkey Spy Adventure.

""Chicken Little" scribes Ron Friedman and Steve Bencich are reteaming with Walt Disney Pictures for the live-action family comedy "The Missing Link." Disney paid mid-six figures for Friedman and Bencich’s pitch, which is described as a monkey spy adventure in the vein of "The Bourne Identity.""

Beat THAT, aspiring screenwriters!

As usual we rely on Movie City News to bring us the "best of 2005" picks from the critics, and now come the year-end nominations from the Writers Guild of America (WGA) and the Producers Guild of America (PGA).

Writer’s Guild Nominations

Original Screenplay

Cinderella Man
Cliff Hollingsworth & Akiva Goldsman

CrashPaul Haggis & Bobby Moresco

The 40-Year-Old VirginJudd Apatow & Steve Carell

Good Night, And Good LuckGeorge Clooney & Grant Heslov

The Squid and the Whale
Noah Baumbach

Adapted Screenplay

Brokeback Mountain
Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana, based on the short story by Annie Proulx

CapoteDan Futterman, based on the book by Gerald Clarke

The Constant GardenerJeffrey Caine, based on the novel by John le Carré

A History of ViolenceJosh Olson, based on the graphic novel by John Wagner and Vince Locke

SyrianaStephen Gaghan, based on the book "See No Evil" by Robert Baer

Documentary Screenplay

Cowboy Del Amor — Michèle Ohayon

Enron: The Smartest Guys in the RoomAlex Gibney, based on the book "The Smartest Guys in the Room: The Amazing Rise and Scandalous Fall of Enron" by Bethany McLean and Peter Elkind

The Fall of Fumimori — Ellen Perry, Zack Anderson & Kim Roberts

March of the Penguins — Narration written by Jordan Roberts, based upon the story by Luc Jacquet and screenplay by Luc Jacquet & Michel Fessler

Street Fight — Marshall Curry



Producer’s Guild Nominations

Darryl F. Zanuck Producer of the Year Award — Theatrical Motion Pictures

Brokeback Mountain — Diana Ossana & James Schamus

Capote — Caroline Baron, William Vince & Michael Ohoven

Crash — Paul Haggis & Cathy Schulman

Good Night, and Good Luck — Grant Heslov

Walk the LineJames Keach & Cathy Konrad

Producer of the Year Award — Animated Film

Chicken Little — Randy Fullmer

MadagascarMireille Soria

RobotsJerry Davis, John C. Donkin & William Joyce

Corpse BrideTim Burton & Allison Abbate

Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit — (Credits are pending arbitration)

Thanks to Movie City News for sharing the scoop on the Windy City critics and their favorite flicks of 2005.The Chicago film journalists will announce their year-end winners on January, 2006.

Best Picture

Brokeback Mountain
Crash
Good Night, and Good Luck
A History of Violence
King Kong

Best Foreign Language Film

2046
Cache
Downfall
Kung-Fu Hustle
Oldboy

Best Director

George Clooney: Good Night, and Good Luck
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence
Peter Jackson: King Kong
Ang Lee: Brokeback Mountain
Steven Spielberg: Munich

Best Screenplay

Brokeback Mountain by Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana
Capote by Dan Futterman
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco
Good Night, and Good Luck by George Clooney & Grant Heslov
A History of Violence by Josh Olson

Best Actor

Philip Seymour Hoffman
– Capote
Terrence HowardHustle & Flow
Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain
Joaquin PhoenixWalk the Line
David Strathairn – Good Night, and Good Luck

Best Actress

Joan AllenThe Upside of Anger
Felicity HuffmanTransamerica
Keira KnightleyPride & Prejudice
Naomi Watts – King Kong
Reese Witherspoon – Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor

Matt Dillon – Crash
Terrence Howard – Crash
Paul GiamattiCinderella Man
Jake Gyllenhaal – Brokeback Mountain
Mickey RourkeSin City
Donald Sutherland – Pride & Prejudice

Best Supporting Actress

Amy AdamsJunebug
Maria Bello – A History of Violence
Scarlett JohanssonMatch Point
Catherine Keener – Capote
Rachel WeiszThe Constant Gardener
Michelle Williams – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score

Batman BeginsHans Zimmer and James Newton Howard
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla
Charlie and the Chocolate FactoryDanny Elfman
King Kong – James Newton Howard
Memoirs of a GeishaJohn Williams

Best Cinematography

Brokeback Mountain – Rodrigo Prieto
Good Night, and Good Luck – Robert Elswit
King Kong – Andrew Lesnie
Munich – Janusz Kaminski
The New WorldEmmanuel Lubezki
Pride & Prejudice – Roman Osin

Best Documentary

Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Most Promising Performer

Chris "Ludacris" Bridges – Crash and Hustle & Flow
Georgie HenleyThe Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Miranda JulyMe and You and Everyone We Know
Q’Orianka Kilcher – The New World
Owen KlineThe Squid and the Whale

Most Promising Director

Craig Brewer – Hustle & Flow
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Bennett Miller – Capote
Phil Morrison – Junebug
Joe Wright – Pride & Prejudice

OK, so they’re not exactly the Oscars, but as a longtime animation aficionado, I thought it’d be fun to cover the 33rd Annie Awards, which celebrate excellence in (what else) the art of animation. "DreamWorks and Aardman garnered an amazing total of 25 nominations, more than any other studio, and with the two movies which received by far the most nominations…"

BURBANK, CA (December 5, 2005) – ASIFA-Hollywood, The International Animated Film Society, announced today nominations for the 33rd Annual Annie Awards recognizing the year’s finest animation across film, television, short subjects and gaming. Winners will be announced at the awards ceremony and gala celebration on Saturday, February 4, 2006 at the Alex Theatre in Glendale, CA (216 N. Brand Blvd.).

It was a tremendous showing for DreamWorks Animation as two of its features earned the most nominations for a total of 25 overall. “Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit” (Aardman Animations Ltd./DreamWorks Animation) led the pack with a record-setting sixteen nominations including Best Animated Feature and a sweep in the voice acting category with Ralph Fiennes, Helena Bonham Carter, Peter Sallis and Nicholas Smith all earning nominations. “Madagascar” (DreamWorks Animation) garnered nine nominations for Best Animated Feature as well as multiple nods in the Effects and Storyboarding categories.

Rounding out the Best Animated Feature category are “Chicken Little” (Walt Disney Feature Animation), “Corpse Bride” (Warner Bros. Presents A Tim Burton/Laika Entertainment Production) and “Howl’s Moving Castle” (Walt Disney Studios/Studio Ghibli).

Nominations for Best Animated Television Production are “AVATAR: The Last Airbender” (Nickelodeon), “Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends” (Cartoon Network Studios), “My Life As A Teenage Robot” (Nickelodeon/Frederator), “Star Wars: Clone Wars II” (Cartoon Network Studios) and “The Batman” (Warner Bros. Animation).

Annual prestigious juried awards will also be awarded. The 33rd Annual Annie Award recipients are:

June Foray Award (significant impact): Mark Kausler

Winsor McCay Awards (lifetime achievement): Cornelius Cole; Tyrus Wong; Fred Crippen

Ub Iwerks Award (technical achievement): “Corpse Bride”

Certificates of Merit: Larry Loc; “Dream on Silly Dreamer”

Below is the full list of nominees:

2005 ANNIE AWARD NOMINATIONS BY CATEGORY

PRODUCTION CATEGORIES

Best Animated Feature

  • Chicken Little – Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Corpse Bride – Warner Bros. Presents A Tim Burton/Laika Entertainment Production
  • Howl’s Moving Castle – Walt Disney Studios/Studio Ghibli
  • Madagascar – DreamWorks Animation
  • Wallace & Gromit – The Curse of the Were-Rabbit – Aardman Features


Best Home Entertainment Production


Best Animated Short Subject

  • The Fan and The Flower – Atomic Television/Plymptoons Productions
  • Life in Transition – Stretch Films, Inc.
  • Milch – Klasky Csupo
  • Moongirl – Laika
  • The Moon and The Sun: An Imagined Conversation – John Canemaker Productions


Best Animated Television Commercial

  • Conoco ‘1975’ – Ring of Fire
  • Bastard Wants to Hit Me – Laika/House
  • Coke "Futbol" – Laika/House
  • GE "Tower"- Quiet Man Inc.
  • United Airlines "Mr. Pants" – Acme Filmworks


Best Animated Television Production

  • AVATAR: The Last Airbender – Nickelodeon
  • Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends – Cartoon Network Studios
  • My Life As A Teenage Robot – Nickelodeon/Frederator
  • Star Wars: Clone Wars II Chapters 21-25 – Cartoon Network Studios
  • The Batman – Warner Bros. Animation


Best Animated Video Game


INDIVIDUAL ACHIEVEMENT CATEGORIES

Animated Effects

  • Matt Baer – "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation
  • Rick Glumac – "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation
  • Dale Mayeda – "Chicken Little" – Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Jason Wen – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Martin Usiak – "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation


Character Animation

  • Claire Billett – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Spike Brandt – Tom & Jerry- "The Karate Guard" – Warner Bros. Animation
  • Jay Grace – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Christopher Sadler – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Matt Shumway – "The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe" – Rhythm and Hues


Character Design in an Animated Feature Production

  • Carlos Grangel – "Corpse Bride" – Warner Bros. Presents A Tim Burton/Laika Entertainment Production
  • William Joyce – "Robots" – 20th Century Fox Animation/Blue Sky Studios
  • Craig Kellman – "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation
  • Joe Moshier – "Chicken Little" – Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Nick Park – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features


Character Design in an Animated Television Production

  • Bryan Arnett – My Life As A Teenage Robot "Escape From Cluster Prime" – Nickelodeon
  • Ernie Gilbert – The Fairly OddParent "The Good Old Days" – Nickelodeon
  • Jorge Guiterrez – The Buzz on Maggie "Bella Con Carny" – Walt Disney Television Animation
  • Luther McLaurin – "Catscratch" – Nickelodeon
  • Shannon Tindle – Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends "Go Goo Go" – Cartoon Network Studios


Directing in an Animated Feature Production

  • Mike Johnson, Tim Burton "Corpse Bride" – Warner Bros. Presents A Tim Burton/Laika Entertainment Production
  • Hayao Miyazaki "Howl’s Moving Castle" – Walt Disney Studios/Studio Ghibli
  • Nick Park, Steve Box – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features


Directing in an Animated Television Production

  • Gary Conrad – The Fairly OddParents "The Good Old Days" – Nickelodeon
  • Craig McCracken – Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends "Duchess of Wails" – Cartoon Network Studios
  • Dan Povenmire – Family Guy "PTV" – Fox TV Animation
  • Dan Riba – Justice League Unlimited "Clash" – Warner Bros. Animation
  • Peter Shin – Family Guy "North by North Quahog" – Fox TV Animation


Music in an Animated Feature Production

  • Julian Nott – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit"- Aardman Features
  • Hans Zimmer – "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation


Music in an Animated Television Production

  • Jeff Dana – Zula Patrol "Case of the Missing Rings" – Zula USA LLC
  • Thomas Chase Jones – The Batman "The Laughing Bat" – Warner Bros. Animation
  • James L. Venable – Foster’s Home For Imaginary Friends "Duchess of Wails" – Cartoon Network Studios


Production Design in an Animated Feature Production

  • Ian Gooding, Dan Cooper, David Womersley, Mac George – "Chicken Little" – Walt Disney Feature Animation
  • Dennis A. Greco "Lilo & Stitch 2" – DisneyToon Studios
  • Yoriko Ito "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation
  • William Joyce & Steve Martino "Robots" – 20th Century Fox Animation/Blue Sky Studios
  • Phil Lewis "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit"- Aardman Features


Production Design in an Animated Television Production

  • Alan Bodner – The Life and Times of Juniper Lee "Enter Sandman" – Cartoon Network Studios
  • Michael Giaimo "Hi Hi Puffy Ami Yumi" – Renegade Animation
  • Alex Kirwan "My Life as a Teenage Robot" – Nickelodeon
  • Mike Moon, Craig McCracken, Dave Dunnet, Martin Ansolabehere – Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends "A Lost Claus" – Cartoon Network Studios
  • Nadia Vurbenova – Kim Possible "So The Drama" – Walt Disney Television Animation


Storyboarding in an Animated Feature Production

  • Tom McGrath – "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation
  • Chris Otsuki – "Kronk’s New Groove" – DisneyToon Studios
  • Bob Persichetti – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Catherine Yuh Rader – "Madagascar" – DreamWorks Animation
  • Michael Salter – "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features


Storyboarding in an Animated Television Production

  • Troy Adomitis – Kim Possible "So The Drama" – Walt Disney Television Animation
  • Ben Balistreri – Danny Phantom "Identity Crisis" – Nickelodeon
  • Dave Bullock – Kim Possible "So The Drama" – Walt Disney Television Animation
  • Lauren MacMullan – AVATAR:The Last Airbender "The Deserter" – Nickelodeon
  • Andrew Tan – Miss Spider’s Sunny Patch Friends "A Froggy Day in Sunny Patch" – Nelvana Ltd.


Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production

  • Helena Bonham Carter – Voice of Lady Campanula Tottington "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Ralph Fiennes – Voice of Victor Quartermaine "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Peter Sallis – Voice of Wallace "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Nicholas Smith – Voice of Reverend Clement Hedges "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features


Voice Acting in an Animated Television Production

  • Grey Delisle – Voice of Kitty – Danger Rangers "Fires & Liars" – Educational Adventures
  • Johnny Hardwick – Voice of Dale Gribble – King of the Hill "Smoking and the Bandit" – 20th Century Fox Television
  • Tony Jay – Voice of Spiderus – Miss Spider’s Sunny Patch Friends "A Froggy Day in Sunny Patch" – Nelvana Ltd.
  • Seth MacFarlane – Voice of Stewie – Family Guy "Brian the Bachelor" – Fox TV Animation
  • Rob Paulsen – Voice of Eubie "The Happy Elf" – Film Roman


Writing in an Animated Feature Production

  • Steve Box, Nick Park, Mark Burton "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" – Aardman Features
  • Tony Leondis, Michael LaBash, Tom Rogers "Kronk’s New Groove" – DisneyToon Studios
  • Hayao Miyazaki, Donald H. Hewitt, Cindy Davis Hewitt "Howl’s Moving Castle" – Walt Disney Studios/Studio Ghibli


Writing in an Animated Television Production

  • Aaron Ehasz, John O’Bryan – AVATAR: The Last Airbender "The Fortune Teller" – Nickelodeon
  • C.H. Greenblatt, Paul Tibbitt, Mike Bell, Tim Hill – SpongeBob "Fear of a Krabby Patty" – Nickelodeon
  • Christopher Painter – The Adventures of Jimmy Neutron, Boy Genius "The Tomorrow Boys" – DNA Productions
  • Johanna Stein, Jack Ferraiolo – O’Grady III "Old Cold" – Soup 2 Nuts
  • Larry Swerdlove – Jakers! "Wish Upon A Story Part 1" – Mike Young Productions

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