(Photo by Niko Tavernise / © Warner Bros. / courtesy Everett Collection)

20 Movies To Watch If You Loved Joker

Joker: The highest-grossing R-rated movie ever at over $1 billion in worldwide box office, and also the most nominated movie at the 2020 Oscars. Not bad for a comic-book flick from the man who gave us three Hangovers. If you’re looking for more movies like Joker, the obvious place to start would be its direct influences: The Robert De Niro and Martin Scorsese psychotic joints, Taxi Driver and The King of Comedy. Throw in ’90s Cape Fear for a full triumvirate.

As you’re undoubtedly aware, Joker was not universally beloved by critics as far as Joaquin Phoenix vigilantism flicks go (though those who loved it, loved it). For that, turn to Lynne Ramsay’s Certified Fresh You Were Never Really Here, where Phoenix plays a fearless hired gun who tracks down missing girls at any cost. And if you like your lawless justice even grubbier, go with the Charles Bronson action classic Death Wish, or the churning slow burn of Sam Peckinpah’s Straw Dogs.

Beyond Scorsese, Joker director Todd Phillips has cited post-Vietnam War ’70s cinema in general as an influence, and that decade had no shortage of man-against-the-system stories. Look upon One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Dog Day Afternoon, and Network for proof.

Network also serves (and so does Dog Day honestly) as an indictment of media, a major and pervasive presence in Joker. Nightcrawler, Natural Born Killers, and Christine (not the one about the scary car) are the ones to watch if that’s where your interest in Joker lies.

Or if you’re just interested in seeing psychotic breakdowns, or breakdowns of psychosis, the medium of movies have long been a playground for the disturbed. American Psycho, Entertainment, and One Hour Photo go for the jugular, while The Vanishing, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, and Man Bites Dog truly try to get under your skin with their clinical explorations of madness.

Of course, Joker is still a story torn from the pages of DC Comics and in that vein we recommend checking out Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker. It’s got Mark Hamill reprising his signature villain role, animated at his most intensely violent. (Ah, if only The Killing Joke adaptation were good!)

And as for our suggestion of UHF, “Weird Al” Yankovic’s foray into film spoofery… Imagine a world where Arthur Fleck actually achieved success in his professional ambitions. What would that look like? We think it’d be a little zany, a little weird, a little something like what the clown prince of music offers in his 1989 cult classic.

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 50246%
Critics Consensus: Natural Born Killers explodes off the screen with style, but its satire is too blunt to offer any fresh insight into celebrity or crime -- pummeling the audience with depravity until the effect becomes deadening.
Synopsis: Woody Harrelson and Juliette Lewis are two young, attractive serial killers who become tabloid-TV darlings, thanks to a sensationalistic press... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Stone

#19

UHF (1989)
61%

#19
Adjusted Score: 61410%
Critics Consensus: UHF is bizarre, freewheeling, and spotty, though its anarchic spirit cannot be denied.
Synopsis: After losing yet another job, George (Weird Al Yankovic) wonders if there is any career that can handle his outrageous... [More]
Directed By: Jay Levey

#18

Death Wish (1974)
63%

#18
Adjusted Score: 65499%
Critics Consensus: Death Wish is undeniably exploitation fare -- and also undeniably effective.
Synopsis: Once a mild-mannered liberal, New York City architect Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson) snaps when intruders break into his home, murdering... [More]
Directed By: Michael Winner

#17

American Psycho (2000)
69%

#17
Adjusted Score: 74646%
Critics Consensus: If it falls short of the deadly satire of Bret Easton Ellis's novel, American Psycho still finds its own blend of horror and humor, thanks in part to a fittingly creepy performance by Christian Bale.
Synopsis: In New York City in 1987, a handsome, young urban professional, Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale), lives a second life as... [More]
Directed By: Mary Harron

#16

Man Bites Dog (1992)
74%

#16
Adjusted Score: 73972%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: The activities of rampaging, indiscriminate serial killer Ben (Benoît Poelvoorde) are recorded by a willingly complicit documentary team, who eventually... [More]

#15

Cape Fear (1991)
74%

#15
Adjusted Score: 76896%
Critics Consensus: Smart and stylish, Cape Fear is a gleefully mainstream shocker from Martin Scorsese, with a terrifying Robert De Niro peformance.
Synopsis: When attorney Sam Bowden (Nick Nolte) knowingly withholds evidence that would acquit violent sex offender Max Cady (Robert De Niro)... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#14

One Hour Photo (2002)
82%

#14
Adjusted Score: 87620%
Critics Consensus: Robin Williams is very effective in this creepy, well-shot thriller.
Synopsis: Casual shoppers stocking up at the local SavMart may not pay much attention to the man at the photo counter.... [More]
Directed By: Mark Romanek

#13

Entertainment (2015)
82%

#13
Adjusted Score: 83660%
Critics Consensus: As brilliantly and uncomfortably confrontational as its protagonist, Entertainment is a boundary-blurring exercise in cinematic misanthropy that more than lives up to its title.
Synopsis: An abrasive stand-up comic (Gregg Turkington) hits the road to perform a series of shows at seedy venues.... [More]
Directed By: Rick Alverson

#12

Straw Dogs (1971)
81%

#12
Adjusted Score: 85101%
Critics Consensus: A violent, provocative meditation on manhood, Straw Dogs is viscerally impactful -- and decidedly not for the squeamish.
Synopsis: David Sumner (Dustin Hoffman), a mild-mannered academic from the United States, marries Amy (Susan George), an Englishwoman. In order to... [More]
Directed By: Sam Peckinpah

#11
Adjusted Score: 88959%
Critics Consensus: Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer is an effective, chilling profile of a killer that is sure to shock and disturb.
Synopsis: Henry (Michael Rooker) is released from prison following his mother's murder. He supplements his job as an exterminator with a... [More]
Directed By: John McNaughton

#10

Christine (2016)
88%

#10
Adjusted Score: 97077%
Critics Consensus: Rising on the strength of Rebecca Hall's gripping performance, Christine offers an empathetic look at its subject's public career and painful private life.
Synopsis: In Sarasota, Fla., circa 1974, an ambitious, 29-year-old reporter is relentlessly motivated to succeed. She knows she has talent, but... [More]
Directed By: Antonio Campos

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 93856%
Critics Consensus: Largely misunderstood upon its release, The King of Comedy today looks eerily prescient, and features a fine performance by Robert DeNiro as a strangely sympathetic psychopath.
Synopsis: Rupert Pupkin (Robert De Niro) is a failure in life but a celebrity in his own mind, hosting an imaginary... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#8
Adjusted Score: 106362%
Critics Consensus: Bracingly elevated by a typically committed lead performance from Joaquin Phoenix, You Were Never Really Here confirms writer-director Lynne Ramsay as one of modern cinema's most unique -- and uncompromising -- voices.
Synopsis: A contract killer uncovers a conspiracy while trying to save a kidnapped teen from a life of prostitution.... [More]
Directed By: Lynne Ramsay

#7
Adjusted Score: 49515%
Critics Consensus: This feature length entry in the Batman Beyond mythos sends off the Mark Hamill-voiced Joker in thrilling fashion, hitting the same caped crusading peaks of the original series.
Synopsis: In the Gotham City of the future, an older Bruce Wayne (Kevin Conroy) trains a college student, Terry McGinnis (Will... [More]
Directed By: Curt Geda

#6

Network (1976)
92%

#6
Adjusted Score: 98182%
Critics Consensus: Driven by populist fury and elevated by strong direction, powerful acting, and an intelligent script, Network's searing satire of ratings-driven news remains sadly relevant more than four decades later.
Synopsis: In this lauded satire, veteran news anchorman Howard Beale (Peter Finch) discovers that he's being put out to pasture, and... [More]
Directed By: Sidney Lumet

#5
Adjusted Score: 100989%
Critics Consensus: The onscreen battle between Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher serves as a personal microcosm of the culture wars of the 1970s -- and testament to the director's vision that the film retains its power more than three decades later.
Synopsis: When Randle Patrick McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) gets transferred for evaluation from a prison farm to a mental institution, he assumes... [More]
Directed By: Milos Forman

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 100117%
Critics Consensus: Framed by great work from director Sidney Lumet and fueled by a gripping performance from Al Pacino, Dog Day Afternoon offers a finely detailed snapshot of people in crisis with tension-soaked drama shaded in black humor.
Synopsis: When inexperienced criminal Sonny Wortzik (Al Pacino) leads a bank robbery in Brooklyn, things quickly go wrong, and a hostage... [More]
Directed By: Sidney Lumet

#3

Nightcrawler (2014)
95%

#3
Adjusted Score: 105977%
Critics Consensus: Restless, visually sleek, and powered by a lithe star performance from Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler offers dark, thought-provoking thrills.
Synopsis: Los Angeles denizen Louis Bloom (Jake Gyllenhaal) survives by scavenging and petty theft. He stumbles into a new career as... [More]
Directed By: Dan Gilroy

#2

Taxi Driver (1976)
96%

#2
Adjusted Score: 105409%
Critics Consensus: A must-see film for movie lovers, this Martin Scorsese masterpiece is as hard-hitting as it is compelling, with Robert De Niro at his best.
Synopsis: Suffering from insomnia, disturbed loner Travis Bickle (Robert De Niro) takes a job as a New York City cabbie, haunting... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#1

The Vanishing (1988)
98%

#1
Adjusted Score: 98302%
Critics Consensus: A clinical, maddening descent into the mind of a serial killer and a slowly unraveling hero, culminating with one of the scariest endings of all time.
Synopsis: Rex (Gene Bervoets) and Saskia (Johanna Ter Steege) are enjoying a biking holiday in France when, stopping at a gas... [More]
Directed By: George Sluizer

Like this? Subscribe to our newsletter and get more features, news, and guides in your inbox every week.

In 2007, director David Fincher teamed up with Robert Downey Jr., Mark Ruffalo, and Jake Gyllenhaal on Zodiac, a potent murder mystery about the manhunt for the real life serial killer who terrorized northern California during the 1960s and 1970s. Gyllenhaal earned well-deserved praise for his portrayal of Robert Graysmith, the San Francisco Chronicle political cartoonist who helped decipher the Zodiac’s cryptic letters, but despite the film’s overwhelmingly positive critical reception, it was completely overlooked by the Academy Awards. Now that the film is officially 10 years old to the day, we thought it was the perfect time to look back at star Gyllenhaal’s best-reviewed films… including Zodiac.


10. The Good Girl (2002) 82%

Gyllenhaal ventured into romance — of a sort — with 2002’s The Good Girl, a small-town drama from Chuck & Buck screenwriter Mike White that starred Jennifer Aniston as a morose department store clerk struggling to choose between her unsatisfying marriage and her affair with the unstable, Catcher in the Rye-obsessed co-worker played by Gyllenhaal. Infidelity, dead-end jobs, and small towns are nothing new for the movies — indie films in particular — but however familiar its premise, The Good Girl earned praise from critics thanks to the finely wrought honesty of White’s script and strong performances from Aniston, Gyllenhaal, and their supporting cast (including John C. Reilly, Tim Blake Nelson, and Zooey Deschanel). Taking the cliche of a frustrated young man buried in Holden Caulfield and imbuing it with genuine depth, Gyllenhaal was a major part of why the Hollywood Reporter’s Duane Byrge called it “An absorbing, slice-of-depression life that touches nerves and rings true.”

Watch Trailer


9. Prisoners (2013) 81%

After his 2011 film Incendies earned a heap of acclaim — including a Best Foreign Language Film Oscar nod — French Canadian director Denis Villeneuve made his Hollywood debut with a gripping psychological thriller about a desperate man (Hugh Jackman) driven to extreme measures when his young daughter is abducted with her best friend. While much of the film rested on Jackman’s shoulders, he was supported by a stellar cast that included Viola Davis, Paul Dano, Melissa Leo, and Jake Gyllenhaal as the skeptical detective whose investigation into the disappearance is beset by false leads and a father obsessed with vigilante justice. The end result was a twisty, twisted mystery that impressed more than a few critics, like USA Today’s Claudia Puig, who noted that “the plot raises complicated moral questions about how far an anguished person will go for the love of a child. At the same time, it sets up an intricate, horrifying mystery with breathtaking skill.”

Watch Trailer


8. End of Watch (2012) 85%

Most critics — and more than a few filmgoers — would agree that the found-footage gimmick has been more than played out since rising to prominence with The Blair Witch Project in the late 1990s. Still, it’s a powerful tool when used in the right way, as demonstrated by writer/director David Ayer’s End of Watch, which follows a cop/film student (Gyllenhaal) and his partner (Michael Pena) on patrol in the mean streets of South Central Los Angeles. While Ayer’s use of the found footage technique certainly proved divisive among critics, End of Watch earned a healthy $51 million at the box office, picked up a pair of Independent Spirit Award nominations, and enjoyed the respect of scribes such as Amy Biancolli of the San Francisco Chronicle, who wrote, “The best scenes are filmed inside the cruiser, dashboard shots that face inward instead of out, catching Gyllenhaal and Peña in moments so playful and true they make all other buddy cops look bogus by comparison.”

Watch Trailer


7. Donnie Darko (2001) 86%

Time travel, a falling jet engine, and a dude in a bunny suit: From these disparate ingredients, writer-director Richard Kelly wove the tale of Donnie Darko, a suburban teenager (played by Jake Gyllenhaal) charged with repairing a rift in the fabric of our dimension. Or something. To call Darko “open to interpretation” would be understating the case a bit — it’s been alternately confounding and delighting audiences since it was released in 2001 — but its dense, ambiguous plot found stronger purchase with critics, who cared less about what it all meant than about simply having the chance to see an American movie that took some substantial risks. Though a few reviewers were confused and/or unimpressed (Staci Lynne Wilson of Fantastica Daily called it “derivative,” and Joe Leydon dismissed it as “a discombobulating muddle” in his writeup for the San Francisco Examiner), overall critical opinion proved a harbinger of the cult status the film would eventually enjoy on the home video market; as Thomas Delapa wrote for the Boulder Weekly, “If the sum total of Donnie Darko is hard to figure, there’s no questioning that its separate scenes add up to breathtaking filmmaking.” Despite a paltry $4.1 million gross during its original limited run, Darko returned to theaters in 2004 with a director’s cut — one whose 91 percent Tomatometer actually improved upon the original’s.

Watch Trailer


6. Lovely & Amazing (2001) 86%

Years before he challenged taboos with Brokeback Mountain, Jake Gyllenhaal proved his versatility with script choices like the ones he made in 2001, which found him starring in Donnie Darko, Bubble Boy, and Nicole Holofcener’s Lovely & Amazing. Though Bubble Boy saw the widest release of the three (and some of the harshest reviews of Gyllenhaal’s career), Lovely & Amazing proved he could hold his own with a stellar cast that included Catherine Keener, Emily Mortimer, and Dermot Mulroney — and it proved that he was capable of rising to the challenge of a writer-director known for getting the best out of her actors. Here, Gyllenhaal stars as Jordan, a teenaged one-hour photo developer who earns the adulterous affection of his frustrated (and significantly older) co-worker, played by Catherine Keener. Holofcener’s films are known for focusing on women — and rightly so — but smart dramas need smart performances, and with his empathetic supporting turn here, Gyllenhaal more than held his own. Though it wasn’t a major commercial success, grossing only just over $4.2 million in limited release, Lovely & Amazing enjoyed a number of awards and nominations from critics’ associations, as well as acclaim from scribes such as Terry Lawson of the Detroit Free Press, who wrote, “For all its dirty talk and up-frontness, this is a family film — it’s about one family and the extended family of females. Any woman who sees it will recognize that, and any man who sees it will be better for it.”

Watch Trailer


5. Brokeback Mountain (2005) 87%

Take a heart-wrenching short story by Annie Proulx, give it to award-winning director Ang Lee, and surround him with a rock-solid cast including Heath Ledger, Michelle Williams, Anne Hathaway, and — of course — Jake Gyllenhaal, and you’ve got Brokeback Mountain, one of the most talked-about (and award-winning) movies of 2005. Gyllenhaal and Ledger starred as Jack Twist and Ennis del Mar, a pair of Wyoming ranch hands whose tortured, almost completely unspoken affair has a profound impact on their lives — and the lives of their wives and children — over a period of several decades. Not your everyday Hollywood love story, to put it mildly — and to no one’s surprise, Gyllenhaal and Ledger earned more attention for their characters’ sexuality than for their performances in the roles, with a wide variety of pundits accusing the filmmakers of using Brokeback to further a political agenda; famously, one Utah theater owner canceled his engagement just hours before the first scheduled screening. Underneath all the hubbub, however, shone a beautifully acted love story with uncommon depth and intensity, and both Gyllenhaal and Ledger were richly rewarded for their work with an impressive number of awards and nominations, not to mention a $178 million worldwide gross and reams of critical praise from critics including Colin Covert of the Minneapolis Star Tribune, who wrote, “It has become shorthand to call Brokeback Mountain the ‘gay cowboy movie,’ but it is much more than that glib description implies. This is a human story, a haunting film in the tradition of the great Hollywood romantic melodramas.”

Watch Trailer


4. Zodiac (2007) 89%

In the hands of an ordinary filmmaker, any attempt to tell the story of the Zodiac Killer might have been equal parts conjecture and garden-variety gore — after all, the serial murderer who terrorized the San Francisco Bay Area for years in the 1960s and 1970s, taunting the police with a series of cryptic letters, eventually disappeared, never to be identified. For director David Fincher, though, the truly interesting story didn’t lie so much with the Zodiac as it did with the men and women who devoted themselves to apprehending him — particularly Robert Graysmith, the San Francisco Chronicle cartoonist who broke the Zodiac’s code and eventually became an asset to the investigation. As the increasingly driven Graysmith, Gyllenhaal led the viewer on a darkening spiral of dead ends, wild goose chases, and grim obsession — and he anchored a showy cast that included Robert Downey, Jr., Mark Ruffalo, Chloe Sevigny, and Anthony Edwards. Unfortunately, the words “David Fincher” and “serial killer drama” sparked hopes that Fincher was returning to his Se7en roots, and the studio’s marketing campaign did nothing to set filmgoers straight; ultimately, despite a strongly positive reaction from critics, Zodiac was a non-starter at the box office, and by the time awards season arrived, this March release was all but forgotten. It deserved better, according to writers like the Toronto Star’s Geoff Pevere, who argued, “It makes you want to study it even more closely, in search of things you might have missed, trailing after leads that flash by in the relentless momentum of going nowhere fast. If you’re not careful, it might make you obsessed.”

Watch Trailer


3. October Sky (1999) 91%

It isn’t often that NASA engineers get their own biopics — but then, most of them don’t have life stories as inspiring as Homer Hickam, the West Virginia native whose Sputnik-fueled fascination with rockets turned him into a teen science fair sensation (and, more importantly, helped him avoid working in the local coalmine). Based on Hickam’s autobiographical novel Rocket Boys, Joe Johnston’s 1999 drama October Sky gave audiences a rare slice of critically acclaimed drama during the cold winter months — and it provided a breakout role for Gyllenhaal, whose biggest credits to that point came through parts in a pair of his father Stephen’s movies and minor appearances in City Slickers and Josh and S.A.M. Though he was surrounded with talented co-stars, it fell to Gyllenhaal to carry the movie as the young Hickam and make audiences believe in not only his wide-eyed wonder at the stars, but his struggles with his distant, unsupportive father (played by Chris Cooper); his success was noted by critics such as Jeff Vice of the Deseret News, who correctly predicted that “Even if October Sky was a complete dud, the drama would still get points for being the movie that launched the career of a new star, Jake Gyllenhaal.”

Watch Trailer


2. Source Code (2011) 92%

It’s a common complaint that there isn’t any room for original ideas in Hollywood anymore, but every so often, we’re treated to a movie like Source Code that proves an exception to the rule. Helmed by Moon director Duncan Jones from a script by Ben Ripley, this twisty sci-fi thriller follows the adventures of a U.S. Army captain (Gyllenhaal) whose latest mission — to prevent a catastrophic bombing on board a moving train — masks a horrible personal tragedy that his support team is keeping from him. Bolstered by a strong support cast that included Vera Farmiga, Michelle Monaghan, and Jeffrey Wright, and topped off by a thought-provoking ending, Source Code earned the applause of critics like the New Yorker’s David Denby, who wrote, “The movie is a formally disciplined piece of work, a triumph of movie syntax, made with a sense of rhythm and pace, and Gyllenhaal, who is always good at conveying anxiety, gives [his] desperation a comic edge.”

Watch Trailer


1. Nightcrawler (2014) 95%

After cutting his teeth writing screenplays for films like The Fall and The Bourne Legacy, Dan Gilroy made his feature directorial debut with Nightcrawler, an uncomfortably tense thriller about a socially awkward man (Gyllenhaal) who finds his calling as an ambulance-chasing freelance videographer. Gilroy spent years reworking his script around the character of Lou Bloom and found a perfect partner in Gyllenhaal, who played an active part in the production of the film, lost nearly 30 pounds for the role, and turned in a powerhouse performance. With help from outstanding supporting players like Rene Russo, Bill Paxton, and Riz Ahmed, Nightcrawler went on to become one of the best-reviewd films of the year and earned Gilroy a Best Original Screenplay nod at the Academy Awards in the process. As Christopher Orr of The Atlantic pointed out, “Gyllenhaal is the same age that De Niro was in Taxi Driver and, like him, he is learning to channel an eerie, inner charisma, offering it up in glimpses and glimmers rather than all at once.”

Watch Trailer

It was tough picking 10 breakout stars compared to years past, highlighting the continuing fracturing of the media entertainment landscape and how much tougher it is to capture everyone’s attention as a performer. But what stars lack in zeitgeist-smashing power these days has been made up with diversity and more complex roles, and the following actors have risen to that occasion this year and appear primed to continue into the future. Who would you add to the list?

(Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images)

You know him as teenager Manny Delgado in Modern Family, which is premiering its seventh season tomorrow night, Sept. 23 on ABC. But Rico Rodriguez has also been busy with his new film, Endgame, a drama about a young chess prodigy using his gaming skills to further the success of his school’s team and unite his own disjointed family. 

To celebrate both premieres, Rodriguez was able to share his Five Favorite Films with us, and he was eager to talk about his recent movie-bingeing sessions, when he caught up on some classics and popular favorites that he felt were must-sees. Here is his list:


Psycho (1960) 96%

One of the first ones on my list would have to be Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, just because I really look up to Alfred Hitchcock and what he did as a director. What’s so funny is that I never really knew the big reveal. After all these years, I’d never known the reveal. So when I saw it, I was genuinely shocked and freaked out by what I just saw. So it was really fun to be able to not have that kind of secret be revealed to me before and let me be surprised. It was a really great film and I really enjoyed it.

RT: That’s a long time to go through life not having that revealed to you; that is really cool.

And it’s crazy because they had Bates Motel come out — which is before Norman went crazy — but I never really dived into that before so I didn’t really know much backstory or anything. So when I watched it, I was genuinely freaked out.

RT: You just saw it recently then?

Yeah. A lot last year and this year, I have been on a movie watching phase  — I just want to watch a bunch of movies: old, new — kind of, like, acclaimed. And I watched it around Halloween time so that’s what also kind of creeped me out as well. A lot of fun.

Star Wars: Episode V -- The Empire Strikes Back (1980) 94%

Just because I’m a huge Star Wars fan, and that movie really took the movie into a turn that set up the last movie. And the big surprises and everything that happen in the movie were really kind of revolutionary. And I just love sci-fi films, so Star Wars had to be on this list. And what’s so cool about it is I went to the 30th anniversary premiere — and I had just watched them — so I had brought an old VHS tape of that movie to the premiere, and I got Harrison Ford to sign it for me, which is really, really cool. And Billy Dee Williams was in an episode of Modern Family, and I got him to sign that VHS as well. So now all I really need to get is Mark Hamill and Carrie Fisher to complete the actors in that movie. It’s one of my prized possessions.

RT: You must be really excited for The Force Awakens too.

I am super excited for the new movie. And that’s why I’m re-watching them now, just to get back into it and see if I missed anything — make sure I’m all caught up with everything when the new movie comes out later.

RT: The new toys came out recently.

I saw one of them and they just look so cool!

Nosferatu (1922) 97%

I really, really enjoyed that one just because I watched [it] around when I watched Psycho, and I’d always heard about it. They make references in some shows that I watch. I was like, “You know, I might as well watch it.”  It was my first — and so far the only — silent film I’ve ever seen.  It was really cool just to watch back then how they did it and, again, it was revolutionary for its time.

RT: It’s a creepy one.

It’s really, really creepy. Again, it freaked me out. You’d think a silent movie from the 1920s wouldn’t be that scary. It was actually kind of scary; the beginning sequence as it described the vampire, that freaked me out [laughs].

RT: And there’s something just creepy about silence, too when we don’t have the words. Once we add dialogue, it’s so easy to ruin the mood.

It really is, and so you get to see their faces and body language — how they acted without sound, without words — which I thought was really cool. When I went to go watch it, I was like, “OK Rico, it’s a silent film. I don’t know how I’m going to react to it. I’m not sure if I’m going to like it or not.” I wanted to see it because it’s been so long since it came out. And when I watched it, I just really enjoyed it and now it’s one of my favorite movies.

RT: Lots of classics on your list.

Yeah, like I was saying, I’ve been into that movie phase and I just want to watch a bunch of classics.

Nightcrawler (2014) 95%

Now I’m going a little more up-to-date modern. My fourth one would probably have to be Nightcrawler with Jake Gyllenhaal. I just really liked it. It was one of those movies that’s creepy but really entertaining and just different, and I really, really enjoyed that. When I saw the previews for it last year, I was like, “Man I really want to see it.” And I never got to because — we go to the movies often, but not as much. But whenever I do, I always want to go see a good movie; I want to see a movie I’d been wanting to see. So since I wasn’t able to watch it, I rented it the first day it came out, and I thought wow this movie is really, really good.

RT: And it’s scary in a very real way. It’s like this person could exist.

Which is the weird part, I know! Jake Gyllenhaal gave a great performance and that was really great to watch.

Straight Outta Compton (2015) 89%

I’m a big fan of rap music and that group kind of revolutionized that style of music. And the acting was great. It was such a great film. I thought it was awesome , though, that these people — most biopics are of people who have passed away — these people are [pushing 50] and they already have a movie  made about them. That’s so cool! Ice Cube and Dr. Dre — that’s so cool — they’ve really reached, like, awesome status.


Endgame opens Sept. 25 in limited release.
Modern Family‘s seventh season premieres Wednesday, Sept. 23 on ABC.

This week on streaming video, we’ve got a handful of acclaimed indie films available for purchase, as well as two well-received films from 2014 on Netflix, a sci-fi series on Hulu, and some classics on Fandor. Read on for the full list:

Available for purchase


Wild Tales
94%

This Oscar-nominated black comedy anthology from Argentina is comprised of six short tales in which ordinary people pushed to violence.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


The Wrecking Crew
95%

This Certified Fresh documentary tells the story of the legendary L.A. session musicians who backed up everyone from Frank Sinatra to the Beach Boys.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter
88%

Rinko Kikuchi stars in this Certified Fresh drama about a woman who leaves behind her life in Japan to search for the buried cash in Fargo.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


Danny Collins
78%

Al Pacino stars as an aging pop star on the downside of his career whose life is changed when he discovers a long-lost letter sent to him by John Lennon. His spirit reinvigorated, Collins attempts to mend his frayed relationships with family and friends. Annette Bening, Bobby Cannavale, Jennifer Garner Jennifer Garner Michael Caine, and Christopher Plummer round out the cast.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes


Lord Montagu

This documentary profiles the titular English aristocrat who, after being elected to Parliament, was arrested for homosexual offenses in a landmark case, then later went on to invent a new form of tourism.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu

New on Netflix


Nightcrawler
95%

In this Certified Fresh thriller, Jake Gyllenhaal stars as Lou Bloom, a freelance TV journalist who sells lurid crime footage to a local station. But as his career progresses, and his scoops become ever more explosive, Bloom’s shaky ethics threaten to overwhelm him.

Available now on: Netflix


High Fidelity
91%

Based on the Nick Hornby novel of the same name, this Certified Fresh comedy from Stephen Frears stars John Cusack as a music junkie and record store owner who reexamines his past love life after his longtime girlfriend leaves him.

Available now on: Netflix


Rosewater
76%

Jon Stewart’s Certified Fresh directorial debut focuses on the real life story of Maziar Bahari (Gael Garcia Bernal), an Iranian-Canadian journalist who was imprisoned and tortured by the Iranian government for four months in 2009.

Available now on: Netflix


Life of Crime
68%

John Hawkes, Jennifer Aniston, Tim Robbins, Isla Fisher, Will Forte, and Yasiin Bey star in this caper comedy about a man who refuses to pay the ransom for his kidnapped wife.

Available now on:
Netflix

New on Hulu


The Strain: Season One

A vampiric “virus” is discovered after a plane lands in New York with all but four passengers dead of mysterious causes. The remaining survivors gradually acquire a rapacious appetite for — can you guess? — blood.

Available now on: Hulu

New on Fandor


The 400 Blows
98%

François Truffaut’s masterpiece — the story of a 13-year-old who knocks around Paris to escape his trouble home life — is one of the most influential of all the French New Wave films, and one of the most beloved.

Available now on: Fandor


Stolen Kisses
96%

François Truffaut’s whimsical romantic comedy stars Jean-Pierre Léaud once again as Antoine Doinel, who in this film becomes a private detective and stumbles through some amusing misadventures.

Available now on: Fandor


Farewell, Herr Schwarz
91%

This fascinating documentary tells the story of a reunion of siblings who survived the Holocaust.

Available now on: Fandor

This week on home video, we’ve got a surprisingly solid list of new films to check out, including no less than five Certified Fresh movies. Considering the glut of bad movies plaguing most cineplexes these days, the offerings below make a strong case for staying in. Read on for details:



Nightcrawler

95%

Jake Gyllenhaal’s really been on a tear in recent years. Beginning with 2011’s Source Code, he’s starred in five straight Certified Fresh films, and his most recent effort even drew some awards attention. Nightcrawler stars Gyllenhaal as a petty thief who spies a future in amateur video journalism and, after selling some footage to a news director (Rene Russo), begins a dark downward spiral into his most sociopathic impulses. The feature directing debut of screenwriter Dan Gilroy, Nightcrawler earned high marks from critics who cited Gyllenhaal’s creepy performance as a highlight and made comparisons to Taxi Driver. Certified Fresh at 95 percent, this is a dark thriller that operates equally well as a thought-provoking satire of sensationalist news media.



Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

61%

Live action family films — decent ones, anyway — seem to be rarer in supply these days, so it’s always a nice surprise when one comes along that’s pleasant and suitably entertaining. Based on the popular 1972 children’s book of the same name, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day is about exactly what its title indicates: on the day before his 12th birthday, a young boy named Alexander (Ed Oxenbould) stumbles through an extremely unfortunate series of events. Spoiler alert: everything turns out okay. Most critics found Alexander a perfectly fine diversion for parents to share with their kids, even if the film fails to make a strong, lasting impression, and awarded it a respectable 62 percent on the Tomatometer. It’s not the best kids’ movie around, but it’s pretty harmless and good-natured.



Rosewater

76%

During the Summer of 2013, Jon Stewart took a short break from Comedy Central’s The Daily Show to focus on his feature directorial debut, a drama based on a true story that, at least peripherally, involved him. Rosewater depicts the plight of Iranian-Canadian journalist Maziar Bahari (played by Gael García Bernal), who was detained by Iran in 2009 after he sent video footage of post-election riots to the BBC. Held in prison for almost four months, Bahari was tortured and interrogated about, among other things, his appearance on Stewart’s satirical show, before finally being released. Based on the best-selling memoir that Bahari wrote about the experience, Rosewater earned mostly strong reviews from critics, who rewarded the film with a Certified Fresh 74 percent for its timely subject matter, Bernal’s performance, and Stewart’s prowess in his first stint behind the camera.



Predestination

84%

It’s unusual for a genre flick released during the first half of January to earn high marks from critics, especially one that, save for the involvement of star Ethan Hawke, reads more like something you might find in the direct-to-dvd listings, but Predestination managed to beat the odds. In it, Hawke plays an unnamed “Temporal Agent,” tasked with time-traveling to the past to stop crime. Given one last job before retirement, the Agent travels to the 1970s to meet with a man whose unusual life story leads to a twisty, decade-hopping pursuit of the truth. Certified Fresh at 81 percent, Predestination impressed critics with its surprisingly smart storytelling — as well as a remarkable performance from costar Sarah Snook — and helped offer a mindbending alternative to the usual January dreck.

Also available this week:

  • The Cannes Festival-winning Force Majeure (93 percent), a Swedish drama about a small family vacationing in the alps whose bonds are tested when its patriarch leaves them in the lurch during an avalanche scare.
  • Taiwanese import Stray Dogs (88 percent), a drama about a destitute man living on the streets and his two children, who encounter a mysterious woman that may change their lives.
  • Kill the Messenger (77 percent), a Certified Fresh thriller starring Jeremy Renner as Gary Webb, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist who publicized his findings on the birth of the crack epidemic and the shady dealings of the CIA.
  • Felony (74 percent), starring Joel Edgerton and Tom Wilkinson in a crime thriller about three detectives at odds with each other after an accident that nearly kills a child.
  • Lynn Shelton’s Laggies (69 percent), starring Keira Knightley and Chloe Grace Moretz in a dramedy about a 28-year-old slacker who befriends a teen and falls for her father.
  • Addicted (8 percent), a drama about a married woman who embarks down a dark road of temptation.
  • HBO’s miniseries Olive Kitteridge (95 percent), starring Frances McDormand and Bill Murray in a four-part adaptation of the Elizabeth Strout novel of the same name.
  • Season six of Showtime’s dark dramedy Nurse Jackie (67 percent), starring Edie Falco as a drug-addicted nurse.
  • And finally, two choices from the Criterion Collection: Nicolas Roeg’s classic thriller Don’t Look Now (96 percent), starring Donald Sutherland and Julie Christie, and Jean Renoir’s A Day in the Country (100 percent), a shorter feature about a family’s idyllic vacation in the French countryside.

This week on streaming video, we’ve got an Academy Award-nominated thriller starring Jake Gyllenhaal, a feelgood story from the UK, and the controversial James Franco-Seth Rogen comedy that irked North Korea, plus more. Read on for details:


Nightcrawler
95%

In this Certified Fresh thriller, Jake Gyllenhaal stars as Lou Bloom, a freelance TV journalist who sells lurid crime footage to a local station. But as his career progresses, and his scoops become ever more explosive, Bloom’s shaky ethics threaten to overwhelm him.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Google Play


One Chance
63%

This inspirational drama is based on the true story of the amateur opera singer who became an overnight sensation on Britain’s Got Talent.

Available now on: iTunes


Lego DC Comics Super Heroes: Justice League vs. Bizarro League

In the latest animated collaboration between Lego and DC Comics, Bizarro returns to Earth when Bizarro World is threatened by Darkseid, and he clones the Justice League to create the Bizarro League.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes


The Interview
51%

Dave Skylark (James Franco), the host of a trashy talk show, and his producer Aaron Rapoport (Seth Rogen) land the biggest interview of their careers: North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un (Randall Park). But before they journey to Pyongyang, the CIA recruits them to assassinate the Dear Leader. The film became newly available to stream on Netflix on Saturday, January 24.

Available now on: Netflix


The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo
85%

Michael Nyqvist and Noomi Rapace star in the first part of the original Swedish trilogy, based upon Stieg Larsson’s bestselling novel.

Available now on: Netflix

The Screen Actors Guild Awards held their annual ceremony on Sunday, Januray 25 in a televised event at Los Angeles’s Shrine Auditorium. Birdman took home another trophy — for Best Ensemble — though The Theory of Everything‘s Eddie Redmayne beat Michael Keaton for Best Actor, while Netflix’s Orange is the New Black came away with a couple of big wins. Read on for the full list.

Movie Awards

 

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture


Television Awards

 

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Comedy or Drama Series

The Oscar nominees were announced last Thursday, and we here at Rotten Tomatoes have been pretty fortunate to sit down and chat with a whole lot of them. If you’re still unsure who to root for in the Best Picture race, or you’d just like a little more info on the films being honored on February 22, check out our various interviews with the casts and filmmakers of Selma, The Theory of Everything, Nightcrawler, American Sniper, The Hobbit, and more.



 

 

Actor Chris Pine, Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs, and directors Alfonso Cuarón and J.J. Abrams announced today the nominations for all 24 Oscar categories at a live news conference at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Read through for the full list of nominees.

BEST PICTURE

DIRECTING

ACTOR in a Leading Role

ACTRESS in a Leading Role

ACTOR in a Supporting Role

ACTRESS in a Supporting Role

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

CINEMATOGRAPHY

COSTUME DESIGN

FILM EDITING

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

MUSIC – Original Score

MUSIC – Original Song

  • “Everything Is Awesome”; Music and Lyric by Shawn Patterson from The Lego Movie
  • “Glory”; Music and Lyric by John Stephens and Lonnie Lynn from Selma
  • “Grateful”; Music and Lyric by Diane Warren from Beyond the Lights
  • “I’m Not Gonna Miss You”; Music and Lyric by Glen Campbell and Julian Raymond from Glen Campbell… I’ll Be Me
  • “Lost Stars”; Music and Lyric by Gregg Alexander and Danielle Brisebois from Begin Again

PRODUCTION DESIGN

  • Adam Stockhausen (Production Design); Anna Pinnock (Set Decoration) for The Grand Budapest Hotel
  • Maria Djurkovic (Production Design); Tatiana Macdonald (Set Decoration) for The Imitation Game
  • Nathan Crowley (Production Design); Gary Fettis (Set Decoration) for Interstellar
  • Dennis Gassner (Production Design); Anna Pinnock (Set Decoration) for Into the Woods
  • Suzie Davies (Production Design); Charlotte Watts (Set Decoration) for Mr. Turner

SOUND EDITING

SOUND MIXING

  • John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Walt Martin for American Sniper
  • Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and Thomas Varga for Birdman
  • Gary A. Rizzo, Gregg Landaker and Mark Weingarten for Interstellar
  • Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and David Lee for Unbroken
  • Craig Mann, Ben Wilkins and Thomas Curley for Whiplash

VISUAL EFFECTS

WRITING – Adapted Screenplay

WRITING – Original Screenplay

    • Written by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr. & Armando Bo for Birdman
    • Written by Richard Linklater for Boyhood
    • Written by E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman for Foxcatcher
    • Screenplay by Wes Anderson; Story by Wes Anderson & Hugo Guinness for The Grand Budapest Hotel
    • Written by Dan Gilroy
      for Nightcrawler

 

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

SHORT FILM – Animated

SHORT FILM – Live Action

On Wednesday, Januray 7, the Writers Guild of America (WGA) released their list of nominees for their annual WGA Awards, honoring outstanding writing in film, television, radio, and new media. The ceremony itself will take place on Saturday, February 7 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles, but you can check out a select list of the nominees below:

 

Original Screenplay

Adapted Screenplay

Documentary Screenplay

Drama Series

Comedy Series

New Series

Awards season is on, and with everything that is going on from December through February, it’s difficult to keep track of who is getting what. To help you with that, we created the Awards Leaderboard, a ranking of movies by the number of awards won and their respective categories. Read on to find out where your favorite movies stand, and who is leading the pack.

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014) 91%

49 wins

Boyhood (2014) 97%

49 wins

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) 92%

25 wins

Whiplash (2014) 94%

24 wins

Citizenfour (2014) 96%

11 wins

The LEGO Movie (2014) 96%

11 wins

  • BAFTA – Animated Film
  • PGA – Animated Picture
  • Critics Choice – Best Animated Feature
  • Golden Tomato – Best-Reviewed Animation
  • CFCA – Best Animated Feature
  • SFFCC – Best Animated Feature
  • NYFCO – Best Animated Feature
  • WAFCA – Best Animated Feature
  • NBR – Original Screenplay
  • NYFCC – Best Animated Film
  • LVFCS – Best Animated Film

Still Alice (2014) 85%

11 wins

Ida (2013) 96%

9 wins

The Theory of Everything (2014) 80%

8 wins

Life Itself (2014) 98%

7 wins

Tag Cloud

critics dramedy richard e. Grant Shondaland HBO Max documentaries zero dark thirty game show Mary Tyler Moore USA Network See It Skip It DC streaming service Travel Channel hist LGBT Super Bowl VICE olympics Pride Month TV movies scorecard Opinion Turner Classic Movies 007 Quiz romantic comedy live action free movies Masterpiece Arrowverse gangster aliens Black Mirror theme song Netflix Adult Swim Acorn TV Sundance TV Comic Book DC Universe pirates of the caribbean wonder woman documentary Columbia Pictures ITV Mudbound black japanese Binge Guide period drama politics crime festivals space series obituary NBC Schedule reboot festival 21st Century Fox dogs natural history sag awards Legendary superman Sneak Peek feel good binge Freeform Countdown Tarantino 20th Century Fox live event movies based on movie Winners RT History Lionsgate mcc IMDb TV social media lord of the rings Best and Worst Comics on TV japan Country twilight YA Heroines streaming movies films Trailer Comic-Con@Home 2021 slasher travel james bond basketball CBS All Access Rocky mockumentary Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Interview all-time Biopics breaking bad PlayStation Fantasy Horror crime drama Lifetime Sundance Now CNN halloween tv A&E directors Netflix Christmas movies Apple TV Plus debate indie canceled TV shows DC Comics Music Sundance cults Reality 2019 venice TV One boxing Brie Larson biopic Character Guide 2021 Polls and Games composers Animation sequels zombie chucky Podcast zombies christmas movies nbcuniversal TCA women TCA 2017 71st Emmy Awards Fargo sopranos BBC Family Emmys 2017 TCA Awards VH1 genre parents cars cartoon PaleyFest Elton John Superheroe batman Fox News trophy Tumblr true crime cats marvel cinematic universe ghosts Television Critics Association italian cancelled TV series Hallmark Christmas movies Nominations Extras Comedy justice league A24 green book Film Festival Creative Arts Emmys die hard WGN popular Syfy high school remakes stoner razzies 73rd Emmy Awards docudrama hispanic ABC Family San Diego Comic-Con cinemax rt labs critics edition HBO Go ID Spectrum Originals black comedy dragons blockbusters trailers emmy awards Prime Video Women's History Month BBC One Set visit Rock HBO comedies spanish doctor who Awards Tour worst movies Rom-Com werewolf Comedy Central IFC Films The Purge singing competition worst VOD Classic Film book spider-verse 93rd Oscars anthology Warner Bros. toy story stand-up comedy art house Video Games Hallmark cancelled TV shows Ovation satire Sci-Fi king kong BET Awards golden globe awards serial killer facebook GIFs new york The Walt Disney Company MSNBC Exclusive Video Captain marvel Fall TV comic book movies crime thriller Box Office TCA Winter 2020 BBC America Discovery Channel Pet Sematary MTV Marvel Studios Rocketman Sony Pictures GoT Britbox Pixar screen actors guild AMC romance DGA comic book movie prank blaxploitation supernatural nfl Trophy Talk Martial Arts foreign vampires hispanic heritage month 79th Golden Globes Awards Turner classics independent Crackle APB The CW Nat Geo dark Universal 45 Toys sequel sports FOX Premiere Dates children's TV young adult fresh harry potter 1990s renewed TV shows spanish language TV Paramount Network psycho dceu Holidays godzilla indiana jones screenings Vudu Avengers Kids & Family strong female leads adaptation Mary poppins Apple TV+ Universal Pictures National Geographic Oscars comic books FX GLAAD President Hollywood Foreign Press Association Paramount Plus revenge cancelled television Trivia spy thriller aapi Stephen King E3 Funimation jamie lee curtis toronto biography Infographic Thanksgiving ESPN Esquire technology casting Emmy Nominations Instagram Live Starz Academy Awards TLC 99% NBA kaiju spider-man telelvision First Look witnail First Reviews Mindy Kaling 4/20 Epix critic resources NYCC hollywood psychological thriller transformers posters comics Awards dc name the review finale Drama robots Year in Review medical drama BAFTA new star wars movies Hear Us Out AMC Plus 2015 Watching Series Spike vs. police drama Amazon stop motion war The Arrangement a nightmare on elm street Pop Spring TV Chernobyl joker scary IFC Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Paramount news rt archives rotten movies we love concert Disney streaming service political drama FX on Hulu DirecTV Showtime marvel comics streaming Ghostbusters mutant target Cannes 2020 Wes Anderson south america asian-american halloween dexter diversity Pop TV rt labs Hulu Endgame WarnerMedia Certified Fresh fast and furious know your critic crossover Walt Disney Pictures historical drama RT21 Musicals Western ViacomCBS jurassic park CBS adenture HFPA Anna Paquin FXX Tags: Comedy TV Land mob anime what to watch comic Peacock thriller Marvel deadpool Broadway Election disaster video on demand PBS YouTube Red Mary Poppins Returns Star Wars OWN dreamworks Disney Plus new zealand canceled Film docuseries quibi TV renewals archives Image Comics LGBTQ legend MCU blockbuster award winner Black History Month elevated horror best royal family golden globes science fiction CW Seed sitcom talk show E! movie Crunchyroll scary movies saw spain SDCC Photos Tubi Christmas Baby Yoda Calendar mission: impossible TCM video The Academy Song of Ice and Fire adventure TNT SXSW Grammys The Witch unscripted Marathons Neflix Cosplay international Tomatazos YouTube Valentine's Day Musical Superheroes Marvel Television 2018 tv talk Amazon Studios Food Network boxoffice El Rey slashers television Action spinoff laika hidden camera OneApp USA 24 frames franchise TIFF Shudder latino 2016 TruTV Star Trek Pirates YouTube Premium superhero Ellie Kemper monster movies History ratings french kong SundanceTV American Society of Cinematographers Disney Fox Searchlight Writers Guild of America TBS Winter TV Disney+ Disney Plus X-Men child's play football 72 Emmy Awards ABC CMT Lifetime Christmas movies scene in color nature animated Pacific Islander comiccon miniseries Red Carpet Nickelodeon The Walking Dead rotten BET universal monsters action-comedy cops cancelled australia Alien Lucasfilm Teen cooking criterion Apple game of thrones 90s Reality Competition 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards Summer teaser leaderboard Holiday Tokyo Olympics king arthur suspense Television Academy ABC Signature rom-coms Amazon Prime book adaptation reviews discovery kids versus Logo Dark Horse Comics Amazon Prime Video Mystery heist movie Bravo Cartoon Network New York Comic Con Disney Channel