(Photo by A24 / courtesy Everett Collection)

20 Movies To Watch If You Loved Uncut Gems

Uncut Gems: Critics loved it. Adventurous audiences loved it. Even the Academy…Well, they probably did, but not enough to get Adam Sandler an Oscar nomination. If you got mauled by the relentless, noisy, vice-tightening style — and loved every second of it — and you’re looking for more movies like Uncut Gems, we’ve got a spread of 20 for you to challenge and throttle the senses.

Uncut Gems was directed by Josh and Benny Safdie, two brothers who’ve honed their intimate filmmaking over several features. They really gained traction with heroin drama Heaven Knows What, and 2017’s Good Time, starring Robert Pattinson trapped in a similar anxiety-inducing trip as the one Sandler’s unscrupulous jeweler, Howard, goes on in Uncut Gems. Howard is largely driven by his addiction to high-stakes gambling, a potentially lethal path to go down also seen in Rounders, The Gambler, and Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels.

The fashionable hell Howard has created for himself invites many players of the criminal world in, and Uncut Gems is in many ways that classic kind of thriller where a small player cobbles together a risky plan to bet against the underworld, hoping for that big score. Some of the best that this grim genre has to offer: The Killing of a Chinese Bookie, The Pope of Greenwich Village, The Friends of Eddie Coyle, Thief (if you can’t find this, try Collateral, another Michael Mann nocturnal classic), and Sidney Lumet’s final film, Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead. Conversely, The Long Good Friday and Nicolas Winding Refn’s Pusher III: I’m the Angel of Death (you can generally watch this without having seen the other Pushers) are from the kingpin’s perspective, which show that when you know everybody, everybody’s potentially out to kill you.

Of course, plenty of Uncut Gems fans admire the nerve-wracking pace, where problems just pile up one after the other, frequently because characters just can’t get out of their own way. If you’re looking for more of that, seek out Dog Day Afternoon, Victoria (an after-hours thriller legitimately shot in one take), Running Scared (a fan favorite with Paul Walker), Whiplash, and Run Lola Run.

Howard is arguably Sandler’s most memorable character ever: A man in deep agitation, both financial and existential in nature. You can find more deep character work from the likes of Dustin Hoffman in Straight Time, about a thief who struggles to abide by society’s pecking order after release from jail. Or Nicolas Cage in Martin Scorsese’s Bringing Out the Dead as a burned-out philosophical paramedic who red-eyes across multiple New York shifts. And Harvey Keitel in Bad Lieutenant, a crooked cop who loses the will to make sound decisions. These movies lay the pressure on their wayward protagonists, compressing, until out comes, well, some gritty gems of filmmaking.

#20

Running Scared (2006)
41%

#20
Adjusted Score: 45348%
Critics Consensus: This film runs with frenetic energy punctuated by gratuitous violence but sorely lacks in plot, character development and stylistic flair.
Synopsis: Mafia flunky Joey Gazelle (Paul Walker) is ordered to dispose of the guns that killed a pair of policemen. He... [More]
Directed By: Wayne Kramer

#19

Rounders (1998)
65%

#19
Adjusted Score: 68874%
Critics Consensus: Richly atmospheric and colorful performances contributed to the movie's entertainment value.
Synopsis: Mike McDermott (Matt Damon) loses his money in a poker game against Russian gangster Teddy "KGB" (John Malkovich). Under pressure... [More]
Directed By: John Dahl

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 76563%
Critics Consensus: Stunning and compelling, Scorsese and Cage succeed at satisfying the audience.
Synopsis: After a disheartening and haunting career wears him down, New York City paramedic Frank Pierce (Nicolas Cage) begins to collapse... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#17
Adjusted Score: 77082%
Critics Consensus: Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels is a grimy, twisted, and funny twist on the Tarantino hip gangster formula.
Synopsis: Eddy (Nick Moran) convinces three friends to pool funds for a high-stakes poker game against local crime boss Hatchet Harry... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#16

Straight Time (1978)
82%

#16
Adjusted Score: 81289%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A career criminal, Max Dembo (Dustin Hoffman) is determined to go straight after his latest stint in prison. He takes... [More]
Directed By: Ulu Grosbard

#15

Bad Lieutenant (1992)
77%

#15
Adjusted Score: 80664%
Critics Consensus: Bad Lieutenant will challenge less desensitized viewers with its depiction of police corruption, but Harvey Keitel's committed performance makes it hard to turn away.
Synopsis: The Lieutenant (Harvey Keitel) is a corrupt cop steeped in gambling debt who exploits his authority to sexually harass teenage... [More]
Directed By: Abel Ferrara

#14

The Gambler (1974)
80%

#14
Adjusted Score: 36384%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: New York City English professor Axel Freed (James Caan) outwardly seems like an upstanding citizen. But privately Freed is in... [More]
Directed By: Karel Reisz

#13
Adjusted Score: 80053%
Critics Consensus: Ben Gazzarra gives a grand performance as a hard-pressed debtor with delusions of grandeur in this naturalistic and tense thriller.
Synopsis: Cosmo Vittelli (Ben Gazzara), the proprietor of a sleazy, low-rent Hollywood cabaret, has a real affection for the women who... [More]
Directed By: John Cassavetes

#12

Victoria (2015)
82%

#12
Adjusted Score: 90359%
Critics Consensus: Victoria's single-take production is undeniably impressive, but it's also an effective drama in its own right -- and one that juggles its tonal shifts as deftly as its technical complexities.
Synopsis: Four local Berliners recruit a thrill-seeking Spanish woman (Laia Costa) to be their getaway driver for a bank robbery.... [More]
Directed By: Sebastian Schipper

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 89248%
Critics Consensus: Grueling and rewarding in equal measure, Heaven Knows What hits hard -- and serves as a powerful calling card for its captivating star, Arielle Holmes.
Synopsis: A young heroin addict (Arielle Holmes) roams the streets of New York to panhandle and get her next fix, while... [More]
Directed By: Josh Safdie, Benny Safdie

#10
Adjusted Score: 95419%
Critics Consensus: A tense and effective thriller, Before the Devil Knows You're Dead marks a triumphant return to form for director Sidney Lumet.
Synopsis: Andy (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a debt-ridden broker, needs some quick cash. He ropes his younger brother, Hank (Ethan Hawke), into... [More]
Directed By: Sidney Lumet

#9
Adjusted Score: 77510%
Critics Consensus: Undisciplined direction and a clichéd story prevent The Pope of Greenwich Village from achieving greatness, but it's an entertaining showcase for its stars.
Synopsis: Cousins Paulie (Eric Roberts) and Charlie (Mickey Rourke) plan to rob a merchant in the New York City neighborhood that's... [More]
Directed By: Stuart Rosenberg

#8

Good Time (2017)
92%

#8
Adjusted Score: 109209%
Critics Consensus: A visual treat filled out by consistently stellar work from Robert Pattinson, Good Time is a singularly distinctive crime drama offering far more than the usual genre thrills.
Synopsis: A bank robber stops at nothing to free his brother from prison, launching himself into a nightlong odyssey through New... [More]
Directed By: Josh Safdie, Benny Safdie

#7

Run Lola Run (1998)
93%

#7
Adjusted Score: 96057%
Critics Consensus: More fun than a barrel of Jean-Paul Sartre, pic's energy riffs on an engaging love story and really human performances while offering a series of what-ifs and a blood-stirring soundtrack.
Synopsis: In this visually and conceptually impressive film, two-bit Berlin criminal Manni (Moritz Bleibtreu) delivers some smuggled loot for his boss,... [More]
Directed By: Tom Tykwer

#6

Thief (1981)
79%

#6
Adjusted Score: 83974%
Critics Consensus: Thief's enigmatic conclusion will rob some audiences of satisfaction, but it's an authentic and sleekly rendered neo-noir, powered by a swaggering James Caan at the peak of his charisma.
Synopsis: A highly skilled jewel thief, Frank (James Caan) longs to leave his dangerous trade and settle down with his girlfriend,... [More]
Directed By: Michael Mann

#5

Pusher 3 (2005)
93%

#5
Adjusted Score: 68078%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Milo (Zlatko Buric) is a drug dealer and recovering addict who's slowly coming unraveled. While trying to prepare for his... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

#4

Whiplash (2014)
94%

#4
Adjusted Score: 106549%
Critics Consensus: Intense, inspiring, and well-acted, Whiplash is a brilliant sophomore effort from director Damien Chazelle and a riveting vehicle for stars J.K. Simmons and Miles Teller.
Synopsis: Andrew Neiman (Miles Teller) is an ambitious young jazz drummer, in pursuit of rising to the top of his elite... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 100222%
Critics Consensus: Framed by great work from director Sidney Lumet and fueled by a gripping performance from Al Pacino, Dog Day Afternoon offers a finely detailed snapshot of people in crisis with tension-soaked drama shaded in black humor.
Synopsis: When inexperienced criminal Sonny Wortzik (Al Pacino) leads a bank robbery in Brooklyn, things quickly go wrong, and a hostage... [More]
Directed By: Sidney Lumet

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 97529%
Critics Consensus: Bob Hoskins commands a deviously sinister performance in The Long Good Friday -- a gangster flick with ferocious intelligence, tight plotting and razor-edged thrills.
Synopsis: In the late 1970s, Cockney crime boss Harold Shand (Bob Hoskins), a gangster trying to become a legitimate property mogul,... [More]
Directed By: John Mackenzie

#1
Adjusted Score: 97944%
Critics Consensus: The Friends of Eddie Coyle sees Robert Mitchum in transformative late-career mode in a gritty and credible character study.
Synopsis: Aging Boston gunrunner Eddie Coyle (Robert Mitchum) is looking at several years of jail time for a hold-up if he... [More]
Directed By: Peter Yates

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(Photo by Gary Gershoff/Getty Images)

For decades, prolific character actor J.K. Simmons was a familiar face in supporting roles on television and film, showing up for a handful of scenes and stealing every single one of them with his effortless charisma and trademark baritone. His gradual rise to fame has included a number of milestones; HBO’s prison drama Oz, NBC’s Law & Order, the TNT drama The Closer, Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man films, and Jason Reitman’s Oscar-winning Juno all served to showcase Simmons’ versatility, and he made the most of every opportunity. If audiences had some trouble naming the actor early in his career, that all changed when he took home the Best Supporting Actor Oscar in 2014 for his portrayal of ruthless jazz instructor Terence Fletcher in Damien Chazelle’s Whiplash.

Simmons’ relentless work ethic is on display again this week, as he appears in two films opening on Friday: the indie dramedy The Bachelors and the serial killer thriller The Snowman. He spoke with RT on the phone about his Five Favorite Films, noting that these were only five of his favorite films, “because I prefer not to be definitive or rank things.” Fair enough. He also talked about his experiences on Juno and Whiplash, discussed the progression of his career, and told us what he could about his role in the upcoming Justice League. Read on for the full interview.


To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) 93%

The first two that jump to mind are both from my formative years. One is To Kill a Mockingbird and the other was Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, both of which are films that I saw at a young age. Obviously To Kill a Mockingbird is, you know, one of the great novels of the 20th century, and a beautiful film adaptation of that that I think did a great job of… I mean, this is from a current perspective, having read the book a couple of times and read the book to my kids and seen the movie. But, at the time — I don’t know how old I was, if I was nine or eleven or twelve — but I was sort of viewing it from the perspective of the kids. The whole story is told from Scout’s perspective and the other kids, and like most kids growing up, I sort of saw Gregory Peck as the film version of my dad in the good guy standing up for what’s right and doing the right thing. Yeah, just a really well-made film with characters that I think are relatable to a really wide range of people, as all great storytelling is, whether it’s a film or a novel, or whatever it is. Something that’s accessible for a variety of ages and demographics and is something that speaks to a lot of people.

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967) 71%

Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner was the first sort of grown-up movie that I remember seeing with my parents, and if I’m not mistaken, I think it was at a drive-in theater, which half your audience doesn’t even know what that is. And that was like an odd movie for the drive-in.

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest (1975) 93%

Another all-time favorite would be Cuckoo’s Nest, which was particularly interesting from my perspective because a year or so before the film came out, I had seen the play. I was in college, and I was studying music. I wasn’t into acting or theater or any of that at the time, but a friend of mine was in the play, in a little black box production of the play at the theater department at the University of Montana where I studied music. And I went to see it, and it was, in many ways, an interestingly cast production, but it was brilliant. It was one of the first pieces of theater I saw that had that, you know, that real raw kind of Steppenwolf vibe that really blew me away. So when the movie came out, I kinda felt like, “You know, I don’t think I want to see this movie,” because the play was really so well done. But then I saw the movie, and obviously, [director Milos] Forman and the entire cast, down to people that didn’t even speak on camera, that movie was just so wonderfully done.

Juno (2007) 94%

My last two are gonna be Whiplash and Juno, for obvious reasons. [laughsJuno came along, what is that, 10 years ago now? That came along when I had a nicely established career going and was paying my mortgage and putting my kids through their outrageous L.A. private school. We’d moved out from New York to L.A. two or three years before that, and I’d met Jason. I’d done Jason Reitman’s first feature, Thank You For Smoking, which is also an underrated film, by the way.

Actually, he joined our semi-regular poker game when I was playing it at the time. And he quickly became, from a guy who basically barely knew what beats what in poker, he quickly became one of the best players at the table just because he’s such a smart guy. But we were playing at my friend’s house, and Jason showed up and he just handed me this paper script and he said, “Hey, I’m gonna be working on this,” or, “I just got this,” or something sort of vague, and he said, “You gotta read this. This is so good. It’s by this writer nobody ever heard of.”

That night or the next day, I read the script, and of course immediately fell in love with the part of Juno’s dad, Mac MacGuff. You know, [Reitman] hadn’t said anything to me. He hadn’t said, “Look at this part,” or, “Look at that part.” So, I’m thinking, you know, maybe he wants me to play the drugstore guy in the first scene, or maybe he just wanted to share it with me because we’re pals now. I don’t know. It wasn’t until days later — and I wasn’t gonna say, “Hey, I wanna play this part” — it wasn’t until days later that he said, “Oh, God, of course, J.K. I want you to play the dad. Of course I do.” And he said, “I got the whole movie cast already in my head. I hope we get everybody I want.”

Of course, the people financing the movie wanted him to get some famous pop star to play Juno, and they wanted to get some very well-known actor to play Juno’s dad. There were lists of guys that were way more famous than I was, but they kept throwing at Jason saying, “Look, if you want to get this movie made and get the budget that you want to have, these are the kind of guys that you need to play Juno’s dad.” For both Ellen Page and for me — and really for most of the characters, for Michael Cera, for Allison Janney — you know, these were all the people that he had in mind as soon as he read the script, but he knew he wanted the cast in the movie. He went to bat for all of us, and Ellen and I actually had to do a full on screen test that he set up with film, on actual film, at a sound stage. Jason had us do a couple scenes from the movie to convince the money people that we were the actors that were gonna help make the movie the best it could be.

So that was a really nice vote of confidence from Jason, who, by the way, I just emailed five minutes before you called, because I’m gonna be doing his next movie, The Front Runner, which we start shooting in like less than two weeks.

Whiplash (2014) 94%

A little Whiplash anecdote is, of course, like everybody else, I had no idea who Damien Chazelle was. Jason Reitman was the one who sent me the script, in an email, for Whiplash. He sent me both the short and the feature script and just said, “Read this,” and obviously it’s from Jason so I’m gonna read it. It was again, obviously, probably one of the most brilliant scripts I had ever read and one of the best fits in terms of the character that I really immediately understood and felt like I could wrap my brain around and pull off.

They said, “The writer-director would love to meet you,” and we set up a lunch, and Damien and I sat down and immediately basically agreed on everything, except he didn’t know that I had a musical background, so he was talking about how we’d have body doubles and we’d have somebody coaching me on how to wave my arms around like a conductor. And I said, “Hey, we don’t need that because actually, that’s one of the arrows I have in my quiver.” That was one of those moments where it felt like kismet, that Damien was like, “Oh, my God.” He said, “When Jason and Helen suggested you for this part, I immediately thought that’s a great idea, but I had no idea that you actually had those kinds of abilities.” And also, he didn’t write the script for me, but he wrote it with Miles Teller in mind from the beginning, and didn’t know that Miles had been playing drums since he was 15 years old.


Ryan Fujitani for Rotten Tomatoes: I want to stick with Whiplash for a second. You’ve been one of the most reliable character actors for decades, and you’re always so good in everything. Just speaking personally, whenever you appear on screen, I almost always wish the scenes were longer. In that sense, seeing you in Whiplash was kind of like wish fulfillment for me, and I’m wondering, did you find it particularity gratifying to win the Oscar and be recognized specifically for a larger performance like that?

J.K. Simmons: Yeah, I mean, it was definitely gratifying to get all that attention that I got from that film and all the awards, culminating in the Oscar. That had never been sort of my raison d’etre as an actor. It was just a very nice, sort of, benefit of having the opportunity to play a brilliantly written role in a brilliantly written and executed movie and have it take off the way it did. And it felt like I was just kind of along for the ride that whole time, and all of a sudden I found myself walking red carpets and making acceptance speeches every other week. Yeah, it was a great ride. I’m glad it happened to me when I was 60, or pushing 60, instead of when I was young.

RT: Why is that?

Simmons: Well, my career arc has obviously been pretty gradual. I did nothing but theater for 20 years and in the first 10 or 12 years of that, I was doing little regional stuff that dozens of people were seeing. And then, when I started doing on camera acting, it was bit parts here and there. I didn’t really start making a comfortable living until, coincidentally, about the time I was grown-up enough to be getting married and having kids, which wasn’t until my early 40s.

I’ve worked with a lot of guys, a lot of young guys, who get a lot of attention. These guys or women who get a lot of attention are just famous when they’re young, and I think it’s an incredibly challenging thing for anybody to deal with. Whether it’s an actor, or an athlete, or a musician, or whatever, people who are such celebrities at such a young age, it kind of alters your perception — or it can alter your perception — of what life is about.

By the time all the attention came my way for Whiplash, I was already grown-up enough to know that it didn’t mean I was the center of the universe. It just meant I’d put in a lot of years doing some solid work, and I’d gotten the part that really drew a lot of attention. It almost felt like it was 75% an award, or awards, for my work in Whiplash and 25% kind of a “lifetime achievement, this guy’s been around a long time, let’s throw him some trophies” kind of award.

(Photo by Daniel McFadden/Sony Pictures Classics)

RT: I’ve read that you said you made a conscious decision to go into screen acting because theater just wasn’t paying the bills at the time. I’m wondering what the first role was that you landed that really felt like it was going to take you somewhere?

Simmons: Well, really, the screen acting transition, it was partly about money, but it was also partly because I’d kind of gotten to the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow for a theater guy, which was doing Broadway and being in long-running Broadway hit shows. Yeah, part of it was that it wasn’t making me rich, but more importantly it was kind of like doing the same show eight times a week, month after month after month. It just got to be tedious at times.

The last Broadway show I did was Laughter on the 23rd Floor, a Neil Simon play, and a lot of the cast was people who did both theater and screen acting, TV and film — Mark Linn-Baker, John Slattery, Nathan Lane. As I got to know them and hear their stories, I thought, “What? I’d like to be one of those guys.” So yeah, once in a while you walk out to the mailbox and get a surprise residual check, which you don’t get for theater, but also, you get opportunities to play different kinds of things and not have to repeat yourself 400+ times a year playing the same character.

RT: Early in your career, you were doing Law & Order at the same time that you were doing Oz, and the two characters you portrayed were like diametric opposites. I’m wondering if you think that that helped to raise your profile — not just the fact that they were two big shows, but that, together, they were sort of able to showcase your versatility.

Simmons: Yeah, the timing of those two different characters was one of the many, many, many fortunate breaks that I look back on and the career that’s gotten me to where I am now. Really, my first sort of big on-camera thing was a guest-starring role on Homicide: Life on the Street, the Tom Fontana show, and it was the first time that Homicide was doing a crossover episode with Law & Order. I had just started auditioning for TV and movies, and I had told my agent, “I’m not gonna do another play. I want to try and make this work for a while.” I had been in a week or two earlier for a nice guest-starring part on Law & Order and they didn’t hire me.

When they were casting this guy on Homicide, Ed Sherin — sweet, wonderful, Ed Sherin who passed away recently, and to whom I owe a lot, based on this one thing — they were talking about casting for this big crossover episode that was gonna get a lot of attention, and he said, “Hey, we just saw this guy his name is Simmons.” He said, “I think he’d be really good in this,” playing this, you know, bad guy, neo-Nazi bastard. And Fontana, he didn’t know who I was, and they talked about it, and they just offered me the part. I didn’t even have to go in and read for it. The next day I was on a train to Baltimore to go shoot this part, and it was a great, great part. It was almost like doing a play, because it was a big interrogation scene with Andre Braugher and Kyle Secor, like a 10-page scene, and it was challenging and beautifully written.

That’s what, within the next year, led to both Oz, and then a few months after Oz started, Law & Order called again and asked me to play the recurring shrink part, which was the perfect complement to playing Vern Schillinger on Oz, because once Oz started, half the calls my agent got were to play the Nazi bastard of the week on some TV show. And I was like, “Look, I know I’m new at this and beggars can’t be choosers,” but I said, “I am not gonna play that character for the rest of my life.” So I passed on all those kinds of parts, and then Law & Order started airing, and, you know, audiences saw this same guy playing the psycho and the psychiatrist, and it really helped me not get typecast for the next decade.

J.K. Simmons in Oz (Photo by HBO)

RT: Clearly, the decision not to go ahead with those other roles was the smart move.

Simmons: Yeah, and honestly, a lot of the time, people talk about, for an actor, all the smart choices of roles that you do, but oftentimes it’s as important, if not more important, the smart choices of the roles that you don’t do. Even when I was doing theater and kind of waiting tables in between gigs and barely paying my rent on my sublet in Hell’s Kitchen, if something just wasn’t interesting or there just didn’t seem like a good fit, like a part that I felt like I could do well, or just not something I liked, I would turn it down. I’d rather wait tables than do something that didn’t feel right.

RT: I think that speaks to your integrity as an artist who wants to express himself, and I think it reflects a certain kind of courage. I mean, you have to have courage to be able to do something like that, right?

Simmons: Well, you have to have courage/foolishness to get into this line of work in the first place, so yeah, I’ll take that as a major compliment.

RT: I’ve heard you describe the difference between a character actor and a “regular actor” is that character actors aren’t that good looking. With Whiplash, I feel like you’ve sort of ascended beyond character actor status. Does it feel like that to you at all? Do you feel sexier these days?

Simmons: [laughs] Oh, I always feel sexy, baby… mostly at home. Yeah, I mean, there are obviously myriad ways in which Whiplash was a career gift, and yeah, one of them is to be seen as — nobody’s gonna ever mistake me for Clooney or Pitt — but you know, to be seen as a guy that can walk into a room and bring some charisma or some intimidation factor, just bring a strong presence into the room. And again, once Whiplash came out, it was like when Oz first started and everybody wanted me to be the Nazi of the week. When Whiplash first came out, three quarters of the scripts were like, “Oh, let’s have him play the charismatic guy that screams at people and belittles them and reduces them to little stinking puddles,” and I thought, “You know, I just got done doing that in one of the best films ever, and that doesn’t mean I want to play that character again.”

I actually consciously looked for characters who were not charismatic, who were part of the woodwork or who were going through difficult journeys or who were not the alpha male, the guy in charge, as I will continue to do. What interests me is doing something different from whatever I’ve been doing recently. So, hopefully, that’ll continue to be the case.

The Bachelors, actually was another one of those. It was a part that I took because the guy was just a guy who, partly because it’s who he is and partly because of the circumstances of his recent life, he’s just a nonpresence. He’s, actually, the one thing he has in common with Whiplash is that he’s a teacher. In this case he’s a classroom math teacher, but he’s the guy that walks into the room and the kids don’t even stop talking. It’s very unlike Terence Fletcher, somewhat in appearance and certainly in character.

J.K. Simmons in Bojack Horseman (Photo by Netflix)

RT: Your versatility extends beyond just the dramatic characters you play, since you’ve shown you have great comic timing as well. But you’ve also done a lot of voice work. You have an extensive, impressive resume of animated stuff, which makes sense because you have such a distinctive voice. How did you come to be so involved in that side of the industry?

Simmons: Well, I actually first started getting a little voiceover work when I was doing Guys and Dolls on Broadway. It was 1992 and we were a gigantic, ridiculous hit. It was a beautiful, great, great, great, production directed by Jerry Zaks. And everybody in the cast was getting a lot of attention from agents. “Oh, we want to send you out for this or that,” booking mostly commercials. Half the commercials you see are Broadway actors cashing in a paycheck.

So I got a lot of commercial agents who called and wanted to send me out, and I had sort of tried commercials off and on and I wasn’t drawn to it, and I didn’t feel like I was good at it. But I kept asking to speak to their voiceover people, because I said I’d love to try voiceovers, and most of them the response was exactly that. Most of them said, “Well, sure. So would everybody else in show business.” Voiceover is a pretty tight market, especially in New York. There’s like a handful of guys that are getting most of the work. But my dear pal Jeb Bernstein at Paradigm was just starting a new voiceover department and he said, “Sure, yeah, I’ll start sending you out for voiceovers.” I did a few auditions, I got a couple of small, little radio spots, and within, I don’t know, a year or two or something, I ended up getting hired as the Yellow M&M. That’s a job that has been going for well over 20 years, now and helping to pay the mortgage.

RT: Wow, has it really been that long already?

Simmons: Oh, yeah. Billy West as Red and myself as Yellow, it’s gotta be over 20 years now. Yeah, crazy. And I just thought it’d be really fun kind of work to do and it’s, you know, it’s a painless kind of work to do, because in my case, I just ride my bike over there and it doesn’t matter if I’m a sweaty mess or I’m not dressed well. You just go into your little booth and do your little thing.

So, the rest of the time that we were living in New York, I had some nice commercial voiceover stuff going on, and then once we moved to L.A. where more of the animated work is, I started getting more of those opportunities. And then, of course, as you become more recognizable as an on-camera presence, then people start throwing cartoon work your way, whether you’re good at it or not, so a lot of it is just for that reason. I mean, it gets harder and harder to schedule little quirky, animated things, but I still do those little kinds of things once in a while, just mostly for fun, or because it’s something I think my kids will be into.

RT: You’ve got a pretty high-profile release coming up in Justice League, and Commissioner Gordon is a pretty important character in the Batman world. Is there anything that you might be able to tell us about his relationship to Batman in the film, particularly considering those workout photos of you that surfaced some time ago?

Simmons: Yeah, no. That was just interesting timing, but the internet got kind of carried away with it. I was just working out with my buddy, Aaron Williamson, who was a pal that I train with sometimes. And he said, “Hey, let me take some pictures and put them up on my Instagram.” And a couple months later, you know, they were all over the internet. But no, that actually had nothing to do with Commissioner Gordon.

I had recently gotten very, very thin for a movie called I’m Not Here, which is about to premier at Raindance Film Festival in a couple of weeks. And I was just sort of in the process of like, “Let’s look somewhat emaciated without going crazy.” And so I was just back in the gym with Aaron a few weeks after that, just trying to build back some muscle, and yeah, those pictures just took off.

You’re not gonna be seeing the bulging biceps on Commissioner Gordon, at least in the first Justice League movie. You’re not gonna see much of Commissioner Gordon, actually. It’s just kind of a “Let’s introduce, or reintroduce, this character with a new actor playing him.” Obviously, he’s been played by a lot of really wonderful actors. It was an intimidating character to step into, but yeah, don’t blink during Justice League or you’ll miss my Commissioner Gordon.


The Bachelors opens in limited release and The Snowman opens in wide release this Friday, October 20. 

 

Don Cheadle brings his Miles Davis biopic Miles Ahead to theaters this weekend, and given that this month has also brought us Ethan Hawke in the Chet Baker-inspired Born to Be Blue, we decided there could be no better moment to devote a feature to some of the best jazz films in Hollywood history. From groundbreaking arthouse efforts to Oscar-winning crowd-pleasers, there’s something for everyone here, so tune up — it’s time for Total Recall!


Bird (1988) 83%

While he was busy helping shepherd Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser into theaters, Clint Eastwood was also working on Bird, his 1988 Charlie Parker biopic starring Forest Whitaker as the brilliant — and infamously troubled — saxman. Although the project lingered in development for years, Eastwood ultimately succeeded in providing a compelling window into the too-brief life and career of a true jazz giant — and while some fans cried foul over the behind-the-scenes shenanigans employed to create the soundtrack, there’s no arguing the unabashed love he brought to the project, or the overall compelling results onscreen. As Hal Hinson put it for the Washington Post, “Even though, thematically, the movie won’t come clear, Eastwood has succeeded so thoroughly in communicating his love of his subject, and there’s such vitality in the performances, that we walk out elated, juiced on the actors and the music.”

Watch Trailer


Cabin in the Sky (1943) 81%

When Cabin in the Sky arrived in 1943, many theaters still refused to screen films featuring black performers in central roles, making its release a considerable gamble for MGM — and one that happily paid off with an Oscar-nominated hit. While the film’s racial dynamics have aged about as well as you might expect given its vintage, it was admirably forward-thinking in some respects given the context of its time, and it offered a richly deserved spotlight to a roster of performers that included Lena Horne and Louis Armstrong. “Cabin in the Sky,” crowed the New York Times, “is a bountiful entertainment.”

Watch Trailer


The Connection (1961) 95%

Acclaimed director Shirley Clarke made her feature-length debut with this 1961 adaptation of the Jack Gelber play, which uses a group of jazz musicians waiting for a score from their dealer as the launchpad for a loose, thought-provoking, and ultimately groundbreaking look at music and addiction in the beatnik era. The experience, according to Salon’s Andrew O’Hehir, adds up to “A lean, mean saga of jazz, junk and rebellion.”

Watch Trailer


Arguably the most iconic demonstration of the city’s central role in the thriving jazz scene of the era, photographer Art Kane’s “A Great Day in Harlem” received its documentary due with director Jean Bach’s 1994 film of the same name. Taking a fond look back at the time and place surrounding Kane’s photo of 57 jazz greats, Harlem provides a seamlessly entertaining look at its subjects while offering a smartly assembled overview of jazz as a whole. “It’s a funny and moving film,” wrote the San Francisco Chronicle’s Jesse Hamlin, “whose swinging rhythms and informal tone capture a feeling for the music, the people who make it and the affection and respect they feel for each other and the art form.”

Watch Trailer


Jazz on a Summer's Day (1959) 97%

The Newport Jazz Festival is one of the longest-running events of its kind in America, and along the way it’s played host to an incredible list of talented musicians. Jazz on a Summer’s Day, filmed during the festival’s 1958 performances, captures only a tiny handful of the many distinguished players who’ve passed through the Newport grounds, but it’s still plenty impressive: Thelonious Monk, Louis Armstrong, and Dinah Washington are just a few of the giants on this year’s bill. Since enshrined in the United States National Film Registry, it’s reaped critical praise from an array of critics that includes the A.V. Club’s Keith Phipps, who wrote, “Jazz bounds from strength to strength, stylishly immortalizing transcendently beautiful music on a glorious day, suggesting in the process that film might have no higher purpose.”

Watch Trailer


Kansas City (1996) 60%

One of director Robert Altman’s less acclaimed (and less often seen) films, 1996’s Kansas City uses the sights and sounds of the city’s 1930s jazz scene as the backdrop for an admittedly rather ordinary crime thriller. Yet while it may not rank among Altman’s finest, there are definitely pleasures to be had while watching the typically solid cast (including Harry Belafonte, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and Steve Buscemi) and taking in the soundtrack, which found contemporary jazz artists recreating classic tracks under the guidance of famed producer Hal Wilner. “Altman loves to explode movie genres,” wrote Newsweek’s Jack Kroll, “and his script, co-written with Frank Barhydt, fuses the classic ’30s screwball comedy and crime film.”

Watch Trailer


Keep on Keepin' On (2014) 98%

Trumpeter Clark Terry was such an influential and prolific player that it would have been easy to put together a biopic looking at nothing but his music — and it’s very much to director Alan Hicks’ credit that his movie, 2014’s Keep On Keepin’ On, offers a much more personal overview of what made Terry so special. Instead of surveying his legacy along established narrative lines, Hicks focuses on the beautiful friendship between Terry and Justin Kauflin, a much younger pianist he took under his wing and spent countless hours mentoring. While offering ample demonstration of Terry’s professional legacy, Keepin’ also emphatically underscores what he brought to this life on a personal level, and serves as a graceful, quiet reminder of the power of a simple human connection. “One need not be a jazz aficionado to enjoy this film,” wrote David Lewis for the San Francisco Chronicle. “All that’s required is a smile.”

Watch Trailer


Lady Sings the Blues (1972) 67%

It would be all but impossible to satisfactorily summarize a life as large as Billie Holiday’s, no matter how big the screen — but 1972’s Lady Sings the Blues gets most of the way there, and Holiday herself couldn’t have asked for a better cast than the one assembled by director Sidney J. Furie. Diana Ross ran with the role of a lifetime as the legendary singer, earning a Best Actress Oscar nomination and holding her own against an ensemble supporting cast that included Billy Dee Williams and Richard Pryor, all while pulling double duty on a bestselling soundtrack that helped reintroduce Holiday’s classic songs through Ross’ interpretations. “Furie,” wrote the Chicago Reader’s Dave Kehr, “never again seemed so adept or comfortable with genre material: this show-biz bio hits all of the high points of the formula with some measure of precision.”

Watch Trailer


Mo' Better Blues (1990) 71%

Spike Lee followed the triumph of 1989’s Do the Right Thing with Mo’ Better Blues, a period jazz musical drama that could hardly have felt like more of a hard left turn during hip-hop’s commercial ascension. Trends aside, Lee — aided by a strong cast that included Denzel Washington as a talented trumpet player and Wesley Snipes as his showboating saxophonist — used the music and the conflicts of a bygone era to impart a handful of immutable truths about art, commerce, and the pursuit of a dream. Calling it “full of wonderful music, grand visuals, and melodramatic plot twists,” TV Guide wrote, “the movie is laced with very funny moments, as well as interesting insights into the world of jazz and the plight of the dedicated musician.”

Watch Trailer


Round Midnight (1986) 96%

Real-life jazz giant Dexter Gordon earned a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his work in this 1986 drama, which looks at the budding friendship between a legendary sax player and a fan who meet in Paris during the ’50s. Director Bertrand Tavernier’s attention to detail and obvious fondness for the jazz world are evident in every frame of ‘Round Midnight, which takes a handful of tropes associated with the music of the era — including the substance abuse that plagued too many of its performers — and weaves a timeless tale that’s enjoyed decades of critical acclaim. The end result, as Paul Attanasio wrote for the Washington Post, is “A lovingly gentle yet vibrant tribute to jazz, friendship and film itself, made by a director of consummate taste and precise imagination.”

Watch Trailer


Sweet and Lowdown (1999) 77%

Woody Allen’s love of jazz has informed his life’s work in any number of ways, but if you’re looking for the movie that most directly reflects his fondness for the music, it can’t hurt to start with Sweet and Lowdown. Starring Sean Penn as a fictional ’30s jazz guitarist who sees himself as a peer of Django Reinhardt’s, it steeps Allen’s usual techniques in a potent brew of strong acting, fine period detail, and — of course — a smartly crafted soundtrack. Penn and Samantha Morton both earned Oscar nominations for their work, and while it wasn’t one of Allen’s bigger hits, it was greeted with applause by the majority of critics, including the New York Times’ Janet Maslin, who deemed it “one very tuneful labor of love.”

Watch Trailer


Thelonious Monk: Straight, No Chaser (1988) 83%

Noted jazz enthusiast Clint Eastwood used his clout to get this documentary about the genius pianist and composer to the big screen after director Charlotte Zwerin fashioned it from a trove of previously unreleased Monk footage. The result is one of the most clear-eyed and comprehensive jazz biopics of the ’80s — or any other decade, for that matter — as well as a terrific primer for anyone unfamiliar with Thelonious Monk’s contributions to American music. Stephen Holden for the New York Times observed, “The Monk music that courses through the film is extraordinary in its range of feeling.”

Watch Trailer


Whiplash (2014) 94%

While a number of jazz purists (and musicians in general) have taken extreme issue with the way Whiplash portrays certain sectors of the musical community — not to mention what it seems to suggest regarding an artist’s sacrifices on his journey to greatness — there’s no denying that it’s one of the few recent films to make any kind of attempt to get inside the music. It’s also eminently well-acted, as evidenced by the Best Supporting Actor Oscar that J.K. Simmons took home for his volcanic turn as borderline psychotic music instructor Terence Fletcher — and of course, it’s got a solid soundtrack to boot. As Moira MacDonald wrote for the Seattle Times, “The film works, often wonderfully, as a remarkable visualization of jazz music — you feel it and breathe it, just like the musicians — and as a showcase for the two actors at its center.”

Watch Trailer

New this week to streaming video, we’ve got a recently crowned Oscar-winner, an incisive documentary, and the latest from David Cronenberg. Then, on Netflix and Amazon PRIME, a selection of noteworthy choices are available, including the recent remake of an iconic Paul Verhoeven film. Read on for details:

Whiplash

94%

Miles Teller and freshly-minted Oscar winner J.K. Simmons star in this Certified Fresh drama about an ambitious jazz drummer and his punishingly strict teacher.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, Google Play

Code Black

88%

This documentary takes an in-depth look at the doctors in one of America’s busiest emergency rooms.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu

Maps to the Stars

61%

Julianne Moore, Mia Wasikowska, John Cusack, Robert Pattinson, and a bunch of other notables star in David Cronenberg’s dark comedy about a variety of messed-up Hollywood denizens.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu

The Overnighters

97%

This Certified Fresh documentary focuses on the North Dakota oil boom and the hardships experienced by prospective workers there.

Available now on: Netflix

Felony

70%

Joel Edgerton,Tom Wilkinson, Jai Courtney, and Melissa George star in a thriller about three cops dealing with the potential fallout from a bust gone wrong.

Available now on: Netflix

RoboCop

48%

When Detroit detective Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) is badly injured on the job, a military contractor fits him with a robot exoskeleton in an attempt to create the ultimate crime fighter.

Available now on: Netflix

Monster

81%

Charlize Theron took home a Best Actress Oscar for her portrayal of real-life serial killer Aileen Wuornos in this haunting Certified Fresh drama.

Available now on: Amazon PRIME

This week on home video, we’ve got a couple of Oscar winners, a comedy sequel, and the final season of a popular drama. Then, we’ve got another Oscar nominee and a handful of smaller releases that might be worth your time. Read on for details:

Big Hero 6

90%

It’s official: Big Hero 6 is the Best Animated Feature of 2014 according to the Academy, and now you can chortle and coo at Baymax in the comfort of your own living room. Loosely based on the Marvel comic of the same name, the film takes place in the fictional metropolis of San Fransokyo, where a young robotics prodigy named Hiro Hamada (voiced by Ryan Potter) who enrolls in a super exclusive school for gifted scientists after the death of his older brother. Faced with the possibility of tracking down his brother’s killer, Hiro teams up with his new friends — and invents some hi-tech gear for them — in order to bring the villain to justice. Critics were big fans of the animation in Big Hero 6, as well as the action-packed story and surprisingly heartfelt touches, leading to a Certified Fresh 90 percent Tomatometer score. As a bonus, the Blu-ray will also get you the Oscar-winning animated short Feast, as well as the requisite behind-the-scenes featurettes and deleted scenes.

Whiplash

94%

Speaking of Oscar wins, the one category that was arguably a complete lock was Best Supporting Actor, which went to J.K. Simmons for his portrayal of a draconian music conductor in Damien Chazelle’s Whiplash. Based on Chazelle’s own experiences, the film starred Miles Teller as ambitious jazz drummer Andrew Neiman, who comes under the tutelage of notoriously brutal instructor Terence Fletcher (Simmons) at a prestigious music school. Fletcher pushes Andrew to extremes, leading to a battle of wills and a climactic showdown. Critics gushed over Whiplash, rewarding it with a Certified Fresh 95 percent on the Tomatometer not only for the impressive performances from Simmons and Teller, but also for the film’s sustained tension and superb sound and editing. The particularly notable audio commentary track features Simmons and Chazelle, but the Blu-ray also comes with a 43-minute piece on professional drummers, Chazelle’s original 18-minute short which was expanded into the feature film, and more.

Horrible Bosses 2

35%

2011’s Horrible Bosses was a successful ensemble comedy that made the most of its stars talents, and while the film didn’t feel especially ripe for a sequel, it was somewhat inevitable. This time around, pals Nick (Jason Bateman), Kurt (Jason Sudeikis), and Dale (Charlie Day) embark on an entrepreneurial venture producing a new shower head. When the trio is duped by an unscrupulous investor (Christoph Waltz), they decide the best course of action is to kidnap his son (Chris Pine) for ransom. It’s often rare for comedy franchises to strike gold twice in a row, especially when the first film relies on a specific premise that’s abandoned in its sequel, and Horrible Bosses 2 fell prey to the sophomore jinx, clocking in at 35 percent on the Tomatometer. Critics were unamused by what they called lazy writing and witless humor, but it might still tickle your fancy if you’re a fan of its three stars.

Sons of Anarchy: Season Seven

Late last year, FX’s popular biker drama Sons of Anarchy finally came to a close after seven seasons, and by most counts, its final year was a success. Built on a foundation of deep character development, bursts of violent action, and dark family drama, SOA hurtled into its finale with six straight Fresh seasons under its belt — all at 78 percent or above. The final episode itself was well-received at 88 percent, and though its Shakespearean conclusion was something of a given, most agreed it was satisfying and effective nonetheless. The complete series was previously available with an empty slot for the season seven package, and you can pick that up this week — or you can pick up the complete series with season seven included as well.

Also available this week:

  • Code Black (91 percent), a documentary focusing on the Los Angeles County Hospital’s trauma ward, the busiest emergency department in the country.
  • Gina Prince-Bythewood’s Beyond the Lights (81 percent), starring Gugu Mbatha-Raw and Nate Parker in a Certified Fresh romantic drama about a pop diva who begins to question her career trajectory. The film was nominated for an Oscar in the Best Original Song category.
  • The Borderlands (79 percent), a horror film about a team of investigators looking into reports of paranormal activity at a remote church in England.
  • Private Peaceful (64 percent), starring Jack O’Connell and George MacKay in a war drama about two brothers who grow up rough and enlist in the military together.
  • Cantinflas (29 percent), starring Óscar Jaenada and Michael Imperioli in a drama about the famous titular Mexican entertainer.
  • And finally, two choices from the Criterion Collection: Federico Fellini’s Fellini Satyricon (78 percent), a surrealist portrait of Rome, is available in a new DVD and Blu-ray; and the 1978 animated adaptation of Watership Down (82 percent), Martin Rosen’s haunting rabbit tale of survival, is also available in a new DVD and Blu-ray.

The Screen Actors Guild Awards held their annual ceremony on Sunday, Januray 25 in a televised event at Los Angeles’s Shrine Auditorium. Birdman took home another trophy — for Best Ensemble — though The Theory of Everything‘s Eddie Redmayne beat Michael Keaton for Best Actor, while Netflix’s Orange is the New Black came away with a couple of big wins. Read on for the full list.

Movie Awards

 

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture


Television Awards

 

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Comedy or Drama Series

The Oscar nominations are out, and soon, everybody’s going to be hotly debating which of the nominees will be crowned Best Picture on Feb. 22. We at RT are here to get you up to speed, so with that in mind, here’s a quick overview of the contenders:


American Sniper   72%

Powered by Clint Eastwood’s sure-handed direction and a gripping central performance from Bradley Cooper, American Sniper delivers a tense, vivid tribute to its real-life subject. “It’s a gritty, confident portrait of a man whose life may have been somewhat messier than this Hollywood version,” wrote Richard Corliss of Time Magazine.


Birdman   91%

A thrilling leap forward for director Alejandro González Iñárritu, Birdman is an ambitious technical showcase that features a layered story and outstanding performances from Michael Keaton and Edward Norton. “It’s a quasi-religious fable about a man haunted by the past and facing a profound moral and existential crisis in the present, and it’s a dazzling display of virtuoso cinematic technique and showboat performances,” wrote Andrew O’Hehir of Salon.com.


Boyhood   97%

Epic in technical scale but breathlessly intimate in narrative scope, Boyhood is a sprawling investigation of the human condition and an unqualified triumph for director Richard Linklater. “Few filmmakers ever make a great movie,” wrote Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle. “Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with Boyhood.”


The Grand Budapest Hotel   92%

Typically stylish but deceptively thoughtful, The Grand Budapest Hotel finds Wes Anderson once again using ornate visual environments to explore deeply emotional ideas. “If a movie can be elegantly zany, this wholly imaginative, assured fable of a legendary concierge Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes), his protégé Zero (Tony Revolori) and the murder of a countess, is it,” wrote Lisa Kennedy of the Denver Post.


The Imitation Game   90%

With an outstanding starring performance from Benedict Cumberbatch illuminating its fact-based story, The Imitation Game serves as an eminently well-made entry in the “prestige biopic” genre. “The Imitation Game leaves Turing’s essential mysteries intact, but they will nonetheless find even the most public contours his story ripe with drama, excitement and deeply affecting resonance,” wrote Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post.


Selma   99%

Fueled by a spellbinding performance from David Oyelowo, Selma draws inspiration and dramatic power from the life and death of Martin Luther King, Jr. — but doesn’t ignore how far we remain from the ideals his work embodied. “History becomes breathtaking drama in Selma; there’s an urgent realism in the storytelling, as if we’re seeing this just in time,” wrote Moira MacDonald of the Seattle Times.


The Theory of Everything   80%

Part biopic of Stephen Hawking, part love story, The Theory of Everything rises on James Marsh’s polished direction and the strength of leads Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones. “What Redmayne does is breathtaking-and it never feels like a performance,” wrote Chris Nashawaty of Entertainment Weekly. “In a much less showy role, Jones does her own heartbreaking work as the woman who dedicated her life to loving and caring for Hawking.”


Whiplash   94%

Intense, inspiring, and well-acted, Whiplash is a brilliant sophomore effort from director Damien Chazelle and a riveting vehicle for stars J.K. Simmons and Miles Teller. Music instruction and combat are rarely linked in movies, and particularly not in the singularly riveting way they come together in Whiplash,” wrote Claudia Puig of USA Today.


  • Full list of Oscar Nominees
  • Actor Chris Pine, Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs, and directors Alfonso Cuarón and J.J. Abrams announced today the nominations for all 24 Oscar categories at a live news conference at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Read through for the full list of nominees.

    BEST PICTURE

    DIRECTING

    ACTOR in a Leading Role

    ACTRESS in a Leading Role

    ACTOR in a Supporting Role

    ACTRESS in a Supporting Role

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

    ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

    DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

    CINEMATOGRAPHY

    COSTUME DESIGN

    FILM EDITING

    MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

    MUSIC – Original Score

    MUSIC – Original Song

    • “Everything Is Awesome”; Music and Lyric by Shawn Patterson from The Lego Movie
    • “Glory”; Music and Lyric by John Stephens and Lonnie Lynn from Selma
    • “Grateful”; Music and Lyric by Diane Warren from Beyond the Lights
    • “I’m Not Gonna Miss You”; Music and Lyric by Glen Campbell and Julian Raymond from Glen Campbell… I’ll Be Me
    • “Lost Stars”; Music and Lyric by Gregg Alexander and Danielle Brisebois from Begin Again

    PRODUCTION DESIGN

    • Adam Stockhausen (Production Design); Anna Pinnock (Set Decoration) for The Grand Budapest Hotel
    • Maria Djurkovic (Production Design); Tatiana Macdonald (Set Decoration) for The Imitation Game
    • Nathan Crowley (Production Design); Gary Fettis (Set Decoration) for Interstellar
    • Dennis Gassner (Production Design); Anna Pinnock (Set Decoration) for Into the Woods
    • Suzie Davies (Production Design); Charlotte Watts (Set Decoration) for Mr. Turner

    SOUND EDITING

    SOUND MIXING

    • John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Walt Martin for American Sniper
    • Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and Thomas Varga for Birdman
    • Gary A. Rizzo, Gregg Landaker and Mark Weingarten for Interstellar
    • Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and David Lee for Unbroken
    • Craig Mann, Ben Wilkins and Thomas Curley for Whiplash

    VISUAL EFFECTS

    WRITING – Adapted Screenplay

    WRITING – Original Screenplay

      • Written by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr. & Armando Bo for Birdman
      • Written by Richard Linklater for Boyhood
      • Written by E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman for Foxcatcher
      • Screenplay by Wes Anderson; Story by Wes Anderson & Hugo Guinness for The Grand Budapest Hotel
      • Written by Dan Gilroy

        for Nightcrawler

     

    DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

    SHORT FILM – Animated

    SHORT FILM – Live Action

    The Golden Globes were announced on Sunday, January 11 in a televised ceremony, and Richard Linklater’s Boyhood continued its winning streak with a trophy for Best Motion Picture – Drama, as well as a Best Director award for Linklater himself. Read on for the full list of winners.

    All |

    Film |

    TV

     

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    The Golden Globes were announced on Sunday, January 11 in a televised ceremony, and Richard Linklater’s Boyhood continued its winning streak with a trophy for Best Motion Picture – Drama, as well as a Best Director award for Linklater himself. Read on for the full list of winners.

    All |

    Film |

    TV

     

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

    The Golden Globes were announced on Sunday, January 11 in a televised ceremony, and Richard Linklater’s Boyhood continued its winning streak with a trophy for Best Motion Picture – Drama, as well as a Best Director award for Linklater himself. Read on for the full list of winners.

    All |

    Film |

    TV

     

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    On Wednesday, Januray 7, the Writers Guild of America (WGA) released their list of nominees for their annual WGA Awards, honoring outstanding writing in film, television, radio, and new media. The ceremony itself will take place on Saturday, February 7 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles, but you can check out a select list of the nominees below:

     

    Original Screenplay

    Adapted Screenplay

    Documentary Screenplay

    Drama Series

    Comedy Series

    New Series

    The National Society of Film Critics announced the winners of its 49th annual awards on Saturday, January 3, 2015. Jean-Luc Godard’s 3-D film Goodbye to Language was awarded Best Picture. Read through for the full list of winners.