The winners of the 42nd Annual People’s Choice Awards were revealed last night on a show broadcast live on CBS. The Award celebrates fans’ favorites in categories spanning film, television and music. Read through for the list of movie and television winners.

Movie Winners | TV Winners


Favorite Movie


Favorite Movie Actor


Favorite Movie Actress


Favorite Action Movie


Favorite Action Movie Actor


Favorite Action Movie Actress


Favorite Animated Movie Voice


Favorite Comedic Movie


Favorite Comedic Movie Actor


Favorite Comedic Movie Actress


Favorite Dramatic Movie


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actor


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actress


Favorite Family Movie


Favorite Thriller Movie

Jane-Lynch-Peoples-Choice

Jane Lynch, who won the Favorite TV Comedy award for Glee last year, will be the host of the People’s Choice Awards 2016. (Photo by Michael Caulfield/Getty Images)

The People’s Choice Awards polls are open, and they want to hear your opinion. Check out the list of  TV and movies nominees below, and go their official page through December 3 to vote for your favorites.


Movie Nominations | TV Nominations


Favorite Movie


Favorite Movie Actor


Favorite Movie Actress


Favorite Action Movie


Favorite Action Movie Actor


Favorite Action Movie Actress


Favorite Animated Movie Voice


Favorite Comedic Movie


Favorite Comedic Movie Actor


Favorite Comedic Movie Actress


Favorite Dramatic Movie


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actor


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actress


Favorite Family Movie


Favorite Thriller Movie

This week on home video, we’ve got a well-received adaptation of a classic children’s book character, P.T. Anderson’s latest film, and a handful of films with big stars that earned mediocre reviews. Luckily, there are also a couple of smaller films that are worth your while. Read on for details:


Paddington (2014) 98%

If you’re going to adapt a beloved children’s book character for film, you’d better do it right. Thankfully, almost everyone who saw Paddington approved. For the unfamiliar, Paddington Bear was created by British author Michael Bond in 1958, ultimately spawning dozens of books, three television series, merchandise, and more. Think Winnie the Pooh, but with a penchant for marmalade instead of honey. The film remains quite faithful to the character’s origin story, in which a talking bear from Peru with nowhere to go is adopted by a kind family who grows to accept him as one of their own. Conflict comes in the form of a taxidermist (Nicole Kidman) who wants to capture and stuff Paddington for her museum collection. Critics called Paddington an utterly charming family film and awarded it a Certified Fresh 98 percent on the Tomatometer, calling it a welcome update on the character that both respects the source material and provides some fresh laughs.


Inherent Vice (2014) 72%

If you’ve met anyone who’s seen Inherent Vice and asked them to describe it, chances are you got a muddled mess of a story with lots of stops and starts and “Wait; lemme back up”s. This is because Paul Thomas Anderson’s latest ensemble drama-comedy, based on the eponymous novel by Thomas Pynchon, is a near indecipherable shaggy dog story full of dead ends, red herrings, and plain old wackiness. Joaquin Phoenix plays stoner P.I. Doc Sportello, who can’t refuse when his ex-girlfriend (Katherine Waterston) asks him to look into a possible abduction plot involving her new boyfriend’s wife and her lover. From there, Doc discovers what may be a much larger conspiracy that may or may not involve the LAPD, a missing musician, and a heroin-smuggling cult, among other things. Bolstered by a typically outstanding cast that includes Josh Brolin, Owen Wilson, Benicio del Toro, Reese Witherspoon, and more, Inherent Vice will satisfy fans of P.T. Anderson and the source novel, even if those expecting a more traditional, coherent narrative will probably find themselves scratching their heads.


 

ALSO AVAILABLE THIS WEEK:

Last Days in Vietnam (2014) (95 percent), a documentary covering the final days of the Vietnam War and the joint efforts of the South Vietnamese and American soldiers to save as many lives as possible.
Mommy (2015) (91 percent), Xavier Dolan’s drama about a single mother trying to raise her ADHD teen son with the help of a new neighbor.
The Gambler (2015) (46 percent), starring Mark Wahlberg and Jessica Lange in a remake of the 1974 James Caan film, about a lit professor with a gambling problem who owes the wrong people a lot of money.
The Wedding Ringer (2015) (28 percent), starring Kevin Hart and Josh Gad in a comedy about an awkward groom-to-be who hires the services of a professional Best Man.
The Boy Next Door, starring Jennifer Lopez and Ryan Guzman in a thriller about a high school teacher who has a one-night stand with a younger man who becomes obsessed with her.

This week at the movies, we’ve got fairy tale creatures (Strange Magic, with voice performances from Alan Cumming and Evan Rachel Wood), an eccentric adventurer (Mortdecai, starring Johnny Depp and Gwyneth Paltrow), and a troubled teacher-student relationship (The Boy Next Door, starring Jennifer Lopez and Ryan Guzman). What do the critics have to say?


Strange Magic

18%

On paper, an animated musical inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream sounds reasonably promising. Unfortunately, critics say Strange Magic could use a whole lot more pixie dust — along with visual inspiration and interesting characters. It’s the story of Marianne (voiced by Evan Rachel Wood), a fairy princess who’s been jilted by her Prince Charming. The cad then discovers a love potion, which sets off a series of battles and daring rescues. The pundits say Strange Magic is oddly charmless, and its few clever ideas are smothered by a plot that’s both patchwork and overly busy.



Mortdecai

12%

What’s the deal with Johnny Depp? With the exception of the animated Rango, the man who was once the biggest star in Hollywood hasn’t had a critically approved starring vehicle since Public Enemies in 2009. The critics say Mortdecai is a stunning misfire, a tonally-jarring would-be caper comedy that reduces its talented cast to broad, goofy caricatures. Depp is Charlie Mortdecai, a mustachioed, anachronistic rogue who’s tasked with recovering a stolen Goya painting; hilarity, in the form of pratfalls and double-entendres, ensues. The pundits say Mortdecai is visually sharp but comically dull; it’s an attempt at satire that seems unsure of what exactly it’s lampooning. (Check out this week’s 24 Frames for a gallery of Johnny Depp’s wildest looks through the years.)



The Boy Next Door

12%

The divide between trashy fun and plain ol’ trash is often razor thin. Critics say The Boy Next Door falls on the wrong side of the line, promising campy thrills that it can’t ultimately deliver. Jennifer Lopez stars as a high school English teacher who’s taking a break from her husband when she has a tryst with a teenager. Naturally, he becomes obsessed and possessive, threatening our heroine’s security and peace of mind. The pundits say The Boy Next Door simmers but never reaches full boil, so its silly dialogue and ludicrous plotting are never quite as entertaining as they could be. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we count down Lopez’s best-reviewed movies, as well as director Rob Cohen’s Five Favorite Films.)

What’s Hot On TV:


Critics say Justified (100 percent) returns to form for its endgame, rebounding with crisp storytelling and colorful characters who never take themselves too seriously.

The critics say the high quality execution and cool characters are top-notch, but the nonsensical time-travel scenarios make 12 Monkeys (54 percent) less watchable than its original source material.

The pundits say the stale cop humor of Backstrom (33 percent) is a cop-out, availed little by the talented cast’s attempt to make the best of its sloppy schtick.

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • Red Army, a documentary about the legendary Soviet hockey team, is at 100 percent.
  • The Duke Of Burgundy, a drama about an erotic relationship between two entomologists in a lavish country estate, is at 97 percent.
  • Mommy, a drama about a single mother dealing with her difficult teenage son, is Certified Fresh at 91 percent.
  • Salvation Army, a coming-of-age drama about a gay Moroccan teenager dealing with complex family and societal dynamics, is at 83 percent.
  • Killers, a thriller about a serial killer and a vigilante who each record videos of their bloody deeds, is at 83 percent.
  • Black Sea, starring Jude Law and Scoot McNairy in a thriller about a submarine crew searching the deep for rumored treasure, is Certified Fresh at 78 percent.
  • Son of a Gun, starring Ewan McGregor and Brenton Thwaites in a drama about a small-time crook who falls under the influence of a seasoned criminal, is at 59 percent.
  • The Humbling, starring Al Pacino and Greta Gerwig in a drama about an emotionally fragile actor who is rejuvinated by a much younger woman, is at 56 percent.
  • Cake, starring Jennifer Aniston and Anna Kendrick in a drama about a woman suffering from chronic physical and emotional pain, is at 38 percent.
  • Song One, starring Anne Hathaway and Mary Steenburgen in a drama about aspiring New York City folkies, is at 37 percent.
  • Manny, a documentary about the champion prizefighter and politician Manny Pacquiao, is at 25 percent.
  • We’ll Never Have Paris, starring Melanie Lynskey and Simon Helberg in a romantic comedy about a passive guy who chases the ex he dumped when she relocates to the City of Lights, is at 20 percent.
  • Americons, a drama about the rise and fall of a shady real estate investment firm, is at 17 percent.

Five-Favorite-Films-with-Rob-Cohen

It can be fascinating learning what films inspire the filmmakers who inspire us. In this instance, action film director Rob Cohen imparted to us five of his favorite films, some of which helped to manuever him towards a career in filmmaking. His The Fast and the Furious brought the once popular car-race genre back to the forefront of action films, and on Jan. 23, he’ll offer his take on another classically popular genre, the stalker-suspense film, with The Boy Next Door, starring Jennifer Lopez and Ryan Guzman. So hearing him discuss his favorite films elucidates why he jumped into making the types of movies that have made him famous. Do any of his choices affect you the same way?

 


Gone in 60 Seconds (H.B. Halicki, 1974; 38% Tomatometer)



I like films that really break every rule, where the director, writers, producers have gone out, they’re just going, “We don’t give a f— what the hell has happened in other movies, or how other movies were written, or other movies were shot. We’re just going to do it our way.” And those movies not only tickle my fancy, but they always give me a lot of courage when I should have to do something to go, “You know what? Be more like that. Don’t listen so much to the popular wisdom or the collective wisdom, the rules.” And that’s one of the reasons I’m so proud of The Fast and the Furious. It’s because nobody gave a s— about the movie except me and the cast, and so we didn’t hear anything. I just did what I wanted to do. I was very much inspired by the original Gone in 60 Seconds, but the H.B. Halicki version, not the other version. You know, because that guy was staging car chases on the Long Beach freeway with no permits, no anything [laughing] and he was clipping telephone poles and doing all sorts of stuff that was just so balls-to-the-wall. H.B. Halicki was a junk dealer who wanted to be a movie director. And he financed, wrote, directed and starred in the original Gone in 60 Seconds. That was such an outrageous thing that it stimulated me in many, many different ways.

Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (George Miller, 1981; 100% Tomatometer)



Same with my friend George Miller’s Road Warrior. When I first saw that in Westwood, I was like, “OooooK, there is a whole world beyond Hollywood that is sort of significant in this movie, that has a set of rules about gasoline as the ultimate currency that is both metaphorical and so out-of-the-box.” And the vehicles, the way George did it, the stunning performance of young Mel Gibson. I can remember the visceral impact that it had on me and I’m really looking forward to Fury Road now. I’m sure it’s going to be amazing.

Pulp Fiction (Quentin Tarantino, 1994; 94% Tomatometer)



After Gone and Road Warrior is Pulp Fiction, which I consider a perfect movie. I consider it a pitch-perfect movie. I’ve gotten to the point now where I pray to not come across it while channel surfing because, if I see five frames of it, then I have to sit and watch the rest of it. I’m now up to something like 30 or 40 times I’ve seen it. I just love that movie and all its dimensions, its crazy story structure, Quentin’s just brilliant dialogue, and the kind of mix of style and atmosphere with these memorable, memorable characters. Pulp is definitely one [of my favorites], although anything Tarantino would be good with me.

True Romance (Tony Scott, 1993; 92% Tomatometer)



I love Tony Scott’s True Romance. Tony was a good friend of mine and I miss him every day. That movie was not only, in my opinion, his best movie, that movie changed movies. It changed the way movies looked and, again, I think that script was written by Quentin.


Yeah, it was. But I don’t believe he had much involvement in it after that.

No, I don’t think he did. But Tony took that sort of subversive script and created a thing of such visual beauty and such compelling characters. You know, I gave Christian Slater his first leading role in The Legend of Billie Jean when he was 13.


I love that movie!

Oh! Thank you! [laughing]. [One of] Kerr’s favorites!


I love that movie, are you kidding me? I used to watch that over and over again, when I was young.

If you put that as one of your favorite films…


Oh it’s probably up there. I still go around singing “Invincible” to myself whenever I think about the movie, and vice versa.

Hey, fair is fair. And Monster Squad. I have my cult films.

Irréversible (Gaspar Noe, 2002; 57% Tomatometer)



Another one that I was very inspired by and touched by in all its ugliness and brutality, but its daring story structure, was Gasper Noe’s Irréversible, which is an odd one, but I just found the idea of starting at the end and telling it backwards as such a conceit. And the world it took you in, and the way it took you in, I felt that was something new that I’d never seen before.

It’s a journey through hell, starting at the end and working backwards to the beginning. So it’s sort of Paris’ underground, and it has a rape scene in it of Monica Belluci that’s one of the most frank, most brutal… You know, people kid about rape, you just say, “Yeah, I think you should watch this movie and see what rape really looks like. You should see how violent and terrible it is and then you’ll not make any jokes anymore.” It’s so balls-out, this film. It’s so unafraid. It’s so in-your-face. It’s one of those movies that, once you see [it], you will never forget it, and it keeps coming back to you and back to you. It’s not necessarily a pleasant thing, but it was definitely a filmmaker who said, “I don’t give a f— what anyone thinks. Anybody. Not the critics, not my friends, not the finance producers, nobody. I’m just going out to tell my story the way I want to tell it.” Vincent Cassel is so great in it, and Belluci. It’s really a very powerful movie.

Where are your light-hearted comedies, Rob?

Well then I start sounding like a geek, you know? I love Preston Sturges. The Lady Eve is one of the most wonderful high-style comedies. My comedic taste runs sort of to that zone which, after the era of Judd Apatow, we’re not doing that anymore. Nobody’s doing the high styled sophisticated comedy.


The Boy Next Door opens Jan. 23, 2015, in wide release.

Tag Cloud

razzies Prime Video YouTube BBC Certified Fresh HBO Max Chernobyl Spring TV Amazon Studios cops 99% ABC Family binge RT21 Pixar Pride Month child's play Netflix Christmas movies kong hispanic genre superhero Film Festival trailers Chilling Adventures of Sabrina 73rd Emmy Awards japanese Mary Tyler Moore period drama 79th Golden Globes Awards PBS Binge Guide The Arrangement Pacific Islander Exclusive Video TCM Opinion The Academy The Purge E! BET christmas movies Travel Channel Apple Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Kids & Family 007 Funimation romance Emmys TCA 2017 space Ovation TLC VH1 Showtime Paramount Plus Winter TV comedies directors spy thriller Rom-Com comiccon universal monsters Nat Geo CMT quibi Drama Universal tv talk crime thriller Rocky movie Apple TV+ children's TV Horror Sneak Peek french Hollywood Foreign Press Association Mary Poppins Returns Rocketman asian-american worst new zealand dark RT History spanish language Cartoon Network james bond live action boxing unscripted BAFTA rotten movies we love Quiz Masterpiece Arrowverse free movies ViacomCBS scorecard Hear Us Out dceu romantic comedy Marvel Studios Action Awards Tour target doctor who documentary FX on Hulu true crime fast and furious saw 2015 biopic high school fresh Ellie Kemper First Reviews Star Wars Brie Larson royal family scene in color TCA Winter 2020 Mystery hispanic heritage month zombies cancelled TV series Marvel Television adenture critic resources Set visit A&E name the review Premiere Dates Nickelodeon spinoff Comedy Central FOX science fiction teaser cars remakes TV One Super Bowl Countdown Music CBS All Access action-comedy olympics Superheroes ESPN Columbia Pictures ID adventure Video Games nfl The CW The Witch OneApp miniseries anime 2021 art house SXSW Film SDCC indiana jones USA Network Peacock blockbusters sequel OWN dreamworks comic book movie stoner scary king kong Broadway italian Winners live event Food Network Sundance Now social media Tubi mutant WGN war game of thrones Pop wonder woman Photos monster movies what to watch hist australia Summer TNT emmy awards Women's History Month Cosplay See It Skip It Interview DC streaming service mcc prank Instagram Live FXX Paramount Network 2020 Amazon Prime NBC nature Oscars Year in Review godzilla canceled hidden camera best Spike rotten Superheroe Warner Bros. cults rt labs Character Guide Toys mockumentary NYCC book archives Television Critics Association comic independent streaming movies vampires 93rd Oscars legend MCU talk show FX Stephen King cats Disney Plus TV Land Television Academy dragons Elton John batman stop motion concert ABC black comedy hollywood Comedy jamie lee curtis Mindy Kaling festivals book adaptation BET Awards Best and Worst X-Men comics Wes Anderson NBA El Rey Bravo Grammys Turner Classic Movies DC Universe women Disney stand-up comedy king arthur Lifetime Christmas movies telelvision USA twilight a nightmare on elm street Freeform dogs Teen Disney Channel indie news HFPA leaderboard dramedy TruTV 71st Emmy Awards sequels witnail revenge San Diego Comic-Con dc Image Comics 2016 films reviews The Walt Disney Company transformers Dark Horse Comics debate MTV composers documentaries TCA Awards Trivia Amazon richard e. Grant Comic-Con@Home 2021 Tarantino Pop TV HBO Trailer nbcuniversal movies cancelled TV shows heist movie cartoon die hard casting political drama biography serial killer VOD Musicals natural history diversity Spectrum Originals international supernatural GLAAD Comic Book comic books Crackle 45 Sony Pictures A24 GoT new york kaiju all-time Tumblr Nominations Holidays Lifetime basketball Endgame football Country Fox News TCA black 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards PaleyFest feel good Discovery Channel Calendar DC Comics CBS Red Carpet joker Ghostbusters harry potter Academy Awards Hallmark finale Fantasy dexter National Geographic elevated horror E3 VICE discovery TV movies Sundance ABC Signature TV gangster trophy parents aliens IFC YA pirates of the caribbean franchise 1990s travel slashers Musical based on movie crime superman Pirates Family disaster Election criterion aapi police drama Infographic 21st Century Fox 4/20 crossover Avengers Comics on TV Schedule medical drama Legendary robots Epix Mudbound mission: impossible TIFF Hulu ghosts Britbox 20th Century Fox CW Seed Captain marvel politics WarnerMedia sports Walt Disney Pictures classics jurassic park thriller festival obituary theme song suspense laika Crunchyroll video on demand AMC golden globes Lucasfilm YouTube Premium animated psychological thriller The Walking Dead Tags: Comedy anthology screen actors guild Song of Ice and Fire Alien golden globe awards TBS GIFs 2018 72 Emmy Awards Reality Competition Holiday Polls and Games Universal Pictures Sundance TV television APB comic book movies video toronto know your critic green book Watching Series Disney+ Disney Plus lord of the rings New York Comic Con Fox Searchlight Martial Arts 2017 DGA Fall TV Biopics Extras posters docuseries rom-coms latino cancelled television Disney streaming service LGBTQ strong female leads History 24 frames historical drama worst movies Marathons rt archives Esquire Mary poppins Paramount scary movies boxoffice versus First Look Vudu critics Heroines Thanksgiving Tokyo Olympics spain Valentine's Day venice 90s game show Turner Star Trek docudrama Adult Swim award winner halloween PlayStation zero dark thirty south america canceled TV shows japan singing competition streaming Fargo YouTube Red cooking blaxploitation Animation kids IMDb TV new star wars movies toy story deadpool spanish breaking bad young adult Black History Month marvel comics marvel cinematic universe chucky Podcast Shudder Western Box Office ratings 2019 sopranos Reality rt labs critics edition Apple TV Plus Sci-Fi ITV foreign Awards blockbuster popular Black Mirror AMC Plus mob justice league DirecTV Lionsgate sag awards cancelled SundanceTV Rock Tomatazos Classic Film facebook Christmas halloween tv adaptation TV renewals Writers Guild of America psycho renewed TV shows Shondaland IFC Films Anna Paquin reboot MSNBC slasher BBC America spider-man Baby Yoda Cannes LGBT sitcom Netflix Marvel Syfy zombie Logo Neflix Creative Arts Emmys Trophy Talk series vs. Amazon Prime Video screenings Emmy Nominations Acorn TV American Society of Cinematographers BBC One technology Starz President CNN werewolf satire HBO Go crime drama Hallmark Christmas movies spider-verse cinemax Pet Sematary