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All Felicity Jones Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Before starring in the first Fresh Star Wars spin-off (we know, we know, you can’t believe The Ewok Adventure is Rotten), Felicity Jones built an impressive resume in her native Britain, where she had been working as an actress since the age of 12. The Worst Witch and its sequel Weirdster College are beloved in certain circles of English millennials, and Jones graduated after that into movies like Flashbacks of a Fool with Daniel Craig, and Brideshead Revisited. Her start in America came with the 2011 romantic drama Like Crazy with Anton Yelchin, which was able to pick up extra headlines for also co-starring Jennifer Lawrence, who was on the cusp of Hunger Games megastardom.

Upwards career trajectory in the 2010s suggests that you haven’t made it until you’re in a superhero movie. With Jones, it was The Amazing Spider-Man 2. (Hey, it doesn’t say the superhero movie had to be actually good.) Jones played Felicia Hardy, who would’ve gone on to become Black Cat, had Sony not given Spider-Man over to Marvel Studios for an MCU makeover. That same year, she was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar with The Theory of Everything, starring Eddie Redmayne, who did win an Oscar for it.

By 2016, she was picking up blockbuster work: A Monster Calls (which critics loved, but no one saw); Inferno (which critics hated, but some people saw); and Rogue One (which the critics loved, and everyone saw). The packed filming schedule and Rogue One‘s famously troubled production may have been what led Jones to a quiet 2017, before returning in 2018 with On the Basis of Sex, portraying Ruth Bader Ginsburg. That was her only movie that year, and likewise in 2019, she’s got the one: The Aeronauts, a survival adventure of air balloon pioneers that reunites her with Redmayne. She takes to the skies, and we’re taking a look back with all Felicity Jones movies, ranked by Tomatometer!

#21

Collide (2016)
24%

#21
Adjusted Score: 26219%
Critics Consensus: Collide wastes a talented cast on a would-be thriller fatally undermined by eye-rolling dialogue, logical fallacies, and humdrum set pieces.
Synopsis: Casey Stein (Nicholas Hoult) agrees to hijack a shipment of cocaine for his old boss (Ben Kingsley) in return for... [More]
Directed By: Eran Creevy

#20

Inferno (2016)
23%

#20
Adjusted Score: 37828%
Critics Consensus: Senselessly frantic and altogether shallow, Inferno sends the Robert Langdon trilogy spiraling to a convoluted new low.
Synopsis: Famous symbologist Robert Langdon (Tom Hanks) follows a trail of clues tied to Dante, the great medieval poet. When Langdon... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#19

The Tempest (2010)
30%

#19
Adjusted Score: 32783%
Critics Consensus: Director Julie Taymor's gender-swapping of roles and some frenzied special effects can't quite disguise an otherwise stagey, uninspired take on Shakespeare's classic.
Synopsis: A shipwreck casts members of a royal court ashore on a mysterious island. Their fateful arrival is no accident, for... [More]
Directed By: Julie Taymor

#18
Adjusted Score: 36343%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: On the day of her wedding, an ambivalent bride (Felicity Jones) locks herself in her bedroom while her family --... [More]
Directed By: Donald Rice

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 35779%
Critics Consensus: Despite Daniel Craig's earnest efforts, Flashbacks of a Fool suffers from an ambitious but underdeveloped script.
Synopsis: When washed-up British actor and drug addict Joe Scott (Daniel Craig) learns that his best friend, Boots (Max Deacon), has... [More]
Directed By: Baillie Walsh

#16

True Story (2015)
45%

#16
Adjusted Score: 51656%
Critics Consensus: James Franco and Jonah Hill make a watchable pair, but True Story loses their performances -- and the viewer's interest -- in a muddled movie that bungles its fact-based tale.
Synopsis: New York Times journalist Michael Finkel (Jonah Hill) loses his job when it's revealed that he was not entirely truthful... [More]
Directed By: Rupert Goold

#15

Chéri (2009)
50%

#15
Adjusted Score: 55362%
Critics Consensus: A too-short script and a romance lacking in heat detracts from an otherwise haughty charmer.
Synopsis: When retired courtesan Charlotte (Kathy Bates) asks her former colleague, Lea (Michelle Pfeiffer) to instruct her son, Chéri (Rupert Friend),... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Frears

#14

Albatross (2011)
54%

#14
Adjusted Score: 53223%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Beth (Felicity Jones), a bookish teenager, becomes friends with Emilia (Jessica Brown Findlay) and has an affair with the latter's... [More]
Directed By: Niall MacCormick

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 64708%
Critics Consensus: While the cast is outstanding and the special effects are top-notch, the latest installment of the Spidey saga suffers from an unfocused narrative and an overabundance of characters.
Synopsis: Confident in his powers as Spider-Man, Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) embraces his new role as a hero and spends time... [More]
Directed By: Marc Webb

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 57785%
Critics Consensus: It fails to challenge the well-established conventions of its storyline, but Cemetery Junction benefits from the genuine warmth of its script, as well as its refusal to give in to cheap nostalgia.
Synopsis: Three bored young men living in the English suburbs strive to create identities for themselves in the stultifying atmosphere of... [More]

#11

Breathe In (2013)
56%

#11
Adjusted Score: 58759%
Critics Consensus: Breathe In's plot never quite sparks the way it should, but it remains thoroughly watchable thanks to strong performances from Felicity Jones and Guy Pearce.
Synopsis: A foreign-exchange student (Felicity Jones) jeopardizes the familial harmony of a piano teacher (Guy Pearce), his wife (Amy Ryan) and... [More]
Directed By: Drake Doremus

#10

Hysteria (2011)
59%

#10
Adjusted Score: 64361%
Critics Consensus: Hysteria has an amusing subject but its winking, vaguely sarcastic tone doesn't do the movie any favors.
Synopsis: Two doctors (Hugh Dancy, Jonathan Pryce) in Victorian England use manual stimulation of female genitalia to cure their patients' ills,... [More]
Directed By: Tanya Wexler

#9

Like Crazy (2011)
72%

#9
Adjusted Score: 77292%
Critics Consensus: It has the schmaltzy trappings of my romantic films, but Like Crazy allows its characters to express themselves beyond dialogue, crafting a true, intimate study.
Synopsis: While attending college in Los Angeles, Jacob (Anton Yelchin), an American, and Anna (Felicity Jones), who hails from London, fall... [More]
Directed By: Drake Doremus

#8

The Aeronauts (2019)
71%

#8
Adjusted Score: 82410%
Critics Consensus: Thrilling visuals and the substantial chemistry of its well-matched leads make The Aeronauts an adventure well worth taking.
Synopsis: In 1862 headstrong scientist James Glaisher and wealthy young widow Amelia Wren mount a balloon expedition to fly higher than... [More]
Directed By: Tom Harper

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 88668%
Critics Consensus: On the Basis of Sex is nowhere near as groundbreaking as its real-life subject, but her extraordinary life makes a solid case for itself as an inspirational, well-acted biopic.
Synopsis: Ruth Bader Ginsburg is a struggling attorney and new mother who faces adversity and numerous obstacles in her fight for... [More]
Directed By: Mimi Leder

#6

SoulBoy (2010)
75%

#6
Adjusted Score: 25470%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A love triangle develops among three young people (Martin Compston, Felicity Jones) during the 1970s British music scene.... [More]
Directed By: Shimmy Marcus

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 80472%
Critics Consensus: Its deliberate pace will frustrate some viewers, but for fans of handsomely mounted period drama, The Invisible Woman offers visual as well as emotional cinematic nourishment.
Synopsis: Nelly Wharton Robinson (Felicity Jones) recalls a fateful time from her past when, as a young actress, she met author... [More]
Directed By: Ralph Fiennes

#4

Chalet Girl (2011)
77%

#4
Adjusted Score: 77024%
Critics Consensus: Chalet Girl is light comedic fun geared for teenage girls, featuring a charming performance from Felicity Jones.
Synopsis: While working a job at an exclusive ski resort to support her Dad, Kim (Felicity Jones) learns to snowboard and... [More]
Directed By: Phil Traill

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 91132%
Critics Consensus: Part biopic, part love story, The Theory of Everything rises on James Marsh's polished direction and the strength of its two leads.
Synopsis: In the 1960s, Cambridge University student and future physicist Stephen Hawking (Eddie Redmayne) falls in love with fellow collegian Jane... [More]
Directed By: James Marsh

#2
Adjusted Score: 113393%
Critics Consensus: Rogue One draws deep on Star Wars mythology while breaking new narrative and aesthetic ground -- and suggesting a bright blockbuster future for the franchise.
Synopsis: Former scientist Galen Erso lives on a farm with his wife and young daughter, Jyn. His peaceful existence comes crashing... [More]
Directed By: Gareth Edwards

#1

A Monster Calls (2016)
86%

#1
Adjusted Score: 105983%
Critics Consensus: A Monster Calls deftly balances dark themes and fantastical elements to deliver an engrossing and uncommonly moving entry in the crowded coming-of-age genre.
Synopsis: Conor (Lewis MacDougall) is dealing with far more than other boys his age. His beloved and devoted mother (Felicity Jones)... [More]
Directed By: J.A. Bayona

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(Photo by Mary Clavering/Young Hollywood/Getty Images)

Ross Lynch is going from Disney to Dahmer. He’s playing a teenaged Jeffrey in My Friend Dahmer, a prequel to the madness that would drive Dahmer to kill (and rape and consume) 17 people over 15 years. Heady stuff for Lynch, who wasn’t born yet when Dahmer was killed in prison in 1994 while serving multiple life imprisonment sentences. And the role is perhaps even shocking to his fans, who’ve been following his career through Disney Channel’s Austin & Ally, and as 20% of R5, the rock band he fronts with his four siblings.

“I like the idea of shocking people and playing something that was so far from what people were used to seeing me in,” Lynch explains on making this his leading actor debut, “Even when I was on Disney Channel, I had that in the back of my head, and I put it out in the universe that I wanted to do an indie film next. I wanted to do something that was darker and with just a little bit more … something with more substance. A lot of this film is what is not being said.”

As My Friend Dahmer opens in limited release this Friday, we spoke with Lynch to get his Five Favorite Films, and followed up with more on expanding a career into film after conquering radio and TV.


Romeo and Juliet (1968) 95%

It was made in 1968, and it’s kind of old school. I actually ended up watching it for school, but I was home schooled, so I watched it in my house. For whatever reason, when I saw that film, dude, I loved it. I [was] addicted to it. Kind of ended up falling in love with Olivia Hussey. I became a fan girl, I’m not even kidding you. I thought about it nonstop for a long, long time.

The Theory of Everything (2014) 80%

My second favorite film right now… This is also a film that hit me pretty hard. The Theory of Everything. I like what it says about life. It made me appreciative of life, about everything. Ultimately, I think those are some of my favorite movies, where you leave the theater, you sit up and you want to be a better person, or you want to enjoy life more.

About Time (2013) 69%

I’m still debating whether or not I want this on my list, but did you ever see About Time, with Domhnall Gleeson? Same kind of thing. An uplifting film. Makes you appreciate the time you got.

Boogie Nights (1997) 93%

You can’t really go wrong with Boogie Nights. [I first saw this] maybe 16, 17, maybe a little younger. I have a lot of older siblings, so I saw really inappropriate stuff when I was pretty young.

I remember the impact Boogie Nights made when it came out. It’s still carrying on.

Yeah, especially with young filmmakers. That film is very, very often referenced. A lot of it because of the technical aspects, along with, obviously, the acting. The whole vibe of it. ’70s Hollywood is epic.

Django Unchained (2012) 86%

A recent film. But man, I had to pick a Quentin Tarantino film. I’m a really big fan. He’s super unique. I appreciate the people who have a thing that’s completely different than whatever anyone else is doing.

Was it a fight to pick the Tarantino movie you wanted on your list?

I definitely thought about Pulp Fiction for a second. You know what I think it was? I was a little too young to really grasp everything about Pulp Fiction on the first watch. When I saw Django Unchained, I was really immersed in the world and everything that was happening. Based on my personal experience with the film, it’s Django Unchained. But, as far as the better movie, you probably should say Pulp Fiction.


Alex Vo for Rotten Tomatoes: Is there anyone you’re looking at as you make these big steps in your career?

Ross Lynch: I look up to people like Jamie Foxx, the people who do everything. He’s got an Oscar, he’s not an average actor, he’s always playing these awesome roles, like Django Unchained. Or Baby Driver, where he’s this random gangster dude.

Ultimately, I just want to be an artist, really. I want to do films that are interesting and that people probably wouldn’t expect me to do, like My Friend Dahmer. I also want to make music that is maybe a little further left field than the norm of pop radio. Obviously, I still have ambition in mind. I still want to get on the top 40, and all those things like that. I’m always wanting to just be creative.

I also really look up to people like Steve Jobs and Elon Musk, the innovators of today that push the envelope. Maybe in the future, I’ll do something like that, too.


My Friend Dahmer is in theaters this Friday.

There aren’t many high profile titles newly available to stream this week, unless you’re looking for something classic to watch — in that case, Fandor has you covered. But otherwise, we’ve got a number of indie titles, documentaries, and foreign films to choose from, as well as a couple of new shows. Read on for the full list.


Available for purchase:

 

I'll See You in My Dreams (2015) 93%

Blythe Danner, Sam Elliott, Martin Starr, Mary Kay Place, and June Squibb star in this Certified Fresh dramedy about a retiree who forges several new friendships after her beloved dog dies.

Available now on: iTunes


Glen Campbell... I'll Be Me (2014) 100%

Suffering from Alzheimer’s, the country music icon embarks on a grueling farewell tour in this heartfelt documentary.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes


Iris (2014) 98%

This Certified Fresh documentary portrait of fashion maven Iris Apfel was the final film from legendary documentarian Albert Maysles.

Available now on: iTunes


Lambert & Stamp (2014) 89%

This documentary tells the story of two aspiring filmmakers who became instrumental in the rise of the Who.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu


The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared (2013) 68%

This Swedish comedy is the story of a 100-year-old man who climbs out a window and disappears.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


5 to 7 (2014) 70%

Anton Yelchinc, Bérénice Marlohe, Olivia Thirlby, Glenn Close, Eric Stoltz, and Frank Langella star in a romantic comedy about a passionate affair between a married woman and an aspiring writer.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes


New on Netflix:

 

Two Days One Night (2014) 97%

Marion Cotillard stars in the Dardenne brothers’ Certified Fresh, Oscar-nominated drama about a woman who tries to return to work after suffering a nervous breakdown.

Available now on: Netflix


Pariah (2011) 95%

This coming-of-age drama tells the tale of an inner-city teenager who’s in the process of coming out of the closet.

Available now on: Netflix


Cloudburst (2011) 100%

Olympia Dukakis and Brenda Fricker star in this road comedy as an aging lesbian couple who are on the run from their nursing home.

Available now on: Netflix


The Glades: Season 1 (2010) 59%

Matt Passmore stars in this A&E original drama/dark comedy about a Chicago cop who relocates to Florida after a scandal.

Available now on: Netflix


Alex of Venice (2014) 74%

Mary Elizabeth Winstead stars as the titular character in Chris Messina’s directorial debut, about a recently single attorney who learns to move on with life.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Hulu:

 

Heroes Reborn: Season 1 (2015) 42%

In anticipation of the upcoming series, “Dark Matters” bridges the gap between the original Heroes series and the rebooted storyline of Heroes Reborn with a six-episode web series arc.

Available now on: Hulu


New on HBO Now:

 

Show Me a Hero: Season 1 (2015) 96%

Oscar Isaac stars in this six-part miniseries from David Simon (creator of The Wire) about a public housing dispute in the 1980s that split the city of Yonkers, NY.

Available now on: HBO Now


The Theory of Everything (2014) 80%

Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones star in this Certified Fresh, Oscar-nominated biopic of celebrated astrophysicist Stephen Hawking.

Available now on: HBO Now


New on Fandor:

 

Playtime (1967) 98%

The great Jacques Tati navigates confusing and fast-moving modern Paris in this colorful comic masterpiece.

Available now on: Fandor


The Great Beauty (2013) 91%

This Oscar-winning dramedy about an aging journalist in the midst of reflection on his career spent hobnobbing amongst Rome’s glitterati earned comparisons to Fellini’s La Dolce Vita.

Available now on: Fandor


French Cancan (1955) 100%

Legendary French director Jean Renoir teams up with Jean Gabin and Edith Piaf in this classic showbiz comedy set in the Moulin Rouge.

Available now on: Fandor


Tokyo Drifter (1966) 93%

Seijun Suzuki’s deliriously insane action flick is the story of a yakuza member attempting to leave his criminal past behind; awesome shootouts ensue.

Available now on: Fandor


Foreign Correspondent (1940) 95%

This tense, witty tale of international intrigue contains one of Alfred Hitchcock’s greatest scenes: an assassin flees through a crowd of umbrella-weilding spectators.

Available now on: Fandor


Hopscotch (1980) 80%

Walter Matthau and Glenda Jackson star in this thriller/comedy about a former CIA agent who attracts a lot of the wrong kind of attention after he publishes a tell-all memoir exposing the secrets of various agencies around the world.

Available now on: Fandor


New on Amazon Prime:

Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem (2014) 100%

This riveting Certified Fresh drama stars Ronit Elkabetz as an abused Israeli wife attempting to divorce her husband, even though it contradicts her country’s religious laws.

Available now on: Amazon Prime

In Theaters This Week:



The DUFF

73%

Rating: PG-13, for crude and sexual material throughout, some language and teen partying.

This high school romantic comedy, which challenges the notions of cliques, hierarchies and labels, is based on Kody Keplinger’s YA novel of the same name. So the material may be familiar to many young viewers, but even if you or your kids haven’t read the book, you’ll all recognize the settings and social challenges. Mae Whitman stars as Bianca, a smart, funny high school senior who learns she’s the DUFF — or Designated Ugly Fat Friend — to her two gorgeous and leggy best pals. As she works to rehabilitate her image, she must navigate the school’s mean girl, the emo boy she has a crush on and her lifelong next-door neighbor and friend, who happens to be the school’s hunky football captain. There’s a lot of frank talk about kissing and sex, much of which exists in an embarrassing video of Bianca that goes viral. Bianca also imagines herself in hot-and-heavy makeout sessions in a couple of dream sequences. But the film’s message of self-acceptance is extremely worthwhile. OK for tweens and up.



McFarland, USA

80%

Rating: PG, for thematic material, some violence and language.

This inspiring Disney film is based on the true story of an underdog, high school cross-country team composed of Latino farm workers’ kids in California’s Central Valley. These are students from struggling families who have toiled in the fields, and while they instinctively know how to run, they don’t know much about training or strategy. Kevin Costner plays their coach, who’s determined to put together a team and prove that his athletes are worthy of competing in a state championship. There are some mature moments and themes regarding socioeconomic disparity, as well as some fistfights, a knife fight and a possible suicide attempt. And yes, given the subject matter, the film itself follows a pretty predictable formula. But the underlying messages of teamwork, dedication and finding home and family are worthwhile. This is probably fine for most ages.

New On DVD:



The Theory of Everything

80%

Rating: PG-13, for some thematic elements and suggestive material.

Eddie Redmayne delivers a powerful, transformative performance in this multiple Oscar nominee about renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking. Admittedly, given the subject matter, it might be a tough sell for your kids. But if the older and more ambitious ones are interested — especially ones who are into science — there’s little here that would be inappropriate for them. Redmayne portrays Hawking from his early days at 1960s Cambridge, where he meets his wife, Jane (Felicity Jones), through his stunning diagnosis of motor-neuron disease and his intellectual triumph over the gradual physical deterioration that leaves him in a wheelchair, unable to speak. As his condition weakens, their marriage evolves, with each having an affair on the side with the other’s tacit approval. At one point, Hawking’s therapist leafs through a Penthouse magazine for his enjoyment. And there’s a bit of joking about the fact that Hawking was able to produce three children with his wife, despite suffering from a disease that renders him unable to move much. Suitable for older tweens and up.



Dumb and Dumber To

30%

Rating: PG-13, for crude and sexual humor, partial nudity, language and some drug references.

Fart jokes and urine jokes. Jokes about genitalia — those of our idiotic heroes and an unsuspecting old lady in a nursing home. Jokes about people of various ethnicities, sexual orientations and physical disabilities. If it’s raunchy and (allegedly) shocking, it’s in here. After all, this is a Farrelly brothers movie — and a sequel to a hugely popular Farrelly brothers movie, at that. Jeff Daniels and Jim Carrey return to the roles of Harry and Lloyd, respectively, which they played in 1994’s Dumb and Dumber. This time, they reunite for a road trip in hopes of tracking down the daughter Harry never knew he had, and hopefully finding a spare kidney along the way. They bumble and stumble from one ridiculous situation to the next and offend everyone they come across — all in the name of (alleged) satire. The crude physical comedy, which is the Farrellys’ raison d’etre, makes much more sense to me now that I have a 5-year-old son. Still, the material here is probably best suited for older tweens and up.



St. Vincent

77%

Rating: PG-13, for thematic material including sexual content, alcohol and tobacco use, and for language.

Sophisticated tweens and older will probably be OK with this rather mature comedy about a misanthropic alcoholic and the boy next door who becomes his inadvertent project. Bill Murray is back in reliable curmudgeon mode as Vincent, who smokes and drinks his way through his days in a shabby Brooklyn home. But his comfortable, anti-social routine is disrupted when a single mom (Melissa McCarthy) and her shy, bullied son (Jaeden Lieberher) move in next door and Vincent ends up functioning as de facto babysitter. Despite its ultimate feel-good themes, there’s some grown-up stuff here. Vincent has an ongoing fling with a pregnant, Russian stripper (Naomi Watts) and he takes the kid to a dive bar and the racetrack. There’s also a subplot involving an elderly woman who’s in a nursing home with Alzheimer’s. And as the kid gains confidence, he punches out one of the classmates who had tormented him. So hey — there’s some uplift after all.

Grae Drake speaks to the biggest, award-winning stars about who the real award-winners should be. Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Eddie Redmayne, Jessica Chastain, Ben Stiller, Ricky Gervais, Chris Rock, Ben Vereen, Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis, Charlie Day, Chris Rock, and Oscar Isaac give props to Hollywood’s brightest behind-the-scenes stars.

This week on home video, we’ve got a few Oscar contenders, a controversial comedy, an acclaimed documentary, a wildly popular HBO series, and a number of other notable choices. Read on for details:



Birdman

91%

Unless you’ve been completely oblivious to all of the awards season buzz, you’re probably already well familiar with Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Birdman. Featuring a powerhouse performance from Michael Keaton, the film centers on a washed-up actor named Riggan Thomson (Keaton) who, eager to reestablish himself, is on the verge of making his Broadway debut. But his past continues to haunt Riggan, and he may be slowly losing his grip on reality. Certified Fresh at 92 percent, Birdman has already won numerous awards, and it’s currently nominated for nine Oscars, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor, among others.



The Theory of Everything

80%

Another film that caused quite a stir this past year was James Marsh’s The Theory of Everything, which features another remarkable lead performance. Eddie Redmayne plays famed theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, beginning with his early days at Cambridge — where he meets his first wife Jane Wilde (Felicity Jones) and is diagnosed with ALS. The film depicts Hawking’s relationship with Wilde, as well as the progression of his condition through the years, and both Redmayne and Jones earned Oscar nominations for their superb work. Certified Fresh at 79 percent on the Tomatometer, The Theory of Everything does hit some familiar biopic notes, but the film’s subject is such a fascinating man — and its performers are so good — that it succeeds pleasantly.



The Interview

51%

Maybe you weren’t paying much attention to all the awards gossip, but you probably at least caught something about Sony being hacked late last year allegedly by the North Koreans? The impetus for the digital invasion — so the story goes — was this comedy starring Seth Rogen and James Franco, in which a talk show personality who’s been invited to North Korea to interview Kim Jong Un is approached by the CIA and asked to assassinate him. Apparently, North Korea didn’t take it so well, but according to about half the critics, there wasn’t much worth talking about anyway. At 53 percent on the Tomatometer, The Interview isn’t the strongest collaboration between Franco and Rogen, and it’ll probably be remembered more for the controversy that accompanied it.



Games of Thrones: Season Four

It’s unlikely you’ll be interested in picking up season four of Game of Thrones if you’re not already a fan, and if you’re picking up season four, it’s also unlikely you haven’t already seen all of it. But for those of you who like to own physical copies of your favorite shows, and for those of you who are interested in the bonus features you can’t get on HBO Go, your wait is over. Season five will begin airing in April, so that gives you plenty of time to rewatch all the darkest, most exciting, and most heartbreaking moments from last season and check out all the extras. Season four is available on DVD and Blu-ray this week.

Also available this week:

  • Best Animated Feature Film Oscar nominee The Tale of Princess Kaguya (100 percent), a Certified Fresh Japanese animated adaptation of a famous folk tale about a woodcutter who finds a young princess inside a bamboo stalk and raises her as his own child.
  • Life Itself (97 percent), the Certified Fresh documentary that chronicles the life of celebrated film critic Roger Ebert.
  • Tommy Lee Jones’s The Homesman (81 percent), starring Jones and Hilary Swank in a Certified Fresh western about a woman who hires a drifter to help her transport three suffering women across Nebraska.
  • St. Vincent (77 percent), starring Bill Murray and Naomi Watts in a comedy about a curmudgeon who forms an unlikely friendship with a 12-year-old he’s been charged with babysitting.
  • V/H/S: Viral (38 percent), an anthology horror film sequel that focuses on home video footage taken over the course of a single night.
  • The Farrelly brothers’ Dumb and Dumber To (29 percent), starring Jeff Daniels and Jim Carrey in a 20-years-in-the-making sequel to the 1994 comedy hit about two dimwits on a road trip.

This week on streaming video, we’ve got a couple of Oscar nominees (including one particularly big one), a Bill Murray comedy, Jon Stewart’s directorial debut, and more on Netflix. Read on for details:


The Theory of Everything
80%

Eddie Redmayne stars as celebrated astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, depicted falling in love with his first wife Jane Wilde (Felicity Jones) during his years at Cambridge and gradually succumbing to ALS. James Marsh’s Certified Fresh biopic has garnered five Oscar nominations, including Best Picture, Best Actor for Redmayne’s performance, and Best Actress for Jones’s role.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Google Play


Beyond the Lights
83%

Nominated for Best Song at this year’s Oscars, Gina Prince-Bythewood’s Certified Fresh musical romance stars up-and-comer Gugu Mbatha-Raw as a pop idol who falls for a police officer (Nate Parker) assigned to her security detail.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes


St. Vincent
77%

Bill Murray plays a curmudgeon with a heart in St. Vincent, about a Vietnam vet who forges an unlikely friendship with a neighborhood boy. Naomi Watts and Melissa McCarthy costar.

Available now on: iTunes


Rosewater
76%

Jon Stewart’s Certified Fresh directorial debut focuses on the real life story of Maziar Bahari (Gael Garcia Bernal), an Iranian-Canadian journalist who was imprisoned and tortured by the Iranian government for four months in 2009.

Available now on: iTunes


Preservation
50%

This indie thriller tells the story of a young couple and their war veteran friend, who embark on a hunting trip together and find themselves stalked by an unseen menace.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Google Play


Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day
61%

Based on the popular children’s book, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day stars Ed Oxenbould as the titular young boy who experiences misfortune after misfortune on the eve of his 12th birthday. Steve Carell and Jennifer Garner costar.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Google Play


Dead Snow 2: Red vs. Dead
81%

The Norwegian sleeper hit gets a sequel, and this time out, Martin (Vegar Hoel) wakes up with a cantankerous new zombie arm with a mind of its own, and he sets out to wreak vengeance upon Colonel Herzog (Ørjan Gamst).

Available now on: Netflix


Bates Motel: Season Two

The second season of A&E’s prequel series to Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho finds mother Bates (Vera Farmiga) doing damage control, while Norman (Freddie Highmore) deals with relationship issues and dark secrets.

Available now on: Netflix

The Screen Actors Guild Awards held their annual ceremony on Sunday, Januray 25 in a televised event at Los Angeles’s Shrine Auditorium. Birdman took home another trophy — for Best Ensemble — though The Theory of Everything‘s Eddie Redmayne beat Michael Keaton for Best Actor, while Netflix’s Orange is the New Black came away with a couple of big wins. Read on for the full list.

Movie Awards

 

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture


Television Awards

 

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series

Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Comedy Series

Outstanding Action Performance by a Stunt Ensemble in a Comedy or Drama Series

The Oscar nominees were announced last Thursday, and we here at Rotten Tomatoes have been pretty fortunate to sit down and chat with a whole lot of them. If you’re still unsure who to root for in the Best Picture race, or you’d just like a little more info on the films being honored on February 22, check out our various interviews with the casts and filmmakers of Selma, The Theory of Everything, Nightcrawler, American Sniper, The Hobbit, and more.



 

 

The Oscar nominations are out, and soon, everybody’s going to be hotly debating which of the nominees will be crowned Best Picture on Feb. 22. We at RT are here to get you up to speed, so with that in mind, here’s a quick overview of the contenders:


American Sniper   72%


Powered by Clint Eastwood’s sure-handed direction and a gripping central performance from Bradley Cooper, American Sniper delivers a tense, vivid tribute to its real-life subject. “It’s a gritty, confident portrait of a man whose life may have been somewhat messier than this Hollywood version,” wrote Richard Corliss of Time Magazine.


Birdman   91%


A thrilling leap forward for director Alejandro González Iñárritu, Birdman is an ambitious technical showcase that features a layered story and outstanding performances from Michael Keaton and Edward Norton. “It’s a quasi-religious fable about a man haunted by the past and facing a profound moral and existential crisis in the present, and it’s a dazzling display of virtuoso cinematic technique and showboat performances,” wrote Andrew O’Hehir of Salon.com.


Boyhood   97%


Epic in technical scale but breathlessly intimate in narrative scope, Boyhood is a sprawling investigation of the human condition and an unqualified triumph for director Richard Linklater. “Few filmmakers ever make a great movie,” wrote Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle. “Fewer still ever make a movie that expands what movies can express. Richard Linklater does both with Boyhood.”


The Grand Budapest Hotel   92%


Typically stylish but deceptively thoughtful, The Grand Budapest Hotel finds Wes Anderson once again using ornate visual environments to explore deeply emotional ideas. “If a movie can be elegantly zany, this wholly imaginative, assured fable of a legendary concierge Gustave H. (Ralph Fiennes), his protégé Zero (Tony Revolori) and the murder of a countess, is it,” wrote Lisa Kennedy of the Denver Post.


The Imitation Game   89%


With an outstanding starring performance from Benedict Cumberbatch illuminating its fact-based story, The Imitation Game serves as an eminently well-made entry in the “prestige biopic” genre. “The Imitation Game leaves Turing’s essential mysteries intact, but they will nonetheless find even the most public contours his story ripe with drama, excitement and deeply affecting resonance,” wrote Ann Hornaday of the Washington Post.


Selma   99%


Fueled by a spellbinding performance from David Oyelowo, Selma draws inspiration and dramatic power from the life and death of Martin Luther King, Jr. — but doesn’t ignore how far we remain from the ideals his work embodied. “History becomes breathtaking drama in Selma; there’s an urgent realism in the storytelling, as if we’re seeing this just in time,” wrote Moira MacDonald of the Seattle Times.


The Theory of Everything   80%


Part biopic of Stephen Hawking, part love story, The Theory of Everything rises on James Marsh’s polished direction and the strength of leads Eddie Redmayne and Felicity Jones. “What Redmayne does is breathtaking-and it never feels like a performance,” wrote Chris Nashawaty of Entertainment Weekly. “In a much less showy role, Jones does her own heartbreaking work as the woman who dedicated her life to loving and caring for Hawking.”


Whiplash   94%


Intense, inspiring, and well-acted, Whiplash is a brilliant sophomore effort from director Damien Chazelle and a riveting vehicle for stars J.K. Simmons and Miles Teller. Music instruction and combat are rarely linked in movies, and particularly not in the singularly riveting way they come together in Whiplash,” wrote Claudia Puig of USA Today.


  • Full list of Oscar Nominees
  • Actor Chris Pine, Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs, and directors Alfonso Cuarón and J.J. Abrams announced today the nominations for all 24 Oscar categories at a live news conference at the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater in Beverly Hills. Read through for the full list of nominees.

    BEST PICTURE

    DIRECTING

    ACTOR in a Leading Role

    ACTRESS in a Leading Role

    ACTOR in a Supporting Role

    ACTRESS in a Supporting Role

    FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

    ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

    DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

    CINEMATOGRAPHY

    COSTUME DESIGN

    FILM EDITING

    MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

    MUSIC – Original Score

    MUSIC – Original Song

    • “Everything Is Awesome”; Music and Lyric by Shawn Patterson from The Lego Movie
    • “Glory”; Music and Lyric by John Stephens and Lonnie Lynn from Selma
    • “Grateful”; Music and Lyric by Diane Warren from Beyond the Lights
    • “I’m Not Gonna Miss You”; Music and Lyric by Glen Campbell and Julian Raymond from Glen Campbell… I’ll Be Me
    • “Lost Stars”; Music and Lyric by Gregg Alexander and Danielle Brisebois from Begin Again

    PRODUCTION DESIGN

    • Adam Stockhausen (Production Design); Anna Pinnock (Set Decoration) for The Grand Budapest Hotel
    • Maria Djurkovic (Production Design); Tatiana Macdonald (Set Decoration) for The Imitation Game
    • Nathan Crowley (Production Design); Gary Fettis (Set Decoration) for Interstellar
    • Dennis Gassner (Production Design); Anna Pinnock (Set Decoration) for Into the Woods
    • Suzie Davies (Production Design); Charlotte Watts (Set Decoration) for Mr. Turner

    SOUND EDITING

    SOUND MIXING

    • John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff and Walt Martin for American Sniper
    • Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and Thomas Varga for Birdman
    • Gary A. Rizzo, Gregg Landaker and Mark Weingarten for Interstellar
    • Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño and David Lee for Unbroken
    • Craig Mann, Ben Wilkins and Thomas Curley for Whiplash

    VISUAL EFFECTS

    WRITING – Adapted Screenplay

    WRITING – Original Screenplay

      • Written by Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr. & Armando Bo for Birdman
      • Written by Richard Linklater for Boyhood
      • Written by E. Max Frye and Dan Futterman for Foxcatcher
      • Screenplay by Wes Anderson; Story by Wes Anderson & Hugo Guinness for The Grand Budapest Hotel
      • Written by Dan Gilroy
        for Nightcrawler

     

    DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

    SHORT FILM – Animated

    SHORT FILM – Live Action

    The Golden Globes were announced on Sunday, January 11 in a televised ceremony, and Richard Linklater’s Boyhood continued its winning streak with a trophy for Best Motion Picture – Drama, as well as a Best Director award for Linklater himself. Read on for the full list of winners.

    All |
    Film |
    TV

     

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    The Golden Globes were announced on Sunday, January 11 in a televised ceremony, and Richard Linklater’s Boyhood continued its winning streak with a trophy for Best Motion Picture – Drama, as well as a Best Director award for Linklater himself. Read on for the full list of winners.

    All |
    Film |
    TV

     

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE

    BEST SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

    BEST ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE

    The Golden Globes were announced on Sunday, January 11 in a televised ceremony, and Richard Linklater’s Boyhood continued its winning streak with a trophy for Best Motion Picture – Drama, as well as a Best Director award for Linklater himself. Read on for the full list of winners.

    All |
    Film |
    TV

     

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – DRAMA

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A TELEVISION SERIES – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A SERIES, MINI-SERIES OR MOTION PICTURE MADE FOR TELEVISION

    Awards season is on, and with everything that is going on from December through February, it’s difficult to keep track of who is getting what. To help you with that, we created the Awards Leaderboard, a ranking of movies by the number of awards won and their respective categories. Read on to find out where your favorite movies stand, and who is leading the pack.

    Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014) 91%

    49 wins

    Boyhood (2014) 97%

    49 wins

    The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) 92%

    25 wins

    Whiplash (2014) 94%

    24 wins

    Citizenfour (2014) 96%

    11 wins

    The LEGO Movie (2014) 96%

    11 wins

    • BAFTA – Animated Film
    • PGA – Animated Picture
    • Critics Choice – Best Animated Feature
    • Golden Tomato – Best-Reviewed Animation
    • CFCA – Best Animated Feature
    • SFFCC – Best Animated Feature
    • NYFCO – Best Animated Feature
    • WAFCA – Best Animated Feature
    • NBR – Original Screenplay
    • NYFCC – Best Animated Film
    • LVFCS – Best Animated Film

    Still Alice (2014) 85%

    11 wins

    Ida (2013) 96%

    9 wins

    The Theory of Everything (2014) 80%

    8 wins

    Life Itself (2014) 98%

    7 wins

    Eddie Redmayne stars as Stephen Hawking in the drama The Theory of Everything. Grae Drake talks to him about how, when he won the role, he was most surprised to learn that everyone struggles, even people who have contributed great things to our society.

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