(Photo by A24)

All A24 Movies Ranked

Indie movie company A24 has built an almost unprecedented level of brand identity and loyalty. Savvy moviegoers actually get excited seeing their rainbow chromatic card in front of movies, despite A24 not being associated with any one filmmaker (like J.J. Abrams with Bad Robot), genre (horror and Blumhouse), or medium (animation studios like Pixar). It’s simply a soft style that threads through the best movies they put out, not quite definable, that’s catnip to open-minded filmgoers and critics alike.

A24 began in 2013 with A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Charles Swan III, directed by Roman Coppola. It was decidedly not a box office or critical success, but does present one of A24’s modus operandi: Giving risky movies from established outsider filmmakers a shot in the theatrical space. You’ll see it again with Harmony Korine’s Spring Breakers, Sean Baker’s The Florida Project, Mike Mills’ 20th Century Women, and Sofia Coppola’s The Bling Ring. Barry Jenkins’ Moonlight won Best Picture in 2017, demonstrating A24 has got their finger on the cultural pulse (with credit to the Academy as well, of course).

Meanwhile, leaning into directorial debuts has paid off dividends, in the form of Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird, Alex Garland’s Ex Machina, Robert Eggers’ The Witch, and Ari Aster’s Hereditary. The studio’s recent hits include Minari, Lamb, The Green Knight, Red Rocket, C’mon C’mon, and The Tragedy of Macbeth. Now, we’re ranking all A24 movies by Tomatometer!

#111

Sidney Hall (2017)
11%

#111
Adjusted Score: 11735%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An enigmatic detective embarks on a cross-country search for a once-prominent author who's mysteriously disappeared after a string of dangerous... [More]
Directed By: Shawn Christensen

#110
Adjusted Score: 15164%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A Chinese emigrant (Justin Chon) and his best friend (Kevin Wu) rise through the ranks of one of New York's... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Lau, Andrew Loo

#109
Adjusted Score: 17507%
Critics Consensus: Tiresomely self-indulgent and lacking any storytelling cohesion, this Glimpse Inside the Mind finds little food for thought.
Synopsis: A graphic designer (Charlie Sheen) plays out unusual fantasies in his head as a way of coping with the departure... [More]
Directed By: Roman Coppola

#108

The Sea of Trees (2015)
17%

#108
Adjusted Score: 19458%
Critics Consensus: Dull, maudlin, and fundamentally empty, The Sea of Trees extinguishes the contributions of a talented cast and marks a depressing low point in director Gus Van Sant's career.
Synopsis: After traveling to Japan's Aokigahara Forest, a troubled teacher (Matthew McConaughey) meets a mysterious stranger (Ken Watanabe) who takes him... [More]
Directed By: Gus Van Sant

#107
#107
Adjusted Score: 23326%
Critics Consensus: Stylistically overwrought and tedious, The Adderal Diaries aspires for profundity but instead feels like a shambolic class project thrown together right before it was due.
Synopsis: Suffering from writer's block, author Stephen Elliott (James Franco) reconnects with his estranged father (Ed Harris) while investigating the murder... [More]
Directed By: Pamela Romanowsky

#106

Dark Places (2015)
23%

#106
Adjusted Score: 25675%
Critics Consensus: Dark Places has a strong cast and bestselling source material, but none of it adds up to more than a mediocre thriller that gets tripped up on its own twists.
Synopsis: A woman (Charlize Theron) confronts traumatic, childhood memories of the murder of her mother and two sisters when she investigates... [More]
Directed By: Gilles Paquet-Brenner

#105

Barely Lethal (2015)
26%

#105
Adjusted Score: 25569%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Seeking a normal adolescence, a special-operations agent (Hailee Steinfeld) fakes her own death and enrolls in high school as an... [More]
Directed By: Kyle Newman

#104

Woodshock (2017)
26%

#104
Adjusted Score: 29479%
Critics Consensus: Woodshock's engages visually, but its half-baked premise is as underwhelming as it is unsatisfying.
Synopsis: A haunted young woman spirals into confusion and chaos after she falls under the spell of a potent, reality-altering drug.... [More]

#103

The Captive (2014)
29%

#103
Adjusted Score: 30465%
Critics Consensus: Wan and lugubrious, The Captive represents another atmospheric, beautifully filmed misfire from director Atom Egoyan.
Synopsis: Eight years after a child disappeared without a trace, detectives find disturbing clues that indicate that the girl is still... [More]
Directed By: Atom Egoyan

#102

Mojave (2015)
31%

#102
Adjusted Score: 33722%
Critics Consensus: Mojave has no shortage of talent on either side of the camera; unfortunately, it amounts to little more than a frustrating missed opportunity.
Synopsis: A down-and-out artist (Garrett Hedlund) has a dangerous and shocking encounter with an evil drifter (Oscar Isaac) in the desert,... [More]
Directed By: William Monahan

#101

Outlaws (2017)
33%

#101
Adjusted Score: 25999%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When the leader of a motorcycle gang is released from prison, he must fight his former deputy for control of... [More]
Directed By: Stephen McCallum

#100

Cut Bank (2014)
36%

#100
Adjusted Score: 35748%
Critics Consensus: Cut Bank contains typically outstanding work from its solid veteran cast, but it's lost in a dull morass of predictably derivative crime thriller clichés.
Synopsis: Things go from bad to worse when a murder witness (Liam Hemsworth) in small-town Montana tries to leverage the crime... [More]
Directed By: Matt Shakman

#99

Equals (2015)
36%

#99
Adjusted Score: 40653%
Critics Consensus: Equals is a treat for the eyes, but its futuristic aesthetic isn't enough to make up for its plodding pace and aimlessly derivative story.
Synopsis: Nia (Kristen Stewart) and Silas work together in a futuristic society known as the Collective. A seemingly utopian world, the... [More]
Directed By: Drake Doremus

#98
Adjusted Score: 37542%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Michael, a young United Nations employee, travels to Iraq with his mentor, who wants to show him how successful the... [More]
Directed By: Per Fly

#97
#97
Adjusted Score: 43570%
Critics Consensus: Hot Summer Nights is easy on the eyes and clearly indebted to some great films, but its strengths -- including a charismatic young cast -- are often outweighed by its uninspired story.
Synopsis: An awkward teenager gets in over his head dealing drugs while falling for his business partner's enigmatic sister during one... [More]
Directed By: Elijah Bynum

#96

Life After Beth (2014)
45%

#96
Adjusted Score: 48558%
Critics Consensus: In spite of Aubrey Plaza's committed performance, Life After Beth remains a sketch-worthy idea that's been uncomfortably stretched to feature length.
Synopsis: A guy (Dane DeHaan) discovers that his girlfriend (Aubrey Plaza) has returned from the dead, but his joy turns to... [More]
Directed By: Jeff Baena

#95

Tusk (2014)
45%

#95
Adjusted Score: 50250%
Critics Consensus: Tusk is pleasantly ridiculous and charmingly self-deprecating, but that isn't enough to compensate for its thin, overstretched story.
Synopsis: A U.S. podcaster (Justin Long) ventures into the Canadian wilderness to interview an old man (Michael Parks) who has an... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Smith

#94

False Positive (2021)
48%

#94
Adjusted Score: 51663%
Critics Consensus: Its classic horror aims exceed its blood-slicked grasp, but False Positive works its way sneakily under the skin.
Synopsis: After months of trying and failing to get pregnant, Lucy (Ilana Glazer) and Adrian (Justin Theroux) finally find their dream... [More]
Directed By: John Lee

#93
Adjusted Score: 52168%
Critics Consensus: How to Talk to Girls at Parties has energy and ambition, but is ultimately too unfocused to do much with either -- or develop its themes into a cohesive whole.
Synopsis: Worlds collide when Enn, a shy teenager in 1970s London, meets the beautiful and rebellious Zan at a party. They... [More]
Directed By: John Cameron Mitchell

#92

Slice (2018)
54%

#92
Adjusted Score: 54542%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In a spooky small town, when a slew of pizza delivery boys are slain on the job, two daring survivors... [More]
Directed By: Austin Vesely

#91
#91
Adjusted Score: 105279%
Critics Consensus: Led by a stellar Denzel Washington, The Tragedy of Macbeth strips the classic story down to its visual and narrative essentials.
Synopsis: Power-hungry Macbeth sets his sights on the Scottish throne after receiving a prophecy from three witches.... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#90
#90
Adjusted Score: 60732%
Critics Consensus: Trespass Against Us benefits from Michael Fassbender and Brendan Gleeson's typically strong performances, even when they aren't quite enough to balance the story's narrative drift and awkward tonal shifts.
Synopsis: After an elaborate heist goes south, reluctant criminal Chad (Michael Fassbender) must find a way to escape from the clutches... [More]
Directed By: Adam Smith

#89
#89
Adjusted Score: 67049%
Critics Consensus: Under the Silver Lake hits its stride slightly more often than it stumbles, but it's hard not to admire - or be drawn in by - writer-director David Robert Mitchell's ambition.
Synopsis: Sam is a disenchanted 33-year-old who discovers a mysterious woman, Sarah, frolicking in his apartment's swimming pool. When she vanishes,... [More]
Directed By: David Robert Mitchell

#88
#88
Adjusted Score: 61891%
Critics Consensus: Woman Walks Ahead gets some extra mileage out of watchable work from Jessica Chastain and Michael Greyeyes, but uneven pacing and two-dimensional characters undermine their efforts.
Synopsis: A headstrong New York painter embarks on a dangerous journey to meet Sitting Bull but must face off with an... [More]
Directed By: Susanna White

#87

Native Son (2019)
60%

#87
Adjusted Score: 62283%
Critics Consensus: Native Son's struggles with its problematic source material are uneven but overall compelling, thanks largely to Ashton Sanders' poised work in the central role.
Synopsis: A young African-American living in Chicago enters into a seductive new world of money and power after becoming a chauffeur... [More]
Directed By: Rashid Johnson

#86

The Bling Ring (2013)
60%

#86
Adjusted Score: 67358%
Critics Consensus: While it's certainly timely and beautifully filmed, The Bling Ring suffers from director Sofia Coppola's failure to delve beneath the surface of its shallow protagonists' real-life crimes.
Synopsis: A teenager (Israel Broussard) and his gang of fame-obsessed youths (Katie Chang, Taissa Farmiga) use the Internet to track the... [More]
Directed By: Sofia Coppola

#85

Dog Years (2017)
61%

#85
Adjusted Score: 60799%
Critics Consensus: The Last Movie Star has a few poignant moments thanks to Burt Reynolds and Ariel Winter, but their performances are stranded in a middling drama unworthy of their efforts.
Synopsis: An aging screen icon gets lured into accepting an award at a rinky-dink film festival in Nashville, Tenn., sending him... [More]
Directed By: Adam Rifkin

#84

Son of a Gun (2015)
62%

#84
Adjusted Score: 63406%
Critics Consensus: Gritty, stylish, and smart, Son of a Gun serves up plenty of genre thrills while offering a refreshing change of pace for Ewan McGregor.
Synopsis: JR, a teenage criminal, is locked up for a minor crime and forced to adapt to the harsh realities of... [More]
Directed By: Julius Avery

#83

Laggies (2014)
65%

#83
Adjusted Score: 68498%
Critics Consensus: Laggies may not do as much with its ideas as it could, but it's buoyed by a winsome performance from Kiera Knightley, as well as Lynn Shelton's empathetic direction.
Synopsis: When 28-year-old Megan (Keira Knightley) attends her 10-year high-school reunion, she realizes that very little in her life has changed.... [More]
Directed By: Lynn Shelton

#82

The Rover (2014)
66%

#82
Adjusted Score: 72988%
Critics Consensus: Fueled by engaging performances from Guy Pearce and Robert Pattinson, the tension-filled The Rover overcomes its narrative faults through sheer watchability.
Synopsis: In the near future, mankind's greed and excesses have pushed civilization to the breaking point. Society is in decline, and... [More]
Directed By: David Michôd

#81

Spring Breakers (2012)
67%

#81
Adjusted Score: 73776%
Critics Consensus: Spring Breakers blends stinging social commentary with bikini cheesecake and a bravura James Franco performance.
Synopsis: College students Candy (Vanessa Hudgens), Faith (Selena Gomez), Brit (Ashley Benson) and Cotty (Rachel Korine) are short of the cash... [More]
Directed By: Harmony Korine

#80

Climax (2018)
68%

#80
Adjusted Score: 79081%
Critics Consensus: Challenging and rewarding in equal measure, Climax captures writer-director Gaspar Noé working near his technically brilliant and visually distinctive peak.
Synopsis: When members of a dance troupe are lured to an empty school, drug-laced sangria causes their jubilant rehearsal to descend... [More]
Directed By: Gaspar Noé

#79

The Kill Team (2019)
70%

#79
Adjusted Score: 72283%
Critics Consensus: Flawed yet viscerally effective, The Kill Team interrogates battlefield morality with a hard-hitting intensity further amplified by a talented cast.
Synopsis: When a young U.S. soldier in Afghanistan witnesses other recruits killing civilians under the direction of a sadistic sergeant, he... [More]
Directed By: Dan Krauss

#78

Remember (2015)
70%

#78
Adjusted Score: 74584%
Critics Consensus: Remember risks wandering into exploitative territory, but it's bolstered by some of Egoyan's best latter-day directing and a typically stellar performance from Christopher Plummer.
Synopsis: With help from a fellow Holocaust survivor (Martin Landau), a widower (Christopher Plummer) who struggles with memory loss embarks on... [More]
Directed By: Atom Egoyan

#77

Free Fire (2016)
70%

#77
Adjusted Score: 86687%
Critics Consensus: Free Fire aims squarely for genre thrills, and hits its target repeatedly and with great gusto -- albeit with something less than pure cinematic grace.
Synopsis: When a black-market arms deal goes outrageously wrong, Justine finds herself caught in the crossfire, forced to navigate through a... [More]
Directed By: Ben Wheatley

#76

Enemy (2013)
71%

#76
Adjusted Score: 75733%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a strong performance from Jake Gyllenhaal and smart direction from Denis Villeneuve, Enemy hits the mark as a tense, uncommonly adventurous thriller.
Synopsis: A mild-mannered college professor (Jake Gyllenhaal) discovers a look-alike actor and delves into the other man's private affairs.... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#75

Low Tide (2019)
72%

#75
Adjusted Score: 72101%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When teenager Alan and his younger brother find a bag of gold coins in a dead man's island home, they... [More]
Directed By: Kevin McMullin

#74

Swiss Army Man (2016)
72%

#74
Adjusted Score: 83899%
Critics Consensus: Disarmingly odd and thoroughly well-acted, Swiss Army Man offers adventurous viewers an experience as rewarding as it is impossible to categorize.
Synopsis: Being stranded on a deserted island leaves young Hank (Paul Dano) bored, lonely and without hope. As a rope hangs... [More]

#73

The Exception (2016)
74%

#73
Adjusted Score: 77872%
Critics Consensus: The Exception (The Kaiser's Last Kiss) elegantly blends well-dressed period romance and war drama into a solidly crafted story further elevated by Christopher Plummer's excellent work and the efforts of a talented supporting cast.
Synopsis: German soldier Stefan Brandt goes on a mission to investigate exiled German Monarch Kaiser Wilhelm II. The Kaiser lives in... [More]
Directed By: David Leveaux

#72
#72
Adjusted Score: 77653%
Critics Consensus: Slow-building and atmospheric, The Blackcoat's Daughter resists girls-in-peril clichés in a supernatural thriller that serves as a strong calling card for debuting writer-director Oz Perkins.
Synopsis: During the dead of winter, a troubled young woman (Emma Roberts) embarks on a mysterious journey to an isolated prep... [More]
Directed By: Osgood Perkins

#71
#71
Adjusted Score: 78055%
Critics Consensus: The Death of Dick Long mixes dark humor with provocative ideas to produce a sharp blend that's admittedly uneven but uniquely satisfying.
Synopsis: In small-town Alabama, Zeke and Earl scramble to cover up the unlikely and illegal events that led to their friend's... [More]
Directed By: Daniel Scheinert

#70

The Children Act (2017)
74%

#70
Adjusted Score: 80196%
Critics Consensus: The Children Act showcases yet another powerful performance from Emma Thompson, who elevates this undeniably flawed picture into an affecting adult drama.
Synopsis: Judge Fiona May must race against the clock to determine the fate of a teenage boy in need of a... [More]
Directed By: Richard Eyre

#69

Into the Forest (2015)
76%

#69
Adjusted Score: 78392%
Critics Consensus: Into the Forest grounds its familiar apocalyptic framework with a relatable look at the bond between two sisters, compellingly brought to life by Elliot Page and Evan Rachel Wood.
Synopsis: In the wilds of the Pacific Northwest, two sisters must fight for survival after an apocalyptic blackout leaves them without... [More]
Directed By: Patricia Rozema

#68

Never Goin' Back (2018)
76%

#68
Adjusted Score: 77984%
Critics Consensus: Never Goin' Back benefits from the chemistry between leads Maia Mitchell and Camila Morrone, whose easy rapport lifts a coming-of-age story with uncommon insight.
Synopsis: Angela and Jessie are best friends intent on taking a wild beach trip, but when their roommate loses all of... [More]
Directed By: Augustine Frizzell

#67

Skin (2018)
76%

#67
Adjusted Score: 80253%
Critics Consensus: Skin could stand to go a bit deeper below its surface, but a worthy story and a committed performance from Jamie Bell make this timely drama well worth a watch.
Synopsis: A young man makes the dangerous choice to leave the white supremacist gang he joined as a teenager. With his... [More]
Directed By: Guy Nattiv

#66

Ginger & Rosa (2012)
78%

#66
Adjusted Score: 82104%
Critics Consensus: Elle Fanning gives a terrific performance in this powerful coming-of-age tale about a pair of teenage girls whose friendship is unnerved by the threat of nuclear war.
Synopsis: In 1962 London, the lifelong friendship between two teenagers (Elle Fanning, Alice Englert) dissolves after one seduces the other's father.... [More]
Directed By: Sally Potter

#65

American Honey (2016)
79%

#65
Adjusted Score: 91432%
Critics Consensus: American Honey offers a refreshingly unconventional take on the coming-of-age drama whose narrative risks add up to a rewarding experience even if they don't all pay off.
Synopsis: Star (Sasha Lane), an adolescent girl from a troubled home, runs away with a traveling sales crew that drives across... [More]
Directed By: Andrea Arnold

#64
#64
Adjusted Score: 81355%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A merciless cowboy sets out on a dangerous journey across the frontier, determined to do whatever it takes to avenge... [More]
Directed By: Jared Moshé

#63

The Monster (2016)
80%

#63
Adjusted Score: 82929%
Critics Consensus: The Monster uses its effectively simple setup and a powerful lead performance from Zoe Kazan to deliver a traditional yet subtly subversive -- and thoroughly entertaining -- horror story.
Synopsis: A divorced mother and her headstrong daughter must make an emergency late-night road trip to see the girl's father. As... [More]
Directed By: Bryan Bertino

#62

Mid90s (2018)
80%

#62
Adjusted Score: 93456%
Critics Consensus: Mid90s tells a clear-eyed yet nostalgic coming-of-age tale that might mark the start of an auspicious new career for debuting writer-director Jonah Hill.
Synopsis: In 1990s Los Angeles, a 13-year-old spends his summer navigating between a troubled home life and a crew of new... [More]
Directed By: Jonah Hill

#61
Adjusted Score: 99906%
Critics Consensus: The Killing of a Sacred Deer continues director Yorgos Lanthimos' stubbornly idiosyncratic streak -- and demonstrates again that his is a talent not to be ignored.
Synopsis: Dr. Steven Murphy is a renowned cardiovascular surgeon who presides over a spotless household with his wife and two children.... [More]
Directed By: Yorgos Lanthimos

#60

The Lovers (2017)
82%

#60
Adjusted Score: 88959%
Critics Consensus: With appealing leads and a narrative approach that offers a fresh perspective on familiar themes, The Lovers tells a quietly absorbing story with unexpected emotional resonance.
Synopsis: A man and his wife, each embroiled in an extramarital affair, are sent reeling when they suddenly fall for the... [More]
Directed By: Azazel Jacobs

#59

High Life (2018)
82%

#59
Adjusted Score: 96495%
Critics Consensus: High Life is as visually arresting as it is challenging, confounding, and ultimately rewarding - which is to say it's everything film fans expect from director Claire Denis.
Synopsis: Monte and his baby daughter are the last survivors of a damned and dangerous mission to the outer reaches of... [More]
Directed By: Claire Denis

#58
#58
Adjusted Score: 86777%
Critics Consensus: The Hole in the Ground artfully exploits parental fears with a well-made horror outing that makes up in sheer effectiveness what it lacks in originality.
Synopsis: One night, Sarah's young son disappears into the woods behind their rural home. When he returns, he looks the same,... [More]
Directed By: Lee Cronin

#57

Midsommar (2019)
83%

#57
Adjusted Score: 108131%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious, impressively crafted, and above all unsettling, Midsommar further proves writer-director Ari Aster is a horror auteur to be reckoned with.
Synopsis: A young American couple, their relationship foundering, travel to a fabled Swedish midsummer festival where a seemingly pastoral paradise transforms... [More]
Directed By: Ari Aster

#56

Supersonic (2016)
84%

#56
Adjusted Score: 85725%
Critics Consensus: Oasis: Supersonic foregoes a comprehensive approach to its multi-platinum subjects in favor of an appreciative -- and stirring -- look at their heady early years.
Synopsis: A revealing look at the meteoric rise of seminal '90s rock band Oasis, weaving never-before-seen concert footage with candid interviews... [More]
Directed By: Mat Whitecross

#55
#55
Adjusted Score: 91178%
Critics Consensus: Poignant and piercingly honest, While We're Young finds writer-director Noah Baumbach delivering some of his funniest lines through some of his most relatable characters.
Synopsis: Middle-aged filmmaker Josh Srebnick (Ben Stiller) and his wife, Cornelia (Naomi Watts), are happily married, but stuck in a rut.... [More]
Directed By: Noah Baumbach

#54

Waves (2019)
84%

#54
Adjusted Score: 99677%
Critics Consensus: An up-close look at one family's emotional ups and downs, Waves captures complicated dynamics with tenderness and grace.
Synopsis: The epic emotional journey of a suburban African American family as they navigate love, forgiveness and coming together in the... [More]
Directed By: Trey Edward Shults

#53

Under the Skin (2013)
84%

#53
Adjusted Score: 95030%
Critics Consensus: Its message may prove elusive for some, but with absorbing imagery and a mesmerizing performance from Scarlett Johansson, Under the Skin is a haunting viewing experience.
Synopsis: Disguising herself as a human female, an extraterrestrial (Scarlett Johansson) drives around Scotland and tries to lure unsuspecting men into... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Glazer

#52

Lamb (2021)
86%

#52
Adjusted Score: 93886%
Critics Consensus: Darkly imaginative and brought to life by a pair of striking central performances, Lamb shears expectations with its singularly wooly chills.
Synopsis: A childless couple in rural Iceland make an alarming discovery one day in their sheep barn. They soon face the... [More]
Directed By: Valdimar Jóhannsson

#51

Share (2019)
86%

#51
Adjusted Score: 85838%
Critics Consensus: Grim yet compelling, Share avoids rote didacticism thanks to sensitive direction and committed central performances.
Synopsis: A disturbing video leaked from a local high school throws a Long Island community into chaos and the national spotlight... [More]
Directed By: Pippa Bianco

#50

Red Rocket (2021)
87%

#50
Adjusted Score: 94941%
Critics Consensus: Led by Simon Rex's magnetic performance, Red Rocket is another vibrant, ground-level look at modern American life from director/co-writer Sean Baker.
Synopsis: The audacious new film from writer-director Sean Baker (The Florida Project, Tangerine), starring Simon Rex in a magnetic, live-wire performance,... [More]
Directed By: Sean Baker

#49
#49
Adjusted Score: 91714%
Critics Consensus: Morris from America adds some novel narrative twists to its father-son story -- and gains added resonance thanks to a powerful performance from Craig Robinson.
Synopsis: A 13-year-old rapper (Markees Christmas) focused on hip-hop stardom falls for a rebellious classmate (Lina Keller) after moving from the... [More]
Directed By: Chad Hartigan

#48
#48
Adjusted Score: 106179%
Critics Consensus: It Comes at Night makes lethally effective use of its bare-bones trappings while proving once again that what's left unseen can be just as horrifying as anything on the screen.
Synopsis: After a mysterious apocalypse leaves the world with few survivors, two families are forced to share a home in an... [More]
Directed By: Trey Edward Shults

#47

The Lobster (2015)
87%

#47
Adjusted Score: 102624%
Critics Consensus: As strange as it is thrillingly ambitious, The Lobster is definitely an acquired taste -- but for viewers with the fortitude to crack through Yorgos Lanthimos' offbeat sensibilities, it should prove a savory cinematic treat.
Synopsis: In a dystopian society, single people must find a mate within 45 days or be transformed into an animal of... [More]
Directed By: Yorgos Lanthimos

#46

On the Rocks (2020)
87%

#46
Adjusted Score: 105624%
Critics Consensus: On the Rocks isn't as potent as its top-shelf ingredients might suggest, but the end result still goes down easy -- and offers high proof of Bill Murray's finely aged charm.
Synopsis: Faced with sudden doubts about her marriage, a young New York mother teams up with her larger-than-life playboy father to... [More]
Directed By: Sofia Coppola

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 104901%
Critics Consensus: 20th Century Women offers Annette Bening a too-rare opportunity to shine in a leading role -- and marks another assured step forward for writer-director Mike Mills.
Synopsis: In 1979 Santa Barbara, Calif., Dorothea Fields is a determined single mother in her mid-50s who is raising her adolescent... [More]
Directed By: Mike Mills

#44

Zola (2020)
88%

#44
Adjusted Score: 100047%
Critics Consensus: Zola captures the stranger-than-fiction appeal of the viral Twitter thread that inspired it -- and announces director/co-writer Janicza Bravo as a filmmaker to watch.
Synopsis: "Y'all wanna hear a story about why me & this bitch here fell out? It's kind of long but full... [More]
Directed By: Janicza Bravo

#43

The Souvenir (2019)
89%

#43
Adjusted Score: 99752%
Critics Consensus: Made by a filmmaker in command of her craft and a star perfectly matched with the material, The Souvenir is a uniquely impactful coming of age drama.
Synopsis: A shy film student begins finding her voice as an artist while navigating a turbulent courtship with a charismatic but... [More]
Directed By: Joanna Hogg

#42

The Green Knight (2021)
89%

#42
Adjusted Score: 106354%
Critics Consensus: The Green Knight honors and deconstructs its source material in equal measure, producing an absorbing adventure that casts a fantastical spell.
Synopsis: An epic fantasy adventure based on the timeless Arthurian legend, THE GREEN KNIGHT tells the story of Sir Gawain (Dev... [More]
Directed By: David Lowery

#41

Hereditary (2018)
89%

#41
Adjusted Score: 112544%
Critics Consensus: Hereditary uses its classic setup as the framework for a harrowing, uncommonly unsettling horror film whose cold touch lingers long beyond the closing credits.
Synopsis: When the matriarch of the Graham family passes away, her daughter and grandchildren begin to unravel cryptic and increasingly terrifying... [More]
Directed By: Ari Aster

#40

Obvious Child (2014)
90%

#40
Adjusted Score: 96847%
Critics Consensus: Tackling a sensitive subject with maturity, honesty, and wit, Obvious Child serves as a deeply promising debut for writer-director Gillian Robespierre.
Synopsis: An immature, newly unemployed comic (Jenny Slate) must navigate the murky waters of adulthood after her fling with a graduate... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Robespierre

#39

Lean on Pete (2017)
90%

#39
Adjusted Score: 100079%
Critics Consensus: Lean on Pete avoids mawkish melodrama, offering an empathetic yet clear-eyed portrayal of a young man at a crossroads that confirms Charley Plummer as a major talent.
Synopsis: Charley, a teen living with his single father, finds work caring for an aging racehorse named Lean on Pete. When... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Haigh

#38
#38
Adjusted Score: 98397%
Critics Consensus: Gritty, gripping, and weighted with thought-provoking heft, A Most Violent Year represents another strong entry in writer-director J.C. Chandor's impressive filmography.
Synopsis: In 1981 New York, a fuel supplier (Oscar Isaac) tries to adhere to his own moral compass amid the rampant... [More]
Directed By: J.C. Chandor

#37

Green Room (2015)
90%

#37
Adjusted Score: 105296%
Critics Consensus: Green Room delivers unapologetic genre thrills with uncommon intelligence and powerfully acted élan.
Synopsis: Members (Anton Yelchin, Alia Shawkat) of a punk-rock band and a tough young woman (Imogen Poots) battle murderous white supremacists... [More]
Directed By: Jeremy Saulnier

#36

The Witch (2015)
90%

#36
Adjusted Score: 111013%
Critics Consensus: As thought-provoking as it is visually compelling, The Witch delivers a deeply unsettling exercise in slow-building horror that suggests great things for debuting writer-director Robert Eggers.
Synopsis: In 1630 New England, panic and despair envelops a farmer, his wife and their children when youngest son Samuel suddenly... [More]
Directed By: Robert Eggers

#35

The Lighthouse (2019)
90%

#35
Adjusted Score: 113080%
Critics Consensus: A gripping story brilliantly filmed and led by a pair of powerhouse performances, The Lighthouse further establishes Robert Eggers as a filmmaker of exceptional talent.
Synopsis: Two lighthouse keepers try to maintain their sanity while living on a remote and mysterious New England island in the... [More]
Directed By: Robert Eggers

#34
#34
Adjusted Score: 90445%
Critics Consensus: Informative, compassionate, and beautifully filmed, The Elephant Queen should satisfy nature documentary lovers of all ages.
Synopsis: An elephant mother leads her herd across an unforgiving African landscape filled with vibrant wildlife.... [More]
Starring: Chiwetel Ejiofor

#33
#33
Adjusted Score: 94423%
Critics Consensus: Well-acted and steeped in Southern atmosphere, Mississippi Grind is a road movie and addiction drama that transcends each of its well-worn genres.
Synopsis: Convinced that his newfound friend (Ryan Reynolds) is a good-luck charm, a gambling addict (Ben Mendelsohn) takes the man on... [More]
Directed By: Ryan Fleck, Anna Boden

#32

In Fabric (2018)
91%

#32
Adjusted Score: 100505%
Critics Consensus: In Fabric's gauzy giallo allure weaves a surreal spell, blending stylish horror and dark comedy to offer audiences a captivating treat.
Synopsis: A lonely divorcee visits a bewitching London department store to find a dress to transform her life. She soon finds... [More]
Directed By: Peter Strickland

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 97988%
Critics Consensus: The Spectacular Now is an adroit, sensitive film that avoids typical coming-of-age story trappings.
Synopsis: An innocent, bookish teenager (Shailene Woodley) begins dating the charming, freewheeling high-school senior (Miles Teller) who awoke on her lawn... [More]
Directed By: James Ponsoldt

#30

Gloria Bell (2018)
91%

#30
Adjusted Score: 102525%
Critics Consensus: Free of visual or narrative embellishments, Gloria Bell rests almost completely on Julianne Moore's performance in the title role -- and she's gloriously up to the task.
Synopsis: A free-spirited divorcee spends her nights on the dance floor, joyfully letting loose at clubs around Los Angeles. She soon... [More]
Directed By: Sebastián Lelio

#29

Locke (2013)
91%

#29
Adjusted Score: 99246%
Critics Consensus: A one-man show set in a single confined location, Locke demands a powerful performance -- and gets it from a never-more-compelling Tom Hardy.
Synopsis: A man's (Tom Hardy) life unravels after he leaves a construction site at a critical time and drives to London... [More]
Directed By: Steven Knight

#28

A Ghost Story (2017)
91%

#28
Adjusted Score: 111061%
Critics Consensus: A Ghost Story deftly manages its ambitious themes through an inventive, artful, and ultimately poignant exploration of love and loss.
Synopsis: A passionate young couple, unexpectedly separated by a shocking loss, discover an eternal connection and a love that is infinite.... [More]
Directed By: David Lowery

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: 116559%
Critics Consensus: Oh, hai Mark. The Disaster Artist is a surprisingly poignant and charming movie-about-a-movie that explores the creative process with unexpected delicacy.
Synopsis: The incredible true story of aspiring filmmaker and Hollywood outsider Tommy Wiseau as he and his best friend defiantly pursue... [More]
Directed By: James Franco

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 95112%
Critics Consensus: A Prayer Before Dawn is far from an easy watch, but this harrowing prison odyssey delivers rich rewards -- led by an outstanding central performance from Joe Cole.
Synopsis: The amazing true story of Billy Moore, an English boxer incarcerated in Thailand's most notorious prison. Thrown into a world... [More]

#25

The Humans (2021)
93%

#25
Adjusted Score: 98152%
Critics Consensus: The Humans takes its Tony-winning source material from stage to screen without sacrificing the essence of writer-director Stephen Karam's dysfunctional drama.
Synopsis: Erik Blake has gathered three generations of his Pennsylvania family to celebrate Thanksgiving at his daughter's apartment in lower Manhattan.... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Karam

#24

Slow West (2015)
92%

#24
Adjusted Score: 96050%
Critics Consensus: Slow West serves as an impressive calling card for first-time writer-director John M. Maclean -- and offers an inventive treat for fans of the Western.
Synopsis: A bounty hunter (Michael Fassbender) keeps his true motive a secret from the naive Scottish teenager (Kodi Smit-McPhee) he's offered... [More]
Directed By: John Maclean

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: 97217%
Critics Consensus: Brilliantly performed and smartly unconventional, The End of the Tour pays fitting tribute to a singular talent while offering profoundly poignant observations on the human condition.
Synopsis: Writer and journalist David Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg) interviews author David Foster Wallace (Jason Segel) for Rolling Stone magazine.... [More]
Directed By: James Ponsoldt

#22

Saint Maud (2019)
92%

#22
Adjusted Score: 101910%
Critics Consensus: A brilliantly unsettling blend of body horror and psychological thriller, Saint Maud marks an impressive debut for writer-director Rose Glass.
Synopsis: The debut film from writer-director Rose Glass, Saint Maud is a chilling and boldly original vision of faith, madness, and... [More]
Directed By: Rose Glass

#21
Adjusted Score: 104591%
Critics Consensus: An affecting story powerfully told, The Last Black Man in San Francisco immediately establishes director Joe Talbot as a filmmaker to watch.
Synopsis: Jimmie and his best friend Mont try to reclaim the house built by Jimmie's grandfather, launching them on a poignant... [More]
Directed By: Joe Talbot

#20

Good Time (2017)
92%

#20
Adjusted Score: 108687%
Critics Consensus: A visual treat filled out by consistently stellar work from Robert Pattinson, Good Time is a singularly distinctive crime drama offering far more than the usual genre thrills.
Synopsis: A bank robber stops at nothing to free his brother from prison, launching himself into a nightlong odyssey through New... [More]
Directed By: Josh Safdie, Benny Safdie

#19

Ex Machina (2014)
92%

#19
Adjusted Score: 103683%
Critics Consensus: Ex Machina leans heavier on ideas than effects, but it's still a visually polished piece of work -- and an uncommonly engaging sci-fi feature.
Synopsis: Caleb Smith (Domhnall Gleeson) a programmer at a huge Internet company, wins a contest that enables him to spend a... [More]
Directed By: Alex Garland

#18

Uncut Gems (2019)
92%

#18
Adjusted Score: 112454%
Critics Consensus: Uncut Gems reaffirms the Safdies as masters of anxiety-inducing cinema -- and proves Adam Sandler remains a formidable dramatic actor when given the right material.
Synopsis: A charismatic jeweler makes a high-stakes bet that could lead to the windfall of a lifetime. In a precarious high-wire... [More]
Directed By: Benny Safdie, Josh Safdie

#17

Val (2021)
93%

#17
Adjusted Score: 98964%
Critics Consensus: An absorbingly reflective documentary that benefits from its subject's self-chronicling, Val offers an intimate look at a unique life and career.
Synopsis: For over 40 years Val Kilmer, one of Hollywood's most mercurial and/or misunderstood actors has been documenting his own life... [More]
Directed By: Ting Poo, Leo Scott

#16

Room (2015)
93%

#16
Adjusted Score: 106210%
Critics Consensus: Led by incredible work from Brie Larson and Jacob Tremblay, Room makes for an unforgettably harrowing -- and undeniably rewarding -- experience.
Synopsis: Held captive for years in an enclosed space, a woman (Brie Larson) and her young son (Jacob Tremblay) finally gain... [More]
Directed By: Lenny Abrahamson

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 96843%
Critics Consensus: Drawing on another terrific performance from Honor Swinton Byrne, The Souvenir Part II continues its story with profound emotional complexity and elegant storytelling.
Synopsis: In the aftermath of her tumultuous relationship with a charismatic but manipulative older man, Julie begins to untangle her fraught... [More]
Directed By: Joanna Hogg

#14

C'mon C'mon (2021)
95%

#14
Adjusted Score: 102884%
Critics Consensus: The sweet chemistry between Joaquin Phoenix and Woody Norman is complemented by writer-director Mike Mills' empathetic work, helping C'mon C'mon transcend its familiar trappings.
Synopsis: Johnny (Joaquin Phoenix) and his young nephew (Woody Norman) forge a tenuous but transformational relationship when they are unexpectedly thrown... [More]
Directed By: Mike Mills

#13

Boys State (2020)
94%

#13
Adjusted Score: 103771%
Critics Consensus: Startling, upsetting, and overall absorbing, Boys State strikingly depicts American political divisions -- and machinations -- taking root in the next generation.
Synopsis: Texas teens learn about American democracy by organizing political parties and running a mock government.... [More]
Starring:
Directed By: Amanda McBaine, Jesse Moss

#12

First Reformed (2017)
94%

#12
Adjusted Score: 107870%
Critics Consensus: Brought to life by delicate work from writer-director Paul Schrader and elevated by a standout performance by Ethan Hawke, First Reformed takes a sensitive and suspenseful look at weighty themes.
Synopsis: The pastor of a small church in upstate New York spirals out of control after a soul-shaking encounter with an... [More]
Directed By: Paul Schrader

#11

Krisha (2015)
95%

#11
Adjusted Score: 98255%
Critics Consensus: Raw, bracingly honest, and refreshingly unconventional, Krisha wrings fresh -- and occasionally uncomfortable -- truths from a seemingly familiar premise.
Synopsis: Tensions rise at a Thanksgiving gathering when a troubled woman (Krisha Fairchild) reunites with the extended family that she abandoned... [More]
Directed By: Trey Edward Shults

#10

De Palma (2015)
95%

#10
Adjusted Score: 100449%
Critics Consensus: De Palma may not make believers out of the director's detractors, but they'll likely share longtime fans' fascination with his career's worth of entertaining stories.
Synopsis: Filmmaker Brian De Palma discusses his body of work, including "Sisters," "Obsession," "Carrie," "Dressed to Kill," "Blow Out," "Scarface," "The... [More]
Starring: Brian De Palma

#9

Amy (2015)
95%

#9
Adjusted Score: 104084%
Critics Consensus: As riveting as it is sad, Amy is a powerfully honest look at the twisted relationship between art and celebrity -- and the lethal spiral of addiction.
Synopsis: Archival footage and personal testimonials present an intimate portrait of the life and career of British singer/songwriter Amy Winehouse.... [More]
Directed By: Asif Kapadia

#8

Menashe (2017)
96%

#8
Adjusted Score: 103272%
Critics Consensus: Menashe offers an intriguing look at a culture whose unfamiliarity to many viewers will be rendered irrelevant by the story's universally affecting themes and thoughtful approach.
Synopsis: Deep in the heart of New York's notoriously secretive Hasidic Jewish community, Menashe, a good-hearted but somewhat hapless grocery store... [More]
Directed By: Joshua Z Weinstein

#7

First Cow (2019)
96%

#7
Adjusted Score: 109579%
Critics Consensus: First Cow finds director Kelly Reichardt revisiting territory and themes that will be familiar to fans of her previous work -- with typically rewarding results.
Synopsis: Two travelers, on the run from a band of vengeful hunters in the 1820s Northwest, dream of striking it rich... [More]
Directed By: Kelly Reichardt

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 118889%
Critics Consensus: The Florida Project offers a colorfully empathetic look at an underrepresented part of the population that proves absorbing even as it raises sobering questions about modern America.
Synopsis: Set in the shadow of the most magical place on Earth, 6-year-old Moonee and her two best friends forge their... [More]
Directed By: Sean Baker

#5

The Farewell (2019)
97%

#5
Adjusted Score: 118651%
Critics Consensus: The Farewell deftly captures complicated family dynamics with a poignant, well-acted drama that marries cultural specificity with universally relatable themes.
Synopsis: Billi's family returns to China under the guise of a fake wedding to stealthily say goodbye to their beloved matriarch... [More]
Directed By: Lulu Wang

#4

Minari (2020)
98%

#4
Adjusted Score: 114413%
Critics Consensus: Led by arresting performances from Steven Yeun and Yeri Han, Minari offers an intimate and heart-wrenching portrait of family and assimilation in 1980s America.
Synopsis: A tender and sweeping story about what roots us, Minari follows a Korean-American family that moves to a tiny Arkansas... [More]
Directed By: Lee Isaac Chung

#3

Moonlight (2016)
98%

#3
Adjusted Score: 123144%
Critics Consensus: Moonlight uses one man's story to offer a remarkable and brilliantly crafted look at lives too rarely seen in cinema.
Synopsis: A look at three defining chapters in the life of Chiron, a young black man growing up in Miami. His... [More]
Directed By: Barry Jenkins

#2

Eighth Grade (2018)
99%

#2
Adjusted Score: 118496%
Critics Consensus: Eighth Grade takes a look at its titular time period that offers a rare and resounding ring of truth while heralding breakthroughs for writer-director Bo Burnham and captivating star Elsie Fisher.
Synopsis: Thirteen-year-old Kayla endures the tidal wave of contemporary suburban adolescence as she makes her way through the last week of... [More]
Directed By: Bo Burnham

#1

Lady Bird (2017)
99%

#1
Adjusted Score: 128249%
Critics Consensus: Lady Bird delivers fresh insights about the turmoil of adolescence -- and reveals writer-director Greta Gerwig as a fully formed filmmaking talent.
Synopsis: A teenager (Saoirse Ronan) navigates a loving but turbulent relationship with her strong-willed mother (Laurie Metcalf) over the course of... [More]
Directed By: Greta Gerwig

This weekend’s Ghost in the Shell brings the beloved manga and classic anime to live-action life — and gives Scarlett Johansson another opportunity to play an impossibly lethal femme fatale. In honor of her most recent action extravaganza, we decided now would be a terrific time to reassess Johansson’s filmography by revisiting some of its brightest critical highlights, and we turned up a more eclectic collection than her blockbuster résumé might lead one to suspect.


Use the up and down arrows to rank ScarJo’s movies, or click here to see her top 10 movies ranked by Tomatometer!

gettyimages-462065155

(Photo by Jerod Harris/Getty Images for WGN America)

To develop a show like Salem, WGN America’s horror-fantasy account of the 17-century witch trials, Executive Producer Brannon Braga must spend his days knee-deep in supernatural lore. So naturally we’re interested to find out what influences the aesthetic of the sci-fi veteran, who spent over 13 years developing Star Trek TV properties like The Next Generation, Voyager, and Enterprise, as well as films Generations and First Contact. Here are 10 of Braga’s favorite horror films:

Frankenstein (1931) 100%


One of the most influential horror movies ever made, with a heartbreaking tragic dimension. How many movies have you seen where you empathize with the monster?

Black Sunday (1960) 86%


The image of a witch’s mutilated face after being impaled by an iron maiden has frightened me since childhood. I still can’t watch that scene.

The Innocents (1961) 95%


This psychosexual ghost story is a masterpiece of atmosphere and tension. My favorite “evil child” movie.

Rosemary's Baby (1968) 96%


The second horror film in Polanski’s trilogy about mentally unstable women trapped in apartments (Repulsion and The Tenant are the others). The Devil is resurrected by a kindly old woman played by Ruth Gordon, who won an Oscar for her insidiously charming performance.

Don't Look Now (1973) 95%


A fierce, disorienting, harrowing, supernatural thriller about a couple grieving after the tragic drowning of their daughter. A masterwork of dread, with one of the all-time freaky endings in horror film history.

The Exorcist (1973) 83%


Horror doesn’t get any better than this. A groundbreaking film so unflinchingly graphic that I’m not sure it would get made today. The first horror film to be nominated for Best Picture.

Eraserhead (1977) 90%


Indescribable. The only film to truly capture what it’s like to have a nightmare.

The Thing (1982) 82%


Body horror, possession, paranoid suspense, and a monster so alien it borders on the supernatural — nearly every sub-genre of horror packed into an isolated research station. A certified classic.

Martyrs (2008) 64%


Extreme horror laced with nihilistic metaphysical rage. Utterly original, unpredictable, and transcendent.

Under the Skin (2013) 84%


I don’t scare easily nowadays, but this movie paralyzed me with fear. One of the most unnerving film scores in recent memory.


Season 3 of Salem premieres Wednesday, Nov. 2 at 9/8C on WGN America

Also Read:  Salem Season 3 Offers Marilyn Manson and Other Monster Scares

As Birdman and Boyhood continue to rack up accolades en route to what is increasingly looking like an Oscar showdown in the making, it’s important to remember there were a ton of films this year that aren’t getting anywhere near the same kind of awards season buzz (and probably won’t), but still deserve a fair amount of love. With that in mind, we’ve put together a list of RT staff favorites that have either been largely forgotten or will pass through awards season with little to no fanfare. Read on for our off-the-radar recommendations of 2014!


Alan Partridge 87%

Alex Vo, Editor

Self-absorbed and misanthropic radio DJ Alan Partridge is Steve Coogan’s most popular creation in his home country and virtually unknown in the United States. This fact makes an Alan Partridge movie a tough sell here, especially since the character has been around for well over 20 years. For example, how much awareness of the character does one need coming into the movie? Fortunately, none! Alan Partridge more than stands on its own, with a barrage of hilarious jokes and scenarios rising out of the absurd “radio station gets held hostage” plot. Great tunes pepper the soundtrack, too, culminating with a memorable tribute to Sparks’ 1979 disco track, “#1 Song in Heaven.”

Watch Trailer

 


The Babadook 98%

Jeff Giles, Associate Editor

If you’ve heard anything about The Babadook, you’ve probably heard that it’s one of the scarier horror films of the year, and for good reason. Debuting writer-director Jennifer Kent envelops the viewer in a steadily encroaching atmosphere of cold, isolating dread, ratcheting up the tension so effectively that — as with many of the best entries in the genre — the movie’s titular villain hardly needs any screen time to establish his malevolent presence. But The Babadook isn’t just scary; in fact, it works just as effectively as a wrenchingly honest (and, in the end, almost sweet) examination of the ways in which unprocessed grief can draw us into darkness. Watch it for the icy chills, but don’t be surprised if The Babadook lingers long after you’ve stopped looking over your shoulder at night — and definitely be on the lookout for more from Kent.

Watch Trailer

 


Blue Ruin 96%

Grae Drake, Senior Editor

The idea of the revenge flick has been around for a loooong time. I imagine that the first one came out right after the Lumiere Brothers’ The Arrival of a Train, and featured a disgruntled passenger who had missed the train at the last stop. So now, in a cinematic landscape overflowing with recycled ideas, the revenge flick has to travel far from the beaten path to make a splash. Blue Ruin, directed and written by newcomer Jeremy Saulnier, is just such a film. Quiet and frantic, Blue Ruin slowly reveals the story of Dwight, who appears to be a lonely drifter with nothing but garbage dinners to keep him shuffling through life. Beneath the surface, however, lies a warrior who has suffered a great loss, and whose only desire in life is to restore balance through violence. One of the many problems Dwight has is that he is completely incompetent as an assassin, but where there’s a will, there’s a (messy) way. Dwight is the kind of samurai that I think I would be — full of enthusiasm and righteousness, but lacking in actual skill or know-how. Saulnier’s film never strays into slapstick territory, as the subject matter and Dwight’s life is too bleak to allow for lightheartedness. Somehow this movie manages to be poignant without being heavy-handed, and brutal without being judgmental.

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A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night 96%

Tim Ryan, Senior Editor

Plenty of movies can be described as “more style than substance.” A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night, on the other hand, is something else altogether: a movie whose style is so striking that it becomes the substance. Describing the plot of A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night makes it sound utterly generic (lovelorn vampire seeks companionship) and its unofficial tagline (“It’s the best Iranian feminist vampire Western ever made!”) makes it seem like some kind of campy stunt. But A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night emits a weird vibe that’s hard to shake, from its haunting black-and-white cinematography to its pulsing soundtrack. Every once in a while, I’ll see something that feels so unique and fresh that I want to tell everyone I know to see it now! This year, A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night was that movie.

Watch Trailer

 


Rob the Mob 81%

Kerr Lordygan, Review Aggregator

The true story of small-time crooks Tommy and Rosie Uva is a pretty incredible one, and it’s brought to vivid life in the little-seen Rob the Mob. Written by Jonathan Fernandez and directed by Raymond De Felitta (City Island, Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story), the film is funny in its portrayal of a couple with enough chutzpah to steal from the mafia, but it’s touching, too; Tommy (Michael Pitt) and Rosie (Nina Arianda) love each other so much, they’ll do whatever is necessary to keep their passion alive. Struggling to pay the bills, they pull mini-heists to stay afloat, but after Tommy serves a stint in prison, he decides to try robbing private clubs owned by the Mafia, and Rosie is forced to go along for the ride. With a cast that includes solid pros like Ray Romano, Andy Garcia, and Griffin Dunne, the film is sure to entertain while pushing a few buttons. And tickling your funny bone. The actors are spot-on, commanding an unlikely empathy through their performances and making this modern day Bonnie and Clyde story worth more than just a glance.

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The Skeleton Twins 86%

Beki Lane, Editorial Coordinator

A surprisingly heartfelt drama starring well-known comedians Bill Hader and Kristen Wiig, The Skeleton Twins is a soft-spoken success. I was amazed to find such simple and clear acting by two people who are usually known for over-the-top comedic performances. This story of estranged twins is easy to relate to and you get the distinct impression that you are peeking in on everyday lives in progress. It is also a study of depression, and the struggle of those who fight to live in the face of it. The Skeleton Twins is Certified Fresh at 87% on the Tomatometer, and is worthy of diving into.

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Snowpiercer 94%

Catherine Pricci, Review Aggregator

Considering it came in at number two on our Summer Movie Scorecard — Certified Fresh at 95 percent, no less — it’s hard to believe so few people have heard of Snowpiercer, let alone seen it. Imagine a frozen, post-apocalyptic Earth whose only survivors are living on a train that perpetually circles the globe, and all of the train’s inhabitants are divided by class. Curtis (Chris Evans) and a ragtag bunch of his fellow
proletarians are fed up and plan a forward assault to the front of the train in an attempt to secure better living conditions. As they progress through each car, they discover increasingly shocking things. There are extremely dark tones in this film that will resonate with most and the morals they live by. Snowpiercer is a rock-solid action film, but it’s hard to miss its allegorical concerns, especially at a time when economic hardship is a reality for so many of us.

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Teenage 77%

Marya E. Gates, Social Media Specialist

Writer/Director Matt Wolf’s documentary adaptation of Jon Savage’s book, Teenage: The Prehistory of Youth Culture: 1875-1945, is more of a visual collage than a traditional documentary. Certified Fresh at 74 percent, Teenage uses archival footage and filmed recreations to tell the true story of four teenagers in the years building up to World War II. Narrators (including Ben Whishaw and Jena Malone) read excerpts from Savage’s book — much of which was taken from diaries and newspaper articles — to bring these four examples to life. A haunting musical score by Atlas Sound ties everything together, and the film ends with a montage of archival footage from post-1945 that celebrates the exuberance, despair, passion, and hope that comes during those tumultuous teenage years. While Teenage might not be for everyone, it’s definitely not like any other documentary you’re going to see this year.

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Under the Skin 84%

Sarah Ricard, TV Editor

At the same time that she was kicking supervillain ass as Black Widow in Marvel’s blockbuster Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Scarlett Johansson was also quietly burrowing her way into the gloomy outskirts of Glasgow, Scotland as a mysterious, beautiful, and dangerous stranger in Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin. Laura, whose name is easy to miss, drives a van through town seducing male strangers into coming home with her. While the men can’t believe their luck, they ought to remember that some things are too good to be true. Going home with a gorgeous woman, only to find that her apartment is actually an infinite quagmire of black goo, should be something of a real red flag. Under the Skin may frustrate many on account of its equally gooey pace and almost-too-subtle plot, but Johansson’s performance is at once beguiling and creepy, leaving you with two questions by this mesmerizing and shocking film’s end: What the heck did I just see? And when can I see it again?

Watch Trailer

 


We Are the Best! 96%

Ryan Fujitani, Editor

Coming-of-age films are a dime a dozen these days, but the vast majority of them — even the comedies — seem intent on filtering adolescence through the adult lens of wistful, melancholy nostalgia. This is one of the reasons why Lukas Moodysson’s We Are the Best! feels so refreshing, even as its themes ring familiar. Set in the early 1980s but never cloyingly era-specific, the film follows a trio of outcast middle-school girls in Stockholm who come together to form a punk band, and it never devolves into the dire melodrama or awkward sexual awakenings of its genre kin. Instead, We Are the Best! embraces the joyful, devil-may-care rebellion of youth in all its ephemeral glory, best illustrated by the scene when the girls panhandle for change to pay for a new guitar, only to spend all their money on a candy and ice cream binge. There are some ups and downs in the movie, to be sure, but Moodysson’s affection for raucous Klara, sheepish Bobo, and demure Hedvig is so clearly on display that I’m inclined to declare you heartless if you don’t at least crack a smile when the girls finally break out into the titular chant.

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Whiplash 94%

Matt Atchity, Editor in Chief

It’s easy to understand why Whiplash got a little bit lost when it was released in October; it was a small film overshadowed by wider releases, and its leads (Miles Teller and J.K. Simmons) aren’t exactly box office draws on their own. But this film absolutely deserves all of the accolades its received so far, including the Grand Jury Award at the 2014 Sundance Film Festival. Miles Teller plays a talented drummer studying at a New York music conservatory who falls under the sway of a tyrannical bandleader, played by J.K. Simmons. The movie explores artistic achievement and obsession in a way that will have you on the edge of your seat, as Simmons and Teller repeatedly face off on the bandstand. The movie features an especially chilling performance from Simmons, balancing charm and abuse in equal measure. Sure, the movie takes a bit of license with jazz history, but the tense and thrilling climax will stick with you long after the film is over.

Watch Trailer

 

Awards season is on, and with everything that is going on from December through February, it’s difficult to keep track of who is getting what. To help you with that, we created the Awards Leaderboard, a ranking of movies by the number of awards won and their respective categories. Read on to find out where your favorite movies stand, and who is leading the pack.

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014) 91%

49 wins

Boyhood (2014) 97%

49 wins

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) 92%

25 wins

Whiplash (2014) 94%

24 wins

Citizenfour (2014) 96%

11 wins

The LEGO Movie (2014) 96%

11 wins

  • BAFTA – Animated Film
  • PGA – Animated Picture
  • Critics Choice – Best Animated Feature
  • Golden Tomato – Best-Reviewed Animation
  • CFCA – Best Animated Feature
  • SFFCC – Best Animated Feature
  • NYFCO – Best Animated Feature
  • WAFCA – Best Animated Feature
  • NBR – Original Screenplay
  • NYFCC – Best Animated Film
  • LVFCS – Best Animated Film

Still Alice (2014) 85%

11 wins

Ida (2013) 96%

9 wins

The Theory of Everything (2014) 80%

8 wins

Life Itself (2014) 98%

7 wins

It’s that time of year again. The Gotham Independent Film Awards have announced their nominees for 2014, unofficially kicking the film industry into the beginning of the anual awards season. While we still have several prestige films yet to hit the big screen, acclaimed films from earlier in the year like Richard Linklater’s Boyhood and Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin are up for multiple Gotham Awards, alongside more recent releases like Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Birdman and Justin Simien’s Dear White People. The awards ceremony is scheduled for December 1 in New York, but you can see the full list of nominees below:

This week on home video, we’ve got an animated sequel, a puzzling sci-fi tale, and the second season of a much buzzed-about BBC America TV series. Beyond that, we’ve got a handful of notable smaller movies, as well as two excellent choices from the Criterion Collection. Read on for details:



Rio 2

48%

Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway reprise their voice roles as Blu and Jewel, the pair of blue macaws who found love in Fox’s 2011 animated film Rio, in this sequel, which follows them as they pursue the trail of another recently spotted macaw. Along the way, Blu, Jewel, and their three kids clash with an illegal logging operation in the Amazon, reunite with Jewel’s family, and run into some trouble in the form of an old nemesis. Unfortunately, critics weren’t as smitten by the colorful couple’s antics this time around, saying Rio 2 felt simply like a bigger, busier retread of its predecessor and rewarding its efforts with a 46 percent on the Tomatometer. Nevertheless, it may serve as a colorful distraction for your little ones, especially considering the special features include an extensive playlist of both sing-along and dance-along songs, among other things.



Under the Skin

84%

Those of you looking to hunker down with a copy of Under the Skin this week purely because “it’s the movie where Scarlett Johansson gets naked” might end up with more than you bargained for (don’t worry; we know that’s not really why you’re watching it). Jonathan Glazer’s (Sexy Beast) third film, an adaptation of Michel Faber’s eponymous sci-fi novel, is the stylized account of an alien who takes the form of a woman (Johansson) to seduce men and, ultimately, absorb their innards. Over time, the alien’s predatory instincts give way to curious observation, but to what end? Critics mostly agreed that Under the Skin‘s visual themes and narrative ambiguity might not be accessible to all viewers, but they also praised Johansson’s performance and the film’s haunting, heady ideas, making the film Certified Fresh at 86 percent. Available on DVD and Blu-ray this week, special features include a little over 42 minutes’ worth of featurettes on topics ranging from the casting and music to the production design and visual effects.



Orphan Black – Season Two

BBC America’s hit sci-fi series has been a coming out party for its star, Tatiana Maslany, who acts opposite herself in multiple roles and has earned a Golden Globe nomination for her efforts (no Emmy nom, though, much to the dismay of fans). After a first season that slowly drew an increasingly larger audience by word of mouth, Orphan Black returned for its second season back in April, expanding its narrative to include more characters, more twists, and more evidence why Maslany deserves the lion’s share of the credit for the show’s Certified Fresh 97 percent Tomatometer. For those of you looking for some extra clone goodness, the season two Blu-ray that hits shelves this week includes a number of making-of featurettes, including an extended version of the four-clone scene (dance party, woohoo!) and clone character profiles.

Also available this week:

  • Wrinkles (96 percent), an animated film about life in a retirement home, with voice work from Martin Sheen and Matthew Modine.
  • Israeli import Bethlehem (77 percent), a Certified Fresh drama exploring the complex relationship between an Israeli Secret Service agent and his Palestinian informant.
  • Road to Paloma (70 percent), a road movie about a Native American who flees across the country after he avenges his mother’s murder, starring, written by, and directed by Jason Momoa.
  • The Face of Love (42 percent), starring Ed Harris and Annette Bening in a dramedy about a widow who meets and falls in love with a man who looks exactly like her deceased husband.
  • Season three of Hell on Wheels, starring Anson Mount in a Western drama about a former Confederate soldier who becomes a foreman in the construction of the first Transcontinental Railroad.
  • And of course, two more choices from the Criterion Collection: David Cronenberg’s breakout 1981 thriller Scanners (79 percent) is available in a first-time Criterion edition, and Robert Bresson’s 1959 classic Pickpocket (97 percent) is available in a new DVD edition and a DVD/Blu-ray combo pack.


Jonathan Glazer’s Certified Fresh sci-fi thriller Under the Skin is currently in theaters in limited release, and we’re choosing three lucky winners to receive a poster signed by Scarlett Johansson and a copy of the soundtrack!

To enter: Tweet us @RottenTomatoes with your favorite Scarlett Johansson movie, and make sure to include #TomatoPrize in your response. Three winners will be chosen at random on April 10, 2014. You must follow @rottentomatoes on Twitter to win.

Contest rules: Prizes will be shipped to three United States winners randomly selected.

This week at the movies, we’ve got just one new wide release: Captain America: The Winter Soldier, starring Chris Evans, Samuel L. Jackson, and Scarlett Johansson in the latest Marvel superhero adventure. What do the critics have to say?



Captain America: The Winter Soldier

90%

It’s become fashionable in some film-going circles to dismiss the recent spate of comic book adaptations as evidence that Hollywood is bereft of ideas. Critics say Captain America: The Winter Soldier offers a powerful rebuttal, delivering outstanding performances and a thoughtful political undercurrent to complement its visceral thrills. This time out, Captain America (Chris Evans) is working undercover for S.H.I.EL.D., but quickly discovers that the organization is far more secretive than he suspected. Meanwhile, a mysterious assassin known as the Winter Soldier has carried out a series of killings — and Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) seems to know more about his identity than she’s telling. The pundits say the Certified Fresh Captain America: The Winter Soldier should please both newcomers and Marvel diehards — it’s slick and action-packed, and most intriguingly, often has the feel of a paranoid thriller from the 1970s. (Check out this week’s Total Recall for a list of memorable superhero franchise part twos..)

Also opening this week in limited release:

Loving the alien: Scarlett Johansson in Jonathan Glazer’s Under the Skin, one of the hits at Venice.

With this year’s diverse Toronto International Film Festival underway, and both the New York and London fests soon to follow, summer blockbuster malaise has given way — for critics, anyway — to the beginning of that months-long circus known as awards season. To get things rolling, here’s a look at 15 of the most buzzed-about titles to look out for from the just-wrapped Venice film festival — with the critics weighing in on new stuff from the likes of Miyazaki, Glazer, Gilliam, Cuarón and (yes, yet another) Coppola.

1. Gravity

Though it screened out of competition, Alfonso Cuarón’s long-overdue return was met with arguably the loudest critical applause, and with the raves now extending to Toronto, the buzz on the Children of Men director’s tense space thriller Gravity is nearing fever pitch. Sandra Bullock and George Clooney star as astronauts cut adrift in the void after their shuttle is destroyed, with Cuarón delivering an experience that has thus far left critics breathless. When no less than James Cameron declares it “the best space film ever done,” you can consider the stakes effectively raised.

2. The Wind Rises

It goes without saying that a new Miyazaki will be at the top of any must-see list, but this time it’s all the more compelling — and terribly bittersweet — given the director’s shock announcement at Venice that The Wind Rises will be his final film. And this time he really, really means it. Miyazaki’s first feature since 2009’s Ponyo is a more personal, mature affair, continuing the director’s obsession with flight in its story of the designer of Japan’s WWII fighter planes. It’s already been an enormous hit in Miyazaki’s home nation, and reviews so far are strong. One can only hope he changes his mind about retiring. Again.

3. Night Moves

With Old Joy, Wendy and Lucy and Meek’s Cutoff, Kelly Reichardt has been on a major roll — and it looks as though the director’s latest, the eco-action thriller Night Moves, is set to continue her critical winning streak. Jesse Eisenberg, Dakota Fanning and Peter Saarsgard play environmentalists en route to demolish a dam, a premise that, by most accounts, has been elevated by the filmmaker’s trademark touch. Reichardt “takes this volatile story,” writes Xan Brooks in The Guardian, “and handles it with care and precision, as if transporting unstable nitroglycerin.”

4. Under the Skin

In what surely comprises some of the more inspired casting of late, Scarlett Johansson plays an alien in human form, wandering through Scotland in search of men to prey upon. If the pitch sounds like B-grade sci-fi, then director Jonathan Glazer — who hasn’t made a feature since 2004’s Birth — has by many accounts crafted a distinct original, with Film.com’s William Goss calling it a “surreal study of an outsider examining our world with a clinical fascination, driven by a cryptic purpose, more akin to David Bowie’s visitor in The Man Who Fell to Earth.” Under the Skin has proved otherwise divisive with Venice critics, however, which only makes it more exciting to see.

5. Tom at the Farm

Still just 24 and with four feature films to his name, French-Canadian filmmaker Xavier Dolan will be hearing the label “precocious” for some time to come — and with good reason. Last year’s epic, hyperstylized melodrama Laurence Anyways upped the director’s ambition and creative ante, and Tom at the Farm seems to have pared back the indulgence but not the talent. “A kinky queer noir detailing the dangers awaiting a gay Montreal hipster as he journeys to the homophobic heartland for his lover’s funeral,” writes Guy Lodge at Variety, “it’s an improbably exciting match of knife-edge storytelling and a florid vintage aesthetic.” Let’s hope the film gets a wider theatrical release in the US than Dolan’s last.

6. Joe

Since his “return to form” with this year’s well-reviewed Prince Avalanche, David Gordon Green has found himself back in critics’ favor — and anticipation has been piqued for his latest effort, Joe. Nicolas Cage is apparently back on serious acting form as an ex-con who forms an unlikely friendship with a 15-year-old (Tye Sheridan, who won the young acting prize at Venice), and Green has made a dark, rural companion piece to to the more comedic Avalanche. Time‘s Richard Corliss says Cage’s performance “recalls why, before his megastardom, he was considered one of cinema’s most powerful and subtle actors.” It must be the beard.

7. Locke

For anyone who wanted to spend 90 minutes alone on a road trip with Bane, this is your movie. Eastern Promises writer Stephen Knight’s Locke is just that — a minimalist piece consisting of Tom Hardy traversing the English motorways while talking on his phone — and it is, at the very least, a feat of vocal prowess. “If you are asking an audience to listen to one man talking for an hour and a half,” offers Robbie Collin at The Telegraph, “you had better make sure he is worth listening to, and minute-by-minute, Hardy has you spellbound.” It’s comforting to know that Hardy’s voice will be comprehensible this time.

8. The Zero Theorem

A Terry Gilliam movie actually finding its way to the screen is such a rare event these days that even when the results seem mixed — and The Zero Theorem is reportedly in that category — they’re worth some curiosity. The veteran filmmaker’s first effort since the flawed-but-fascinating Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, Theorem stars Christoph Waltz as a computer architect on the verge of solving the riddle of existence — or losing his mind. Gilliam has likened it to his 21st-century Brazil, which has been a problem for some: “At best,” claims Variety‘s Leslie Felperin, it “momentarily recalls the dystopian whimsy of the director’s best-loved effort.” Still, who knows when we’ll see his next movie?

9. Palo Alto

Not only does the Coppola family make fine wine, it just keeps cranking out the filmmakers — the latest being Gia Coppola, Francis’s granddaughter and Sofia’s niece. And if those aren’t industry connections enough, Coppola’s debut, Palo Alto, is based on a series of stories by James Franco, concerning the wayward lives of bored, affluent California teens. The usual charges of nepotism aside, plenty of encouraging notices have been forthcoming: writing for The Hollywood Reporter, Todd McCarthy suggests it’s “the best feature film directed by someone named Coppola in a number of years.” It’ll be interesting to see how it measures against her aunt’s sublime teen-portrait debut, The Virgin Suicides.

10. Child of God

James Franco — yes, him again — takes a break from brokering world peace and wearing phallic noses to direct his 34th (okay, third) feature this year, and the word from Venice is positive. Having last tackled Faulkner, Franco adapts Cormac McCarthy’s Child of God, a Tennessee-set story about a grieving young man descending into society’s murky moral fringe. At The Village Voice, Stephanie Zacharek likens Scott Haze’s Lester to “Denis Lavant’s sewer-dwelling troglodyte in Leos Carax’s Holy Motors, only with about half the charisma.” Which, frankly, is still plenty more than most.

11. Philomena

Steve Coogan shared the Best Screenplay award at Venice for his work on Philomena, which critics are mostly calling The Queen director Stephen Frears’s best work in some time. Comic Coogan plays it straight as a BBC journalist slumming on a human interest story about Judi Dench’s Philomena, a working class Londoner whose child was taken from her long ago. While it’s potentially middlebrow melodrama, plenty of critics have come away impressed with a film geared to please crowds. “It’s a terrifically moving film,” says Dave Calhoun at London’s Time Out, and “offers a healthy dose of cheekiness to counter the gloom.”

12. Why Don’t You Play in Hell?

Fans of Japanese genre filmmaker Sion Sono — director of 2010’s cult fave Cold Fish — will no doubt be clamoring for Why Don’t You Play in Hell?, in which, as the Telegraph‘s Robbie Collin handily summarizes, “two rival groups of gangsters agree to slaughter one another on camera for the benefit of a group of wannabe filmmakers, over a decade-long feud partly rooted in a toothpaste advert.” Such a typically demented premise will be enough to hook the faithful, though not all reviews have been enamored with the schlock and violence.

13. Moebius

Then again, Sono’s genre splatter may well be family-friendly relative to the infamy of Ki-duk Kim’s worlds of twisted perversity. The South Korean auteur won the Golden Lion at Venice last year with Pieta, a cheery incest drama, and Moebius appears to be a variation on the theme. Still, audiences won’t be at a loss for provocation: “A gloriously off-the-charts study in perversity,” enthuses Variety‘s Leslie Felperin, “Kim Ki-duk’s Moebius is right inside the Korean king-of-wackitude’s wheelhouse of outrageous cinema.”

14. Stray Dogs

Graced with Venice’s Grand Jury prize, the latest from the acclaimed filmmaker Tsai Ming-liang will be high on the must-see list of every cinephile — or anyone, really, who wants to see an epic long-take of a man eating a cabbage his daughter had used for her doll’s makeshift head. “It takes no less than three shots and maybe two edits before you know — for absolute certain — that you’re in the close company of a master filmmaker,” raves David Jenkins at Little White Lies, while the Financial Times‘ Nigel Andrews says Stray Dogs “poetry goes straight to the heart and solar plexus.”

15. Sorcerer

Finally, a film that deserves special mention: William Friedkin’s 1977 thriller Sorcerer, which was screened, at long last in its director’s restored version, in honor of the New Hollywood veteran’s Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement. Friedkin’s too-oft overlooked remake of The Wages of Fear has been tangled up in release issues for years, but will finally see the light again in theaters, and on Blu-ray, in the near future. According to the filmmaker, it’s the “best print ever of Sorcerer.” It’s also a masterpiece, and should not be missed.


Sacro GRA‘s director Gianfranco Rosi.

VENICE: While much of the critical buzz surrounded the likes of Alfonso Cuarón’s out-of-competition Gravity, the Golden Lion at the 70th Venice Film Festival has quietly gone to Gianfranco Rosi’s Sacro GRA, an Italian documentary in which the filmmaker spent two years touring Rome’s enormous ring road — the “GRA” — and chronicling the disparate lives around it.

The festival jury, lead by veteran filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci and including the eclectic likes of Carrie Fisher, Pablo Larraín and Ryuichi Sakamoto, awarded the Silver Lion for Best Director to Alexandros Avranas for Miss Violence, while the newly-created Grand Jury Prize went to Ming-Liang Tsai’s critically-favored Stray Dogs.

The sole US competition winner was Tye Sheridan, who took home the Best Young Actor award for his performance alongside Nicolas Cage in David Gordon Green’s Joe. Earlier, director William Friedkin was presented with the festival’s Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement, where he held a screening of his personally restored, soon-to-be-released 1977 masterpiece Sorcerer.

Other winners included Themis Panou (Best Actor, Miss Violence), Elena Cotta (Best Actress, A Street in Palermo), Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope (Best Screenplay, for Stephen Frears’ Philomena), and The Police Officer’s Wife (Winner of the Special Jury Prize).

Check back for a critical round up of the most talked-about features from the festival, including the latest from Jonathan Glazer, Hayao Miyazaki, Terry Gilliam and Xavier Dolan. In the meantime, here’s the trailer for Sacro GRA. It’s in Italian, but you can get a sense of the film.

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