All Dev Patel Movies, Ranked by Tomatometer

After being alerted to Dev Patel’s existence by his Skins-watching daughter, director Danny Boyle cast the then 17-year-old actor in 2008’s Slumdog Millionaire. The film, which was originally dropped by Warner Independent after the studio doubted its commercial prospects, would go on to gross over $350 million worldwide, win Best Picture at the Academy Awards, and make international stars out of leads Patel and Freida Pinto.

It would be hard to match that kind of explosive feature debut, and for the next several years, only the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel cinematic universe films would come close to that early critical and box office success. But Patel came roaring back with Lion, the true-story drama that would earn him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nom, with the film itself ultimately in the running for Best Picture. The Certified Fresh Hotel Mumbai and Personal History of David Copperfield followed, and now Patel is getting career-best review write-ups for A24’s Arthurian jam, The Green Knight.

Read on to see all Dev Patel movies, ranked by Tomatometer!

#1

Only Yesterday (1991)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 102961%
Critics Consensus: Only Yesterday's long-delayed U.S. debut fills a frustrating gap for American Ghibli fans while offering further proof of the studio's incredibly consistent commitment to quality.
Synopsis: A put-upon 27-year-old Japanese office worker travels to the countryside and reminisces about her childhood in Tokyo and what life... [More]
Directed By: Isao Takahata

#2
Adjusted Score: 108753%
Critics Consensus: The Personal History of David Copperfield puts a fresh, funny, and utterly charming spin on Dickens' classic, proving some stories truly are timeless.
Synopsis: The life of David Copperfield is chronicled from his youth into adulthood.... [More]
Directed By: Armando Iannucci

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 103601%
Critics Consensus: Visually dazzling and emotionally resonant, Slumdog Millionaire is a film that's both entertaining and powerful.
Synopsis: As 18-year-old Jamal Malik (Dev Patel) answers questions on the Indian version of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," flashbacks... [More]
Directed By: Danny Boyle

#4

The Green Knight (2021)
89%

#4
Adjusted Score: 106390%
Critics Consensus: The Green Knight honors and deconstructs its source material in equal measure, producing an absorbing adventure that casts a fantastical spell.
Synopsis: An epic fantasy adventure based on the timeless Arthurian legend, THE GREEN KNIGHT tells the story of Sir Gawain (Dev... [More]
Directed By: David Lowery

#5

Lion (2016)
84%

#5
Adjusted Score: 101374%
Critics Consensus: Lion's undeniably uplifting story and talented cast make it a moving journey that transcends the typical cliches of its genre.
Synopsis: Five year old Saroo gets lost on a train which takes him thousands of miles across India, away from home... [More]
Directed By: Garth Davis

#6
Adjusted Score: 84209%
Critics Consensus: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel isn't groundbreaking storytelling, but it's a sweet story about the senior set featuring a top-notch cast of veteran actors.
Synopsis: Some British retirees (Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy) decide to outsource their retirement to exotic -- and less expensive... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#7

Hotel Mumbai (2018)
76%

#7
Adjusted Score: 89311%
Critics Consensus: Its depiction of real-life horror will strike some as exploitative, but Hotel Mumbai remains a well-made dramatization of tragic events.
Synopsis: November 26, 2008 ... terror struck the heart of India. From the producer of Sicario and Wind River.... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Maras

#8
Adjusted Score: 72552%
Critics Consensus: The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is about as original as its title -- but with a cast this talented and effortlessly charming, that hardly matters.
Synopsis: As his marriage to Sunaina draws near, Sonny sets his eye on opening a second residence for the elderly, but... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#9
Adjusted Score: 69949%
Critics Consensus: The Man Who Knew Infinity might be a tad too conventional to truly do its subject justice, but Dev Patel and Jeremy Irons elevate the end result beyond mere biopic formula.
Synopsis: In 1913, brilliant East Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan (Dev Patel) travels to Trinity College in England to work with professor... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Brown

#10

The Road Within (2014)
45%

#10
Adjusted Score: 41160%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A man with (Robert Sheehan) Tourette's syndrome brings his OCD roommate (Dev Patel) and an anorexic woman (Zoë Kravitz) along... [More]
Directed By: Gren Wells

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 46837%
Critics Consensus: The Wedding Guest makes a compelling argument for Dev Patel as an actor worthy of diverse leading roles, even if the movie's less than the sum of its action thriller parts.
Synopsis: Jay is a man with a secret who travels from Britain to Pakistan to attend a wedding - armed with... [More]
Directed By: Michael Winterbottom

#12

Chappie (2015)
32%

#12
Adjusted Score: 41422%
Critics Consensus: Chappie boasts more of the big ideas and visual panache that director Neill Blomkamp has become known for -- and, sadly, more of the narrative shortcomings.
Synopsis: In the near future, a mechanized police force patrols the streets and deals with lawbreakers -- but now, the people... [More]
Directed By: Neill Blomkamp

#13

Cherry (2012)
14%

#13
Adjusted Score: 13645%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A teenager (Ashley Hinshaw) takes the money she earned for a photo shoot and runs away to San Francisco, where... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Elliott

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 11562%
Critics Consensus: The Last Airbender squanders its popular source material with incomprehensible plotting, horrible acting, and detached joyless direction.
Synopsis: The four nations of Air, Water, Earth and Fire lived in harmony until the Fire Nation declared war. A century... [More]
Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan

The Visual Effects Society announced the winners for the 14th Annual VES Awards on a ceremony held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on February 2. Star Wars: The Force Awakens was the big winner this year with four awards, while The Good Dinosaur was picked as top animated feature film. In the TV categories, Games of Thrones took home the most awards with four wins. Read through for the full list of movies and television winners.


Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature


Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode


Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode


Outstanding Animated Performance in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Animated Performance in an Animated Feature


Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature


Outstanding Animated Performance in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project


Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project


Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project


Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project

  • SSE; Pier
  • Halo 5: The Hunt Begins
  • Lipton; The Revolution in Tea
  • Game of Thrones; Hardhome

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Models in a Photoreal or Animated Project


Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode


Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

The Visual Effects Society announced today the nominees for the 14th Annual VES Awards, the celebration that recognizes outstanding visual effects artistry and innovation in film, animation, television, commercials and video games, and the professionals who bring this work to life. Read through for the full list of film & television-related awards. The VES Awards will be held on February 2 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel.


Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature


Outstanding Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode


Outstanding Created Environment in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Supporting Visual Effects in a Photoreal Episode


Outstanding Animated Performance in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Animated Performance in an Animated Feature


Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature


Outstanding Animated Performance in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project


Outstanding Created Environment in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project


Outstanding Virtual Cinematography in a Photoreal Project


Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Episode, Commercial, or Real-Time Project

  • SSE; Pier
  • Halo 5: The Hunt Begins
  • Lipton; The Revolution in Tea
  • Game of Thrones; Hardhome

Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Models in a Photoreal or Animated Project


Outstanding Effects Simulations in a Photoreal Feature


Outstanding Compositing in a Photoreal Episode


Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature

This week on home video, we’ve got a less than satisfying sci-fi tale and another Liam Neeson thriller, as well as a dark comedy starring Kristen Wiig, a couple of TV series finales, and both a bland comedy and a horror misfire. Read on for the full list:


Chappie (2015) 31%

South African director Neill Blomkamp loves his brainy sci-fi, but as his first three feature films now demonstrate, he doesn’t always know what to do with his big ideas. Set in the near future, Chappie centers on a police enforcement droid gone rogue after his creator (Dev Patel) uploads new artificial intelligence programming that causes the droid to become self aware. Christened “Chappie” by his adoptive parents — a couple of common criminals (played by hip hop duo Ninja and Yolandi Visser of Die Antwoord) — he learns quickly that not everyone is happy to see his transformation come to fruition. Co-starring Hugh Jackman, Sigourney Weaver, and Blomkamp regular Sharlto Copley as the voice of Chappie, the film boasted a strong cast and seamless visual effects, but critics felt it was too derivative and tonally inconsistent for its message to resonate. The Blu-ray comes with several featurettes on everything from a profile of Johannesburg to a look at the weaponry to an examination of real A.I., as well as an alternate ending, an extended scene, and concept art.


Run All Night (2015) 61%

Liam Neeson furthers his late career badass cred in Run All Night, his third collaboration with director Jaume Collet-Serra after Unknown and Non-Stop. When retired mob hitman Jimmy Conlon (Neeson) kills the son of his former boss (Ed Harris) during an altercation, his own son (Joel Kinnaman) becomes the new target, and Jimmy fights to protect him at all costs. The bottom line for Run All Night is that there’s hardly anything new here, but Neeson’s performance and a propulsive storyline make it a passably entertaining revenge thriller. Disc features include two featurettes — on shooting the film and on Liam Neeson as a gritty action hero — and a handful of deleted scenes.



 

ALSO AVAILABLE THIS WEEK:

Wild Tales (2015) (96 percent), a Certified Fresh dark comedy anthology comprised of six scenes themed around ordinary people pushed to violence.

Welcome to Me (2014) (69 percent), starring Kristen Wiig in a dark comedy about a woman with Borderline Personality Disorder who wins the lottery and decides to produce her own TV talk show.

The Lazarus Effect (2015) (13 percent), starring Mark Duplass and Olivia Wilde in a thriller about a group of scientists who discover the secret to reanimation but soon realize it brings unforeseen side effects.

Unfinished Business (2014) (11 percent), starring Vince Vaughn, Tom Wilkinson, and Dave Franco in a comedy about three business partners who travel to Europe to close a deal and get wildly sidetracked on the way.

The Certified Fresh third and final season of HBO’s The Newsroom (2015) (76 percent), starring Jeff Daniels as a self-important but idealistic anchor at a failing cable news network.

The twelfth and final season of CBS sitcom Two and a Half Men (2014), starring John Cryer and Ashton Kutcher as mismatched housemates.

The robot film Chappie led a crappy North American box office with a number one debut that was nothing to be happy about. The R-rated action pic bowed to an estimated $13.3M from 3,201 locations (including 358 IMAX screens) and averaged a soft $4,155. It was the worst gross for a number one film since Halloween while the top ten slumped to its lowest point since early December.

Starring Hugh Jackman, Dev Patel, and Sigourney Weaver, Chappie skewed 60% male and 57% under 30, according to studio data. Reviews were generally negative which hurt. Those polled by CinemaScore gave a lukewarm B grade to this Sony title which never generated much consumer interest at all. Produced for $49M, and unlikely to reach that amount in domestic grosses, Chappie will need substantial success overseas to break even. The international cast and crew will certainly help in that regard.

March came in like a lamb with box office sales slumping to the worst showing of 2015 so far. But girlpower muscles will be flexed soon with next weekend’s fairy tale epic Cinderella followed a week later by the sci-fi sequel Divergent so expect this month to go out like a lion.

Dropping from first to second was the Will Smith flick Focus with an estimated $10M in its sophomore frame. The 46% decline was reasonable but Warner Bros. has banked only $34.6M after two weekends which is on the low side for the actor. Even his 2008 flop Seven Pounds grossed more in its first ten days. Focus looks on course to end with $57M which would be Smith’s worst-grossing film since 2000’s The Legend of Bagger Vance.

Debuting in third place was the comedy sequel The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel with an estimated $8.6M from 1,573 locations for a $5,467 average. The Fox Searchlight release played to a mature audience and brought back the stars from the first film including Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, and Dev Patel while adding Richard Gere.

Scoring the highest average among all wide releases, the PG-rated film earned reviews which were generally positive and saw a B+ grade from CinemaScore. Next weekend will see another 200 locations being added to the run. The first film, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel platformed in 27 theaters in May 2012 before expanding out to nearly 1,300 theaters nationwide ending with a $46.4M domestic total.

Successful winter films followed. Fox’s Kingsman: The Secret Service eased 30% to an estimated $8.3M boosting the domestic cume to near the century mark at $98M. Kidpic The SpongeBob Movie followed with an estimated $7M, off 35%, giving Paramount $149M to date. Global stands at $259.4M.

Worldwide phenomenon Fifty Shades of Grey dropped 47% to an estimated $5.6M for a new domestic haul of $156.4M while Universal’s global tally rose to a stellar $527.7M. Fading fast, look for a final of just under $600M which will be fantastic. Kevin Costner’s McFarland, USA followed dipping 32% to an estimated $5.3M putting Disney at $29.4M.

Tumbling 50% in its sophomore frame was the supernatural thriller The Lazarus Effect which collected an estimated $5.1M landing it at $17.4M to date. Hit high school comedy The DUFF eased just 29% in its third round to an estimated $4.9M for a cume of $26.1M.

Vince Vaughn continued his tumble out of box office relevancy with his latest comedy Unfinished Business which barely made the top ten opening to a dismal $4.8M, according to estimates. The Fox release averaged a poor $1,728 from 2,777 locations and marked the former star’s fourth consecutive flop after The Watch, The Internship, and Delivery Man which all opened in the $8-17M range.

Poor reviews slammed Business and its B- CinemaScore indicates that paying audiences were not too satisfied with what they got. Moviegoers no longer see Vaughn as an appealing comedy anchor and he will need quality projects that actually deliver laughs in order to return to his old form. He enjoyed six $30M+ openings from 2004 to 2009. R-rated comedies in general have underperformed over the past year and Hollywood will need to up its game if it wants to mine the riches that can come from this genre.

Bumped out of the top ten after a seven-week stay, Clint Eastwood’s smash hit American Sniper achieved yet another milestone as it surpassed The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 to become the highest-grossing domestic hit to come out of 2014. Over 99% of its current cume of $337.2M came in 2015, but still to beat out all the tentpoles, super hero flicks, and big-budget behemoths of last year is an amazing accomplishment. Worldwide, Sniper has just smashed $500M with more still to come. The domestic portion should finish in the neighborhood of $350M which is more than double Eastwood’s previous career high of $148.1M for Gran Torino.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $72.9M which was down a steep 43% from last year when 300: Rise of an Empire opened at number one with $45M; and down 42% from 2013 when Oz the Great and Powerful debuted on top with $79.1M.

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This week at the movies, we’ve got a conflicted robot (Chappie, starring Sharlto Copley and Dev Patel), traveling businessmen (Unfinished Busines, starring Vince Vaughn and Dave Franco), and spry seniors (The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, starring Judi Dench and Maggie Smith). What do the critics have to say?


Chappie

32%

With District 9 and Elysium, director Neill Blomkamp established himself as a purveyor of action-packed sci-fi allegories. But critics say Chappie is a much less successful mix of pulp thrills and deep thoughts; its ideas take a backseat to its overstuffed, occasionally illogical plot. It’s 2016, and Johannesburg is policed by fearsome robots called scouts. Deon (Dev Patel), an artificial intelligence expert gets his hands on a dilapidated scout and tries to give the machine a conscience, but others want to use the bot — now christened Chappie (Sharlto Copley) — as a weapon of rebellion. The pundits say Chappie is ambitious and visually striking, but its message is a little too heavy-handed and its characters aren’t developed enough. (Click through our gallery of the most dangerous robots from movies and TV shows, and watch our video interviews with Copley and co-stars Hugh Jackman and Sigourney Weaver.)



Unfinished Business

10%

Take a ragtag trio, send them to an unfamiliar land, and what have you got? Unfinished Busines, which critics say is a startlingly unfunny and undisciplined comedy that strands its sharp cast in a lackadaisical narrative. Vaughn stars as a small business owner who treks to Berlin with his two underlings (Dave Franco and Tom Wilkinson) to close an important deal. But our heroes get sidetracked by a variety of distractions, and hilarity (allegedly) ensues. The pundits say Unfinished Business attempts to combine gross-out gags and farcical scenarios with heartfelt sentiment, and comes up empty on nearly all counts. (Check out Dave Franco’s Five Favorite Films here.)



The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel

65%

Like The Avengers for the senior set, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel featured a murderer’s row of super-powered British acting talent. Most of the gang is back for The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel, and critics say that’s the main reason to recommend this predictable trifle — though its gorgeous setting is a close second. This time out, hotel managers Muriel (Maggie Smith) and Kapoor (Dev Patel) are looking to expand the business, while an American novelist (Richard Gere) takes up residence and various other occupants fall in and out of love. The pundits say The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is cinematic comfort food — less substantial than its predecessor, but warm and appetizing nonetheless. (Watch our video interview with Dench here, and check out our countdown of her best-reviewed movies here.)

What’s On TV:


Critics say that raw, emotional portrayals of diverse characters in dire pain mashed up with chilling narratives and a gutsy attitude make American Crime (Certified Fresh at 100 percent) a must-see.

The pundits say season two of Broadchurch (87 percent) builds on its predecessor’s intrigue, with the added bonus of new characters who mesh well with the existing cast.

While stocked with impressive talent, CSI: Cyber (39 percent) fails to add anything truly new to the franchise, settling for a slightly modernized twist on the same typical crimefighting scenarios.

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • Buzzard, a dark comedy about a slacker who perpetrates a series of low-level cons, is at 95 percent.
  • An Honest Liar, a documentary portrait of magician and skeptic James “The Amazing” Randi, is at 91 percent.
  • Faults, starring Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Leland Orser in a thriller about a troubled man who attempts to deprogram a cult member, is at 87 percent.
  • The Aussie import These Final Hours, a dramedy about a wild party on the eve of the apocalypse, is at 84 percent.
  • Deli Man, a documentary about an innovative delicatessen in Houston, is at 80 percent.
  • Merchants Of Doubt, a documentary about corporate-funded pundits who inject themselves into public debates as dispassionate experts, is at 79 percent.
  • Two Men In Town, starring Forest Whitaker and Harvey Keitel in a drama about an ex-con who’s hounded by a small-town sheriff, is at 56 percent.
  • Road Hard, starring Adam Carolla as a stand-up comedian attempting to jumpstart both his career and his personal life, is at 33 percent.
  • October Gale, starring Patricia Clarkson and Scott Speedman in a thriller about a grieving woman and a man with a gunshot wound under siege in a remote cabin, is at 27 percent.
  • Kidnapping Mr. Heineken, starring Anthony Hopkins and Jim Sturgess in a drama based on the true story of the brazen kidnapping of a brewery heir, is at 21 percent.
  • Rufus, a drama about a lonely teenage vampire looking for love, is at 17 percent.

Since the robot Chappie is so influenced by the He-Man cartoon, Grae Drake asks Hugh Jackman, Sigourney Weaver, and Sharlto Copley about who or what shaped their childhoods.