Dee Cercone/Everett Collection

(Photo by Dee Cercone/Everett Collection)

All Mark Wahlberg Movies Ranked

During the early ’90s, while he was flashing his abs and modeling underwear as Marky Mark, few could have suspected that beneath Mark Wahlberg’s b-boy cap lurked the soul of a thespian. Now, that’s no longer the case — with dozens of roles and a pair of Academy Award nominations to his credit, Wahlberg has compiled an impressive filmography since making his big-screen debut in Danny DeVito’s 1994 comedy Renaissance Man. Since then, he’s branched out quite a bit, showing a flair for drama (Boogie Nights), comedy (Ted), and blockbuster action (Shooter, the Transformers franchise) along the way. It’s never a bad time to look back on Mr. Wahlberg’s career — and with that in mind, we’ve rounded up all of his major roles, sorting the bunch by Tomatometer. Where do your favorites rank? Read on to find out.

#43

Max Payne (2008)
15%

#43
Adjusted Score: 20098%
Critics Consensus: While it boasts some stylish action, Max Payne suffers severely from an illogical plot and overdirection.
Synopsis: After the murders of his family and his partner, maverick cop Max (Mark Wahlberg) becomes hell-bent on revenge. Teamed with... [More]
Directed By: John Moore

#42
Adjusted Score: 34037%
Critics Consensus: Cacophonous, thinly plotted, and boasting state-of-the-art special effects, The Last Knight is pretty much what you'd expect from the fifth installment of the Transformers franchise.
Synopsis: Humans are at war with the Transformers, and Optimus Prime is gone. The key to saving the future lies buried... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#41

Renaissance Man (1994)
12%

#41
Adjusted Score: 12980%
Critics Consensus: Renaissance Man tries to simultaneously be a literary comedy, an inspirational drama, and a star vehicle that caters to Danny DeVito's strengths, but proves to be a master of none.
Synopsis: After getting canned from his advertising job, down-and-out divorcé Bill Rago (Danny DeVito) gets a gig teaching English at a... [More]
Directed By: Penny Marshall

#40

The Happening (2008)
18%

#40
Adjusted Score: 24339%
Critics Consensus: The Happening begins with promise, but unfortunately descends into an incoherent and unconvincing trifle.
Synopsis: An apocalyptic threat to humanity arrives out of the clear blue sky with a series of violent, inexplicable deaths spreading... [More]
Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan

#39
Adjusted Score: 25962%
Critics Consensus: With the fourth installment in Michael Bay's blockbuster Transformers franchise, nothing is in disguise: Fans of loud, effects-driven action will find satisfaction, and all others need not apply.
Synopsis: After an epic battle, a great city lies in ruins, but the Earth itself is saved. As humanity begins to... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#38

Mile 22 (2018)
23%

#38
Adjusted Score: 33336%
Critics Consensus: Mile 22 lets the bullets fly -- and not much else -- in a thrill-deficient action thriller whose title proves sadly fitting for a film that feels close to a marathon endurance test.
Synopsis: CIA operative James Silva leads a small but lethal paramilitary team on an urgent and dangerous mission. They must transport... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#37

Daddy's Home 2 (2017)
21%

#37
Adjusted Score: 29137%
Critics Consensus: A formulaic comedy that's unlikely to spread much yuletide merriment, Daddy's Home 2 can only muster a few stray yuks from its talented cast.
Synopsis: Father and stepfather Dusty and Brad join forces to make Christmastime perfect for the children. Their newfound partnership soon gets... [More]
Directed By: Sean Anders

#36

Broken City (2013)
28%

#36
Adjusted Score: 33851%
Critics Consensus: Broken City's thinly sketched, formulaic script offers meager rewards for all but the least demanding noir aficionados.
Synopsis: Former cop Billy Taggart (Mark Wahlberg) sees a chance at redemption for past sins when New York City's Mayor Nicolas... [More]
Directed By: Allen Hughes

#35

Mojave (2015)
31%

#35
Adjusted Score: 33722%
Critics Consensus: Mojave has no shortage of talent on either side of the camera; unfortunately, it amounts to little more than a frustrating missed opportunity.
Synopsis: A down-and-out artist (Garrett Hedlund) has a dangerous and shocking encounter with an evil drifter (Oscar Isaac) in the desert,... [More]
Directed By: William Monahan

#34

Daddy's Home (2015)
30%

#34
Adjusted Score: 34507%
Critics Consensus: Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg have proven comedic chemistry, but Daddy's Home suffers from a dearth of genuinely funny ideas - and lacks enough guts or imagination to explore the satirical possibilities of its premise.
Synopsis: Brad Whitaker (Will Ferrell) is a kindhearted radio executive who wants to be the best possible stepfather to his wife's... [More]
Directed By: Sean Anders

#33

The Lovely Bones (2009)
32%

#33
Adjusted Score: 41238%
Critics Consensus: It's stuffed full of Peter Jackson's typically dazzling imagery, but The Lovely Bones suffers from abrupt shifts between horrific violence and cloying sentimentality.
Synopsis: After being brutally murdered, 14-year-old Susie Salmon (Saoirse Ronan) watches from heaven over her grief-stricken family (Mark Wahlberg, Rachel Weisz)... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#32
#32
Adjusted Score: 37081%
Critics Consensus: Newton has star quality, but this exercise in style can't hold a candle to the original.
Synopsis: Regina (Thandie Newton) meets charming Joshua (Mark Wahlberg) while vacationing in Martinique, as she contemplates ending her whirlwind marriage to... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Demme

#31

Fear (1996)
46%

#31
Adjusted Score: 46649%
Critics Consensus: Fear has an appealing young cast, but their efforts aren't enough to consistently distract from an increasingly overblown - and illogical - teen stalker story.
Synopsis: When 16-year-old Nicole Walker (Reese Witherspoon) meets 23-year-old David McCall (Mark Wahlberg) at a Seattle nightclub, she falls in love.... [More]
Directed By: James Foley

#30

The Big Hit (1998)
43%

#30
Adjusted Score: 43587%
Critics Consensus: The Big Hit seeks to blend the best of Hong Kong and American action cinema, but ends up offering a muddled mush that mostly misses.
Synopsis: Affable hit man Melvin Smiley (Mark Wahlberg) is constantly being scammed by his cutthroat colleagues in the life-ending business. So,... [More]
Directed By: Che-Kirk Wong

#29

The Gambler (2014)
44%

#29
Adjusted Score: 48453%
Critics Consensus: Well-paced and reasonably entertaining in its own right, The Gambler still suffers from comparisons to the James Caan classic that inspired it.
Synopsis: Literature professor Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) leads a secret life as a high-stakes gambler. Always a risk-taker, Bennett bets it... [More]
Directed By: Rupert Wyatt

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 50178%
Critics Consensus: This remake of Planet of the Apes can't compare to the original in some critics' mind, but the striking visuals and B-movie charms may win you over.
Synopsis: Director Tim Burton ("Batman") reinvents one of the most acclaimed and beloved works of science fiction, Pierre Boulle's classic novel... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: 46694%
Critics Consensus: In spite of its young leading man's heroic efforts to hold it all together, a muddled message prevents The Basketball Diaries from compelling as a cautionary tale.
Synopsis: Jim Carroll (Leonardo DiCaprio) is consumed by his life as a high school basketball star. Pressured by a wicked coach... [More]
Directed By: Scott Kalvert

#26

Ted 2 (2015)
44%

#26
Adjusted Score: 52367%
Critics Consensus: Ted 2 reunites Mark Wahlberg and Seth MacFarlane for another round of sophomoric, scatological humor -- and just as before, your enjoyment will depend on your tolerance for all of the above.
Synopsis: Life has changed drastically for thunder buddies John (Mark Wahlberg), now a bachelor, and best pal Ted (Seth MacFarlane), now... [More]
Directed By: Seth MacFarlane

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 50984%
Critics Consensus: While the special effects are well done and quite impressive, this film suffers from any actual drama or characterization. The end result is a film that offers nifty eye-candy and nothing else.
Synopsis: Based on a true story, the film tells of the courageous men and women who risk their lives every working... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Petersen

#24

Shooter (2007)
47%

#24
Adjusted Score: 53178%
Critics Consensus: With an implausible story and numerous plot holes, Shooter fails to distinguish itself from other mindless action-thrillers.
Synopsis: A top Marine sniper, Bob Lee Swagger (Mark Wahlberg), leaves the military after a mission goes horribly awry and disappears... [More]
Directed By: Antoine Fuqua

#23

The Corruptor (1999)
48%

#23
Adjusted Score: 48470%
Critics Consensus: This uninspiring cop thriller doesn't measure up to Chow Yun-Fat's Hong Kong work.
Synopsis: Martial arts expert Detective Nick Chen (Chow Yun-Fat) teams up with his colleague Danny Wallace (Mark Wahlberg) to keep several... [More]
Directed By: James Foley

#22

Pain & Gain (2013)
50%

#22
Adjusted Score: 58134%
Critics Consensus: It may be his most thought-provoking film to date, but Michael Bay's Pain & Gain ultimately loses its satirical edge in a stylized flurry of violent spectacle.
Synopsis: Danny Lupo (Mark Wahlberg), manager of the Sun Gym in 1990s Miami, decides that there is only one way to... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#21

Contraband (2012)
51%

#21
Adjusted Score: 56763%
Critics Consensus: It's more entertaining than your average January action thriller, but that isn't enough to excuse Contraband's lack of originality and unnecessarily convoluted plot.
Synopsis: Ex-smuggler Chris Farraday (Mark Wahlberg) gave up his criminal ways long ago. But, he's forced back into the game after... [More]
Directed By: Baltasar Kormákur

#20

Rock Star (2001)
53%

#20
Adjusted Score: 56783%
Critics Consensus: Like its title, Rock Star is rather generic, being not so much about the heavy metal scene than about rock cliches and formula.
Synopsis: A comedy set in the world of '80s rock 'n' roll, "Rock Star" is the story of an office supplies... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Herek

#19

Four Brothers (2005)
52%

#19
Adjusted Score: 56987%
Critics Consensus: Despite striking a believable rapport among its principal actors, Four Brothers overwhelms with ultra-violent, vigilante-glorifying action and devolves into too many fractured, insubstantial thematic directions.
Synopsis: When an inner-city Detroit foster mother (Fionnula Flanagan) is murdered in a botched holdup, four of her now-grown adopted children... [More]
Directed By: John Singleton

#18

We Own the Night (2007)
57%

#18
Adjusted Score: 63369%
Critics Consensus: Bland characters, clichéd dialogue and rickety plotting ensure We Own The Night never lives up to its potential.
Synopsis: In 1988, New York's police wage an all-out war on drugs, and guilty and innocent alike become casualties. Bobby Green... [More]
Directed By: James Gray

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 70058%
Critics Consensus: I Heart Huckabees certainly isn't for everyone, but audiences attuned to its quirky wavelength will find a singularly brainy screwball comedy that refuses to pander.
Synopsis: Environmentalist Albert (Jason Schwartzman) enlists the services of "existential detectives" Bernard (Dustin Hoffman) and Vivian (Lily Tomlin) to solve the... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#16

The Yards (2000)
64%

#16
Adjusted Score: 67342%
Critics Consensus: Featuring strong performances and direction, The Yards is a richly textured crime thriller with an authentic feel.
Synopsis: After serving time in prison for taking the fall for a group of his friends, Leo just wants to get... [More]
Directed By: James Gray

#15

2 Guns (2013)
65%

#15
Adjusted Score: 71508%
Critics Consensus: Formulaic and often jarringly violent, 2 Guns rests its old-school appeal on the interplay between its charismatic, well-matched stars.
Synopsis: For the past year, DEA agent Bobby Trench (Denzel Washington) and U.S. Navy intelligence officer Marcus Stigman (Mark Wahlberg) have... [More]
Directed By: Baltasar Kormákur

#14

Date Night (2010)
66%

#14
Adjusted Score: 74861%
Critics Consensus: An uneasy blend of action and comedy, Date Night doesn't quite live up to the talents of its two leads, but Steve Carell and Tina Fey still manage to shine through most of the movie's flaws.
Synopsis: Dragged down by the daily grind, suburbanites Phil (Steve Carell) and Claire (Tina Fey) try to invigorate their marriage by... [More]
Directed By: Shawn Levy

#13

Ted (2012)
69%

#13
Adjusted Score: 77397%
Critics Consensus: Ted's "romance versus bromance" plot is familiar, but the film's held aloft by the high-concept central premise and a very funny (albeit inconsistent) script.
Synopsis: When John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) was a little boy, he made a wish that Ted (Seth MacFarlane), his beloved teddy... [More]
Directed By: Seth MacFarlane

#12

Invincible (2006)
72%

#12
Adjusted Score: 77478%
Critics Consensus: As simple and authentic as the gritty South Philly invirons in which it's set in, Invincible sends a uplifting and heartfelt message packed with an athletic enthusiasm that shouldn't be missed.
Synopsis: Lifelong football fan Vince Papale (Mark Wahlberg) sees his wildest dreams come true when he becomes a member of the... [More]
Directed By: Ericson Core

#11

The Italian Job (2003)
73%

#11
Adjusted Score: 78186%
Critics Consensus: Despite some iffy plot elements, The Italian Job succeeds in delivering an entertaining modern take on the original 1969 heist film, thanks to a charismatic cast.
Synopsis: After a heist in Venice, Steve (Edward Norton) turns on his partners in crime, killing safecracker John Bridger (Donald Sutherland)... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#10

Lone Survivor (2013)
75%

#10
Adjusted Score: 83667%
Critics Consensus: A true account of military courage and survival, Lone Survivor wields enough visceral power to mitigate its heavy-handed jingoism.
Synopsis: In 2005 Afghanistan, Navy SEALs Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg), Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch), Danny Dietz (Emile Hirsch) and Matthew "Axe"... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#9
Adjusted Score: 98336%
Critics Consensus: All the Money in the World offers an absorbing portrayal of a true story, brought compellingly to life by a powerful performance from Christopher Plummer.
Synopsis: In 1973, kidnappers demand $17 million from billionaire J. Paul Getty in exchange for his grandson's release. Getty refuses to... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#8

The Other Guys (2010)
79%

#8
Adjusted Score: 85926%
Critics Consensus: A clever parody of cop-buddy action-comedies, The Other Guys delivers several impressive action set pieces and lots of big laughs, thanks to the assured comic chemistry between Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg.
Synopsis: Unlike their heroic counterparts on the force, desk-bound NYPD detectives Gamble (Will Ferrell) and Hoitz (Mark Wahlberg) garner no headlines... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#7

Traveller (1997)
79%

#7
Adjusted Score: 79094%
Critics Consensus: Though it may not explore its core issues as deeply as some may like, Traveller is nevertheless a smart and funny portrait of a relatively unfamiliar subculture with some strong performances.
Synopsis: A con man (Bill Paxton) teaches a novice (Mark Wahlberg) the rules for membership in an Irish-American grifters gang.... [More]
Directed By: Jack N. Green

#6

Patriots Day (2016)
81%

#6
Adjusted Score: 97625%
Critics Consensus: Patriots Day offers a stirring, solidly crafted tribute to the heroes of a real-life American tragedy without straying into exploitative action thriller territory.
Synopsis: Tragedy strikes on April 15, 2013, when two bombs explode during the Boston Marathon. In the aftermath of the attack,... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 98680%
Critics Consensus: Deepwater Horizon makes effective use of its titular man-made disaster to deliver an uncommonly serious -- yet still suitably gripping -- action thriller.
Synopsis: On April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig explodes in the Gulf of Mexico, igniting a massive fireball that... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#4

The Fighter (2010)
91%

#4
Adjusted Score: 99782%
Critics Consensus: Led by a trio of captivating performances from Mark Wahlberg, Christian Bale, and Amy Adams, The Fighter is a solidly entertaining, albeit predictable, entry in the boxing drama genre.
Synopsis: For Micky Ward (Mark Wahlberg), boxing is a family affair. His tough-as-nails mother is his manager. His half-brother, Dicky (Christian... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#3

The Departed (2006)
90%

#3
Adjusted Score: 102528%
Critics Consensus: Featuring outstanding work from an excellent cast, The Departed is a thoroughly engrossing gangster drama with the gritty authenticity and soupy morality we come to expect from Martin Scorsese.
Synopsis: South Boston cop Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio) goes under cover to infiltrate the organization of gangland chief Frank Costello (Jack... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#2

Boogie Nights (1997)
93%

#2
Adjusted Score: 97458%
Critics Consensus: Grounded in strong characters, bold themes, and subtle storytelling, Boogie Nights is a groundbreaking film both for director P.T. Anderson and star Mark Wahlberg.
Synopsis: In the San Fernando Valley in 1977, teenage busboy Eddie Adams (Mark Wahlberg) gets discovered by porn director Jack Horner... [More]
Directed By: Paul Thomas Anderson

#1

Three Kings (1999)
94%

#1
Adjusted Score: 98635%
Critics Consensus: Three Kings successfully blends elements of action, drama, and comedy into a thoughtful, exciting movie on the Gulf War.
Synopsis: Just after the end of the Gulf War, four American soldiers decide to steal a cache of Saddam Hussein's hidden... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

100 Best War Movies of All Time

From peacetime to frontlines, from coming home to left behind: Rotten Tomatoes presents the 100 best-reviewed war movies of all time, ranked by Adjusted Tomatometer with at least 20 reviews each.

#100

Che: Part Two (2008)
79%

#100
Adjusted Score: 80411%
Critics Consensus: The second part of Soderbergh's biopic is a dark, hypnotic and sometimes frustrating portrait of a warrior in decline, with a terrific central performance from Del Toro.
Synopsis: Seven years after his triumph in Cuba, Che (Benicio Del Toro) winds up in Bolivia, where he tries to ignite... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#99
Adjusted Score: 75645%
Critics Consensus: Worthy themes and strong performances across the board make Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence an impactful story about bridging cultural divides.
Synopsis: During World War II, British soldier Jack Celliers (David Bowie) is captured by Japanese forces and held in a prison... [More]
Directed By: Nagisa Ôshima

#98

Black Hawk Down (2001)
76%

#98
Adjusted Score: 82790%
Critics Consensus: Though it's light on character development and cultural empathy, Black Hawk Down is a visceral, pulse-pounding portrait of war, elevated by Ridley Scott's superb technical skill.
Synopsis: The film takes place in 1993 when the U.S. sent special forces into Somalia to destabilize the government and bring... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#97

The Tin Drum (1979)
84%

#97
Adjusted Score: 85675%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Oskar Matzerath (David Bennent) is a very unusual boy. Refusing to leave the womb until promised a tin drum by... [More]
Directed By: Volker Schlöndorff

#96
#96
Adjusted Score: 83118%
Critics Consensus: A well-crafted and visually arresting drama with a touch of whimsy.
Synopsis: Mathilde (Audrey Tautou) is told that her fiancé (Gaspard Ulliel) has been killed in World War I. She refuses to... [More]
Directed By: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

#95

American Sniper (2014)
72%

#95
Adjusted Score: 84400%
Critics Consensus: Powered by Clint Eastwood's sure-handed direction and a gripping central performance from Bradley Cooper, American Sniper delivers a tense, vivid tribute to its real-life subject.
Synopsis: U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) takes his sole mission -- protect his comrades -- to heart and becomes... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#94

Kelly's Heroes (1970)
78%

#94
Adjusted Score: 79773%
Critics Consensus: Kelly's Heroes subverts its World War II setting with pointed satirical commentary on modern military efforts, offering an entertaining hybrid of heist caper and battlefield action.
Synopsis: In the midst of World War II, an array of colorful American soldiers gets inside information from a drunk German... [More]
Directed By: Brian G. Hutton

#93

Braveheart (1995)
79%

#93
Adjusted Score: 83525%
Critics Consensus: Distractingly violent and historically dodgy, Mel Gibson's Braveheart justifies its epic length by delivering enough sweeping action, drama, and romance to match its ambition.
Synopsis: Tells the story of the legendary thirteenth century Scottish hero named William Wallace (Mel Gibson). Wallace rallies the Scottish against... [More]
Directed By: Mel Gibson

#92

War Horse (2011)
74%

#92
Adjusted Score: 83296%
Critics Consensus: Technically superb, proudly sentimental, and unabashedly old-fashioned, War Horse is an emotional drama that tugs the heartstrings with Spielberg's customary flair.
Synopsis: Albert (Jeremy Irvine) and his beloved horse, Joey, live on a farm in the British countryside. At the outbreak of... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#91

Coming Home (1978)
85%

#91
Adjusted Score: 87127%
Critics Consensus: Coming Home's stellar cast elevates the love triangle in the center of its story - and adds a necessary human component to its none-too-subtle political message.
Synopsis: The wife of a Marine serving in Vietnam, Sally Hyde (Jane Fonda) decides to volunteer at a local veterans hospital... [More]
Directed By: Hal Ashby

#90
#90
Adjusted Score: 85662%
Critics Consensus: The Thin Red Line is a daringly philosophical World War II film with an enormous cast of eager stars.
Synopsis: In 1942, Private Witt (Jim Caviezel) is a U.S. Army absconder living peacefully with the locals of a small South... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#89

Lone Survivor (2013)
75%

#89
Adjusted Score: 83667%
Critics Consensus: A true account of military courage and survival, Lone Survivor wields enough visceral power to mitigate its heavy-handed jingoism.
Synopsis: In 2005 Afghanistan, Navy SEALs Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg), Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch), Danny Dietz (Emile Hirsch) and Matthew "Axe"... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#88

Private Benjamin (1980)
82%

#88
Adjusted Score: 84639%
Critics Consensus: Private Benjamin proves a potent showcase for its Oscar-nominated star, with Hawn making the most of a story that rests almost completely on her daffily irresistible charm.
Synopsis: A Jewish-American princess, Judy Benjamin (Goldie Hawn), is devastated when her husband (Albert Brooks) drops dead on their wedding night.... [More]
Directed By: Howard Zieff

#87
#87
Adjusted Score: 84627%
Critics Consensus: Benigni's earnest charm, when not overstepping its bounds into the unnecessarily treacly, offers the possibility of hope in the face of unflinching horror.
Synopsis: A gentle Jewish-Italian waiter, Guido Orefice (Roberto Benigni), meets Dora (Nicoletta Braschi), a pretty schoolteacher, and wins her over with... [More]
Directed By: Roberto Benigni

#86

Fury (2014)
76%

#86
Adjusted Score: 87218%
Critics Consensus: Overall, Fury is a well-acted, suitably raw depiction of the horrors of war that offers visceral battle scenes but doesn't quite live up to its larger ambitions.
Synopsis: In April 1945, the Allies are making their final push in the European theater. A battle-hardened Army sergeant named Don... [More]
Directed By: David Ayer

As we celebrate America’s 241st birthday, this special 24 Frames gallery highlights Fresh and Certified Fresh patriotic movies for our long weekend of good food, family, and fireworks!

During the early 1990s, while he was flashing his abs and modeling underwear as Marky Mark, few could have suspected that beneath Mark Wahlberg’s b-boy cap lurked the soul of a thespian. Now, of course, that’s no longer the case — with more than 20 roles and an Academy Award nomination to his credit, Wahlberg has compiled an impressive filmography over the last 15-plus years. With his latest film, Patriots Day, opening this weekend, we thought now would be the perfect time to take a look back at his best-reviewed major roles. It’s time for Total Recall!


10. Invincible (2006) 72%

invincible

He isn’t a household name, but Vince Papale is a legend among hardcore football fans — particularly in Philadelphia, where he overcame the odds to earn a spot on the Eagles’ roster and became one of the oldest rookies in the history of the NFL — as well as a living embodiment of the team’s scrappy, blue-collar image. Though Wahlberg is from Boston, he knows a thing or two about seemingly impossible dreams that come true, and his performance helped give Invincible a sweaty leg up on the many inspirational sports dramas in theaters at the time. “It may seem that Invincible takes too long to get to the football,” wrote Gary Dowell of the Baltimore City Paper. “But by the time it does get down to it, we’ve invested enough in Wahlberg and Kinnear to give a damn about the outcome of the all-important Big Game.”

Watch Trailer


9. The Italian Job (2003) 73%

the-italian-job

Part of the wave of heist flick remakes that gave us new versions of The Thomas Crown Affair and Ocean’s Eleven, F. Gary Gray’s “homage” to the 1969 Michael Caine caper The Italian Job put Wahlberg in the middle of a double-crossing, gold-thieving band of criminals that included Charlize Theron, Jason Statham, Mos Def, and Seth Green. Though critics were quick to point out that the new Job didn’t really add much to the original — and the movie was arguably bettern-known for its heavy use of trendy Mini Coopers than anything that actually transpired in the plot — it offered 111 minutes of agreeably undemanding action thrills. As Jon Niccum of the Lawrence Journal-World wrote, “Filled with easy-to-like characters, innovative action sequences and a story rife with momentum, the movie is as endearingly zippy as the BMW MINIs the heroes use to pull off their scam.”

Watch Trailer


8. Lone Survivor (2013) 75%

lone-survivor

Having already starred in arguably the definitive Gulf War movie (Three Kings), Wahlberg may have been tempting fate when he signed on for Lone Survivor, writer-director Peter Berg’s adaptation of the nonfiction bestseller from Marcus Luttrell and Patrick Robinson inspired by Luttrell’s experiences in Afghanistan during Operation Red Wings. But looking back, it isn’t hard to see what drew Wahlberg to the project; opening wide in early 2014, it managed to escape the dismal commercial fate afforded many modern-day war movies, as well as drawing praise from the majority of critics, who were able to see past Survivor’s occasionally troublesome subtext and appreciate the film’s genuinely harrowing action sequences and generally persuasive performances. “Lone Survivor‘s lack of suspense never works against it,” argued Dana Stevens for Slate. “If anything, the fact that the outcome is, at least roughly, known in advance only adds to the film’s sickening tension.”

Watch Trailer


 7. The Other Guys (2010) 79%

the-other-guys

Sometimes it seems like all Will Ferrell needs in order to be funny is a sufficiently broad premise and a solid foil to help ground his lunatic behavior in something like the real world. With 2010’s The Other Guys, he got both — a screenplay from Chris Henchy and Adam McKay (the latter of whom directed) about a serious-but-unlucky cop (Mark Wahlberg) who’s saddled with a milquetoast desk jockey (Ferrell) for a partner. When the best cops in town (played by Dwayne Johnson and Samuel L. Jackson) are incapacitated, the “other guys” step into the breach and blow the lid off a massive conspiracy involving an unscrupulous billionaire (Steve Coogan) and his even more ruthless client (Anne Heche) — firing off belly laughs along the way. Not the most novel setup, perhaps, but it’s all Wahlberg and Ferrell needed to rack up nearly $225 million at the box office, as well as earn the admiration of critics like the Los Angeles Times’ Betsy Sharkey, who chuckled, “The plot doesn’t always hold water and it has a tendency to ramble, but they don’t seem to care. And honestly, neither should you.”

Watch Trailer


6. Traveller (1997) 79%

traveller

Truly entertaining stories about con men are difficult to come by — and even the best of the bunch tend to focus on the thrill of the grift, leaving the characters themselves in the background. 1997’s Traveller reversed the formula, examining the knotty feuds and traditions of a tight-knit clan of small-time North Carolina con artists, in particular Bokky (Bill Paxton), a Traveller whose life is thrown out of balance when he crosses paths with the son of an exiled member (Mark Wahlberg) and develops an honest emotional attachment to one of his victims (Julianna Margulies). It isn’t one of Wahlberg’s better-known movies, but it was a hit with critics like ReelViews’ James Berardinelli, who wrote, “The script is smart and sneaky — by never telling the audience more than is necessary, it develops a keen sense of suspense that persists until the gritty final reel.”

Watch Trailer


5. Deepwater Horizon (2016) 83%

deepwater-horizon

Mark Wahlberg’s carved out a pretty good career for himself playing heroes, but playing a guy who helped save the day in an actual tragedy — particularly one that resulted in lives lost and the worst environmental disaster in U.S. history — takes a little more tact than your average action thriller. It’s a line he managed to walk fairly successfully with Deepwater Horizon, which saw him reuniting with Lone Survivor director Peter Berg to dramatize the titular oil rig’s 2010 spill with a combination of excitement and respect for the gravity of the situation. Leading an impressive cast rounded out by Kurt Russell, John Malkovich, and Kate Hudson, Wahlberg played real-life ship worker Mike Williams, giving audiences a hero to root for — and helping outline the case against the corporate malfeasance that created the problem. “Deepwater Horizon achieves that impossible balance,” wrote Lindsey Bahr of the Associated Press, calling it “a tribute to the workers who both perished and survived that day and a searing critique of the rotten system that put them there in the first place.”

Watch Trailer


4. The Fighter (2010) 91%

the-fighter

David O. Russell clearly enjoys working with Mark Wahlberg. After striking critical paydirt with Three Kings and getting him to flex his comedic muscle with I Heart Huckabees, Russell again turned to his former leading man for The Fighter, a dramatization of the real-life story of welterweight boxing champ “Irish” Micky Ward, the Massachusetts legend who teamed up with his brother (and trainer) Dicky (Christian Bale) to duke out a triumph of sorts over their difficult upbringing. Wahlberg was one of the few Fighter stars who didn’t earn an Academy Award nomination for his work — Bale took home a Best Supporting Actor Oscar — but given how long and how vigorously he fought to help bring the movie to the big screen, the movie’s warm critical reception and $129 million box office had to serve as a pretty sweet vindication. “The Fighter deftly manages to be equal parts character drama and sports film without giving short shrift to either,” wrote Joshua Starnes for ComingSoon. “Containing a couple of the best performances of the year, it is in turn harrowing and heartwarming.”

Watch Trailer


3. The Departed (2006) 90%

the-departed

We love to hate remakes, but not all of them are created equal; for proof, look no further than The Departed, Martin Scorsese’s expertly cast treatment of the 2002 Hong Kong hit Infernal Affairs. On the surface, it might look like just another crime thriller where no one is who or what he seems — but this kind of story is all in the telling, and Scorsese had a tightly wound William Monahan screenplay to work from, as well as a bruising set of leads in Matt Damon, Leonardo DiCaprio, Jack Nicholson, and Wahlberg. A four-time Oscar winner, The Departed finally earned Scorsese his long-overdue Best Picture and Best Director honors, and triggered an avalanche of praise from critics like Terry Lawson of the Detroit Free Press, who applauded, “It’s a thinking fan’s thriller, a movie involving multiple fully dimensional characters, multiple story lines and edge-of-your-seat twists and swerves, stylized to just the edge of believability.”

Watch Trailer


2. Boogie Nights (1997) 93%

boogie-nights

A year after terrorizing Reese Witherspoon in Fear, Wahlberg made the leap to Serious Actor territory with the starring role in Paul Thomas Anderson’s ensemble opus about life in the porn industry, Boogie Nights. As the genitally gifted Eddie Adams, a.k.a. Dirk Diggler, Wahlberg took a character that could have been a cheesy joke and imbued him with palpable emotion. One of the year’s biggest critical winners, Boogie Nights started Anderson and Wahlberg’s careers in earnest, earned co-star Burt Reynolds some of the best reviews of his career, and enjoyed a thumbs up from Roger Ebert, who wrote, “As a writer and director, Paul Thomas Anderson is a skilled reporter who fills his screen with understated, authentic details.”

Watch Trailer


1. Three Kings (1999) 94%

three-kings

Anyone who wonders why audiences refuse to see movies about the wars raging in the Middle East would do well to study the example set by David O. Russell, who waited eight years before making the Gulf War picture Three Kings — and even then, the conflict served mainly as grist for a heist storyline involving a trio of U.S. Army Reservists (George Clooney, Ice Cube, and Wahlberg) making plans to steal plundered Kuwaiti gold. Widely recognized as a sharp, stylish satire today, Kings wasn’t a huge commercial success during its initial theatrical run, but it earned instant admiration from critics like Sean Means of Film.com, who called it “Possibly the best wartime comedy since Robert Altman’s M*A*S*H.

Watch Trailer

600StarWars6

This weekend, Star Wars: The Force Awakens is now the number one film all time domestically, The Revenant expanded nationwide to explosive results while Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight crumbled in its second week of wide release.

In a mere 20 days, Star Wars: The Force Awakens managed to overtake Avatar and become the highest grossing film of all time domestically. In its 4th weekend (which would be 24 days), The Force Awakens racked up another $41.6M, according to estimates, raising its record to $812M. Internationally it made another $146M (including a record-breaking $52.6M two-day opening in China) bringing its cume to $921M for a worldwide total of $1.73B, overtaking Jurassic World for number three all-time. This leaves only Titanic ($2.1865B worldwide) and Avatar ($2.788B) left in its path. Will it be able to make another billion dollars? That might be difficult but never say never with this film. Perhaps if one person wins this week’s $1.3B Powerball jackpot in the U.S., they’ll spend all their money on Star Wars tickets?

In what turned out to be a close race, Leonardo DiCaprio’s best chance yet at Oscar glory The Revenant exploded in wide release taking in an estimated $38M from 3,375 theaters for a per screen average of $11,259, best in the top 10. If the estimates hold, it’ll be the fifth highest opening weekend in January, slipping right in between 2015’s Taken 3 ($39M) and 2014’s Lone Survivor ($37.8M). The last three years have seen five of the top six January openings. For DiCaprio, it’s his fourth biggest opening behind Shutter Island ($41M in 2010), The Great Gatsby ($50M in 2013) and Inception ($62.8M in 2010). Finally, we have a prestige pic that does well in its nationwide expansion, which should bode well for its Oscar chances.

Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg’s Daddy’s Home continued it’s impressive run with an estimated $15M in its third weekend, a drop of 48% from last weekend’s holiday infused grosses. Its total now stands at $116M for Paramount, a studio always in desperate need of a hit.

Debuting in fourth was the horror film The Forest which made $13.1M, according to estimates, from 2,451 theaters for a per screen average of $5,340. January has always been kind to horror films and anytime you can make back your budget in a single weekend, you’re on the right path. Between this and The Revenant, audiences spent a lot of money on films that take place in between the trees.

Also continuing a strong run was the tag team of Tina Fey and Amy Poehler with Sisters taking in an estimated $7.2M this weekend, bringing its cume after four weekends to $75M. Collapsing in sixth place was the eighth film from Quentin Tarantino, The Hateful Eight which fell 60% from last weekend despite adding over 450 theaters. It took in an estimated $6.35M this weekend bringing its total up to $41.5M. So let’s kindly forget my thoughts from last week where I said it had a shot at hitting $100M, shall we?

Holding on in seventh place with the smallest drop in the top 10 (30%) was The Big Short which made an estimated $6.3M bringing its total up to $42.8M for Paramount. A couple of Fox films took the next two spots with Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip bringing in an estimated $5.5M lifting its total to $75M and awards-hopeful Joy taking in an estimated $4.5M bringing its cume up to $46M. And rounding out the top 10 was Concussion which became much more relevant after the vicious hit taken by Antonio Brown of the Pittsburgh Steelers last night left him with a concussion. The Will Smith starrer took in $3M, according to estimates, bringing its total up to $31M.

Outside of the top 10 Anomalisa added 13 theaters but saw its per screen average drop from $35,000 to $13,000 with its total now at $490K.

The top ten films grossed $140.6M which was up 34% from last year when Taken 3 debuted at number one with $39M; and up 25% from 2014 when Lone Survivor jumped into the top spot in its first weekend of wide release with $37.8M.

Mark Wahlberg
During the early 1990s, while he was flashing his abs and modeling underwear as Marky Mark, few could have suspected that beneath Mark Wahlberg‘s b-boy cap lurked the soul of a thespian. Now, of course, that’s no longer the case — with more than 20 roles and an Academy Award nomination to his credit, Wahlberg has compiled an impressive filmography over the last 15-plus years. With Wahlberg leading the human contingent in Transformers: Age of Extinction this weekend, we thought now would be the perfect time to take a look back at Wahlberg’s best-reviewed major roles. It’s time for Total Recall!



First, a sample of Wahlberg’s emotive prowess.


69%

10. Ted

A comedy about a talking teddy bear who grows up to be a foul-mouthed pothead, from the man who gave us Family Guy? It’s got to be a childish waste of time, right? Not so fast, friends: As 2012’s Ted proved, sophomoric and scatological humor can be mighty effective when they’re used by the right cast in service of a sufficiently funny story, and while this may have been yet another variation on the “eternal manchild” comedy we’ve been watching for years — right down to the inexplicably striking, long-suffering girlfriend (Mila Kunis) who waits for our stars to grow up — it still produced its share of laughs, as well as nearly $550 million in worldwide grosses. Of course, now there’s a Ted 2 in development — not that you’ll hear any complaining from critics like the New York Daily News’ Elizabeth Weitzman, who wrote, “Not every joke scores, of course. But the hits are worth the misses, and anyway, the movie’s true genius is in the way its outlandish scenario is played so perfectly straight.”


72%

9. Invincible

He isn’t a household name, but Vince Papale is a legend among hardcore football fans — particularly in Philadelphia, where he overcame the odds to earn a spot on the Eagles’ roster and became one of the oldest rookies in the history of the NFL — as well as a living embodiment of the team’s scrappy, blue-collar image. Though Wahlberg is from Boston, he knows a thing or two about seemingly impossible dreams that come true, and his performance helped give Invincible a sweaty leg up on the many inspirational sports dramas in theaters at the time. “It may seem that Invincible takes too long to get to the football,” wrote Gary Dowell of the Baltimore City Paper. “But by the time it does get down to it, we’ve invested enough in Wahlberg and Kinnear to give a damn about the outcome of the all-important Big Game.”


73%

8. The Italian Job

Part of the wave of heist flick remakes that gave us new versions of The Thomas Crown Affair and Ocean’s Eleven, F. Gary Gray’s “homage” to the 1969 Michael Caine caper The Italian Job put Wahlberg in the middle of a double-crossing, gold-thieving band of criminals that included Charlize Theron, Jason Statham, Mos Def, and Seth Green. Though critics were quick to point out that the new Job didn’t really add much to the original — and the movie was arguably bettern-known for its heavy use of trendy Mini Coopers than anything that actually transpired in the plot — it offered 111 minutes of agreeably undemanding action thrills. As Jon Niccum of the Lawrence Journal-World wrote, “Filled with easy-to-like characters, innovative action sequences and a story rife with momentum, the movie is as endearingly zippy as the BMW MINIs the heroes use to pull off their scam.”


75%

7. Lone Survivor

Having already starred in arguably the definitive Gulf War movie (Three Kings), Wahlberg may have been tempting fate when he signed on for Lone Survivor, writer-director Peter Berg’s adaptation of the nonfiction bestseller from Marcus Luttrell and Patrick Robinson inspired by Luttrell’s experiences in Afghanistan during Operation Red Wings. But looking back, it isn’t hard to see what drew Wahlberg to the project; opening wide in early 2014, it managed to escape the dismal commercial fate afforded many modern-day war movies, as well as drawing praise from the majority of critics, who were able to see past Survivor‘s occasionally troublesome subtext and appreciate the film’s genuinely harrowing action sequences and generally persuasive performances. “Lone Survivor‘s lack of suspense never works against it,” argued Dana Stevens for Slate. “If anything, the fact that the outcome is, at least roughly, known in advance only adds to the film’s sickening tension.”


79%

6. Traveller

Truly entertaining stories about con men are difficult to come by — and even the best of the bunch tend to focus on the thrill of the grift, leaving the characters themselves in the background. 1997’s Traveller reversed the formula, examining the knotty feuds and traditions of a tight-knit clan of small-time North Carolina con artists, in particular Bokky (Bill Paxton), a Traveller whose life is thrown out of balance when he crosses paths with the son of an exiled member (Mark Wahlberg) and develops an honest emotional attachment to one of his victims (Julianna Margulies). It isn’t one of Wahlberg’s better-known movies, but it was a hit with critics like ReelViews’ James Berardinelli, who wrote, “The script is smart and sneaky — by never telling the audience more than is necessary, it develops a keen sense of suspense that persists until the gritty final reel.”


79%

5. The Other Guys

Sometimes it seems like all Will Ferrell needs in order to be funny is a sufficiently broad premise and a solid foil to help ground his lunatic behavior in something like the real world. With 2010’s The Other Guys, he got both — a screenplay from Chris Henchy and Adam McKay (the latter of whom directed) about a serious-but-unlucky cop (Mark Wahlberg) who’s saddled with a milquetoast desk jockey (Ferrell) for a partner. When the best cops in town (played by Dwayne Johnson and Samuel L. Jackson) are incapacitated, the “other guys” step into the breach and blow the lid off a massive conspiracy involving an unscrupulous billionaire (Steve Coogan) and his even more ruthless client (Anne Heche) — firing off belly laughs along the way. Not the most novel setup, perhaps, but it’s all Wahlberg and Ferrell needed to rack up nearly $225 million at the box office, as well as earn the admiration of critics like the Los Angeles Times’ Betsy Sharkey, who chuckled, “The plot doesn’t always hold water and it has a tendency to ramble, but they don’t seem to care. And honestly, neither should you.”


91%

4. The Fighter

David O. Russell clearly enjoys working with Mark Wahlberg. After striking critical paydirt with Three Kings and getting him to flex his comedic muscle with I Heart Huckabees, Russell again turned to his former leading man for The Fighter, a dramatization of the real-life story of welterweight boxing champ “Irish” Micky Ward, the Massachusetts legend who teamed up with his brother (and trainer) Dicky (Christian Bale) to duke out a triumph of sorts over their difficult upbringing. Wahlberg was one of the few Fighter stars who didn’t earn an Academy Award nomination for his work — Bale took home a Best Supporting Actor Oscar — but given how long and how vigorously he fought to help bring the movie to the big screen, the movie’s warm critical reception and $129 million box office had to serve as a pretty sweet vindication. “The Fighter deftly manages to be equal parts character drama and sports film without giving short shrift to either,” wrote Joshua Starnes for ComingSoon. “Containing a couple of the best performances of the year, it is in turn harrowing and heartwarming.”


93%

3. Boogie Nights

A year after terrorizing Reese Witherspoon in Fear, Wahlberg made the leap to Serious Actor territory with the starring role in Paul Thomas Anderson’s ensemble opus about life in the porn industry, Boogie Nights. As the genitally gifted Eddie Adams, a.k.a. Dirk Diggler, Wahlberg took a character that could have been a cheesy joke and imbued him with palpable emotion. One of the year’s biggest critical winners, Boogie Nights started Anderson and Wahlberg’s careers in earnest, earned co-star Burt Reynolds some of the best reviews of his career, and enjoyed a thumbs up from Roger Ebert, who wrote, “As a writer and director, Paul Thomas Anderson is a skilled reporter who fills his screen with understated, authentic details.”


90%

2. The Departed

We love to hate remakes, but not all of them are created equal; for proof, look no further than The Departed, Martin Scorsese’s expertly cast treatment of the 2002 Hong Kong hit Infernal Affairs. On the surface, it might look like just another crime thriller where no one is who or what he seems — but this kind of story is all in the telling, and Scorsese had a tightly wound William Monahan screenplay to work from, as well as a bruising set of leads in Matt Damon, Leonardo DiCaprio, Jack Nicholson, and Wahlberg. A four-time Oscar winner, The Departed finally earned Scorsese his long-overdue Best Picture and Best Director honors, and triggered an avalanche of praise from critics like Terry Lawson of the Detroit Free Press, who applauded, “It’s a thinking fan’s thriller, a movie involving multiple fully dimensional characters, multiple story lines and edge-of-your-seat twists and swerves, stylized to just the edge of believability.”


94%

1. Three Kings

Anyone who wonders why audiences refuse to see movies about the wars raging in the Middle East would do well to study the example set by David O. Russell, who waited eight years before making the Gulf War picture Three Kings — and even then, the conflict served mainly as grist for a heist storyline involving a trio of U.S. Army Reservists (George Clooney, Ice Cube, and Wahlberg) making plans to steal plundered Kuwaiti gold. Widely recognized as a sharp, stylish satire today, Kings wasn’t a huge commercial success during its initial theatrical run, but it earned instant admiration from critics like Sean Means of Film.com, who called it “Possibly the best wartime comedy since Robert Altman’s M*A*S*H.


In case you were wondering, here are Wahlberg’s top 10 movies according RT users’ scores:

1. The Departed — 94%
2. Boogie Nights — 89%
3. The Fighter — 89%
4. Lone Survivor — 89%
5. Four Brothers — 81%
6. The Italian Job — 80%
7. Shooter — 80%
8. Three Kings — 77%
9. I Heart Huckabees — 76%
10. Ted — 74%


Take a look through Wahlberg’s complete filmography, as well as the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for Transformers: Age of Extinction.

Finally, here’s Mr. Wahlberg bringin’ some good vibrations to the entire nation:

iTunes
Download
RSS

Ep. 016 – Fault in Our Stars cast & Griffin Dunne
This extended episode covers the critical consensus on new movies Edge of Tomorrow and The Fault in Our Stars, new TV shows Orange Is the New Black, Jennifer Falls, and Power, and new DVD/Blu-ray releases Robocop and Lone Survivor. Grae Drake talks to Fault in Our Stars‘ cast members Shailene Woodley, Ansel Elgort, Laura Dern and Sam Trammell, and both Matt & Grae have an extended interview with veteran actor/producer Griffin Dunne.

We’ve got a couple of explosive action films headlining the column this week, along with another retelling of the greatest story ever told, a new box set for an iconic TV series, a few indie films, and a handful of TV season sets. Read on for details:



RoboCop

48%

Joel Kinnaman stars as Alex Murphy, a police officer in a near-future Detroit who barely survives a car bomb explosion, only to be reborn as the titular cyborg as part of an experimental program. José Padilha’s RoboCop split critics down the middle at 49% on the Tomatometer; though most felt it did little to distinguish itself from Paul Verhoeven’s subversive 1987 film, quite a few thought the remake was a lot better than it had any right to be. The DVD/Blu-ray/digital copy/UltraViolet pack includes a handful of deleted scenes, three featurettes, ten Omnicorp-branded spotlights on the various machines and weapons from the film, and a couple of trailers.



Lone Survivor

75%

This based-on-true-events story stars Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch, and Ben Foster as a team of Navy SEALs tasked with the covert elimination of an important Taliban leader; when they are unexpectedly discovered by local shepherds, things quickly take a turn for the worse. Though some critics found what they considered a jingoistic angle to be a bit hard to swallow, most were taken by Lone Survivor‘s propulsive action and sheer visceral power, leading to a Certified Fresh 75% Tomatometer score. Disc bonuses are limited to one lengthy featurette profiling Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg’s character) and a number of shorter ones ranging in content from typical behind-the-scenes pieces to a collection of tributes to the real life soldiers involved in the failed operation.



Son of God

21%

Pieced together from the History Channel’s 10-hour miniseries covering The Bible, Son of God focuses solely on the rise and fall (and rise again) of Christianity’s central figure, played by Portugese actor Diogo Morgado. Most critics agreed that this presentation of the oft-told tale was hokey and heavy-handed, not to mention a bit choppy and inelegantly constructed, and it earned a mere 21% on the Tomatometer. The faithful ones who will be picking this up can expect a couple of mini-docs on modern-day Christianity and a making-of video, among other extras.



Breaking Bad – The Complete Series

Widely considered one of the greatest American television series ever produced, Breaking Bad came to a close in late September last year, ending the meth-cooking misadventures of Walter “Heisenberg” White (Bryan Cranston) and Jesse Pinkman (Aaron Paul). Critics rated the show Certified Fresh in each of its seasons, all of which sit at an impressive 100% with the exception of the first (78%). The new box set being released this week contains essentially the same content as the previously available collectible set that came in the replica money barrel, except that it’s packaged more traditionally and doesn’t include all the nifty extras like the commemorative coin or the Los Pollos Hermanos apron. Otherwise, you’ll still get the 55 hours of bonus features, so this is ideal for anyone who was waiting for a more compact set.

Also available this week:

  • The Trouble with the Truth (93%), starring Lea Thompson in a drama about a divorced couple reuniting and reminiscing after their own daughter gets engaged.
  • What’s In A Name? (75%), a French comedy about a father-to-be who causes a family ruckus when he announces his child’s controversial name.
  • The Motel Life (71%), starring Emile Hirsch and Stephen Dorff as two brothers on the run when one of them flees from the scene of a car accident.
  • The Pretty One (45%), starring Zoe Kazan in a coming-of-age comedy about a shy girl who assumes her twin’s identity when she falls for a new neighbor.
  • In the Blood (44%), starring Gina Carano and Cam Gigandet in a thriller about a deadly woman who must confront her past when her husband is kidnapped on their honeymoon.
  • Season one of Graceland (69%), which follows a team of law enforcement officers operating out of a confiscated mansion.
  • Season three of AMC’s mystery series The Killing (67%), which has been picked up by Netflix for a six-episode conclusion, scheduled to become available this August.
  • Season six of HBO’s vampire drama True Blood (40%), which begins its final season on June 22.
  • Season four of Comedy Central’s Workaholics, centering on three housemates/co-workers who also happen to be idiots.

Lots of good choices on streaming video this week for action fans, including a remake of a beloved 1980s classic, a based-on-true-events story starring Mark Wahlberg, and the latest thriller featuring Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan. Then, we’ve also got the biggest animated movie of the year so far, another ’80s remake (this time a romantic comedy), a thriller with a creative premise, and an animated feature starring the Justice League. To cap things off, we’ve got a few new noteworthy films on Netflix, and Amazon Prime begins offering some of HBO’s most popular and acclaimed television series. Read on for details:


HBO Collection

All the great HBO shows that everybody’s always talking about will be available for free to all Amazon Prime subscribers starting May 21, including The Wire, Rome, True Blood, Six Feet Under, Treme, Boardwalk Empire, Sopranos, and TV movies like Game Change and Grey Gardens. Don’t plan on leaving your house for a few weeks.

Available on May 21 on: Amazon Prime


The LEGO Movie
96%

Chris Pratt, Elizabeth Banks, and an impressive supporting cast lend their voices to this charming, surprisingly thoughtful animated film based on the popular building blocks.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Lone Survivor
75%

Mark Wahlberg stars in the story of an ill-fated mission by a group of Navy SEALs to track down a high-value Taliban target through a mountainous region in Afghanistan — a mission that turns deadly after the soldiers decide against firing on a group of civilians.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


RoboCop
48%

When Detroit detective Alex Murphy (Joel Kinnaman) is badly injured on the job, a military contractor fits him with a robot exoskeleton in an attempt to create the ultimate crime fighter.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit
54%

Inspired to serve his country after 9/11, Jack Ryan (Chris Pine) joins the Marines. After being injured in Afghanistan, Ryan is recruited in the CIA, and soon he’s on the trail of a Russian terrorist plot.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Grand Piano
79%

Elijah Wood and John Cusack in this Certified Fresh thriller about a concert pianist who must deliver a flawless performance to stave off a sniper.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


About Last Night
69%

This romantic comedy follows Danny (Michael Ealy) and Debbie (Joy Bryant) from their first meeting to an eventual break up; meanwhile, their friends Bernie (Kevin Hart) and Joan (Regina Hall) share a combustible bond of their own.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


JLA Adventures: Trapped in Time

Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman must foil Lex Luthor’s fiendish plan to travel into the past and terminate Supes in this animated feature.

Available now on: iTunes


Stranger by the Lake
94%

Alain Guiraudie’s sexy, Certified Fresh thriller tells the tale of a man who falls for a mysterious stranger who may be involved in a murder.

Available now on: Netflix


Much Ado About Nothing
86%

Joss Whedon’s micro-budgeted modern-day reworking of Shakespeare’s comedy features a plethora of Whedon regulars, including Amy Acker, Clark Gregg, and Nathan Fillion.

Available now on: Netflix


Pain & Gain
50%

Based on a bizarre true story, Pain & Gain stars Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson in the tale of three bodybuilders who concoct a scheme to kidnap a wealthy businessman and wrest control of his riches. However, the plan quickly goes awry, with violent repercussions.

Available now on: Netflix


Free Birds
20%

In this animated action comedy about time-traveling turkeys, pampered Reggie (voiced by Owen Wilson) and activist Jake (Woody Harrelson) team up to travel back to the first Thanksgiving in order to kill the annual tradition of eating turkeys before it starts.

Available now on: Netflix



This weekend, U.S. audiences surprised industry observers by flooding multiplexes in larger numbers than expected to see Mark Wahlberg’s new Navy SEAL thriller Lone Survivor, which expanded nationwide and captured the number one spot with a sensational performance. Three other films that debuted in limited release in December tried their luck with mainstream audiences as well by expanding into wide play, but they were met with varying results with more offbeat pictures delivering dull results. The frame’s only brand new wide release, the adventure epic The Legend of Hercules, opened in fifth place with lackluster results.

Doubling expectations, Lone Survivor seized the top spot with an estimated $38.5M giving the Universal release the second biggest January opening weekend of all-time. Movies rarely debut to more than $30M in the first month of the year with 2008’s Cloverfield being the best ever with $40.1M. Playing in 2,875 theaters, the R-rated hit averaged a sizzling $13,395 per site. Cume including two weeks of play at solo runs in New York and Los Angeles is $38.9M.

What was surprising was not that it took the number one slot; it was widely expected to do that. It was the amazing amount of ticket sales that really blew the industry away. A debut in the high teen millions was expected, which itself would have been solid and enough to take the top spot. But audiences responded favorably to the patriotic themes of this story of American soldiers in peril and to the strong reviews. Survivor follows in the footsteps of other military movies with good reviews that platformed in December and then waited for mid-January to attack nationwide. Last year, Zero Dark Thirty did the same thing this very weekend, while in 2002, Black Hawk Down used that strategy to great success. All opened wide at number one with well over $20M each.

Dropping to the bridesmaid position, but still holding up exceptionally well, was Disney’s mammoth blockbuster Frozen which dipped only 23% in its seventh wide weekend to an estimated $15.1M. The animated smash has hauled in a stellar $317.7M setting a new record for the studio as the highest gross ever for a toon in its initial release. The old record has been held for nearly 20 years by The Lion King which grossed a staggering $312.8M from the summer of 1994 through early 1995 during its first run in theaters. Of course, Frozen benefits from higher ticket prices and 3D surcharges. With subsequent IMAX and 3D releases, King still is the studio’s top toon with a lifetime gross of $422.8M. Anna and Elsa have now climbed up to number 34 on the list of all-time domestic blockbusters.

With great audience buzz and no competition for kids, Frozen has been raking in the dough from Thanksgiving through Christmas and beyond. The international run has been equally impressive with the snow sisters breaking the $700M global mark this weekend with much more still to come. Overseas, the cume has risen to $394.6M putting the worldwide tally at $712.3M with big runs still to come from top-tier markets where Disney animation really sells. On February 5, China will gets its launch while Japan closes out the international run when it opens on March 15. Disney/Pixar’s Monsters University grossed over $90M in Japan last year.

The Wolf of Wall Street scored another good round of sales with an estimated $9M in its third weekend. Down 32%, the Paramount release has banked $78.6M to date and is headed past the $100M mark — the third straight Martin-Scorsese-Leonardo DiCaprio film to that. Also holding up well and playing to much of the same audience was American Hustle with an estimated $8.6M, down 31%, for a $101.6M total as the Sony release crossed the century mark over the weekend. Both films could earn Academy Award nominations for Best Picture this Thursday and will have plenty of weeks of awards season still ahead to turn those nods into extra box office.

Opening in fifth place was the frame’s only brand new wide release, The Legend of Hercules. The epic PG-13 adventure did not make much of a dent at multiplexes as it bowed to an estimated $8.6M from 2,104 theaters for a mediocre $4,087 average. 49% of the business came from 3D screens and the audience was predictably more male. Studio research showed that the Lionsgate release played 57% male and 55% 25 and older. The CinemaScore grade was a dull B-. Another Hercules movie is on tap for this summer with Dwayne Johnson headlining a bigger project set for July 25 from director Brett Ratner.

Dropping 49% in its fifth weekend was The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug with an estimated $8M for a new domestic cume of $242.2M. The Middle Earth tentpole is running 13% behind its predecessor. Overseas, Smaug pushed its international tally to $566M as the global gross surged past the $800M mark to $808.2M with China and Japan still to open on February 21 and 28, respectively.

Oscar winners Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts saw their collaboration August: Osage County enjoy a good national expansion this weekend with an estimated $7.3M from 905 locations for a $8,083 average. Cume for the The Weinstein Co. including the platform release since late December is $7.9M. Reviews have been good but not exceptional.

Disney’s Saving Mr. Banks followed with an estimated $6.6M, off only 24%, for a $68.9M cume. A Best Picture nod from the Academy could give Tom Hanks yet another $100M+ hit. Paramount rounded out the top ten with a pair of franchise flicks. Horror pic Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones fell an understandably steep 66% in its second weekend to an estimated $6.3M while Will Ferrell’s Anchorman 2 dropped 43% to an estimated $6.1M. Totals are $28.5M and $118.5M, respectively.

The acclaimed Spike Jonze film Her fared poorly in its nationwide expansion grossing an estimated $5.4M from 1,729 locations for a weak $3,129 average. Failing to crack the top ten, the R-rated film starring Joaquin Phoenix and the voice of Scarlett Johansson did not connect with mainstream audiences due to low starpower (on-screen) and an offbeat concept. Reviews have been sensational and Her has also picked up many awards and nominations during awards season, but multiplex crowds did not pay to try it out. The CinemaScore grade was a disappointing B-. But if the Warner Bros. release were to land a Best Picture Oscar nomination this week, its commercial fortunes could change somewhat.

The Coen brothers did not fare well in national release either with their critics darling Inside Llewyn Davis which expanded from 156 to 729 locations grossing an estimated $1.9M for a weak $2,573 average. The CBS Films release has banked $9.3M to date. Davis and Her were both wildly loved by film critics, but their arthouse casts and offbeat stories limited their appeal to paying mainstream moviegoers. Extended releases like these are risky given how many weeks of national TV ads must be purchased to support them.

Faring well outside the top ten was the juggernaut The Hunger Games: Catching Fire which last week surpassed Iron Man 3 to become the highest grossing film released in 2013. This weekend added another $4.6M, according to estimates, pushing the cume up to $414M putting it at number 13 on the all-time domestic list. A final of about $425M seems likely with another installment being prepped for release this November.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $114.1M which was up 2% from last year when Zero Dark Thirty opened wide at number one with $24.4M; and up 8% from 2012 when Contraband debuted in the top spot with $24.3M.

Follow Gitesh on Twitter!

This week at the movies, we’ve got a band of brothers (Lone Survivor, starring Mark Wahlberg and Taylor Kitsch), an unconventional couple (Her, starring Joaquin Phoenix and Scarlett Johansson), and a mythical strongman (The Legend of Hercules, starring Kellan Lutz and Gaia Weiss). What do the critics have to say?



Lone Survivor

75%

War movies often traffic in epic, grandiose heroics, but Lone Survivor tells a more intimate story — that of dedicated soldiers at work. Critics say that perspective is refreshing, and the result is a film that’s visceral, immediate, and suspenseful — even if it’s a little short on character development. Based on a true story, the film chronicles an ill-fated mission by a group of Navy SEALs to track down a high-value Taliban target through a mountainous region in Afghanistan — a mission that turns deadly after the soldiers decide against firing on a group of civilians. The pundits say this well-crafted war film may not say much about the broader context of modern warfare, but such objectivity makes for an intense, ultimately thought-provoking experience. (Click through this week’s 24 Frames for a gallery of stars in uniform, and watch our video interview with Wahlberg and the other stars of Lone Survivor.)



Her

94%

With Being John Malkovich and Adaptation, Spike Jonze established himself as one of Hollywood’s most original filmmakers. And critics say he’s outdone himself with Her, taking a bizarre premise and turning it into a film that’s unique, funny, and deeply moving. Joaquin Phoenix stars as Theodore Twombly, a lovelorn writer who falls in love with OS1, his computer’s highly intelligent operating system (voiced by Scarlett Johansson). What follows is one of the strangest love stories in recent cinema. The pundits say the Certified Fresh Her is a one-of-a-kind experience: sometimes hilarious, sometimes somber, often thoughtful, and, finally, deeply resonant.



The Legend of Hercules

5%

It appears the folks behind The Legend of Hercules are concerned that the film is less than mighty, since it wasn’t screened for critics prior to its release. Kellan Lutz stars as the fabled hero, who must overcome exile, enslavement, and scary monsters before claiming the throne atop Mount Olympus. Time to guess the Tomatometer! (And check out this week’s total recall, in which we count down director Renny Harlin’s best-reviewed films.)

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • The Rocket, a coming-of-age-drama about a resourceful boy determined to prove his worth to his family, is at 100 percent.
  • In Bloom, a drama about two teenage best friends growing up in post-Soviet Georgia, is at 90 percent.
  • The Banshee Chapter, a thriller about a journalist who discovers a secret government research program involving human subjects, is at 91 percent.
  • Divorce Corp., a documentary about the financial and emotional tolls caused by dissolving marriages, is at 80 percent.
  • If You Build It, a documentary about a group of high school students who work on an innovative year-long building project, is at 67 percent.
  • Loves Her Gun, a drama about a woman who flees New York after becoming the victim of street violence, is at 60 percent.
  • Return to Nuke ‘Em High, the latest in Troma’s absurdist B-movie franchise, is at 50 percent.
  • Cold Comes The Night, starring Bryan Cranston and Alice Eve in a thriller about a criminal who takes a hotel owner hostage in order to recover his stolen loot, is at 48 percent.
  • The Truth About Emanuel, starring Kaya Scodelario and Jessica Biel in a drama about a teenager who makes a startling discovery while babysitting for her neighbor, is at 41 percent.
  • Raze, starring Zoe Bell and Rachel Nichols in an action thriller about a fighting competition in a women’s prison, is at 44 percent.
  • Free Ride, a drama starring Anna Paquin as a woman caught up in the drug trade, is at 20 percent.

Finally, props to Garner Montgomery for coming the closest to guessing Paranormal Activity: The Marked Ones‘ 42 percent Tomatometer.

Madea Christmas

Get ready to salute our nation’s heroes. Lone Survivor was tops at the box office last weekend, and we’re giving away another prize pack.

The prize pack includes a Lone Survivor baseball cap and a tee shirt (size large).

To enter: Tweet @RottenTomatoes with your favorite Mark Wahlberg movie, and make sure to include #TomatoPrize in your response. One winner will be chosen at random on January 17, 2014. You must follow @rottentomatoes on Twitter to win.

Contest rules: Prizes will be shipped to one United States winner randomly selected.

Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch, Eric Bana, director Peter Berg, and real-life survivor Marcus Lutrell discuss shooting live rounds with actors, the responsibility of playing real-life figures, and what happens when a Navy Seal moves into your home.

 

Click here to watch more video interviews

Merry Christmas! This week at the movies, we’ve got a financial fraudster (The Wolf of Wall Street, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill); a timid daydreamer (The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty, starring Ben Stiller and Kristen Wiig); a pair of aging prizefighters (Grudge Match, starring Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro); a legendary warrior (47 Ronin, starring Keanu Reeves and Hiroyuki Sanada); a pop music sensation (the documentary Justin Bieber’s Believe); and a human rights hero (Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, starring Idris Elba and Naomie Harris). What do the critics have to say?



The Wolf of Wall Street

79%

Martin Scorsese knows how to capture the vicarious allure of criminality better than just about any other filmmaker. Critics say he’s in fine form with The Wolf of Wall Street, a slick, sleek, and surprisingly funny tale of financial fraud that features a riveting performance from Leonardo DiCaprio. The film follows the rise of Jordan Belfort (DiCaprio), the founder of a boiler room that sold worthless stocks to naïve customers. Belfort’s ill-gotten gains finance a staggering level of conspicuous debauchery, but he’s shrewd enough to stay one step ahead of the government — for a while, anyway. The pundits say the Certified Fresh Wolf of Wall Street has the hyperkinetic energy you’d expect from Scorsese, but what distinguishes it from past triumphs is its wild, ribald sense of humor.



The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty

52%

For all its evocative detail, James Thurber’s 1939 short story The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty is pretty brief, so it takes an imagination worthy of the title character to extend it to feature film length. Critics say Ben Stiller’s fantasy world looks great and has an optimistic tone, but its story often feels episodic and tonally uneven. Stiller stars as a reverie-prone Life magazine photo editor with problems at work: he’s derided by his boss, he’s got an unrequited crush on a co-worker (Kristen Wiig), and he can’t find an image that’s set to run in the next issue. He escapes into a globe-spanning fantasyland of his own creation — which might be just the thing that snaps him out of his rut. The pundits say that The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is well-meaning and ambitious, but it pushes its emotional buttons too hard to make up for a slight story.



Grudge Match

31%

Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro played two of cinema’s most iconic boxers, and Grudge Match purports to be a lighthearted fantasy bout between Rocky Balboa and Jake “The Raging Bull” LaMotta. Unfortunately, critics say it’s more tomato can than contender — a film with a promising premise that rarely punches above its weight. Thirty years after hanging up the gloves after splitting their two matchups, bitter rivals Henry “Razor” Sharp (Stallone) and Billy “The Kid” McDonnen (De Niro) have a fisticuffs-filled reunion while performing motion capture for a video game. When news of their punch-up spreads, the two fighters agree to a long-delayed rubber match — and a lot more than pride is on the line. The pundits say Grudge Match is sporadically funny but surprisingly lumbering, its strong cast largely mired in a plot that’s overrun with clichés.



47 Ronin

16%

From the silent era to the present, the tale of the 47 Ronin has inspired some of Japan’s greatest filmmakers. Now it gets a big-budget Western adaptation, but unfortunately, critics say the human element gets lost under a barrage of overblown CGI effects. When a disgraced feudal lord is compelled to commit suicide after a confrontation with a corrupt official, his disgraced followers (a group that includes an orphaned swashbuckler played by Keanu Reeves). The pundits say 47 Ronin is a surprisingly dull fantasy adventure, one that leaves its talented international cast stranded within one dimensional roles.



Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

62%

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom goes into wide release this week, and critics say it’s a decent if not always inspired look at Nelson Mandela’s life that’s bolstered by a terrific central performance by Idris Elba in the title role. Based upon Mandela’s autobiography, the film follows the South African political leader’s life from his early activism to his time in prison to his election to president in the first post-Apartheid elections. The pundits say the Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom tries to cover too much ground in the great man’s life, but it’s a sincere and powerfully acted biopic that serves as a good first step for those who want to learn more about one of the great human rights champions or our era.



Justin Bieber’s Believe

53%

Sorry, Beliebers: we’d love to tell you what the critics thought of Justin Bieber’s Believe, but it wasn’t screened for critics prior to its release in theaters. If Bieber’s previous doc, Never Say Never, captured the rise of the pop star, Believe purports to show how his world has changed now that he’s on the cusp of adulthood. Hey everybody, take a break from yuletide festivities and guess the Tomatometer!

Also opening this week in limited release:

Tag Cloud

Ellie Kemper Syfy Marvel X-Men revenge TV Land wonder woman laika golden globe awards ABC Family Lionsgate slashers spanish language singing competition spider-verse versus See It Skip It foreign Amazon Studios Mudbound mob Quiz debate Amazon cancelled television popular chucky casting 99% festivals Spring TV rom-coms Spike latino RT History cancelled TV series Tomatazos saw 4/20 Kids & Family APB ABC Wes Anderson Polls and Games Watching Series young adult ghosts Crackle FOX stop motion cops king arthur superman SXSW dc politics asian-american video on demand Song of Ice and Fire Action Tumblr Women's History Month new zealand Summer comic ratings National Geographic dexter Vudu Biopics Musical PBS Image Comics Black Mirror spinoff Disney Channel royal family Film Rocketman news The Walking Dead adaptation 90s Rock Comedy romance trailers olympics Red Carpet Rocky mcc fast and furious documentaries SundanceTV Endgame MSNBC BBC America renewed TV shows deadpool discovery 71st Emmy Awards television movie science fiction new york HBO cars Walt Disney Pictures Star Trek canceled TV shows Marathons indie Certified Fresh thriller independent Trophy Talk theme song Pacific Islander Shudder Elton John animated CW Seed godzilla justice league Starz Disney Plus Podcast PaleyFest hist suspense new star wars movies twilight Lifetime live action NYCC sitcom technology Fargo what to watch Legendary serial killer know your critic Spectrum Originals Marvel Studios live event anime 2015 comic book movies Esquire IFC Films Hulu stoner Chilling Adventures of Sabrina harry potter rotten movies we love obituary stand-up comedy hidden camera YouTube genre Awards 2018 Trailer golden globes Mary Tyler Moore Travel Channel Music anthology worst Adult Swim diversity Country Britbox 2016 Sneak Peek Broadway directors Brie Larson series psychological thriller Reality Competition Tarantino spanish aapi The Walt Disney Company zero dark thirty ITV Disney cooking action-comedy Heroines GLAAD nbcuniversal marvel cinematic universe Nat Geo Oscars Hear Us Out international Universal Exclusive Video A&E 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards canceled rotten toy story Apple joker TruTV dogs werewolf mission: impossible Acorn TV black comedy spain Classic Film Reality psycho critics basketball classics E! Fox Searchlight Year in Review dark USA Network Premiere Dates Prime Video 2020 OneApp TIFF CBS All Access Opinion E3 richard e. Grant MTV Logo Crunchyroll high school kong Superheroes video halloween reboot scary supernatural Instagram Live Pirates Mindy Kaling archives witnail Universal Pictures TV One Comic Book children's TV cinemax natural history Tokyo Olympics CBS Winners Lucasfilm book VICE festival 2019 comic book movie Holidays Film Festival DirecTV kids Toys Animation women TV TV movies Rom-Com Sci-Fi Photos cancelled TV shows vampires Cannes feel good TBS 72 Emmy Awards Tubi sports scorecard Infographic batman social media based on movie Neflix docuseries Winter TV prank Election boxing The Witch Set visit TLC target TV renewals PlayStation black Pop TV rt archives Pixar New York Comic Con Netflix 79th Golden Globes Awards french Awards Tour TCM kaiju game show YouTube Red nfl Anna Paquin BET Awards First Reviews Tags: Comedy RT21 Ghostbusters Fantasy VOD posters Television Academy streaming movies 45 cartoon slasher spider-man ViacomCBS name the review cults transformers 93rd Oscars Sony Pictures Pride Month Warner Bros. game of thrones CMT dceu Arrowverse Bravo NBA Teen TCA 2017 Disney streaming service BBC dramedy Character Guide Drama Super Bowl Paramount Network teaser superhero Schedule AMC Plus elevated horror Paramount halloween tv 007 Hallmark Christmas police drama blaxploitation rt labs critics edition comedies Pop Mary poppins binge Countdown critic resources Mystery political drama Calendar GoT Creative Arts Emmys Amazon Prime Masterpiece japan franchise films italian Martial Arts sequels 2021 razzies vs. 73rd Emmy Awards medical drama Captain marvel concert romantic comedy Western legend movies comic books Peacock IMDb TV hispanic heritage month spy thriller FXX leaderboard award winner Television Critics Association zombie cancelled First Look BET Ovation australia james bond sequel Extras remakes Horror AMC Binge Guide Turner Classic Movies Turner OWN dreamworks Funimation screen actors guild DC streaming service DGA Comics on TV gangster criterion DC Comics A24 1990s Stephen King strong female leads HFPA DC Universe TCA Winter 2020 GIFs lord of the rings Academy Awards crime drama Showtime facebook comics Sundance Best and Worst zombies quibi Grammys art house unscripted emmy awards President Trivia finale breaking bad MCU History Marvel Television Comic-Con@Home 2021 blockbusters FX Superheroe HBO Max adenture USA docudrama crime true crime Emmys CNN satire scene in color Shondaland biography FX on Hulu 21st Century Fox blockbuster football Alien Apple TV+ Dark Horse Comics TCA Cosplay Comedy Central composers Lifetime Christmas movies parents SDCC war Epix scary movies indiana jones crime thriller Discovery Channel doctor who king kong 2017 jurassic park all-time Black History Month Box Office LGBTQ christmas movies dragons Emmy Nominations rt labs NBC Holiday monster movies The Purge nature best streaming Nickelodeon biopic a nightmare on elm street YA free movies telelvision Food Network pirates of the caribbean aliens The Academy VH1 adventure Cartoon Network LGBT universal monsters Amazon Prime Video Apple TV Plus Columbia Pictures ABC Signature Nominations 20th Century Fox boxoffice sag awards El Rey venice Fall TV Freeform WarnerMedia comiccon south america Netflix Christmas movies Baby Yoda crossover miniseries ESPN mockumentary Thanksgiving Hallmark Christmas movies IFC Chernobyl Video Games space robots marvel comics child's play Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Hollywood Foreign Press Association Pet Sematary heist movie TCA Awards Musicals YouTube Premium worst movies Sundance Now Fox News The Arrangement fresh jamie lee curtis die hard disaster Disney+ Disney Plus toronto Star Wars tv talk documentary cats historical drama TNT sopranos HBO Go hollywood talk show Family trophy 24 frames japanese Writers Guild of America travel WGN BAFTA San Diego Comic-Con BBC One period drama hispanic The CW Mary Poppins Returns American Society of Cinematographers Interview ID book adaptation reviews Avengers screenings mutant Valentine's Day Sundance TV Paramount Plus green book