Transformers

(Photo by Paramount/Courtesy Everett Collection)

All Shia LaBeouf Movies Ranked

Shia LaBeouf’s first movie was the Certified Fresh surprise kids hit Holes. And though his next starring project, The Even Stevens Movie (based on the show that gave his young career a start), didn’t get same critical reception, it was a quick launch towards the Hollywood A-list. Soon enough he was groomed to be next of adventuring kin in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, and was the main confused human face among non-stop robotic carnage with the Transformers franchise.

By 2014, LaBeouf had all but ditched blockbusters for arthouse material, starring in Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac saga. Afterwards, red carpet antics, abrasive art projects, and personal issues began to consume his image, with LaBeouf seemingly in danger of becoming another industry burnout. 2016’s American Honey hinted at a comeback, but 2019 was a true redemption arc with the sentimental, classically-styled adventure The Peanut Butter Falcon, and the autobiographical Honey Boy, a searing personal history, both which became his highest-rated movies. As he prepares his next films for release (including re-teaming with Fury director David Ayer for The Tax Collector, and the Vanessa Kriby-starring drama Pieces of a Woman), we’re ranking all Shia LaBeouf movies by Tomatometer!

#27

Man Down (2015)
16%

#27
Adjusted Score: 19322%
Critics Consensus: Well-intentioned but overall misjudged, Man Down makes an unfortunately muddled attempt to mine thoughtful drama out of modern warfare's emotional wreckage.
Synopsis: When U.S. Marine Gabriel Drummer (Shia LaBeouf) returns from Afghanistan, he finds the place he once called home is no... [More]
Directed By: Dito Montiel

#26
Adjusted Score: 29466%
Critics Consensus: Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen is a noisy, underplotted, and overlong special effects extravaganza that lacks a human touch.
Synopsis: Two years after he and his Autobot friends saved the Earth from the Decepticons, Sam Witwicky (Shia LaBeouf) faces a... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#25

Eagle Eye (2008)
26%

#25
Adjusted Score: 33205%
Critics Consensus: Eagle Eye is a preposterously plotted thriller that borrows heavily from other superior films.
Synopsis: Jerry Shaw (Shia LaBeouf) and Rachel Holloman (Michelle Monaghan) are two strangers whose lives are suddenly thrown into turmoil by... [More]
Directed By: D.J. Caruso

#24
Adjusted Score: 29101%
Critics Consensus: Shia LaBeouf clearly relishes his role in Charlie Countryman, but his efforts can't salvage the movie's shallow script and overstuffed direction.
Synopsis: In Romania, an American tourist (Shia LaBeouf) falls for the estranged wife (Evan Rachel Wood) of a brutal gangster (Mads... [More]
Directed By: Fredrik Bond

#23
Adjusted Score: 44330%
Critics Consensus: Its special effects -- and 3D shots -- are undeniably impressive, but they aren't enough to fill up its loud, bloated running time, or mask its thin, indifferent script.
Synopsis: Sam Witwicky (Shia LaBeouf) and his new girlfriend, Carly (Rosie Huntington-Whiteley), join the fray when the evil Decepticons renew their... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 40243%
Critics Consensus: Like many anthologies, New York, I Love You has problems of consistency, but it isn't without its moments.
Synopsis: On the eve of her wedding, a Hasidic woman (Natalie Portman) considers a romance with another man, in one of... [More]

#21
Adjusted Score: 39317%
Critics Consensus: LaBeouf is appealing, but The Battle of Shaker Heights feels too watered down and disjointed.
Synopsis: A quirky teen with a penchant for war reenactments, Kelly Ernswiler (Shia La Beouf) obsesses over military tactics with his... [More]
Directed By: Kyle Rankin, Efram Potelle

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 7853%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Members (Shia LaBeouf, Nick Spano, Tom Virtue) of a family unwittingly appear on a reality-television show after the producer sends... [More]
Directed By: Sean McNamara

#19

Constantine (2005)
46%

#19
Adjusted Score: 55279%
Critics Consensus: Despite solid production values and an intriguing premise, Constantine lacks the focus of another spiritual shoot-em-up: The Matrix.
Synopsis: As a suicide survivor, demon hunter John Constantine (Keanu Reeves) has literally been to hell and back -- and he... [More]
Directed By: Francis Lawrence

#18

Bobby (2006)
46%

#18
Adjusted Score: 53384%
Critics Consensus: Despite best intentions from director Emilio Estevez and his ensemble cast, they succumb to a script filled with pointless subplots and awkward moments working too hard to parallel contemporary times.
Synopsis: In 1968 the lives of a retired doorman (Anthony Hopkins), hotel manager (William H. Macy), lounge singer (Demi Moore), busboy... [More]
Directed By: Emilio Estevez

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 57507%
Critics Consensus: The Company You Keep is a (frustratingly) slow-burning thriller about very contemporary issues.
Synopsis: Decades after an ill-fated robbery, a former member (Susan Sarandon) of the Weather Underground turns herself in to authorities. While... [More]
Directed By: Robert Redford

#16
Adjusted Score: 64103%
Critics Consensus: It's more entertaining than many sequels, but with Oliver Stone directing, a terrific cast, and a timely storyline that picks up where the original left off, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps should be better.
Synopsis: Following a long prison term for insider trading, Gordon Gekko (Michael Douglas) finds himself on the outside looking in at... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Stone

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 63965%
Critics Consensus: It doesn't quite live up to the promise of the first installment, but Nymphomaniac: Volume II still benefits from Lars von Trier's singular craft and vision, as well as a bravura performance from Charlotte Gainsbourg.
Synopsis: ... [More]
Directed By: Lars von Trier

#14
Adjusted Score: 66004%
Critics Consensus: Despite all the underdog sports movie conventions, the likable cast and lush production values make The Greatest Game Ever Played a solid and uplifting tale.
Synopsis: Blue-collar Francis Ouimet (Shia LaBeouf) fights class prejudice while mastering golf, a game guarded by the upper crust. Employed as... [More]
Directed By: Bill Paxton

#13

Lawless (2012)
66%

#13
Adjusted Score: 75319%
Critics Consensus: Grim, bloody, and utterly flawed, Lawless doesn't quite achieve the epic status it strains for, but it's too beautifully filmed and powerfully acted to dismiss.
Synopsis: In 1931, the Bondurant brothers of Franklin County, Va., run a multipurpose backwoods establishment that hides their true business, bootlegging.... [More]
Directed By: John Hillcoat

#12

Disturbia (2007)
69%

#12
Adjusted Score: 76378%
Critics Consensus: Aside from its clichéd resolution, Disturbia is a tense, subtle thriller with a noteworthy performance from Shia LaBeouf.
Synopsis: Ever since his father died, young Kale (Shia LaBeouf) has become increasingly sullen and withdrawn, until he finds himself under... [More]
Directed By: D.J. Caruso

#11

Fury (2014)
76%

#11
Adjusted Score: 87212%
Critics Consensus: Overall, Fury is a well-acted, suitably raw depiction of the horrors of war that offers visceral battle scenes but doesn't quite live up to its larger ambitions.
Synopsis: In April 1945, the Allies are making their final push in the European theater. A battle-hardened Army sergeant named Don... [More]
Directed By: David Ayer

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 84535%
Critics Consensus: Darkly funny, fearlessly bold, and thoroughly indulgent, Nymphomaniac finds Lars von Trier provoking viewers with customary abandon.
Synopsis: ... [More]
Directed By: Lars von Trier

#9
Adjusted Score: 78452%
Critics Consensus: A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints is a lively, powerful coming-of-age tale with winning performances and sharp direction from first-timer Dito Montiel.
Synopsis: Dito Montiel (Robert Downey Jr.), a successful author, receives a call from his long-suffering mother (Dianne Wiest), asking him to... [More]
Directed By: Dito Montiel

#8
Adjusted Score: 88420%
Critics Consensus: Though the plot elements are certainly familiar, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull still delivers the thrills and Harrison Ford's return in the title role is more than welcome.
Synopsis: It's the height of the Cold War, and famous archaeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), returning from his latest adventure, finds... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#7

Holes (2003)
78%

#7
Adjusted Score: 81458%
Critics Consensus: Faithful to its literary source, this is imaginative, intelligent family entertainment.
Synopsis: A boy and his friends question the motives of a woman (Sigourney Weaver) who forces them to dig holes at... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Davis

#6

American Honey (2016)
79%

#6
Adjusted Score: 91431%
Critics Consensus: American Honey offers a refreshingly unconventional take on the coming-of-age drama whose narrative risks add up to a rewarding experience even if they don't all pay off.
Synopsis: Star (Sasha Lane), an adolescent girl from a troubled home, runs away with a traveling sales crew that drives across... [More]
Directed By: Andrea Arnold

#5

Surf's Up (2007)
79%

#5
Adjusted Score: 84037%
Critics Consensus: Surf's Up is a laid back, visually stunning animated movie that brings a fresh twist to some familiar conventions. Its witty mockumentary format is fun and inventive, and the CGI is breathtakingly realistic.
Synopsis: Surfing means everything to teenage penguin Cody Maverick (Shia LaBeouf). Followed by a documentary film crew, he leaves his home... [More]
Directed By: Ash Brannon, Chris Buck

#4

Borg vs. McEnroe (2017)
84%

#4
Adjusted Score: 92380%
Critics Consensus: Borg vs McEnroe makes tennis improbably cinematic -- and brings the absolute best out of Shia LaBeouf, who delivers some of the best work of his career.
Synopsis: It's the summer of 1980, and Björn Borg is the top tennis player in the world, dominating the sport both... [More]
Directed By: Janus Metz

#3
Adjusted Score: 89248%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Far in the future, after an apocalyptic conflict has devastated much of the world's ecosystem, the few surviving humans live... [More]
Directed By: Hayao Miyazaki

#2

Honey Boy (2019)
95%

#2
Adjusted Score: 108560%
Critics Consensus: Honey Boy serves as an act of cinematic therapy for its screenwriter and subject -- one whose unique perspective should strike a chord in audiences from all backgrounds.
Synopsis: When 12-year-old Otis begins to find success as a television star, his abusive, alcoholic father returns and takes over as... [More]
Directed By: Alma Har'el

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 107434%
Critics Consensus: A feelgood adventure brought to life by outstanding performances, The Peanut Butter Falcon finds rich modern resonance in classic American fiction.
Synopsis: After running away from a residential nursing home to pursue his dream of becoming a pro wrestler, a man who... [More]

100 Best War Movies of All Time

From peacetime to frontlines, from coming home to left behind: Rotten Tomatoes presents the 100 best-reviewed war movies of all time, ranked by Adjusted Tomatometer with at least 20 reviews each.

#100

Che: Part Two (2008)
79%

#100
Adjusted Score: 80412%
Critics Consensus: The second part of Soderbergh's biopic is a dark, hypnotic and sometimes frustrating portrait of a warrior in decline, with a terrific central performance from Del Toro.
Synopsis: Seven years after his triumph in Cuba, Che (Benicio Del Toro) winds up in Bolivia, where he tries to ignite... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#99
Adjusted Score: 75642%
Critics Consensus: Worthy themes and strong performances across the board make Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence an impactful story about bridging cultural divides.
Synopsis: During World War II, British soldier Jack Celliers (David Bowie) is captured by Japanese forces and held in a prison... [More]
Directed By: Nagisa Ôshima

#98

Black Hawk Down (2001)
76%

#98
Adjusted Score: 82806%
Critics Consensus: Though it's light on character development and cultural empathy, Black Hawk Down is a visceral, pulse-pounding portrait of war, elevated by Ridley Scott's superb technical skill.
Synopsis: The film takes place in 1993 when the U.S. sent special forces into Somalia to destabilize the government and bring... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#97

The Tin Drum (1979)
84%

#97
Adjusted Score: 85674%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Oskar Matzerath (David Bennent) is a very unusual boy. Refusing to leave the womb until promised a tin drum by... [More]
Directed By: Volker Schlöndorff

#96
#96
Adjusted Score: 83118%
Critics Consensus: A well-crafted and visually arresting drama with a touch of whimsy.
Synopsis: Mathilde (Audrey Tautou) is told that her fiancé (Gaspard Ulliel) has been killed in World War I. She refuses to... [More]
Directed By: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

#95

American Sniper (2014)
72%

#95
Adjusted Score: 84403%
Critics Consensus: Powered by Clint Eastwood's sure-handed direction and a gripping central performance from Bradley Cooper, American Sniper delivers a tense, vivid tribute to its real-life subject.
Synopsis: U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) takes his sole mission -- protect his comrades -- to heart and becomes... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#94

Kelly's Heroes (1970)
78%

#94
Adjusted Score: 79773%
Critics Consensus: Kelly's Heroes subverts its World War II setting with pointed satirical commentary on modern military efforts, offering an entertaining hybrid of heist caper and battlefield action.
Synopsis: In the midst of World War II, an array of colorful American soldiers gets inside information from a drunk German... [More]
Directed By: Brian G. Hutton

#93

Braveheart (1995)
79%

#93
Adjusted Score: 83525%
Critics Consensus: Distractingly violent and historically dodgy, Mel Gibson's Braveheart justifies its epic length by delivering enough sweeping action, drama, and romance to match its ambition.
Synopsis: Tells the story of the legendary thirteenth century Scottish hero named William Wallace (Mel Gibson). Wallace rallies the Scottish against... [More]
Directed By: Mel Gibson

#92

War Horse (2011)
74%

#92
Adjusted Score: 83296%
Critics Consensus: Technically superb, proudly sentimental, and unabashedly old-fashioned, War Horse is an emotional drama that tugs the heartstrings with Spielberg's customary flair.
Synopsis: Albert (Jeremy Irvine) and his beloved horse, Joey, live on a farm in the British countryside. At the outbreak of... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#91

Coming Home (1978)
85%

#91
Adjusted Score: 87123%
Critics Consensus: Coming Home's stellar cast elevates the love triangle in the center of its story - and adds a necessary human component to its none-too-subtle political message.
Synopsis: The wife of a Marine serving in Vietnam, Sally Hyde (Jane Fonda) decides to volunteer at a local veterans hospital... [More]
Directed By: Hal Ashby

#90
#90
Adjusted Score: 85725%
Critics Consensus: The Thin Red Line is a daringly philosophical World War II film with an enormous cast of eager stars.
Synopsis: In 1942, Private Witt (Jim Caviezel) is a U.S. Army absconder living peacefully with the locals of a small South... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#89

Lone Survivor (2013)
75%

#89
Adjusted Score: 83662%
Critics Consensus: A true account of military courage and survival, Lone Survivor wields enough visceral power to mitigate its heavy-handed jingoism.
Synopsis: In 2005 Afghanistan, Navy SEALs Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg), Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch), Danny Dietz (Emile Hirsch) and Matthew "Axe"... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#88

Private Benjamin (1980)
82%

#88
Adjusted Score: 84637%
Critics Consensus: Private Benjamin proves a potent showcase for its Oscar-nominated star, with Hawn making the most of a story that rests almost completely on her daffily irresistible charm.
Synopsis: A Jewish-American princess, Judy Benjamin (Goldie Hawn), is devastated when her husband (Albert Brooks) drops dead on their wedding night.... [More]
Directed By: Howard Zieff

#87
#87
Adjusted Score: 84626%
Critics Consensus: Benigni's earnest charm, when not overstepping its bounds into the unnecessarily treacly, offers the possibility of hope in the face of unflinching horror.
Synopsis: A gentle Jewish-Italian waiter, Guido Orefice (Roberto Benigni), meets Dora (Nicoletta Braschi), a pretty schoolteacher, and wins her over with... [More]
Directed By: Roberto Benigni

#86

Fury (2014)
76%

#86
Adjusted Score: 87212%
Critics Consensus: Overall, Fury is a well-acted, suitably raw depiction of the horrors of war that offers visceral battle scenes but doesn't quite live up to its larger ambitions.
Synopsis: In April 1945, the Allies are making their final push in the European theater. A battle-hardened Army sergeant named Don... [More]
Directed By: David Ayer

Mel Gibson is getting the best reviews of his directorial career for Hacksaw Ridge, the World War II true story of conscientious objector Desmond Doss, who received the Medal of Honor for saving 75 men without ever carrying a gun or weapon. The legend of Doss inspires this week’s gallery: 24 Certified Fresh WWII movies!

(And before you ask, Grave of the Fireflies is Fresh but not Certified Fresh.)

This week on home video, we’ve got David Ayer’s WWII tank actioner, a courtroom drama starring Robert Downey Jr. and Robert Duvall, a visually impressive animated film, and the latest season of Downton Abbey. There are also a number of smaller releases out as well, though not many of them were well-received by critics. Read on for details:



Fury

76%

After directing 2012’s acclaimed cop drama End of Watch, David Ayer took a bit of a misstep in 2014 with Sabotage, a brutal but limp actioner that at least afforded him the opportunity to work with Arnold Schwarzenegger. Thankfully, he also released Fury the same year, which helped to wash the taste of Sabotage away quickly. Brad Pitt stars as Don “Wardaddy” Collier, the commander of a five-man tank crew that takes on an inexperienced newbie (Logan Lerman) when the veteran gunner is killed in combat. The film follows the crew as they pilot their Sherman tank behind enemy lines during the final days of World War II. Certified Fresh at 78 percent, Fury earned points for its visceral, authentic-feeling portrayal of life on the front lines, its solid performances, and its thrilling tank battles, even if the film may be almost overwhelmingly grim for some. The Blu-ray comes with a handful of making-of featurettes, including interviews with real WWII veterans and a look at the tanks used in the film, as well as several deleted and extended scenes.



The Judge

49%

Back in the early 2000s, David Dobkin had a couple of comedy hits with Shanghai Knights and Wedding Crashers, but his directorial efforts since then have earned pretty dismal ratings. That might explain why he decided to go serious with The Judge, which, to its credit, starred two Hollywood heavyweights in Robert Duvall and Robert Downey Jr. and could have made for a fairly intriguing character piece. RDJ stars as Hank Palmer, a successful Chicago attorney who returns to his hometown and his estranged family for his mother’s funeral. When he learns that his father (Duvall), the local judge, is the only suspect in a fatal hit-and-run, Hank agrees to defend him, and secrets slowly begin to unravel. Critics were split on The Judge, which they praised for its strong acting and beautiful cinematography but panned for its predictable, cliché-ridden plot, and gave the film a mediocre 47 percent on the Tomatometer. The supporting cast includes Vera Farmiga, Billy Bob Thornton, Vincent D’Onofrio, Melissa Leo, and more.



The Book of Life

83%

In the wake of mass layoffs at Dreamworks Animation, it’s good to know there are still other studios out there producing quality animated fare. One example is last year’s The Book of Life — which, incidentally, Dreamworks originally optioned then relinquished to Reel FX — a fantastical tale steeped in Mexican folklore that went Certified Fresh at 82 percent. The story centers on a wager made by Xibalba (voiced by Ron Perlman), the ruler of the Land of the Forgotten, and La Muerte (Kate del Castillo), ruler of the Land of the Remembered, on a love triangle between bullfighter Manolo (Diego Luna), local hero Joaquin (Channing Tatum), and a free-spirited girl named Maria (Zoe Saldana) that they both love. The briskly paced story follows Manolo from this world to the afterlife as Xibalba tries at every turn to thwart his efforts. Though some wished for slightly more substantial storytelling, most critics found the film vibrant and delightfully energetic, filled with unique character designs and stunning visuals. The Blu-ray comes with several behind-the-scenes looks at the creation of the film, a collection of the film’s musical moments, and a short featuring Chuy the pig.



Downton Abbey: Season Five

For viewers in the US, the fifth season (or series, as they say across the pond) of the hit period drama Downton Abbey began airing on January 4, which means we’ve only gotten four of the nine total episodes (including the Christmas special) so far. Luckily for us, though, the British production already aired the fifth series in its entirety late last year, so we’re getting the whole shebang on DVD and Blu-ray this week. For many fans, season four was a dark departure from what most had come to expect (and want) from the show, and by most accounts, season five has found somewhat proper footing again. With that in mind, if you just cannot wait for the remaining episodes to air on your local PBS channel, you can pick up the entire fifth season tomorrow. Special features include just a couple of behind-the-scenes looks, as well as a longer look at the historical backdrop of the season.

Also available this week:

  • Sion Sono’s Why Don’t You Play in Hell? (83 percent), a dark action comedy about a film crew who gets the opportunity to film a bloody battle to the death between two warring yakuza clans.
  • 1,000 Times Good Night (74 percent), starring Juliette Binoche and Nicolaj Coster-Waldau in a drama about a celebrated war photographer who puts her family at risk when she journeys to Kenya to photograph a refugee camp.
  • The Remaining (50 percent), starring Alexa Vega in a supernatural thriller about a newly married couple coping with the Rapture.
  • Before I Go to Sleep (36 percent), starring Nicole Kidman and Colin Firth in a thriller about a woman with debilitating chronic amnesia who begins to question the mysterious circumstances of her life.
  • Open Windows (34 percent), starring Elijah Wood and Sasha Grey in a psychological thriller about a man who ends up embroiled in a conspiracy when he’s offered the opportunity to secretly watch his favorite actress via webcam.
  • Miss Meadows (22 percent), starring Katie Holmes in a satirical thriller about a mild-mannered schoolteacher who moonlights as a vigilante killer.
  • The Color of Time (6 percent), starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Jessica Chastain and an ensemble cast working with 12 NYU student directors to profile the life of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet C.K. Williams.

We’ve only got two new releases worth talking about this week on streaming video, so if you’re looking for something to do at home on New Year’s Eve, your choices are somewhat limited. In any case, you can either go with David Ayer’s brutal WWII tank thriller or an indie dramedy starring Juliette Lewis. Read on for the full list:


Fury
76%

Brad Pitt stars as tank commander who leads a diverse band of brothers on a deadly mission behind enemy lines to stymie a Nazi attack; along the way, our heroes come face to face with the grim realities of life on the battlefield.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Google Play


Kelly & Cal
71%

Juliette Lewis and Cybill Shepherd star in this drama about an alienated suburban mom who befirends a teen from the neighborhood.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes

Awards season is on, and with everything that is going on from December through February, it’s difficult to keep track of who is getting what. To help you with that, we created the Awards Leaderboard, a ranking of movies by the number of awards won and their respective categories. Read on to find out where your favorite movies stand, and who is leading the pack.

Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) (2014) 91%

49 wins

Boyhood (2014) 97%

49 wins

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) 92%

25 wins

Whiplash (2014) 94%

24 wins

Citizenfour (2014) 96%

11 wins

The LEGO Movie (2014) 96%

11 wins

  • BAFTA – Animated Film
  • PGA – Animated Picture
  • Critics Choice – Best Animated Feature
  • Golden Tomato – Best-Reviewed Animation
  • CFCA – Best Animated Feature
  • SFFCC – Best Animated Feature
  • NYFCO – Best Animated Feature
  • WAFCA – Best Animated Feature
  • NBR – Original Screenplay
  • NYFCC – Best Animated Film
  • LVFCS – Best Animated Film

Still Alice (2014) 85%

11 wins

Ida (2013) 96%

9 wins

The Theory of Everything (2014) 80%

8 wins

Life Itself (2014) 98%

7 wins



Brad Pitt’s World War II tank film Fury topped the North American box office charts opening to an estimated $23.5M for Sony. The brutal R-rated drama averaged a sturdy $7,406 from 3,173 locations and opened in between the $22M of George Clooney’s The Monuments Men from February and the $25.7M of Tom Hanks’ Captain Phillips from this same month last year. All skewed to an older adult audience using an A-list actor as the anchor.

Fury< scored good reviews from critics and pleased paying audiences too as evidenced by its good A- CinemaScore grade. Studio research showed that the crowd was, not surprisingly, 60% male and 51% over 35. Connecting with older men at this time of year is often difficult due to sports competition from NFL and college football plus the baseball playoffs. While Fury< did not score one of top ten opening weekends of Pitt's career, its older skew, good buzz and light competition over the next two weeks should allow the $68M production to build nicely. And overseas potential is solid given the star's drawing power and the Germany-set story.

Despite competition from Brad and the other new releases, two-time champ Gone Girl held up quite well in its third round slipping only 33% to an estimated $17.8M and joining the century club in the process. This fall’s biggest hit has now banked $107.1M and could find its way to the vicinity of $150M from North America. Only five September/October releases have ever climbed to that level before. Girl cost $61M to produce and may reach a global gross five times that amount.

The new animated offering The Book of Life premiered in third place with an estimated $17M from 3,071 sites for a good $5,536 average. That was about even with the recent toon The Boxtrolls which bowed to $17.3M and a $4,987 average in late September. Both were non-sequels offering a unique visual style for family audiences. Fox’s PG-rated Book had Mexican influences from its director, producer and source material and 30% of the audience was Latino. Overall demos showed the crowd to be 57% female and 54% under 25. 3D screens made up 31% of the gross, a low figure but common nowadays for toons. Book of Life features voices from Channing Tatum, Zoe Saldana, Diego Luna, Christina Applegate, Ice Cube, and Cheech Marin plus earned positive reviews.

The best weekend gross among the sophomore titles was an estimated $12M for Disney’s Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. Off only 34%, the Steve Carell comedy has collected a sturdy $36.9M to date and could be headed for the neighborhood of $70M.

Author Nicholas Sparks suffered his worst opening weekend ever for a film based on his novels as the romance The Best of Me opened in fifth to an estimated $10.2M from 2,936 locations for a mild $3,474 average. It was the ninth movie adapted from his books but audiences did not show up. Reviews were terrible and starpower was low with Michelle Monaghan and James Marsden anchoring. The PG-13 entry was released by Relativity which has not yet opened a film north of $13M this year.

The effects-heavy thriller Dracula Untold fell 58% in its second weekend to an estimated $9.9M boosting the cume to $40.7M for Universal. A solid $95.7M from overseas markets during these pre-Halloween weeks has raised the global gross to $136.4M.

Fellow sophomore The Judge held up moderately well with an estimated $7.9M, off 40%. The Warner Bros. release has grossed a modest $26.8M and looks headed for about $45M. The studio’s horror hit Annabelle dropped 50% to an estimated $7.9M as well for $74.1M to date making it 2014’s highest grossing fright film. A final of close to $90M seems likely.

A pair of September hits rounded out the top ten. Denzel Washington’s The Equalizer grossed an estimated $5.5M, down 44%, for a $89.2M cume for Sony. Fox’s The Maze Runner fell 40% to an estimated $4.5M banking $90.8M to date. Both will reach nine digits.

Oscar hopeful Birdman got off to a thunderous start in platform release debuting to an estimated $415,000 from only four locations in New York and Los Angeles for an eye-popping $103,750 average. That was the second highest opening weekend average of any film over the past two years. Only Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel fared better when it bowed last March to a $202,792 average. Both were released in four theaters on the first weekend by Fox Searchlight.

Directed by Alejandro González Iñárritu, Birdman stars Michael Keaton, Zach Galifianakis, Edward Norton, Emma Stone, and Naomi Watts and earned sensational reviews. The R-rated film is eyed as a major contender in the picture, director, cinematography, and acting races. Searchlight will expand Birdman on Friday into 18 new markets for a total of about 50 theaters and continue to roll the awards contender out into November.

Also faring very well in its limited release debut was the race relations satire Dear White People which grossed an estimated $344,000 from 11 playdates for a strong $31,273 average. The Roadside Attractions release has earned great reviews across the board and also took home a Special Jury Award from Sundance last winter.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $116.3M which was up 28% from last year when Gravity remained at number one with $30M; and even with 2012 when Paranormal Activity 4 opened on top with $29M.

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Ep. 065 – Movies, TV, and Yeah, Whassup Monolo?
When the boss is away, the team will play…lots of clips of Channing Tatum spouting catch phrases. They cover the usual movies in theaters, including Fury, The Book of Life, The Best of Me, Birdman, and Dear White People. New DVDs include X-Men: Days of Future Past, Mr. Peabody & Sherman, and Fargo. On television, Sarah discusses The Affair, The Walking Dead, Jane the Virgin, and Marry Me. Listen for Tim and Grae’s impromptu role play!

This week at the movies, we’ve got soldiers in a tank (Fury, starring Brad Pitt and Shia LaBeouf), a princess and her suitors (The Book of Life, with voice performances by Channing Tatum and Zoe Saldana), and star-crossed lovers (The Best of Me, starring Michelle Monaghan and James Marsden). What do the critics have to say?



Fury

76%

Take the star of Inglourious Basterds, mix him in with a ragtag band of soldiers reminiscent of the crew in Saving Private Ryan, and what have you got? Fury, a World War II drama that critics say is a powerful document of the horrors of war that doesn’t quite meet its grand ambitions but still packs a wallop. Pitt stars as tank commander who leads a diverse band of brothers on a deadly mission behind enemy lines to stymie a Nazi attack; along the way, our heroes come face-to-face with the grim realities of life on the battlefield. The pundits say Fury is a rock solid war film, with bracing battle scenes and a feeling of you-are-there authenticity. (Check out Pitt’s 10 best-reviewed films here.)



The Book of Life

83%

Right off the bat, The Book of Life has a couple big things going for it: it’s a visually stunning fantasy that’s rooted in Mexican cultural tradition. And critics say that’s mostly enough, even if the story is never up to brilliance of the animation. It’s the tale of two childhood friends who fall in love with a princess, one of which must make a perilous journey through the land of the dead in order to win her heart. The pundits say The Book of Life is energetic and vibrant, a rare example of style winning out over substance.



The Best of Me

12%

Nicholas Sparks knows the value of corn better than anybody, and the films adapted from his novels (The Notebook, A Walk to Remember ) can extract tears from even the sternest souls. But critics say The Best of Me is so preposterous and bland that it’s more likely to inspire incredulity or boredom than sniffles. Two high school sweethearts are reunited at a mutual friend’s funeral, and find that they still have feelings for each other, before forces beyond their control intervene. The pundits say the actors do what they can with the paper-thin characters and silly dialogue, but ultimately, The Best of Me is too schmaltzy and absurd to resonate.

Certified Fresh on TV this week:


The dubious premise of Jane the Virgin (100 percent) is part of its unlikely charm, which critics say shines thanks to sharp writing and a knockout performance by Gina Rodriguez.

Thanks to a liberal dose of propulsive, bloody action and enough compelling character moments to reward longtime fans, critics say The Walking Dead‘s fifth season (97 percent) continues to deliver top-notch entertainment.

Critics say The Affair (96 percent) is a somber, bewitching exploration of truth and desire, thanks to some smart, creative storytelling and spectacular performances from Dominic West and Ruth Wilson.

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • The Tale of Princess Kaguya, an animated folk tale about a girl who’s found inside a bamboo stalk, is at 100 percent.
  • Dear White People, a comedy about an African American college student whose no-holds-barred radio show shakes up the predominantly white campus, is at 97 percent.
  • Birdman, starring Michael Keaton and Edward Norton in a comedy about an actor famous for playing a superhero who’s trying to mount a Broadway play, is Certified Fresh at 94 percent.
  • Housebound, a horror comedy about a woman sentenced to home confinement who discovers her house is occupied by a malevolent spirit, is at 94 percent.
  • Diplomacy, a historical drama about a plot to destroy Paris during World War II, is at 91 percent.
  • Listen Up Philip, starring Jason Schwartzman and Elisabeth Moss in a dramedy about a self-obsessed author burning bridges with the people around him, is at 87 percent.
  • Watchers of the Sky, a documentary about activists pushing for justice in the wake of mass atrocities, is at 87 percent.
  • Felony, starring Joel Edgerton and Tom Wilkinson in a thriller about three cops dealing with the potential fallout from a bust gone wrong, is at 79 percent.
  • Camp X-Ray, starring Kristen Stewart in a drama about a guard at Guantanamo Bay who develops a friendship with a detainee, is at 64 percent.
  • Rudderless, starring Billy Crudup and Anton Yelchin in a drama about a man who copes with his son’s untimely death by playing music, is at 61 percent.
  • Summer of Blood, a horror comedy about a schlubby guy who becomes a lady-killing vampire, is at 60 percent.
  • Young Ones, starring Michael Shannon and Elle Fanning in a sci-fi drama about a farming family struggling to survive in the midst of a global water shortage, is at 50 percent.

Finally, props to Andrew LaPlant for coming the closest to guessing Addicted‘s eight percent Tomatometer.

Brad Pitt
Today he’s one of the most bankable movie stars in Hollywood, and one of the few actors audiences will pay to see no matter what sort of role he’s playing — whether it’s action, drama, or comedy the script calls for, having Brad Pitt‘s name above the title is about as close as anyone can come to a guarantee for a hit film. Not so long ago, however, Pitt was just another good-looking dude with enough gumption to work his way into a steady stream of TV shows and bit parts in movies. He’s come a long way, for sure, and to celebrate his latest starring role — in David Ayer’s Fury, opening this weekend — we decided the time was right for a brand new Brad Pitt edition of Total Recall.

 


82%

10. Se7en

On the surface, it looks like just another buddy cop movie — in fact, with its “retiring detective partnered with unorthodox rookie” setup, it could have been a Lethal Weapon ripoff. Of course, as we all now know, David Fincher’s Seven brought its own dark twist to the genre, plunging the viewer into a bottomless pit of sorrow, rage, and moral decay — and ultimately refusing to help them climb out at the end. With Fincher’s amped-up direction, Darius Khondji’s gripping cinematography, and mesmerizing performances from Morgan Freeman and Kevin Spacey, Pitt could conceivably just shown up to take a paycheck without damaging Seven too much, but instead, he helped take it to another level, using his youthful good looks — and his character’s mounting horror and confusion — as a painful visual analogy for the brutal loss of innocence and compassion suffered by everyone in the film. Though some critics took issue with Seven‘s constant gloom and grisly violence, most scribes echoed the sentiments of Netflix’s James Rocchi, who called it “a harrowingly bleak vision that haunted me in the theatres and made my flesh slick with fear even on this recent re-viewing.”


79%

9. Fight Club

He started the 1990s on a hot streak, but by the end of the decade, Pitt was suffering through a bit of a slump, appearing in a string of critical dogs (Seven Years in Tibet, The Devil’s Own, Meet Joe Black) whose box office tallies reflected their disappointing reviews. But just when the naysayers were ready to write him off as an expensive hair model who couldn’t break a movie, Pitt rebounded with Fight Club, a reunion with Seven director David Fincher that paired Pitt with Edward Norton in an adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk’s hit novel. Though some critics found the film’s overpowering violence and homoerotic overtones repugnant (New York Magazine’s Peter Rainer, for one, dismissed it as “the squall of a whiny and essentially white-male generation that feels ruined by the privileges of women and a booming economy”), most writers responded to Fight Club‘s social criticism and thought-provoking themes. In the words of ReelViews’ James Berardinelli, it’s “a memorable and superior motion picture — a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer.”


83%

8. Ocean’s Eleven

Critics have a reputation for turning up their noses at escapist fare, but when it’s done right, most scribes have no problem saying so — as they did in 2001, with the Certified Fresh Ocean’s Eleven. A loose remake of the 1960 Rat Pack feature of the same name, Eleven blended the original with the nod-and-a-wink light touch of The Sting, giving its high-wattage cast free rein to essentially goof off for 116 minutes — and audiences, who hadn’t been treated to a real all-star caper since 1984’s woeful Cannonball Run II, turned out in droves. Pitt’s turn as the food-obsessed Rusty Ryan gave him an opportunity to flash the pearly whites and old-fashioned Hollywood cool that he’d played down in recent projects such as Seven Years in Tibet or Fight Club, and helped charm critics like Rolling Stone’s Peter Travers, who wrote, “forget Oscar, Ocean’s Eleven is the coolest damned thing around.”


80%

7. A River Runs Through It

An adaptation of Norman Maclean’s semi-autobiographical book of the same name, A River Runs Through It arrived on screens with a pretty stellar pedigree — director Robert Redford had won an Academy Award for his first effort, 1980’s Ordinary People, cinematographer Philippe Rousselot (who would win his own Oscar for River) was highly regarded for his work in French cinema, and musician Mark Isham brought his Grammy-winning talents to the Oscar-nominated score. The result, as you might imagine, was a visually sumptuous film — one whose stunning vistas bowled critics over even as they yawned through its languid pace and shrugged at its simple presentation of a Montana family’s multi-generational dynamic (as TV Guide wrote, “it’s hard to get excited by fisherman casting their lines into the water”). Still, in spite of its lack of flash, River afforded Pitt an early opportunity to work with some tremendously talented individuals, and proved he was more than just the cowboy-hatted hunk he portrayed in Thelma & Louise. Caryn James of the New York Times was suitably impressed, writing, “here are two things I never thought I’d say: I like a movie about fly fishing, and Robert Redford has directed one of the most ambitious, accomplished films of the year.”


88%

6. Thelma & Louise

By the time Thelma & Louise was released in 1991, Brad Pitt had been around for a few years, notching roles on the big screen (blink-and-you’ll-miss-him appearances in No Way Out and Less Than Zero, as well as topline billing in the low-budget horror flick Cutting Class) and surfacing repeatedly on television (most notably via recurring gigs on Dallas, Growing Pains, and Fox’s quickly canceled Glory Days). However, it was his turn as J.D., the impeccably coiffed, frequently shirtless con man who fleeces Thelma and Louise, that put Pitt over the edge, turning him from a somewhat familiar face into a bona fide sex symbol. It was a performance so well-regarded — albeit mainly by Pitt’s solidly female target demographic — that not even Johnny Suede and Cool World could keep him from imminent superstardom. Of course, it didn’t hurt that Pitt’s breakout role came as part of a movie that inspired waves of praise from critics like Matt Brunson of Creative Loafing, who wrote, “this beautifully realized picture remains a trenchant, almost mystical slice of Americana.”


84%

5. The Tree of Life

Nothing gets a cineaste’s anticipation humming like news of a new Terrence Malick film — and since Malick is nothing if not deliberate, we had plenty of time to hum over Tree of Life. Originally announced in the wake of Malick’s 2005 effort The New World, it tumbled down the release schedule throughout 2009 and 2010 before finally bowing in May 2011 — all 139 inscrutable minutes of it. The product of Malick’s progressively harder-to-contain ambition, Life took viewers from the dawn of life to the 21st century, leaving plenty of room for solid acting from Pitt and Jessica Chastain — as well as hosannas from critics like Salon’s Andrew O’Hehir, who deemed it “a noble crazy, a miraculous William Butler Yeats kind of crazy, alive with passion for art and the world, for all that is lost and not lost and still to come.”


89%

4. 12 Monkeys

Though his film roles to that point had, for the most part, required him to do little more than look good, Pitt’s turn in the Terry Gilliam-directed 12 Monkeys — coming on the heels of his eye-opening appearance in Seven earlier in the year — proved that he not only had good taste in scripts, but the talent to back it up. As the institutionalized activist Jeffrey Goines, Pitt tapped into a nervous energy he’d never been asked to draw on, holding his own against Bruce Willis and helping the twisty dystopian sci-fi thriller become one of 1995’s biggest surprise hits. Though it would be some time before Pitt starred in another movie that earned this kind of critical affection, after 12 Monkeys, the critics knew he wasn’t just another pretty face. As Desson Thomson of the Washington Post wrote, “Willis and Pitts’s performances, Gilliam’s atmospherics and an exhilarating momentum easily outweigh [its] trifling flaws.”


89%

3. Inglourious Basterds

Generally speaking, an actor doesn’t get many chances to play a character named Aldo — and an actor also doesn’t have many opportunities to work with Quentin Tarantino. So when Tarantino came to Pitt with the role of the cheerfully violent Nazi-hunting Lieutenant Aldo Raine in Inglourious Basterds, he clearly knew better than to say no. The result was a tense, colorful, funny, and terribly bloody World War II revenge fantasy that set loose a terrific ensemble cast (including Christoph Waltz and Michael Fassbender) in a spellbinding parallel dimension. Argued the Miami Herald’s Rene Rodriguez: “Inglourious Basterds transcends the war genre to become its own kind of unique picture: A bloody blast of pure movie bliss.”


93%

2. True Romance

Take Christian Slater, an Arquette, and the guy who directed Beverly Hills Cop II, and nine times out of 10, you probably aren’t going to get a film that tops any sort of critically themed list, let alone one that inspires a writer like Peter Canavese to crown it “a hall of fame guy’s movie” — but the exception proves the rule, and 1993’s True Romance is that exception. Slater and Patricia Arquette are the stars of this cult classic action flick, which boasts a Tarantino script and noteworthy supporting turns from (among others) Dennis Hopper, Val Kilmer, Gary Oldman, Christopher Walken, and Bronson Pinchot; it’s Brad Pitt’s few minutes as the epically stoned Floyd, however, that steal the show, sprinkling a few much-needed belly laughs between the bursts of gunfire. Such was Floyd’s influence that he served as the inspiration for 2008’s Pineapple Express. And for good reason: Not only was he industrious enough to figure out an exciting new use for an empty honey container, he was cool enough to threaten a room full of shotgun-wielding Mafia henchmen with death. (We never said he was smart.)


94%

1. Moneyball

As a (freakishly entertaining) by-the-numbers account of how the Oakland A’s used newly adapted metrics to turn conventional baseball wisdom on its head, Michael Lewis’ Moneyball seemed like one of the least cinematic bestsellers to have its film rights optioned by a major studio — and after directors David Frankel and Steven Soderbergh departed the project, it looked like it might be destined for the scrap heap. But with Bennett Miller behind the cameras and Pitt lending his rumpled charisma to the role of A’s GM Billy Beane — not to mention an Aaron Sorkin screenplay — it ended up being not only a six-time Academy Awards nominee, but a $110 million box office hit. “Baseball fans know this story,” admitted USA Today’s Claudia Puig, “but Miller puts it all in fascinating context. This is a thinking person’s baseball movie, a more complex version of the inspirational sports story.”


In case you were wondering, here are Pitt’s top 10 movies according RT users’ scores:

1. Fight Club — 96%
2. Se7en — 95%
3. Snatch — 94%
4. True Romance — 93%
5. Twelve Monkeys — 88%
6. Inglourious Basterds — 87%
7. Legends of the Fall — 87%
8. Interview with the Vampire — 86%
9. Moneyball — 86%
10. A River Runs Through It — 84%


Take a look through Pitt’s complete filmography, as well as the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for Fury.

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