The winners of the 42nd Annual People’s Choice Awards were revealed last night on a show broadcast live on CBS. The Award celebrates fans’ favorites in categories spanning film, television and music. Read through for the list of movie and television winners.

Movie Winners | TV Winners


Favorite Movie


Favorite Movie Actor


Favorite Movie Actress


Favorite Action Movie


Favorite Action Movie Actor


Favorite Action Movie Actress


Favorite Animated Movie Voice


Favorite Comedic Movie


Favorite Comedic Movie Actor


Favorite Comedic Movie Actress


Favorite Dramatic Movie


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actor


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actress


Favorite Family Movie


Favorite Thriller Movie

Jane-Lynch-Peoples-Choice

Jane Lynch, who won the Favorite TV Comedy award for Glee last year, will be the host of the People’s Choice Awards 2016. (Photo by Michael Caulfield/Getty Images)

The People’s Choice Awards polls are open, and they want to hear your opinion. Check out the list of  TV and movies nominees below, and go their official page through December 3 to vote for your favorites.


Movie Nominations | TV Nominations


Favorite Movie


Favorite Movie Actor


Favorite Movie Actress


Favorite Action Movie


Favorite Action Movie Actor


Favorite Action Movie Actress


Favorite Animated Movie Voice


Favorite Comedic Movie


Favorite Comedic Movie Actor


Favorite Comedic Movie Actress


Favorite Dramatic Movie


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actor


Favorite Dramatic Movie Actress


Favorite Family Movie


Favorite Thriller Movie

NEW IN THEATERS



Ant-Man

83%

Rating: PG-13, for sci-fi action violence.

The latest Marvel Comics superhero extravaganza is actually a rather modest affair. That’s because Paul Rudd’s character becomes a tiny crime fighter — ant-sized, to be exact. Rudd’s Scott Lang was a criminal himself, but now is teaming up with the professor (Michael Douglas) who created this shrinking particle (and a snazzy suit to go with it) to protect the technology from falling into the wrong hands. It’s a much lighter and breezier movie than most we’ve seen recently from the Marvel Cinematic Universe — the fate of the world is not at stake, for example — but there are still several thrilling and intense moments, and a few scary ones. Ant-Man must battle a bad guy who also has the capacity to diminish in size. A few people and animals who become the unwitting subjects of the shrinking experiments wind up being zapped into blobs of goo. And a little girl finds herself in very real and intimate peril. There’s also some language, some physical fighting and a tiny bit of brief kissing. Fine for tweens and up.



Mr. Holmes

88%

Rating: PG, for thematic elements, some disturbing images and incidental smoking.

This is a different take on the legacy of Sherlock Holmes, focusing on his later years in his remote farmhouse by the sea. Director Bill Condon’s film finds the world-famous detective (Ian McKellen), at age 93, struggling to recall the details of the case that ended up being his last. He has just returned from post-World War II Japan with a plant whose healing powers he hopes will restore his mental acuity, but he continues to deteriorate. Also living in the house are Holmes’ housekeeper (Laura Linney) and her young son (Milo Parker). Holmes reflects upon this final investigation, which involved the makings of a murder plot. While in Japan, he visited the remnants of Hiroshima and witnessed the devastating impact the bomb had on the city’s survivors. And the boy, whose inquisitive nature makes him a keen companion for Holmes, finds himself in serious physical danger when he helps tend to the detective’s prized bees. There’s also just the scary nature of the creeping effects of dementia. It’s rated PG, though, so for the most part it’s fine for kids around age 8 and older.

NEW ON DVD



The Longest Ride

31%

Rating: PG-13, for some sexuality, partial nudity, and some war and sports action.

Hunky Scott Eastwood — son of Clint, who eerily resembles his father in his young Rawhide days — stars as a professional bull rider living in North Carolina. This being a Nicholas Sparks adaptation, though, he also falls in love — with an art history major (Britt Robertson) who’s on her way to New York City for a gallery internship after graduation. Tweens and older are probably the suitable age for the romantic elements of this fantasy about beautiful but extremely different people whose love is probably doomed. They enjoy a little partial nudity before their artfully lighted, tastefully photographed shower sex. Eastwood’s character also suffers serious injuries from some ornery bulls, which are difficult to watch. A parallel plot involving flashbacks to a young couple during World War II features some violence during the battle scenes and some serious conversations about infertility. In the present day, there’s also some language and collegiate drunkenness.

The unstoppable action sequel Furious 7 easily held onto the number one spot in its second lap and also enjoyed a record launch in China putting it on course to become one of the highest-grossing global blockbusters of all-time.

In North America, the Universal smash dropped 59% to an estimated $60.6M boosting the total to an eye-popping $252.5M after just 10 days. This was the second fastest any non-summer film in history has ever broken the quarter-billion domestic mark. Only The Hunger Games: Catching Fire did it faster needing just eight days in November 2013.

Also impressive was that the decline was smaller than the 62-64% that the last three films in the Furious franchise had seen in their sophomore frames. Action sequels are built to draw their fan bases upfront and then suffer rapid deceleration on the second weekend. Most April movies would kill for a $60M first weekend so collecting this much cash on the second round is just incredible.

Early in its run, Furious 7 has already become the second highest grossing film of 2015 behind American Sniper‘s $347.2M which it should be able to surpass. The latest Vin Diesel flick has already become the top-grossing chapter in the franchise beating the $238.7M of the last installment, Fast & Furious 6. With the road ahead, Furious 7 may end up in the neighborhood of $375M domestically.

As amazing as the North American performance has been, Furious 7‘s global domination has been nothing short of spectacular. Beyond spectacular, actually. The second weekend delivered a sensational $195M from 66 territories pushing the international cume to $548 and the worldwide tally to a jaw-dropping $800.5M. Though North America is playing the 2D format, most major foreign markets have it in higher-priced 3D. In just 12 days of release around the world, the Paul Walker hit has already outgrossed most of last year’s biggest global hits including Guardians of the Galaxy, Maleficent, X-Men: Days of Future Past, Captain America: The Winter Soldier, The Amazing Spider-Man 2, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, and Interstellar.

Anchoring the overseas jackpot was a record-shattering opening day in China of $68.6M on Sunday – the biggest first day there all-time for any film whether Chinese or foreign. It more than doubled the $30M Friday opening day of Transformers: Age of Extinction from last summer which set a record at the time for biggest first-day for a Hollywood film there. That robot hit, which launched day and date with the U.S., ultimately reached over $300M from China powered by 3D and IMAX screens which Furious also has. Transformers even had Chinese locations, actors, financing, and cast/crew publicity visits to help its performance there while Furious 7‘s connection to the country is minimal.

Mexico and the U.K. lead all other international territories with $39-40M a piece after two weekends. Russia generated the largest four-day opening of all-time with $15M this weekend including 3D and IMAX. On Monday, Furious 7‘s international cume will zoom past the $550M of Furious 6 to shatter a new franchise record. Developing an eighth installment must be a priority for Universal, regardless of the changes in cast and crew.

With China just getting started and Japan still to open this Friday, look for the high-octane seven-quel to bust through the billion-dollar barrier next weekend. In fact, Furious 7 is now on a trajectory to reach about $1.5 billion making it the fourth largest global blockbuster of all-time behind just Avatar, Titanic, and The Avengers. It even has a shot at surpassing that Marvel assembly of super heroes, although the sequel Avengers: Age of Ultron launches overseas in T minus ten days and will have something to say about reaching that same box office stratosphere. Add in this year’s new Star Wars, Hunger Games, Jurassic Park, Pixar, and James Bond films and 2015 is setting its sights on obliterating all-time industry records.

The DreamWorks Animation hit Home also stayed put ranking second again in its third round. Fox’s family release grossed an estimated $19M, down just 30% from the Easter frame, for a robust new cume of $129.6M. Compared to other recent toons opening on the week before the bunny holiday, Home is running 3% ahead of 2013’s The Croods and 34% ahead of last year’s Rio 2. A final in the $180M range seems likely with plenty more from overseas markets.

The latest Nicholas Sparks romance The Longest Ride ended up opening in third place with mediocre results taking in an estimated $13.5M from 3,366 locations for a mild $4,011 average. Attracting lackluster reviews just like many past films based on this author’s best-selling books, Fox’s PG-13 pic lacked starpower with Scott Eastwood and Brittany Robertson in the lead. It did, however, open better than the last Sparks pic The Best of Me which bowed to just $10M last October.

Funnymen Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart followed with their R-rated comedy Get Hard which slipped 34% in its third weekend to an estimated $8.6M. The Warner Bros. title has banked $71.2M to date and looks headed for $90M+, a great result for this genre.

Fairy tale smash Cinderella slipped only 29% to an estimated $7.2M boosting the Disney cume to $180.8M after its fifth frame. Worldwide, the glass slipper saga has grossed a stellar $436.8M led by China’s $69.8M with Disney-loving Japan set to open in two weeks. Last summer’s Maleficent saw its top foreign grosses come from China, Mexico, and Japan. Reaching $200M domestic and over $525M global is possible for the princess.

The Divergent Series: Insurgent fell 32% to an estimated $6.9M pushing Lionsgate to $114.8M in North America with the global total topping $250M. Domestically, it is running 8% behind last spring’s Divergent. The Helen Mirren film Woman in Gold expanded and grossed an estimated $5.9M from 1,504 locations for a $3,891 average. The Weinstein Co. has collected $9.3M so far.

Expanding indie films followed. The low-budget horror pic It Follows added screens again and scared up an estimated $2M in its third wide frame giving Radius $11.8M. Al Pacino’s Danny Collins went national and joined the top ten with an estimated $1.6M and mild $2,169 average. Cume is $2.5M for Bleecker Street. A24’s While We’re Young added locations too and rounded out the top ten with an estimated $1.4M raising the sum to $2.4M.

Specialty distributor A24 has nurtured several platform hits recently and its latest came in the form of sci-fi drama Ex Machina which bowed to $250,000 from just four sites in New York and Los Angeles for a powerful $62,500 average. Reviews have been great and buzz out of South by Southwest helped fuel interest with genre fans. The R-rated pic goes nationwide next weekend where it will try to stay buzzworthy with a much broader audience.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $126.7M which was down 3% from last year when Captain America: The Winter Soldier remained at number one with $41.3M; but up 21% from 2013 when 42 debuted in the top spot with $27.5M.

Follow BOG on Twitter!



The Longest Ride

31%

Rating: PG-13, for some sexuality, partial nudity, and some war and sports action.

Tweens may swoon at the very sight of Scott Eastwood, son of Clint, who eerily resembles his father in his young, hunky Rawhide days. The fact that Eastwood is either riding a horse or a bull or conducting himself with cowboy courtliness makes the similarity especially uncanny. Tweens and older are also the suitable age for the romantic element of this Nicholas Sparks-novel fantasy about beautiful but extremely different people who fall for each other, but whose love is probably doomed. Eastwood plays a professional bull rider who insists he’s only staying in this dangerous game to keep his mom’s ranch afloat. Britt Robertson is the pretty art history major at Wake Forest University who’s headed to New York for a gallery internship after graduation. They enjoy a little partial nudity prior to their artfully lighted, tastefully photographed shower sex. Eastwood’s character also suffers serious injuries from some ornery bulls, which are difficult to watch. (Although the meanest and most vindictive one of all, Rango, seems to have been named after a delightful, animated movie starring Johnny Depp as a talking lizard.) A parallel plot involving flashbacks to a young couple during World War II features some violence during battle scenes and some serious conversations about infertility. In the present day, there’s also some language and collegiate drunkenness.

This week at the movies, we’ve got a rodeo star (The Longest Ride, starring Scott Eastwood and Britt Robertson) and a veteran rocker (Danny Collins, starring Al Pacino and Annette Bening). What do the critics have to say?


The Longest Ride

31%

Films based on Nicholas Sparks novels are reliable fodder for critical brickbats — and reliably strong performers at the box office. Critics say the latest Sparks adaptation, The Longest Ride, is somewhat better than most, thanks to its appealing leads and director George Tillman Jr.s’ assured direction; otherwise, it’s sappy, weepy business as usual. Luke (Scott Eastwood) is a bull rider who lives on the edge, while Sophia (Britt Robertson) is an artsy gal who dreams of the big city. Their budding relationship is solidified when they meet an older man (Alan Alda) with a heartbreaking past that makes our young heroes reflect on what they want in their lives. The pundits say The Longest Ride is the cinematic equivalent of a beach read: heavy-handed, occasionally diverting, and ultimately forgettable. (Check out Sparks’ Five Favorite Films here.)



Danny Collins

78%

Even if his recent track record has been spotty, no one would argue that Al Pacino ranks among the finest actors in cinema history. Critics say Pacino is the main reason to see Danny Collins, but a fine supporting cast also helps to elevate this likeable dramedy above its relatively predictable plotting. Pacino stars as Collins, an aging pop star on the downside of his career whose life is changed when he discovers a long-lost letter sent to him by John Lennon. His spirit reinvigorated, Collins attempts to mend his frayed relationships with family and friends. The pundits say Danny Collins occasionally veers into schmaltzy territory, but Pacino and his co-stars are so compelling that it’s hard to resist.

What’s On TV:


Bloody action and extreme power plays return full throttle, as Game of Thrones (100 percent) enjoys a new-found liberation from the world of the source material, resulting in more unexpected thrills.

“Severance” (98 percent), presents the age-old dilemma of human fulfillment, setting the stage for a final season layered with the big questions asked by Mad Men‘s beloved characters.

The finale to the first season of Better Call Saul (86 percent) delivers a payoff that is at once comic and tragic, as Jimmy’s conversion to Saul nears completion.

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • The Iranian import About Elly, a tense drama in which a woman mysteriously disappears during a vacation on the Caspian Sea, is at 100 percent.
  • Black Souls, an Italian drama about long-simmering conflicts between family members involved in organized crime, is at 92 percent.
  • Ex Machina, starring Domhnall Gleeson and Alicia Vikander in a sci-fi thriller about a computer wiz who’s tasked with testing the artificial intelligence of a remarkably lifelike robot, is Certified Fresh at 88 percent.
  • The Sisterhood Of Night, a drama about a group of teenage girls who get caught up in a community-wide witch hunt, is at 88 percent.
  • Clouds of Sils Maria, starring Juliette Binoche and Kristen Stewart in a drama about an actress struggling with constant reminders of her advanced age, is Certified Fresh at 87 percent.
  • Dior and I, a documentary about the fashion brand and its transition to a new artistic director, is at 81 percent.
  • Desert Dancer, starring Freida Pinto in a drama based on the true story of an underground dance troupe that formed during the strife that followed 2009 Iranian election, is at 44 percent.
  • Broken Horses, starring Anton Yelchin as a man trying to rescue his brother from the clutches of a drug gang, is at 29 percent.
  • Ryan Gosling‘s Lost River, starring Christina Hendricks and Saoirse Ronan in a drama/fantasy about a financially strapped family trying to survive in magic realist Detroit, is at 23 percent.
  • Kill Me Three Times, starring Simon Pegg and Alice Braga in a comedy/thriller about an assassin who gets caught up in a series of convoluted criminal plots, is at eight percent.

In my heart, Nicholas Sparks is the Sire of Swoon-Worthy Movie Moments. In honor of his latest book adaptation The Longest Ride, he wanted to share his top five favorite great love stories. Get ready to snuggle.

Casablanca (Michael Curtiz, 1942) 99%

This movie is the best example of the theme “if you love someone, sometimes you have to let them go.” This guy [Rick], he has fallen in love with this woman, and he can’t get over her. She comes back, and she’s married to this freedom fighter, someone that the Nazis are hunting. If he doesn’t give her these two plane tickets, he gets the girl, because the Nazis will find this guy. If he gives her the tickets, her husband is saved and he’ll never see her again. Boy, what a choice. Love often confronts us with some choices that are the toughest things of all. They include compromise and at times, sacrifice. And to me, Casablanca did that phenomenally well.

Ghost (Jerry Zucker, 1990) 75%

Patrick Swayze and Demi Moore. [This movie] came out the same year as Pretty Woman, but this was a film that worked on so many levels — it wonderfully incorporated humor and the supernatural, and was a love story in which, even though the lead character dies, he just can’t leave the woman that he loves. And they put in the mystery, too. It’s such a unique package, I don’t think that it’s ever been done before.RT: For the majority of my life I hated Tony Goldwyn because he’s the villain of that movie.

Right. The whole thing works. You say his name, and yep, I know exactly who that is, because he was the bad guy. How could you betray your best friend?

Dirty Dancing (Emile Ardolino, 1987) 69%

Nobody puts Baby in a corner.RT: Amen.

Right? So this is a love story about a summer fling. It incorporated music and dance into a story that rang of nostalgia and the world as it used to be, which seems so different, and yet the emotions that all of the characters experience — from the couple that falls in love, or the parents or the sister — they all ring with authenticity. It all comes together in a way that is both memorable and moving.

RT: You might be the only person in the history of Five Favorite Films to pick two Patrick Swayze films. It’s long overdue.

It’s a small, specific genre, and the fact that he was in two amazing ones — well, he worked in one and the studio said, “Hey let’s do another.” It’s as simple as that. It was Dirty Dancing that came first, and it was a moderate hit, not a massive hit. Ghost was a massive hit.


Titanic

(James Cameron, 1997) 89%

Titanic: the world’s second highest grossing film in history. It is really the only love story in the top five that feels epic. I know Casablanca is set against the backdrop of World War II, and yet this one is epic, a giant ship, and we all know what’s going to happen. We don’t really know who was on board, but they came up with a story about a couple that falls in love while they’re on board. To me, that has earned it its place in the top five.

Pretty Woman (Garry Marshall, 1990) 65%

My number one top love story would be Pretty Woman. This film wins because unlike so many films, this wasn’t a romantic comedy, it was a romantic drama, and yet there’s humor, the performances were unbelievable, the chemistry between Richard Gere and Julia Roberts was palpable onscreen. It hearkens to fantasy, like “I can be struggling but someone’s gonna see my true me inside.” And it captures all of that in a way that, at the time, felt utterly fresh and original, and you throw in the ending, wonderful. Of these movies, truly, this one is really the only happy one. Patrick Swayze was gone, Leo, sorry, he didn’t make it. Rick doesn’t get the girl. And Baby goes home with her parents at the end of the summer.

The Longest Ride opens Friday, Apr. 10 in wide release.

Tag Cloud

Avengers Winners Universal Pictures sopranos Hollywood Foreign Press Association FOX thriller CNN slasher comic Columbia Pictures hollywood Quiz teaser 72 Emmy Awards directors APB kids Cartoon Network Comics on TV scary movies HBO romantic comedy Fargo Thanksgiving 4/20 San Diego Comic-Con 2019 Ovation BAFTA Disney Plus History CW Seed Marvel Television boxoffice Emmy Nominations debate book adaptation Pet Sematary Trophy Talk Pop TV American Society of Cinematographers wonder woman TV Land Arrowverse book MTV Exclusive Video AMC GoT green book olympics Hallmark Christmas movies Peacock TCM cults true crime Masterpiece golden globe awards Food Network AMC Plus PBS hispanic Apple TV+ documentaries Kids & Family space Comedy 73rd Emmy Awards Binge Guide Comedy Central richard e. Grant screen actors guild parents Travel Channel Mystery DGA discovery independent 99% SDCC indiana jones cartoon adaptation royal family Amazon Prime mockumentary Opinion japan Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt TCA Winter 2020 Sneak Peek best Fox Searchlight live event Awards A24 films CMT vampires marvel cinematic universe 1990s Disney The Arrangement Black Mirror Tarantino New York Comic Con stand-up comedy ratings criterion dramedy foreign prank children's TV zombie blaxploitation ESPN what to watch halloween Oscars free movies Fox News historical drama superman Universal NYCC MCU australia technology diversity Schedule saw mission: impossible TruTV Walt Disney Pictures Image Comics Amazon Studios Warner Bros. asian-american casting Christmas breaking bad rt labs critics edition Netflix Super Bowl ABC Signature HBO Go FX on Hulu comics canceled Starz 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards indie posters universal monsters Bravo Photos Film Cannes werewolf Video Games IMDb TV finale Pixar FXX doctor who unscripted mob Grammys spider-verse SundanceTV Star Wars Set visit Certified Fresh medical drama Trailer rotten Watching Series godzilla composers war NBC Apple TV Plus Best and Worst blockbuster Television Academy basketball Freeform boxing based on movie LGBTQ Teen FX rt labs award winner Action cars YA crime thriller Mary Poppins Returns spider-man Academy Awards new star wars movies king kong genre chucky DirecTV monster movies TV One a nightmare on elm street know your critic Classic Film docuseries justice league GIFs Turner 2020 ITV Pop Country Awards Tour biography TCA dogs Crunchyroll cinemax joker strong female leads Mindy Kaling Pirates The CW The Witch zombies Instagram Live singing competition Holiday dragons Lucasfilm Anna Paquin crime drama 2018 slashers deadpool talk show USA Network politics international crossover Premiere Dates game of thrones adventure Reality HFPA Winter TV TNT Superheroe Mudbound japanese NBA Mary Tyler Moore First Look Marvel Studios Shudder critic resources VOD mcc VICE sitcom hidden camera MSNBC south america anime BBC Musicals dc twilight black comedy sequel Musical YouTube natural history 90s Comic-Con@Home 2021 scene in color hist Fantasy comedies marvel comics The Walking Dead movies Rom-Com PlayStation kong comic book movie mutant spanish serial killer Character Guide golden globes Tokyo Olympics die hard revenge cats IFC dark YouTube Premium rom-coms movie pirates of the caribbean fast and furious psychological thriller Spring TV ID Paramount Plus worst Pacific Islander Discovery Channel feel good Tubi ABC Family dexter E3 SXSW DC streaming service Chilling Adventures of Sabrina spy thriller robots worst movies theme song Television Critics Association telelvision Pride Month archives Countdown TLC Women's History Month quibi stoner Reality Competition witnail lord of the rings franchise 24 frames BBC One Year in Review romance transformers Funimation The Purge cancelled TV shows DC Universe crime period drama Toys The Walt Disney Company science fiction Alien 71st Emmy Awards zero dark thirty cancelled TV series Paramount king arthur Valentine's Day Nat Geo Legendary spain nature comiccon Trivia TV obituary aapi Tags: Comedy Disney+ Disney Plus batman all-time french RT21 Star Trek rotten movies we love 2015 Syfy Apple TV renewals festivals cancelled Prime Video Lionsgate Disney Channel vs. E! CBS All Access halloween tv streaming movies BET Awards TCA Awards A&E Music art house Sundance anthology cooking binge satire trailers name the review Martial Arts Sundance TV hispanic heritage month football CBS news elevated horror Turner Classic Movies Paramount Network USA political drama Lifetime Britbox laika gangster canceled TV shows psycho El Rey superhero Interview 007 DC Comics Ghostbusters Netflix Christmas movies Box Office Mary poppins Baby Yoda trophy Lifetime Christmas movies game show Comic Book Rocky nfl Film Festival Cosplay YouTube Red heist movie popular Rocketman jurassic park new york VH1 razzies Biopics Showtime video on demand BBC America young adult legend emmy awards Extras TV movies ghosts tv talk fresh GLAAD TIFF facebook harry potter President Black History Month Song of Ice and Fire spanish language TCA 2017 OWN latino dceu Epix black aliens 93rd Oscars 20th Century Fox sequels Amazon Prime Video 2021 Crackle scary Spike RT History Sundance Now classics 2016 reviews leaderboard biopic blockbusters comic book movies disaster Tumblr Election kaiju Acorn TV Chernobyl Summer nbcuniversal festival docudrama supernatural Calendar Hear Us Out Neflix spinoff Endgame documentary video screenings Ellie Kemper versus BET Animation Drama Stephen King toronto Marvel action-comedy sports remakes Hulu Wes Anderson Elton John Logo Sci-Fi Western Amazon venice Fall TV Hallmark concert streaming police drama 21st Century Fox X-Men toy story television high school Adult Swim Disney streaming service WGN Spectrum Originals TBS new zealand 79th Golden Globes Awards critics Horror live action Emmys Superheroes Captain marvel Broadway ABC The Academy Nickelodeon Marathons women cops National Geographic ViacomCBS adenture HBO Max target Tomatazos Shondaland rt archives LGBT Writers Guild of America cancelled television james bond Esquire First Reviews scorecard WarnerMedia Dark Horse Comics Rock sag awards renewed TV shows child's play See It Skip It Sony Pictures Red Carpet jamie lee curtis social media PaleyFest suspense animated dreamworks Vudu IFC Films Family series reboot Heroines Holidays 45 OneApp christmas movies Polls and Games Podcast Infographic Creative Arts Emmys travel Brie Larson stop motion 2017 comic books miniseries Nominations italian