(Photo by Marvel / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Anthony Hopkins Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Anthony Hopkins was such a fixture on the Oscars circuit during the ’90s that it was a shock to learn his nomination at this Academy Awards is his first in 20 years. After winning Best Actor for Silence of the Lambs in 1992, and getting nominated every two years after that for The Remains of the Day, Nixon, and then Amistad, the knighted actor would have to wait two decades before The Two Popes would put him officially back in the running for Oscar gold.

Of course, the awards are just one aspect of a legendary career that is now spanning into its seventh decade, one that started with a major role in 1968’s The Lion in Winter, starring Peter O’Toole and Katharine Hepburn. A Bridge Too Far, Magic, and The Elephant Man would be among Hopkins’ highlights in the years that followed, opening into an epic run in the ’90s, beginning with immortalizing Dr. Hannibal Lecter in Silence of the Lambs. Besides his Oscar-nominated hits, other films of the decade include Howards End, Legend of the Fall, The Mask of Zorro, and Meet Joe Black, guaranteeing Hopkins was inescapable no matter what movies you were into.

Hopkins returned to the Dr. Lecter for Hannibal and Red Dragon. And his most memorable roles in recent years play into his effortless gravitas, like a famed director in Hitchcock, Methuselah in Noah, Odin in the Thor trilogy, and one-half of The Two Popes, for which he was nominated for his latest acting Oscar. Lately, there was Elyse, and The Father, which drew some of the strongest reviews of his career. Now, we’re taking a look back and ranking Anthony Hopkins movies by Tomatometer!

#64

Bad Company (2002)
10%

#64
Adjusted Score: 14119%
Critics Consensus: Chris Rock and Anthony Hopkins fail to generate the sparks necessary to save the movie from a generic and utterly predictable script.
Synopsis: CIA operative Kevin Pope (Chris Rock) is suave, brilliant and right on the verge of completing a top secret mission... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#63
#63
Adjusted Score: 17575%
Critics Consensus: With a scenery-chewing performance from Sean Penn, an absence of political insight, and an overall lack of narrative cohesiveness, these Men give Oscar bait a bad name.
Synopsis: Charismatic Southern politician Willie Stark's (Sean Penn) idealism and good intentions give way to corruption after he becomes governor of... [More]
Directed By: Steven Zaillian

#62

August (1996)
14%

#62
Adjusted Score: 7015%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In this adaptation of Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya" relocated to Wales, Ieuan Davies (Anthony Hopkins) is the caretaker of a country... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Hopkins

#61
Adjusted Score: 34021%
Critics Consensus: Cacophonous, thinly plotted, and boasting state-of-the-art special effects, The Last Knight is pretty much what you'd expect from the fifth installment of the Transformers franchise.
Synopsis: Humans are at war with the Transformers, and Optimus Prime is gone. The key to saving the future lies buried... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#60

Alexander (2004)
16%

#60
Adjusted Score: 22557%
Critics Consensus: Even at nearly three hours long, this ponderous, talky, and emotionally distant biopic fails to illuminate Alexander's life.
Synopsis: The story is an epic that is as daring and ambitious as its subject, a relentless conqueror who by the... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Stone

#59

Freejack (1992)
22%

#59
Adjusted Score: 22744%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Early in the 21st century, technological advances have made it possible for aging, wealthy people to pay crooks like Vacendak... [More]
Directed By: Geoff Murphy

#58

The Virtuoso (2021)
19%

#58
Adjusted Score: 20136%
Critics Consensus: Don't let the title -- or the talented cast -- fool you: The Virtuoso falls far shy of even base level competency in its attempts to wring fresh excitement from a threadbare assassin thriller setup.
Synopsis: Danger, deception, and murder descend upon a sleepy country town when a professional assassin (Anson Mount) accepts a new assignment... [More]
Directed By: Nick Stagliano

#57
#57
Adjusted Score: 19865%
Critics Consensus: Dull and devoid of characterization, Kidnapping Mr. Heineken is a true crime thriller that rings false.
Synopsis: In 1983, five longtime friends successfully kidnap and ransom the heir (Anthony Hopkins) to the Heineken beer empire.... [More]
Directed By: Daniel Alfredson

#56

Go With Me (2015)
20%

#56
Adjusted Score: 6651%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A vengeful young woman (Julia Stiles) recruits two men (Anthony Hopkins, Alexander Ludwig) to help her track down a former... [More]
Directed By: Daniel Alfredson

#55

360 (2011)
20%

#55
Adjusted Score: 22529%
Critics Consensus: Spreading itself thin across a sprawling narrative without a unifying focus, 360 just keeps running in circles.
Synopsis: A man (Anthony Hopkins) searches for his missing daughter in one of several vignettes dealing with issues of love, loss... [More]
Directed By: Fernando Meirelles

#54

The Rite (2011)
21%

#54
Adjusted Score: 27444%
Critics Consensus: Anthony Hopkins is as excellent as ever, but he's no match for The Rite's dawdling pace and lack of chills -- or Colin O'Donoghue's tentative performance in the leading role.
Synopsis: Though he is filled with doubt about the subject, seminary student Michael Kovak (Colin O'Donoghue) finds he must attend a... [More]
Directed By: Mikael Hafstrom

#53

The Innocent (1993)
22%

#53
Adjusted Score: 15377%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An English engineer/spy (Campbell Scott) falls for a woman (Isabella Rossellini) who may jeopardize his top-secret mission in 1955 Berlin.... [More]
Directed By: John Schlesinger

#52

Collide (2016)
24%

#52
Adjusted Score: 26219%
Critics Consensus: Collide wastes a talented cast on a would-be thriller fatally undermined by eye-rolling dialogue, logical fallacies, and humdrum set pieces.
Synopsis: Casey Stein (Nicholas Hoult) agrees to hijack a shipment of cocaine for his old boss (Ben Kingsley) in return for... [More]
Directed By: Eran Creevy

#51

Slipstream (2007)
25%

#51
Adjusted Score: 25793%
Critics Consensus: Slipstream is a failed experiment; confusing instead of coherent.
Synopsis: An aging man, Felix Bonhoeffer (Anthony Hopkins), finds that the characters in a murder mystery, which he is writing as... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Hopkins

#50

Solace (2015)
25%

#50
Adjusted Score: 28005%
Critics Consensus: Solace boasts a talented cast and a somewhat intriguing premise, but they're outweighed by a plodding story that teeters between tired clichés and ludicrous twists.
Synopsis: A psychic and a federal agent hunt a serial killer.... [More]
Directed By: Afonso Poyart

#49

Instinct (1999)
27%

#49
Adjusted Score: 29394%
Critics Consensus: A convoluted and predictable plot overshadows the performances.
Synopsis: Years after he goes missing in the jungles of Africa, anthropologist Ethan Powell (Anthony Hopkins) resurfaces when it's discovered that... [More]
Directed By: Jon Turteltaub

#48

The Trial (1993)
29%

#48
Adjusted Score: 18993%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Franz Kafka's Joseph K. (Kyle MacLachlan) is arrested and held by ominous police in prewar Europe, but he is never... [More]
Directed By: David Jones

#47
#47
Adjusted Score: 31360%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: World-renowned painter Pablo Picasso (Anthony Hopkins) is notorious for his infidelity, but his French lover, Françoise Gilot (Natascha McElhone), manages... [More]
Directed By: James Ivory

#46

The Wolfman (2010)
34%

#46
Adjusted Score: 41436%
Critics Consensus: Suitably grand and special effects-laden, The Wolfman suffers from a suspense-deficient script and a surprising lack of genuine chills.
Synopsis: Though absent from his ancestral home of Blackmoor for many years, aristocrat Lawrence Talbot (Benicio Del Toro) returns to find... [More]
Directed By: Joe Johnston

#45

Desperate Hours (1990)
36%

#45
Adjusted Score: 34440%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: With the help of his defense lawyer (Kelly Lynch), who is madly in love with him, psychotic killer Michael Bosworth... [More]
Directed By: Michael Cimino

#44
Adjusted Score: 40377%
Critics Consensus: A stellar cast can't elevate this leaden adaptation that, while just as beautiful as anything director James Ivory's made before, comes off as dusty and dry.
Synopsis: An academic (Omar Metwally) goes to Uruguay to persuade the heirs of a deceased author to grant him permission to... [More]
Directed By: James Ivory

#43

Hannibal (2001)
40%

#43
Adjusted Score: 45671%
Critics Consensus: While superbly acted and stylishly filmed, Hannibal lacks the character interaction between the two leads which made the first movie so engrossing.
Synopsis: Seven years have passed since Dr. Hannibal Lecter (Anthony Hopkins) escaped from custody. The doctor is now at large in... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#42

The Human Stain (2003)
42%

#42
Adjusted Score: 46086%
Critics Consensus: Though the acting is fine, the leads are miscast, and the story is less powerful on screen than on the page.
Synopsis: Coleman Silk (Anthony Hopkins) is a worldly and admired professor who loses his job after unwittingly making a racial slur.... [More]
Directed By: Robert Benton

#41

Elyse (2020)
43%

#41
Adjusted Score: 21813%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Elyse (Lisa Pepper) languidly meanders out of a cold, concrete, designer house mirroring a mausoleum, externalizing the spirit of her... [More]
Directed By: Stella Hopkins

#40

Red 2 (2013)
44%

#40
Adjusted Score: 49895%
Critics Consensus: While it's still hard to argue with its impeccable cast or the fun they often seem to be having, Red 2 replaces much of the goofy fun of its predecessor with empty, over-the-top bombast.
Synopsis: Former CIA black-ops agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis) and his old partner, Marvin Boggs (John Malkovich), are caught in the... [More]
Directed By: Dean Parisot

#39

Meet Joe Black (1998)
45%

#39
Adjusted Score: 46169%
Critics Consensus: Meet Joe Black is pretty to look at and benefits from an agreeable cast, but that isn't enough to offset this dawdling drama's punishing three-hour runtime.
Synopsis: Bill Parrish (Anthony Hopkins), businessman and devoted family man, is about to celebrate his 65th birthday. However, before he reaches... [More]
Directed By: Martin Brest

#38
Adjusted Score: 49902%
Critics Consensus: It's sporadically amusing, and typically well-cast, but You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger isn't one of Woody Allen's more inspired late-period efforts.
Synopsis: Two married couples find only trouble and heartache as their complicated lives unfold. After 40 years of marriage, Alfie leaves... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#37

Bobby (2006)
46%

#37
Adjusted Score: 53384%
Critics Consensus: Despite best intentions from director Emilio Estevez and his ensemble cast, they succumb to a script filled with pointless subplots and awkward moments working too hard to parallel contemporary times.
Synopsis: In 1968 the lives of a retired doorman (Anthony Hopkins), hotel manager (William H. Macy), lounge singer (Demi Moore), busboy... [More]
Directed By: Emilio Estevez

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: 53146%
Critics Consensus: Hearts in Atlantis is well-acted and beautiful to look at, but the movie is nothing more than a mood piece.
Synopsis: "Hearts In Atlantis" is a drama based on Stephen King's best seller of the same name. It is the story... [More]
Directed By: Scott Hicks

#35

Young Winston (1972)
50%

#35
Adjusted Score: 50242%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Lavish rendering of Winston Churchill's early life, from his school days, through his adventures in Africa, to his first days... [More]
Directed By: Richard Attenborough

#34

Audrey Rose (1977)
53%

#34
Adjusted Score: 52897%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Husband and wife Janice (Marsha Mason) and Bill Templeton (John Beck) lead a pleasant life, residing in New York and... [More]
Directed By: Robert Wise

#33
#33
Adjusted Score: 60512%
Critics Consensus: Featuring a swoon-worthy star turn by Brad Pitt, Legends of the Fall's painterly photography and epic sweep often compensate for its lack of narrative momentum and glut of melodramatic twists.
Synopsis: In early 20th-century Montana, Col. William Ludlow (Anthony Hopkins) lives in the wilderness with his sons, Tristan (Brad Pitt), Alfred... [More]
Directed By: Edward Zwick

#32

Chaplin (1992)
60%

#32
Adjusted Score: 63040%
Critics Consensus: Chaplin boasts a terrific performance from Robert Downey, Jr. in the title role, but it isn't enough to overcome a formulaic biopic that pales in comparison to its subject's classic films.
Synopsis: Re-creation of the life of comic genius Charlie Chaplin, from his humble beginnings in south London through his early days... [More]
Directed By: Richard Attenborough

#31

Hitchcock (2012)
60%

#31
Adjusted Score: 68218%
Critics Consensus: Though it suffers from tonal inconsistency and a lack of truly insightful retrospection, Hitchcock is elevated by inspired performances from its two distinguished leads.
Synopsis: Following his great success with "North by Northwest," director Alfred Hitchcock (Anthony Hopkins) makes a daring choice for his next... [More]
Directed By: Sacha Gervasi

#30

A Bridge Too Far (1977)
62%

#30
Adjusted Score: 62895%
Critics Consensus: A Bridge Too Far is a war movie too long, although top-notch talent on both sides of the camera keeps the end result consistently watchable.
Synopsis: Late in 1944, the Allies seem to have the upper hand in the European land war. A combined British and... [More]
Directed By: Richard Attenborough

#29

Proof (2005)
62%

#29
Adjusted Score: 67480%
Critics Consensus: Gwyneth Paltrow and Anthony Hopkins give exceptional performances in a film that intelligently tackles the territory between madness and genius.
Synopsis: Catherine (Gwyneth Paltrow) is a 27-year-old grieving after the loss of her father (Anthony Hopkins), a genius mathematician whose mind... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#28

The Edge (1997)
64%

#28
Adjusted Score: 66738%
Critics Consensus: The Edge is an entertaining hybrid of brainy Mamet dialogue with brawny outdoors action -- albeit one that sadly lacks as much bite as its furry antagonist.
Synopsis: The plane carrying wealthy Charles Morse (Anthony Hopkins) crashes down in the Alaskan wilderness. Together with the two other passengers,... [More]
Directed By: Lee Tamahori

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: 77761%
Critics Consensus: It may not be the finest film to come from the Marvel Universe, but Thor: The Dark World still offers plenty of the humor and high-stakes action that fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: In ancient times, the gods of Asgard fought and won a war against an evil race known as the Dark... [More]
Directed By: Alan Taylor

#26

Spotswood (1991)
67%

#26
Adjusted Score: 38380%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Straitlaced Errol Wallace (Anthony Hopkins) is tasked with traveling to the small Australian town of Spotswood to help the befuddled... [More]
Directed By: Mark Joffe

#25

Titus (1999)
68%

#25
Adjusted Score: 70908%
Critics Consensus: The movie stretches too long to be entertaining despite a strong cast.
Synopsis: Returning from 40 years at war with the Goths, the Roman general Titus Andronicus (Anthony Hopkins) executes the eldest son... [More]
Directed By: Julie Taymor

#24

Red Dragon (2002)
68%

#24
Adjusted Score: 73203%
Critics Consensus: Competently made, but everything is a bit too familiar.
Synopsis: Ex-FBI agent Will Graham (Edward Norton) is an expert investigator who quit the Bureau after almost losing his life in... [More]
Directed By: Brett Ratner

#23

Fracture (2007)
71%

#23
Adjusted Score: 78326%
Critics Consensus: Though Fracture's plot is somewhat implausible, the onscreen face-off between Gosling and Hopkins overshadows any faults.
Synopsis: Willy Beachum (Ryan Gosling), a hotshot prosecutor, is about to leave his post for a lucrative job at a private... [More]
Directed By: Gregory Hoblit

#22

Beowulf (2007)
71%

#22
Adjusted Score: 79426%
Critics Consensus: Featuring groundbreaking animation, stunning visuals, and a talented cast, Beowulf has in spades what more faithful book adaptations forget to bring: pure cinematic entertainment.
Synopsis: In the age of heroes, a mighty warrior named Beowulf (Ray Winstone) arrives at the court of King Hrothgar (Anthony... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#21

The Bounty (1984)
74%

#21
Adjusted Score: 73806%
Critics Consensus: Thanks in large part to its cast, and Anthony Hopkins in particular, The Bounty's retelling of the mutiny on the HMS Bounty is an intelligent, engaging adventure saga.
Synopsis: Captain Bligh (Anthony Hopkins) struggles to restore discipline among the crew of the HMS Bounty after the ship has an... [More]
Directed By: Roger Donaldson

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 79910%
Critics Consensus: Overblown in the best sense of the word, Francis Ford Coppola's vision of Bram Stoker's Dracula rescues the character from decades of campy interpretations -- and features some terrific performances to boot.
Synopsis: Adaptation of Bram Stoker's classic vampire novel. Gary Oldman plays Dracula whose lonely soul is determined to reunite with his... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#19

Nixon (1995)
75%

#19
Adjusted Score: 77893%
Critics Consensus: Much like its subject's time in office, Nixon might have ended sooner -- but what remains is an engrossing, well-acted look at the rise and fall of a fascinating political figure.
Synopsis: This film is a biographical examination of former U.S. President Richard Nixon (Anthony Hopkins). The non-chronological narrative explores Nixon's personal... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Stone

#18

Noah (2014)
76%

#18
Adjusted Score: 86265%
Critics Consensus: With sweeping visuals grounded by strong performances in service of a timeless tale told on a human scale, Darren Aronofsky's Noah brings the Bible epic into the 21st century.
Synopsis: When God decides that mankind has become too sinful and must be wiped off the Earth, he chooses Noah (Russell... [More]
Directed By: Darren Aronofsky

#17

Amistad (1997)
77%

#17
Adjusted Score: 79861%
Critics Consensus: Heartfelt without resorting to preachiness, Amistad tells an important story with engaging sensitivity and absorbing skill.
Synopsis: In 1839, the slave ship Amistad set sail from Cuba to America. During the long trip, Cinque (Djimon Hounsou) leads... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#16

Thor (2011)
77%

#16
Adjusted Score: 87536%
Critics Consensus: A dazzling blockbuster that tempers its sweeping scope with wit, humor, and human drama, Thor is mighty Marvel entertainment.
Synopsis: As the son of Odin (Anthony Hopkins), king of the Norse gods, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) will soon inherit the throne... [More]
Directed By: Kenneth Branagh

#15
Adjusted Score: 86433%
Critics Consensus: Overcomes its formulaic storyline thanks to Anthony Hopkins' warm and endearing portrayal of an age-defying thrill seeker.
Synopsis: New Zealander Burt Munro spent years perfecting his classic Indian motorcycle. The year is 1967, and Burt takes his machine... [More]
Directed By: Roger Donaldson

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 85850%
Critics Consensus: Banderas returns as an aging Zorro in this surprisingly nimble, entertaining swashbuckler.
Synopsis: After being imprisoned for 20 years, Zorro -- Don Diego de la Vega (Anthony Hopkins) -- receives word that his... [More]
Directed By: Martin Campbell

#13

Magic (1978)
85%

#13
Adjusted Score: 86313%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Corky (Anthony Hopkins), a failed magician, adopts a new ventriloquist act with an abrasive dummy named Fats, and suddenly finds... [More]
Directed By: Richard Attenborough

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 48912%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: New York City bibliophile Helene Hanff (Anne Bancroft) writes to the London bookshop Marks & Co in search of some... [More]
Directed By: David Jones

#11

The Two Popes (2019)
89%

#11
Adjusted Score: 102707%
Critics Consensus: Led by outstanding performances from its well-matched leads, The Two Popes draws absorbing drama from a pivotal moment in modern organized religion.
Synopsis: Behind the Vatican walls, Pope Benedict and the future Pope Francis must find common ground to forge a new path... [More]
Directed By: Fernando Meirelles

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 94412%
Critics Consensus: Sharper and wittier than your average period piece, The Lion in Winter is a tale of palace intrigue bolstered by fantastic performances from Peter O'Toole, Katharine Hepburn, and Anthony Hopkins in his big-screen debut.
Synopsis: It's Christmas 1183, and King Henry II (Peter O'Toole) is planning to announce his successor to the throne. The jockeying... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Harvey

#9

King Lear (2018)
91%

#9
Adjusted Score: 90413%
Critics Consensus: Led by dual mesmerizing performances from Sir Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson and rounded out by a solidly stocked ensemble, this King Lear is a highly watchable adaptation.
Synopsis: King Lear divides his kingdom among his three daughters -- Goneril, Regan and Cordelia. The kingdom and family soon collapse... [More]
Directed By: Richard Eyre

#8

The Elephant Man (1980)
93%

#8
Adjusted Score: 96780%
Critics Consensus: David Lynch's relatively straight second feature finds an admirable synthesis of compassion and restraint in treating its subject, and features outstanding performances by John Hurt and Anthony Hopkins.
Synopsis: Dr. Frederic Treves (Anthony Hopkins) discovers Joseph (John) Merrick (John Hurt) in a sideshow. Born with a congenital disorder, Merrick... [More]
Directed By: David Lynch

#7

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
93%

#7
Adjusted Score: 126309%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, funny, and above all fun, Thor: Ragnarok is a colorful cosmic adventure that sets a new standard for its franchise -- and the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
Synopsis: Imprisoned on the other side of the universe, the mighty Thor finds himself in a deadly gladiatorial contest that pits... [More]
Directed By: Taika Waititi

#6

Howards End (1992)
94%

#6
Adjusted Score: 99492%
Critics Consensus: A superbly-mounted adaptation of E.M. Forster's tale of British class tension, with exceptional performances all round, Howard's End ranks among the best of Merchant-Ivory's work.
Synopsis: Helen Schlegel falls for Paul Wilcox, but is rebuffed. Her sister Margaret becomes friends with his mother, who promises her... [More]
Directed By: James Ivory

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 98167%
Critics Consensus: Smart, elegant, and blessed with impeccable performances from Anthony Hopkins and Emma Thompson, The Remains of the Day is a Merchant-Ivory classic.
Synopsis: During the 1930s, James Stevens (Anthony Hopkins) serves as a proper English butler to the doltish Lord Darlington (James Fox).... [More]
Directed By: James Ivory

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 104400%
Critics Consensus: Director Jonathan Demme's smart, taut thriller teeters on the edge between psychological study and all-out horror, and benefits greatly from stellar performances by Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster.
Synopsis: Jodie Foster stars as Clarice Starling, a top student at the FBI's training academy. Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn) wants Clarice... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Demme

#3

Shadowlands (1993)
97%

#3
Adjusted Score: 97907%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to brilliant performances from Debra Winger and especially Anthony Hopkins, Shadowlands is a deeply moving portrait of British scholar C.S. Lewis's romance with American poet Joy Gresham.
Synopsis: C. S. Lewis (Anthony Hopkins), the renowned author of "The Chronicles of Narnia" series, is a bachelor and Oxford University... [More]
Directed By: Richard Attenborough

#2

The Father (2020)
98%

#2
Adjusted Score: 112754%
Critics Consensus: Led by stellar performances and artfully helmed by writer-director Florian Zeller, The Father presents a devastatingly empathetic portrayal of dementia.
Synopsis: Anthony (Academy Award Winner, Anthony Hopkins) is 80, mischievous, living defiantly alone and rejecting the carers that his daughter, Anne... [More]
Directed By: Florian Zeller

#1

The Dresser (2015)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 93093%
Critics Consensus: The Dresser brilliantly showcases two of the most gifted actors of their generation within a thoughtful, well-executed production offering intelligent commentary on the human condition.
Synopsis: In a touring Shakespearean theatre company, backstage hand Norman is devoted to the brilliant but tyrannical head of the company,... [More]
Directed By: Richard Eyre

Get your hot patty of 1950s Americana this Friday with The Founder, starring Michael Keaton as the entrepreneur who transformed McDonald’s from a San Bernardino local joint into the global food megalith during the baby boomer decade. Founder inspires this week’s completely cool, multi-purpose gallery: true stories (all Fresh!) enlightening our values, fears, and triumphs of the ’50s.

This week on home video, we’ve got four new releases that are Certified Fresh, including one multiple Oscar-winner, one animated adventure, a music doc, and an indie drama about alcoholism. On top of that, there’s also the relatively well-received biopic about Alfred Hitchcock and the making of Psycho and a quirky Sean Penn-powered road trip drama. Lastly, we have a feature adaptation of the famed Cirque du Soleil troupe’s performances, as well as a handful of notable reissues. See below for the full list!



Life of Pi

86%

Yann Martel’s 2001 novel Life of Pi was a worldwide success, so it’s not surprising that development of a film adaptation began as early as 2003. Many considered the book “unfilmable,” however, so we didn’t get the movie until Ang Lee took up the helm (after several others dropped out) and felt technology was up to snuff to tell the story. The fantasy adventure revolves around Pi Patel (Suraj Sharma), an Indian teen whose parents own a struggling zoo and decide to sell all their animals to a buyer in Canada, where the family will settle. En route to Winnipeg, their freighter encounters a massive storm that wrecks the ship and leaves Pi stranded alone on a lifeboat with a few animals, including a fearsome Bengal tiger. Like its source novel, Life of Pi was met with both critical and commercial success, and was nominated for eleven Academy Awards; it won four Oscars, including Best Director for Ang Lee. Certified Fresh at 88%, it’s a trasportive, beautifully shot, technically impressive film, even if its underlying message may not resonate with everyone.



Rise of the Guardians

75%

Another film based on a book (or series of books, rather, authored by William Joyce), Rise of the Guardians reimagines mythical childhood figures like Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, the Tooth Fairy, the Sandman, and Jack Frost as warrior-like protectors of the world’s children — in addition to their regular duties delivering presents and hiding Easter eggs, that is. Voiced by Chris Pine, Jack Frost is a bit of a mischief maker, starting snowball fights and conjuring blizzards, until he’s recruited by the existing guardians to help defeat Pitch (Jude Law), a dark spirit intent on taking over the world. In the process, Jack discovers both his true worth as a guardian and the secrets of his past life. Though critics felt the story itself could have been a little more focused, they also liked the clever premise of the film, as well as its lush animation and brisk pacing. Certified Fresh at 74%, Rise of the Guardians is a fresh take on some familiar characters that most will be able to appreciate.



Hitchcock

60%

Screenwriter Sacha Gervasi’s directorial debut, 2007’s Anvil! The Story of Anvil, earned heaps of praise, so hopes were high for his film about Alfred Hitchcock, especially considering Anthony Hopkins would be filling in the role of the great director and Helen Mirren would be playing his wife and collaborative partner, Alma Reville. Hitchcock specifically chronicles the director’s efforts to finance and produce Psycho and the tumultuous relationship that resulted between him and Reville during the making of the film. Although critics would have liked to see a bit more subtlety and insight, most found the film stylishly directed and worth watching, even if only for the inspired performances from Hopkins and Mirren. At 63% on the Tomatometer, Hitchcock isn’t the be all and end all of biopics on The Master of Suspense, but it’s a well-acted glimpse into his life and old Hollywood.



Sound City

100%

Last year, musician Dave Grohl (Nirvana, Foo Fighters) purchased a vintage Neve 8028 mixing console from Sound City Studios in Van Nuys, California, where he had taken part in recording the seminal Nirvana album Nevermind in 1991. The purchase inspired him to direct a documentary recounting the history of the influential studio, which oversaw the recording of several rock legends and musical icons ranging from Neil Young, Elton John, and Grateful Dead to Barry Manilow, Weezer, Metallica, and many more before it closed in 2011. Peppered with interviews and performances by many of those artists, Sound City weaves together the complete story of the studio and culminates in the purchase that inspired the film in the first place. The film, which opened in limited release just a month ago, has so far earned a 100% Tomatometer, with critics calling it an affectionately crafted passion project that’s thrilling, nostalgic, and a must-see for music fans.



Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away 3D

45%

Cirque du Soleil has been an expanding Las Vegas mainstay for several years now, but they’ve been a touring troupe for even longer, their television specials have won awards, and they’ve adapted their shows into films before. This latest venture, Worlds Away, is unique in that it also offers a 3D perspective for the first time, and what’s more? It’s James Cameron-approved 3D. Though it is, in fact, just another showcase for the talents of its performers, there is a narrative framing device: a young woman named Mia (Erica Linz) visits the local circus and falls into a dreamlike world with an aerialist; in order for the two to reunite, they must traverse the various tents of the circus and navigate through their performances. Critics were fairly split here; while some thought the film incoherently plotted and most conceded it was inferior to its live equivalent, others felt it was still beautiful to look at and entertaining enough. At 46%, Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away won’t compare to the real thing, but it’s not too bad if you can’t make it to one of the live shows.



Smashed

83%

Aaron Paul has already built up a considerable fanbase from his role in Breaking Bad, but while Mary Elizabeth Winstead’s star is slowly rising, she hadn’t quite landed the starring role that showcases her talents properly… until Smashed came along. In this low key indie, Paul and Winstead play Charlie and Kate, a young married couple who both decide to come to terms with their alcoholism. When Kate, an elementary schoolteacher, vomits in the middle of class, then drunkenly succumbs to smoking crack later that same night, she consequently joins group therapy and resolves to change her life. Critics roundly applauded Winstead’s performance, as well as director James Ponsoldt’s sensitive direction and the film’s melodrama-free script, en route to a Certified Fresh 84% on the Tomatometer. Costarring Nick Offerman, Octavia Spencer, and Mary Kay Place, Smashed failed to generate much heat at the box office, but here’s hoping it leads to more substantial roles for Winstead.



This Must Be the Place

67%

At first glance, This Must Be the Place might seem simply like the latest in a long line of quirky indie comedy-dramas: Sean Penn, looking like a cross between Bono and Edward Scissorhands, is aging former rock star Cheyenne, who travels home to New York from Ireland in order to reconcile with his estranged father as he lies on his deathbed. Though his father dies before he arrives, Cheyenne soon discovers that he was an Auschwitz survivor whose lifelong mission was to track down the man who abused him there; Cheyenne takes up his father’s quest and sets out across the US to find his father’s persecutor. It’s a strange tale, to be sure, but critics mostly found it surprisingly touching, buoyed by Penn’s oddly charismatic performance. At 68%, This Must Be the Place might be a little too off-kilter for some, but if you give it a chance, it might surprise you.

Also available this week:

  • A 25th Anniversary Blu-ray release of Disney’s Who Framed Roger Rabbit (98%), with a collection of extras ported over from previous releases and an in-depth commentary track.
  • Two choices from the Criterion Collection: The original 1958 The Blob (69%), now on Blu-ray; and Fritz Lang’s Ministry of Fear on both DVD and Blu-ray.
  • Some animated Disney films, paired with their direct-to-DVD sequels: Mulan (86%), The Hunchback of Notre Dame (74%), and Brother Bear (38%).
  • Ron Howard’s 1988 fantasy flick Willow (46%) on Blu-ray.

It’s Oscar weekend – your last chance to see all the nominees before the winners are announced. Fortunately, you can watch Academy Award-nominated movies like Argo, Life of Pi, and Anna Karenina from the comfort of your living room. And if you’re in the mood for something less glitzy, we’ve got some interesting choices for you as well, including a seminal sci-fi flick, a bunch of compelling documentaries, and some 1990s indie favorites. Read on to find out what’s available to watch right now.


Argo
96%

In the midst of the Iranian Revolution of 1979, a group of militants take hostages at the U.S. embassy in Terhan. When six Americans escape and hole up elsewhere, CIA agent Tony Mendez (Ben Affleck) comes up with a scheme to rescue them: pretend they’re filmmakers working on an epic sci-fi movie.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Anna Karenina
63%

Joe Wright adapts Leo Tolstoy’s classic novel, in which the title character (Keira Knightley) is a married aristocrat who becomes enraptured with a wealthy playboy; opulent tragedy ensues.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Hitchcock
60%

This speculative drama about the making of Psycho stars Sir Anthony Hopkins as the legendary director, with Helen Mirren as his wife and collaborator Alma Reville.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Life of Pi
86%

In this phantasmagoric adventure from director Ang Lee, Suraj Sharma stars as a young man who survives a shipwreck only to be set adrift in a lifeboat — with a Bengal tiger.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Sinister
63%

Ethan Hawke stars as a true crime writer who moves his family into a house where a family was mysteriously killed. While investigating the deaths, he discovers a cache of old super 8 movies, and discovers awful secrets that could threaten him and his family as well.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Beautiful Girls
79%

Matt Dillon, Uma Thurman, a young Natalie Portman, and a bunch of other noted indie thespians star in this mid-1990s comedy about a high school reunion in snowy New England.

Available now on: Hulu


Chasing Amy
87%

Starring Ben Affleck, Joey Lauren Adams, and Jason Lee, Chasing Amy is Kevin Smith’s most mature work and an honest and funny look at modern freindship and romance.

Available now on: Hulu


The Imposter
95%

The bizarre story of the mysterious return of a missing Texas teenager is captured in this Certified Fresh documentary.

Available now on: Netflix


North Sea Texas
83%

North Sea Texas is a strong coming-of-age drama about a love affair between two teenage boys.

Available now on: Netflix


Safety not Guaranteed
91%

Safety Not Guaranteed is an indie comedy about the search for the man who placed a mysterious classified ad announcing plans for a journey through time.

Available now on: Netflix


Soylent Green
69%

In this dystopian sci-fi semi-classic, Charlton Heston investigates the murder of a food company executive – and the ingredients in his products.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Undefeated
96%

The Certified Fresh, Oscar-winning Undefeated is a doc about a perennially mediocre high school football team’s push for its first ever playoff spot.

Available now on: Netflix

Arguably the most famous director in cinema history (and the auteur behind the recently crowned Greatest Movie of All Time), Alfred Hitchcock can’t be an easy subject for an on-screen biography. Beyond his larger-than-life persona, embodied by that famously corpulent silhouette, the man was also something of an enigma, an artist who preferred to devote his personality to thrilling audiences with the most popular entertainments of the day.

British-born director Sacha Gervasi has taken a shot at it with this week’s Hitchcock, which adapts — with some creative license — Stephen Rebello’s 1990 book Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho, while exploring the relationship between Hitch (played by Anthony Hopkins) and his wife Alma Reville (Helen Mirren), as he fights to make the thriller that would prove one of his biggest and most influential hits.

Gervasi, known for his hugely entertaining 2007 metal documentary Anvil! The Story of Anvil, called in to chat about Hitchcock, the challenge of taking on a movie icon, working with Hopkins, and separating the man from the mythology.

Read on for that interview, but first, he talks here about his five favorite films.

Withnail and I (Bruce Robinson, 1987; 93% Tomatometer)



Well I guess my first one has to be Withnail and I, the 1987 Bruce Robinson classic. You know, the plot is one that would get you laughed out of any Hollywood studio: Two unemployed actors go on a holiday, drinking, to one of their uncle’s cottages for the weekend; but it’s one of the most deeply rich, brilliant, tragicomic tales of male friendship. I actually remember seeing it when I was a kid, and walking out of the theater in London — and by the way, it did not do well at the time it was released; it was a tiny little film — but I remember thinking that I wanted to become a filmmaker after that.

Betty Blue (Jean-Jacques Beineix, 1986; 77% Tomatometer)



The second one is that incredibly brilliant movie Betty Blue, which I love because it opens with that incredible lovemaking scene with Béatrice Dalle. There’s just something so vivid and luscious about it. It’s just so beautiful and sensual in every regard and I absolutely love the film. I saw it recently and it’s just as brilliant. And the incredible soundtrack, you know. It’s just as brilliant as when I first saw it. Withnail and I and Betty Blue were both in the same period; they were both seminal cinematic experiences for me.

The Sweet Smell of Success (Alexander Mackendrick, 1957; 98% Tomatometer)



The Sweet Smell of Success is, I think, one of the best — certainly one of the greatest New York films, for me — ever made. Alexander Mackendrick, great director. Unbelievable script. James Wong Howe, unbelievable camerawork. And Tony Curtis and Burt Lancaster — to see those two going at it, and really, you know, the tragedy of corruption and how it infiltrates every aspect of peoples’ lives. There was something so deeply dark and cynical about it. But yeah, there’s this sort of tiny little germ of hope at the end of the film, as Susan walks off with the musician boyfriend that Hunsecker has tried to destroy, and you just feel like, you know, absolute power corrupts but not totally. Still, it has a vicious sting to it, that film. It really affected me.

Chinatown (Roman Polanski, 1974; 100% Tomatometer)



Obviously Chinatown. Seeing Nicholson with his destroyed nose [laughs], as Polanski is slitting his nose by the reservoir and calling him “pussy cat,” and all that stuff; and him and Faye Dunaway, you know, it’s just extraordinary. It’s one of my favorite movies of all time. It’s one of the greatest screenplays ever written. I’m a huge Robert Towne fan, and a Polanski fan. And it was great on this movie — on Hitchcock — to work with John Huston’s son, Danny. He had some stories about his dad. [Laughs] That Noah Cross character [played by John Huston], I think is one of the darkest villains in cinematic history. Every little detail of that film, you know — whether it’s Gittes choosing the cheap bourbon at the beginning, rather than the expensive stuff; every single touch, I think, was masterful. It has such brilliance, and poise, and ultimately humanity to it. And again, it’s a story of power, of big city power and corruption and how power and privilege can destroy people and families. That’s a theme in Sweet Smell of Success as well.

This is Spinal Tap (Rob Reiner, 1984; 95% Tomatometer)



The last one, for me, just in terms of comedy, is This is Spinal Tap. [Laughs] I mean, I love Spinal Tap. When I first saw it in 1984 I was the only person in the cinema at Swiss Cottage in London, and I didn’t know whether it was real or if it wasn’t. [Laughs] It was just so profoundly funny. I think it obviously inspired me personally, in a huge way. I would say that the movies that inspired Anvil! were a combination of Withnail and I and This is Spinal Tap. [Laughs]

That’s why Anvil! is so good, you see.

[Laughs] It really was those two movies I saw early on. I just love the pomposity and ridiculousness of being an artist and trying with absolutely no-one caring. [Laughs] There’s an inherent tragedy to it. It’s the same thing in Withnail and I, you know — the philosophical ridiculousness of it, of a thespian in crisis. No-one really cares. There’s something so deeply hard about being an artist, because most of the time no-one gives a sh-t. But there’s something very sort of tragic and uplifting and real about that. I think with Spinal Tap it also has the humor, you know — how these guys, who have grown up, are still basically children. That was something that I also responded to in Anvil! But you know, Spinal Tap — the original and best. There would have been no Anvil! without that film. The best part is having the two films play on double bills all over the world. [Laughs]

Did you ever meet those guys, Michael McKean and Christopher Guest?

Yeah, I did. I did, actually, and they were fantastic. They were very funny.

Now, did you know they were American actors when you first saw the movie? I didn’t.

I didn’t know it wasn’t real, but eventually I figured it out.

A lot of people were fooled, ’cause they made records and toured after that film.

Oh absolutely! Their second album, I believe, was called Break Like the Wind [laughs], which I think sums it up. And they had a video for a song called “Bitch School,” which I though was very funny.

They were genius.

They were genius. I just think it was ironic that I found the guys that were part of the reason that inspired movies like Spinal Tap — they were guys like Anvil. It was very similar, the Anvil story, to Spinal Tap — Anvil had songs like “Butterbutt Jerky” and “Whiteknuckle Shuffle.” You could never make it up. I remember being on the road with Anvil, as a roadie, in 1982, before Spinal Tap came out; so I was living that life, you know, as a young kid on the road with a rock band. So when [Spinal Tap] came out, it was like my holiday job was up there on screen.

So it’s no surprise that you thought Spinal Tap were real.

Exactly! I was the drum tech. I was the drum roadie for [Anvil’s] Robb Reiner. [Laughs] And again, the crazy magical connection between Anvil with Rob Reiner, obviously being the name of the director of Spinal Tap. So it’s like, it was just so meta. It was just very surreal. I’m still amazed to this day by that film.

Next, Gervasi talks about Hitchcock, how he approached the story of one of cinema’s most famous directors (and films), and working with Anthony Hopkins on the lead role.

 

Luke Goodsell: When you set out to do a movie like this, about one of the most famous — if not the most famous — directors of all time, what’s the most daunting aspect?

Sacha Gervasi: Well, I mean when you take on Hitchcock, at all — I mean, we were mostly telling the story of a relationship, but still, Hitchcock is the man — you know it’s gonna provoke some sort of controversy, because there were so many people talking about the book [Stephen Rebello’s Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho] and wanting it to be the film about the making of this movie [Psycho]. But that’s been done. That’s been done in the book, and Stephen Rebello himself was like, “I want a movie which is an entertainment for the audience.” So we made the conscious decision. I think we knew, though, that what we wanted to do — the intention of the film — was to pay tribute to not just this fiercely loyal and amazing wife [Alma Reville, played by Helen Mirren], but also this brilliant artist in her own right, who stood by his side throughout 54 years of marriage and this incredible career. I think for us, you know, it was really important to shine a light on that relationship and that incredible artist. And really show a little peek behind the curtain, of how hard it must be to live with a genius like Alfred Hitchcock and to deal with his crap — and playing a huge role. So for us I think it was a lovely thing to do — to take nothing away from Hitchcock, but also to acknowledge the unseen contributions that often are made to some of the great artists that we know.

LG: As he’s characterized here, Hitchcock often comes across as a big kid — he’s playing pranks, there’s the scene where he puts the corpse in Vera Miles’ dressing room…

SG: Right, yeah.

LG: I’m curious as to how you and Anthony Hopkins approached Hitchcock, to try and flesh him out — because he was a very impenetrable persona.

 

SG: Well, yeah, because he was so impenetrable he became so fascinating. I think what we really needed to do was to kind of explore what might have been in his psychology as he shot these movies, you know. So for us it was really a dramatic exploration, because there’s clearly a big fantasy element in the movie — as there should be in making a movie about Hitch; he was so enigmatic and fascinating that we couldn’t really do a documentary about that.

LG: It’s inescapable in the performance that we see Anthony Hopkins and his own rich history as an actor — it’s like a synthesis of their personae.

SG: Absolutely, and we wanted that intentionally to happen. We knew it was “Anthony Hopkins playing Alfred Hitchcock.” We [originally] had a prosthetic that completely covered him up, but there was no point when you have one of the greatest actors in the world and he’s got a big rubber mask on his face.

LG: There’s also, of course, the connection with the killer Ed Gein inspiring both Psycho‘s Norman Bates and, later, Buffalo Bill in The Silence of the Lambs. Did you and Anthony talk about that at all?

SG: Right, absolutely. I definitely think we discussed it on some level. I don’t remember it exactly but we definitely mentioned it.

 

LG: In your research for the film, was there something that surprised you about Hitchcock that you hadn’t known before?

SG: Yeah, the grocery bills.

LG: [laughs]

SG: The amount he spent was extraordinary. When we went to the Academy and researched his life, we saw all his incredible grocery bills. We found out he was having the food flown in from France and England, and the wines — they had a vineyard in Northern California. I mean, they lived incredibly well — even though their house, at a certain level, was quite modest, the way they lived was quite lavish and extraordinary. You have to admire Hitchcock. He grew up the son of a green grocer, so very humble beginnings, and he reached a point in his life where he was famous and powerful and could do what he wanted, and he loved the finer things in life. So if you’re Alfred Hitchcock and you want to have your food flown in from Maxine’s of Paris, then goddammit you go ahead and do it. [Laughs] The wonderful indulgence of success.

LG: You mentioned working with Danny Huston before. Did he relate any grand tales of his dad? Did the family have any relationship with Hitchcock?

SG: I think they did. I mean, what Danny said to me the other day was growing up with John Huston, he was always aware of the difference between the man and the mythology — and I think that’s what we tried to do in this film, to say there is a difference between the two. Mythology is largely the projection of other people, of what they want someone to be and what they hope they are; and I think for us it was important to tell the story of a man — a contradictory, flawed, difficult human being. It’s not good or bad, you know. He was both. And I think that was the exciting part, to show the complexity of the man. To me that only deepens and enriches your interest in the work, because you’re watching these movies — these brilliant movies — over and over again going, “Who is this guy? What drove him?” And I think we explored that without ever being able to answer it, and that’s a good thing. It needs to be as mysterious as ever.

LG: Do you have a favorite Hitchcock film?

SG: Yeah, Rear Window — because it’s unintentionally his most personal.

LG: That explains the many Rear Window references in your film.

SG: Yeah, there are about 10 references to other Hitchcock films in there.

LG: Were you conscious of maybe putting too many in, or did you just want as many as you could?

SG: We just put stuff in for fun, you know. Again, it’s a fun movie for an audience and we made that decision — and we’re really proud of it. That was really what we wanted, because remember — Hitchcock made movies for the audience, so we tried to be as fun as possible.


Hitchcock opens in a limited release engagement this week ahead of its nationwide expansion.

Happy Thanksgiving! This week at the movies, we’ve got a furry castaway (Ang Lee‘s Life of Pi starring Suraj Sharma); folkloric fighters (Rise of the Guardians, with voice work from Chris Pine and Alec Baldwin); teen guerillas (Red Dawn, starring Chris Hemsworth and Josh Hutcherson); and unhappy singles (Silver Linings Playbook, starring Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence). What do the critics have to say?



Life of Pi

86%

On paper, Life of Pi shouldn’t work — it’s a 3D adaptation of a supposedly “unfilmable” magic realist novel. But critics say director Ang Lee’s film achieves the near impossible — it’s a phantasmagoric technical achievement that’s emotionally rewarding as well. Newcomer Suraj Sharma stars as a young man who survives a shipwreck only to be set adrift in a lifeboat — with a Bengal tiger. The pundits say the Certified Fresh Life of Pie is so visually sumptuous, and newcomer Sharma is so strong, that occasional moments of so-so dialogue are easily forgiven. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we count down Lee’s best-reviewed films.)



Rise of the Guardians

75%

A sort of Avengers for the elementary school set, critics say Rise of the Guardians is stylish and briskly paced, but it’s only so-so in the storytelling department. When a nightmare king named Pitch attempts to spread darkness all over the world, it’s up to such unlikely heroes as Santa Claus, Jack Frost, and the Easter Bunny to save the children from misery and despair. The pundits say Rise of the Guardians should please small children with its whirl colorful action, and adults will find it to be a decent, if not groundbreaking, animated romp.



Red Dawn

15%

The original Red Dawn may have strained credibility, but at least there was a Communist Bloc to fear in 1984. Critics say a lack of topicality is only one of the problems with this new Red Dawn, which features some decent action sequences but gives a short shrift to character development and general logic. A foreign enemy has invaded a small town in Washington, and a group of teens that includes Chris Hemsworth and Josh Hutcherson wage guerilla warfare in order to save their community — and America itself. The pundits say Red Dawn makes precious little sense most of the time, and a solid cast of up-and-comers can do little with its generic dialogue. (Check out our 24 Frames gallery of the stars of Red Dawn.)



Silver Linings Playbook

92%

In the movies, characters fall in love all the time, but critics say they’re rarely as interesting as the folks in Silver Linings Playbook, a sharply written, terrifically acted film about fascinating people in dark situations. Bradley Cooper stars as a down-on-his-luck guy living with his parents after his release from a mental institution. He gets an unexpected boost when he meets a mysterious young woman (Jennifer Lawrence) who seems to offer a solution to his troubles. The pundits say the Certified Fresh Silver Linings Playbook represents another triumph for director David O. Russell, who makes difficult material work splendidly with help from strong performances and witty dialogue.

Also opening this week in limited release:

Tag Cloud

X-Men jurassic park Musicals Hollywood Foreign Press Association SXSW australia GIFs 2018 Star Trek hidden camera Mystery CNN PBS Classic Film halloween sopranos Tumblr adventure Turner Avengers rt archives cooking Musical FXX TV One psycho supernatural Writers Guild of America Sundance Now AMC Plus archives Lucasfilm finale spy thriller Sundance TV Comedy indiana jones Horror facebook crime drama Disney streaming service Walt Disney Pictures game of thrones Hallmark Christmas movies natural history toy story trophy genre obituary TV Land Sneak Peek Universal Pictures posters zombies 90s Ovation boxoffice TCA Fargo Spring TV Biopics razzies transformers Marvel Valentine's Day scorecard news comic books slasher Rom-Com hispanic 20th Century Fox Food Network target BAFTA Logo Crunchyroll NBA VOD Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt The Walking Dead Adult Swim TNT Awards Universal dexter spider-man slashers Ellie Kemper period drama Paramount Network Prime Video Pet Sematary elevated horror Extras twilight free movies kong Marvel Television comedies Cosplay wonder woman Pacific Islander pirates of the caribbean war award winner worst south america Fantasy Red Carpet Turner Classic Movies rotten movies we love BBC America black comedy Countdown 93rd Oscars Disney Plus Music Captain marvel TV new star wars movies legend universal monsters Spike Holiday TV renewals Pirates spider-verse thriller The CW based on movie diversity new york reviews children's TV Mudbound telelvision concert franchise golden globes green book venice video on demand scary movies Election Animation name the review FX mockumentary richard e. Grant Cannes Exclusive Video rotten international teaser Film comic book movie TCM spanish Syfy Endgame Travel Channel Tags: Comedy movies 72 Emmy Awards SDCC batman Netflix Christmas movies stop motion Hulu Best and Worst The Academy Amazon Black Mirror adaptation TCA Awards romantic comedy technology italian emmy awards 2017 Freeform dramedy comic Rocky witnail sequel Chernobyl canceled animated Epix 79th Golden Globes Awards Year in Review theme song halloween tv Sci-Fi ratings Film Festival Funimation high school live action History a nightmare on elm street police drama films olympics breaking bad Drama true crime Creative Arts Emmys disaster MSNBC IFC Films Mary Poppins Returns miniseries series Columbia Pictures discovery sag awards singing competition The Witch OWN tv talk 99% gangster kaiju black reboot trailers HBO Go ABC Signature politics Song of Ice and Fire directors Photos satire American Society of Cinematographers DC streaming service docudrama latino TIFF Shudder independent worst movies 2020 ITV Superheroe Christmas streaming crime thriller WarnerMedia TV movies comiccon science fiction cancelled television king arthur OneApp Ghostbusters rt labs critics edition Winners cancelled TV shows Character Guide Tarantino best LGBT james bond NYCC GoT blaxploitation Amazon Prime superhero Heroines 21st Century Fox 4/20 japan Fox Searchlight marvel cinematic universe 73rd Emmy Awards CBS sports Lifetime Christmas movies sitcom Fox News Legendary 2019 YA football Showtime dc BBC One medical drama TruTV renewed TV shows Image Comics ID Tokyo Olympics AMC 1990s Western nbcuniversal TBS Amazon Studios godzilla robots unscripted doctor who YouTube Red criterion DC Comics Infographic live event Reality hist critic resources composers zombie BET Esquire aapi biopic documentary FX on Hulu Kids & Family Baby Yoda Tubi Elton John streaming movies Marvel Studios historical drama Neflix travel Masterpiece royal family Television Critics Association CBS All Access know your critic new zealand Netflix E3 remakes Television Academy suspense debate mission: impossible art house Apple TV Plus ghosts Fall TV Academy Awards vampires heist movie stoner blockbusters Star Wars 2015 Country fast and furious toronto Mindy Kaling strong female leads Sony Pictures dceu Paramount Plus Bravo VH1 festival marvel comics young adult scene in color harry potter Comics on TV deadpool FOX Anna Paquin king kong Interview screenings GLAAD comic book movies Super Bowl The Walt Disney Company Shondaland child's play die hard kids Spectrum Originals Disney Apple TV+ Wes Anderson Alien Acorn TV Apple HBO Max classics DGA japanese movie Rocketman Comic Book foreign Sundance Starz Podcast USA cancelled TV series See It Skip It binge serial killer Toys crime SundanceTV critics Family 007 Comedy Central LGBTQ Emmy Nominations Cartoon Network Disney+ Disney Plus RT21 MTV mutant psychological thriller Binge Guide MCU YouTube rom-coms monster movies Teen DirecTV political drama joker what to watch Instagram Live Black History Month Comic-Con@Home 2021 versus casting nature jamie lee curtis Polls and Games popular El Rey cats prank Nat Geo First Look Mary Tyler Moore cinemax cartoon National Geographic NBC E! hispanic heritage month Trailer Pop TV justice league 45 Winter TV San Diego Comic-Con Schedule festivals Certified Fresh ABC Family Brie Larson President book adaptation Vudu Premiere Dates quibi Rock BET Awards Pixar Pride Month First Reviews WGN USA Network adenture cops Pop Thanksgiving Peacock chucky Mary poppins Awards Tour DC Universe Amazon Prime Video VICE docuseries superman A24 Warner Bros. dark talk show scary cancelled french Britbox Broadway dogs PaleyFest leaderboard Crackle 2021 The Purge TLC lord of the rings book mob stand-up comedy biography TCA Winter 2020 women game show Lifetime video YouTube Premium hollywood Lionsgate Discovery Channel Martial Arts comics HBO New York Comic Con spanish language vs. Holidays nfl laika Hear Us Out APB Quiz asian-american PlayStation cults action-comedy television IMDb TV feel good Summer 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards werewolf Marathons Nominations saw blockbuster dragons zero dark thirty Set visit parents christmas movies Superheroes Calendar Box Office Grammys rt labs CW Seed IFC Women's History Month screen actors guild 71st Emmy Awards canceled TV shows CMT basketball TCA 2017 boxing Nickelodeon HFPA ABC Hallmark Action spain spinoff A&E aliens Opinion RT History revenge BBC cars Tomatazos Reality Competition Dark Horse Comics 2016 ViacomCBS anthology 24 frames ESPN documentaries Arrowverse anime sequels Chilling Adventures of Sabrina space all-time indie fresh Watching Series Disney Channel crossover romance Trivia dreamworks Emmys Trophy Talk Oscars Paramount Video Games social media golden globe awards Stephen King mcc The Arrangement