(Photo by Warner Bros. / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Margot Robbie Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

It only took two years after an eyebrow-raising entrance in The Wolf of Wall Street for Margot Robbie to become a big-enough known entity to cameo in movies as herself, like she did in 2015’s The Big Short. And by 2018, she was an Oscar-nominated actress thanks to I, Tonya. She’ll also be a fixture at this year’s ceremony: Robbie was nominated for Best Supporting Actress for Bombshell, while her portrayal as Sharon Tate was one of the sentimental cruxes of Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, which is up for Best Picture.

In-between all of this, Robbie also became one of the shining stars of the DC Extended Universe as Harley Quinn, stealing the show in Suicide Squad, with an upgrade to lead status in Birds of Prey. And she was again one of the best parts of The Suicide Squad. Now, we’re ranking all Margot Robbie movies by Tomatometer!

#17

Terminal (2018)
21%

#17
Adjusted Score: 23369%
Critics Consensus: Worth seeking out for only the most hardcore of Margot Robbie completists, Terminal lives down to the medical definition of its title in dreadfully derivative fashion.
Synopsis: In the dark heart of a sprawling and anonymous city, two assassins carry out a sinister mission, a teacher battles... [More]
Directed By: Vaughn Stein

#16

Suicide Squad (2016)
26%

#16
Adjusted Score: 50737%
Critics Consensus: Suicide Squad boasts a talented cast and a little more humor than previous DCEU efforts, but they aren't enough to save the disappointing end result from a muddled plot, thinly written characters, and choppy directing.
Synopsis: Figuring they're all expendable, a U.S. intelligence officer decides to assemble a team of dangerous, incarcerated supervillains for a top-secret... [More]
Directed By: David Ayer

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 51092%
Critics Consensus: The Legend of Tarzan has more on its mind than many movies starring the classic character, but that isn't enough to make up for its generic plot or sluggish pace.
Synopsis: It's been nearly a decade since Tarzan (Alexander Skarsgård), also known as John Clayton III, left Africa to live in... [More]
Directed By: David Yates

#14

Focus (2015)
56%

#14
Adjusted Score: 65218%
Critics Consensus: Focus may have a few too many twists and turns, but it nearly skates by on its glamorous setting and the charm of its stars.
Synopsis: Nicky (Will Smith), a veteran con artist, takes a novice named Jess (Margot Robbie) under his wing. While Nicky teaches... [More]
Directed By: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 79633%
Critics Consensus: Mary Queen of Scots delivers uneven period political thrills while offering a solid showcase for the talents of its well-matched leads.
Synopsis: Queen of France at 16 and widowed at 18, Mary Stuart defies pressure to remarry. Instead, she returns to her... [More]
Directed By: Josie Rourke

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 76211%
Critics Consensus: Goodbye Christopher Robin struggles to balance wartime tension and childlike wonder, but offers valuable insight into the darkness shadowing the creation of a classic children's tale.
Synopsis: After leaving London for the English countryside, writer A.A. Milne starts to spin fanciful yarns about his son's growing collection... [More]
Directed By: Simon Curtis

#11

Peter Rabbit (2018)
64%

#11
Adjusted Score: 71508%
Critics Consensus: Peter Rabbit updates Beatrix Potter's classic characters with colorfully agreeable results that should entertain younger viewers while admittedly risking the wrath of purists.
Synopsis: Peter Rabbit and his three sisters -- Flopsy, Mopsy and Cotton-Tail -- enjoy spending their days in Mr. McGregor's vegetable... [More]
Directed By: Will Gluck

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 80091%
Critics Consensus: While WTF is far from FUBAR, Tina Fey and Martin Freeman are just barely enough to overcome the picture's glib predictability and limited worldview.
Synopsis: In 2002, cable news producer Kim Barker (Tina Fey) decides to shake up her routine by taking a daring new... [More]
Directed By: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa

#9

About Time (2013)
69%

#9
Adjusted Score: 75254%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully filmed and unabashedly sincere, About Time finds director Richard Curtis at his most sentimental.
Synopsis: When Tim Lake (Domhnall Gleeson) is 21, his father (Bill Nighy) tells him a secret: The men in their family... [More]
Directed By: Richard Curtis

#8

Bombshell (2019)
68%

#8
Adjusted Score: 87997%
Critics Consensus: Bombshell benefits from a terrific cast and a worthy subject, but its impact is muffled by a frustrating inability to go deeper than the sensationalistic surface.
Synopsis: The provocative real story of three whip-smart, ambitious, strong women who anchored one of America's most powerful news networks --... [More]
Directed By: Jay Roach

#7

Suite Française (2014)
76%

#7
Adjusted Score: 77059%
Critics Consensus: Suite Française takes an understated approach to its period romance, which -- along with strong performances from a talented cast -- pays absorbing dividends.
Synopsis: Her husband away at war, a lonely Frenchwoman (Michelle Williams) begins a tentative romance with the refined German soldier (Matthias... [More]
Directed By: Saul Dibb

#6
Adjusted Score: 108918%
Critics Consensus: With a fresh perspective, some new friends, and loads of fast-paced action, Birds of Prey captures the colorfully anarchic spirit of Margot Robbie's Harley Quinn.
Synopsis: It's open season on Harley Quinn when her explosive breakup with the Joker puts a big fat target on her... [More]
Directed By: Cathy Yan

#5

Z for Zachariah (2015)
79%

#5
Adjusted Score: 81259%
Critics Consensus: Z for Zachariah wrings compelling drama out of its simplistic premise -- albeit at a pace that may test the patience of less contemplative viewers.
Synopsis: Following a disaster that wipes out most of civilization, a scientist (Chiwetel Ejiofor) and a miner (Chris Pine) compete for... [More]
Directed By: Craig Zobel

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 90851%
Critics Consensus: Funny, self-referential, and irreverent to a fault, The Wolf of Wall Street finds Martin Scorsese and Leonardo DiCaprio at their most infectiously dynamic.
Synopsis: In 1987, Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio) takes an entry-level job at a Wall Street brokerage firm. By the early 1990s,... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#3
Adjusted Score: 121490%
Critics Consensus: Thrillingly unrestrained yet solidly crafted, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood tempers Tarantino's provocative impulses with the clarity of a mature filmmaker's vision.
Synopsis: Actor Rick Dalton gained fame and fortune by starring in a 1950s television Western, but is now struggling to find... [More]
Directed By: Quentin Tarantino

#2

I, Tonya (2017)
90%

#2
Adjusted Score: 118231%
Critics Consensus: Led by strong work from Margot Robbie and Alison Janney, I, Tonya finds the humor in its real-life story without losing sight of its more tragic -- and emotionally resonant -- elements.
Synopsis: In 1991, talented figure skater Tonya Harding becomes the first American woman to complete a triple axel during a competition.... [More]
Directed By: Craig Gillespie

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 110304%
Critics Consensus: Enlivened by writer-director James Gunn's singularly skewed vision, The Suicide Squad marks a funny, fast-paced rebound that plays to the source material's violent, anarchic strengths.
Synopsis: Welcome to hell--a.k.a. Belle Reve, the prison with the highest mortality rate in the US of A. Where the worst... [More]
Directed By: James Gunn

The One I Love

(Photo by © RADiUS-TWC /courtesy Everett Collection)

60 Hidden Gem Movies On Netflix

We know people are burning through their Netflix queues at a cracking pace right now, bingeing the buzziest movies and series as they drop and finally getting to those things you’ve been putting on the backburner for months. To help out – and calm the stress that you could run out of things to watch (ah!) – the Rotten Tomatoes team trawled through the streaming service’s movie offerings with one mission: to find some not-so-obvious hidden gems to help keep your watchlist topped up.

How did we define “hidden gems”? A little broadly, we’ll admit. The collection below is made up of movies with impressive Tomatometer scores that have gone criminally under-seen (Slow WestI Don’t Feel At Home In This World Anymore.Under the Shadow); movies that made a splash when they debuted but which you may have forgotten since (1922My Life As A ZucchiniObvious Child); under-appreciated gems – according to the RT staff (Can’t Hardly WaitThe Foreigner); and some bigger movies you may be surprised to see are available on Netflix. And we threw in a few surprise nostalgic favorites, too. Yes, even some Rotten ones.

We broke out the selections into five categories to help you find what you’re specifically looking for: Action and Adventure, Horror and Suspense, Drama, Comedy, and Kids and Family. If you’re after even more Netflix movie suggestions, check out our guides to the 250 Best Movies on Netflix, the Best Comedies on Netflix, the Best Romantic-Comedies on Netflix, and the Best Horror Movies on Netflix.

Found a hidden gem on Netflix that’s not on our list? Let your fellow fans know in the comments. 


Action and Adventure

#70

The Foreigner (2017)
66%

#70
Adjusted Score: 73893%
Critics Consensus: The Foreigner adheres strictly to action thriller formula, but benefits from committed -- and out of character -- performances from its talented veteran stars.
Synopsis: Quan is a humble London businessman whose long-buried past erupts in a revenge-fueled vendetta when the only person left for... [More]
Directed By: Martin Campbell

#69

Haywire (2011)
80%

#69
Adjusted Score: 87362%
Critics Consensus: MMA star and first-time actress Gina Carano displays ample action-movie chops in Haywire, a fast-paced thriller with a top-notch cast and outstanding direction from Steven Soderbergh.
Synopsis: Mallory Kane (Gina Carano) is a highly trained operative for a government security contractor. Her missions take her to the... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#68

Hostiles (2017)
71%

#68
Adjusted Score: 83456%
Critics Consensus: Hostiles benefits from stunning visuals and a solid central performance from Christian Bale, both of which help elevate its uneven story.
Synopsis: In 1892, legendary Army Capt. Joseph Blocker reluctantly agrees to escort a dying Cheyenne war chief and his family back... [More]
Directed By: Scott Cooper

#67

Kon-Tiki (2012)
81%

#67
Adjusted Score: 83806%
Critics Consensus: A well-crafted retelling of an epic true story, Kon Tiki is a throwback to old-school adventure filmmaking that's exciting and entertaining in spite of its by-the-book plotting.
Synopsis: Norwegian adventurer Thor Heyerdahl (Pål Sverre Hagen) suspects that the South Sea Islands were originally colonized by South Americans. In... [More]

#66
#66
Adjusted Score: 91121%
Critics Consensus: A bloody thrill ride designed to test the limits of more squeamish viewers, The Night Comes for Us wields a stylishly violent, action-packed punch.
Synopsis: Ito, a gangland enforcer, is caught amidst a treacherous and violent insurrection within his Triad crime family.... [More]
Directed By: Timo Tjahjanto

#65

Shadow (2018)
94%

#65
Adjusted Score: 99762%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully filmed and inventively choreographed, Shadow is a thrilling and visually sumptuous wuxia epic that finds director Zhang Yimou near peak form.
Synopsis: To finally achieve victory over a rival kingdom, a brilliant general devises an intricate plan involving his wife, a look-alike... [More]
Directed By: Yimou Zhang

#64

Slow West (2015)
92%

#64
Adjusted Score: 96050%
Critics Consensus: Slow West serves as an impressive calling card for first-time writer-director John M. Maclean -- and offers an inventive treat for fans of the Western.
Synopsis: A bounty hunter (Michael Fassbender) keeps his true motive a secret from the naive Scottish teenager (Kodi Smit-McPhee) he's offered... [More]
Directed By: John Maclean


HORROR AND SUSPENSE 

#63

1922 (2017)
91%

#63
Adjusted Score: 92455%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to director Zak Hilditch's patient storytelling and strong work from lead Thomas Jane, 1922 ranks among the more satisfying Stephen King adaptations.
Synopsis: A rancher conspires to murder his wife for financial gain and convinces his teenage son to participate.... [More]
Directed By: Zak Hilditch

#62
#62
Adjusted Score: 94487%
Critics Consensus: The Autopsy of Jane Doe subverts the gruesome expectations triggered by its title to deliver a smart, suggestively creepy thriller that bolsters director André Ovredal's growing reputation.
Synopsis: When father and son coroners investigate the death of a beautiful "Jane Doe," they find increasingly bizarre clues.... [More]
Directed By: André Øvredal

#61

Blue Ruin (2013)
96%

#61
Adjusted Score: 100767%
Critics Consensus: Smart, stripped-down, and thrillingly grim, Blue Ruin proves that a well-told revenge story can still leave its audience on the edge of their seat.
Synopsis: An ominous piece of news sends a drifter (Macon Blair) back to his hometown to exact brutal -- and inept... [More]
Directed By: Jeremy Saulnier

#60

Cam (2018)
93%

#60
Adjusted Score: 98554%
Critics Consensus: Smart and suspenseful, CAM is a techno-thriller that's far more than the sum of its salacious parts -- and an outstanding showcase for Madeline Brewer in the leading role.
Synopsis: A camgirl has her principles, until a mysterious woman who looks just like her takes over her channel.... [More]
Directed By: Daniel Goldhaber

#59

Cargo (2017)
88%

#59
Adjusted Score: 91883%
Critics Consensus: Cargo takes a refreshingly character-driven approach to the zombie genre that's further distinguished by its Australian setting and Martin Freeman's terrific lead performance.
Synopsis: Stranded in rural Australia in the aftermath of a violent pandemic, an infected father desperately searches for a new home... [More]
Directed By: Ben Howling, Yolanda Ramke

#58

Eli (2019)
48%

#58
Adjusted Score: 48641%
Critics Consensus: Intermittently effective if not wholly successful, Eli offers horror fans a handful of jump scares in search of a truly terrifying story.
Synopsis: A boy becomes trapped in a haunted house while undergoing treatment for a rare disease.... [More]
Directed By: Ciarán Foy

#56

Gerald's Game (2017)
91%

#56
Adjusted Score: 96281%
Critics Consensus: Carla Gugino carries Gerald's Game's small-scale suspense with a career-defining performance.
Synopsis: A woman accidentally kills her husband during a kinky game. Handcuffed to her bed with no hope of rescue, she... [More]
Directed By: Mike Flanagan

#63
Adjusted Score: 94050%
Critics Consensus: The Girl with All the Gifts grapples with thought-provoking questions without skimping on the scares -- and finds a few fresh wrinkles in the well-worn zombie horror genre along the way.
Synopsis: In the future, a strange fungus has changed nearly everyone into a thoughtless, flesh-eating monster. When a scientist and a... [More]
Directed By: Colm McCarthy

#55

The Golem (2018)
86%

#55
Adjusted Score: 85838%
Critics Consensus: A chillingly effective horror story rooted in rich folklore, The Golem blends centuries-old stories with timely themes to powerful effect.
Synopsis: During an outbreak of a deadly plague, a mystical woman must save her tightknit Jewish community from foreign invaders --... [More]
Directed By: Doron Paz, Yoav Paz

#54

Green Room (2015)
90%

#54
Adjusted Score: 105296%
Critics Consensus: Green Room delivers unapologetic genre thrills with uncommon intelligence and powerfully acted élan.
Synopsis: Members (Anton Yelchin, Alia Shawkat) of a punk-rock band and a tough young woman (Imogen Poots) battle murderous white supremacists... [More]
Directed By: Jeremy Saulnier

#53

Hush (2016)
93%

#53
Adjusted Score: 95376%
Critics Consensus: Hush navigates the bloody waters of home invasion thrillers and incisive slashers for a contemporary horror puree.
Synopsis: A deaf woman is stalked by a killer in her home.... [More]
Directed By: Mike Flanagan

#52

The Invitation (2015)
89%

#52
Adjusted Score: 94249%
Critics Consensus: The Invitation makes brilliant use of its tension-rich premise to deliver a uniquely effective -- and surprisingly clever -- slow-building thriller.
Synopsis: While attending a dinner party at his former house, a man (Logan Marshall-Green) starts to believe that his ex-wife (Tammy... [More]
Directed By: Karyn Kusama

#51

The Ravenous (2017)
88%

#51
Adjusted Score: 88120%
Critics Consensus: Uncommonly restrained for a movie about a flesh-eating menace, Ravenous offers a satisfyingly nuanced entry in the crowded zombie apocalypse subgenre.
Synopsis: A village in Quebec is terrorized by a flesh-eating plague.... [More]
Directed By: Robin Aubert

#50

The Ritual (2017)
74%

#50
Adjusted Score: 78169%
Critics Consensus: Director David Bruckner makes evocative use of the Scandinavian setting and a dedicated cast to deliver a handsome -- if familiar -- horror story.
Synopsis: Reuniting after the tragic death of their friend, four college pals set out to hike through the Scandinavian wilderness. A... [More]
Directed By: David Bruckner

#49

Sweetheart (2019)
95%

#49
Adjusted Score: 95562%
Critics Consensus: Carried by Kiersey Clemons' performance, Sweetheart balances smart subtext and social commentary against effective genre thrills.
Synopsis: A shipwreck survivor on an uninhabited island must fend off a malevolent force that surfaces each night.... [More]
Directed By: J.D. Dillard

#48

Under the Shadow (2016)
99%

#48
Adjusted Score: 104302%
Critics Consensus: Under the Shadow deftly blends seemingly disparate genres to deliver an effective chiller with timely themes and thought-provoking social subtext.
Synopsis: After Shideh's building is hit by a missile during the Iran-Iraq War, a superstitious neighbor suggests that the missile was... [More]
Directed By: Babak Anvari


Drama, Mystery, and A Documentary or Two 

#47

American Honey (2016)
79%

#47
Adjusted Score: 91432%
Critics Consensus: American Honey offers a refreshingly unconventional take on the coming-of-age drama whose narrative risks add up to a rewarding experience even if they don't all pay off.
Synopsis: Star (Sasha Lane), an adolescent girl from a troubled home, runs away with a traveling sales crew that drives across... [More]
Directed By: Andrea Arnold

#46

Atlantics (2019)
96%

#46
Adjusted Score: 104245%
Critics Consensus: An unpredictable supernatural drama rooted in real-world social commentary, Atlantique suggests a thrillingly bright future for debuting filmmaker Mati Diop.
Synopsis: After the bodies of his friends feeling Senegal for Europe wash up on a shore, a young woman assumes that... [More]
Directed By: Mati Diop

#45
Adjusted Score: 98364%
Critics Consensus: The Body Remembers When the World Broke Open uses an encounter between two strangers as the catalyst for a thoughtful drama as poetic as its title.
Synopsis: After a chance encounter on the street, a woman encourages a pregnant domestic abuse victim to seek help.... [More]

#44

The Burial of Kojo (2018)
100%

#44
Adjusted Score: 98476%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When a man's vengeful brother traps him in a mine shaft, his daughter embarks on a journey to rescue him.... [More]
Directed By: Sam Blitz Bazawule

#43

Burning (2018)
95%

#43
Adjusted Score: 105592%
Critics Consensus: Burning patiently lures audiences into a slow-burning character study that ultimately rewards the viewer's patience -- and subverts many of their expectations.
Synopsis: Jong-soo runs into Hae-mi, a girl who once lived in his neighborhood, and she asks him to watch her cat... [More]
Directed By: Lee Chang-dong

#41
#41
Adjusted Score: 97217%
Critics Consensus: Brilliantly performed and smartly unconventional, The End of the Tour pays fitting tribute to a singular talent while offering profoundly poignant observations on the human condition.
Synopsis: Writer and journalist David Lipsky (Jesse Eisenberg) interviews author David Foster Wallace (Jason Segel) for Rolling Stone magazine.... [More]
Directed By: James Ponsoldt

#40

Enemy (2013)
71%

#40
Adjusted Score: 75733%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a strong performance from Jake Gyllenhaal and smart direction from Denis Villeneuve, Enemy hits the mark as a tense, uncommonly adventurous thriller.
Synopsis: A mild-mannered college professor (Jake Gyllenhaal) discovers a look-alike actor and delves into the other man's private affairs.... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#40

Frida (2002)
75%

#40
Adjusted Score: 79991%
Critics Consensus: Frida is a passionate, visually striking biopic about the larger-than-life artist.
Synopsis: This is the true story of Frida Kahlo (Salma Hayek) and her husband Diego Rivera (Alfred Molina), the larger-than-life painters... [More]
Directed By: Julie Taymor

#39
Adjusted Score: 78748%
Critics Consensus: The Fundamentals of Caring gets maximum mileage out of the chemistry between its well-matched leads as it follows a fairly well-worn coming-of-age road trip route.
Synopsis: A writer (Paul Rudd) retires after a personal tragedy and becomes a disabled teen's caregiver. When the two embark on... [More]
Directed By: Rob Burnett

#37

Happy as Lazzaro (2018)
91%

#37
Adjusted Score: 95718%
Critics Consensus: Happy as Lazzaro uses a friendship's ups and downs as a satisfyingly expansive canvas for a picture rich with thematic and cinematic depth.
Synopsis: Lazzaro, a good-hearted young peasant, and Tancredi, a young nobleman cursed by his imagination, form a life-altering bond when Tancredi... [More]
Directed By: Alice Rohrwacher

#36

High Flying Bird (2019)
91%

#36
Adjusted Score: 98863%
Critics Consensus: High Flying Bird takes a thoughtful and engrossing look at professional sports that sees Steven Soderbergh continuing to test the limits of new filmmaking technology.
Synopsis: A sports agent pitches a controversial business opportunity to a rookie basketball player during a lockout.... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#35
Adjusted Score: 83690%
Critics Consensus: Far more traditional and straightforward than its unwieldy title, The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society offers delightful comfort food for fans of period drama.
Synopsis: In 1946 a London-based writer begins exchanging letters with residents on the island of Guernsey, which was German-occupied during WWII.... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#34
Adjusted Score: 93103%
Critics Consensus: I don't feel at home in this world anymore. transcends its unwieldy title to offer timely, intoxicatingly dark observations on gender dynamics and social norms in modern America.
Synopsis: After being burglarized, a depressed woman (Melanie Lynskey) and her obnoxious neighbor set out to find the thieves, but they... [More]
Directed By: Macon Blair

#33
#33
Adjusted Score: 83635%
Critics Consensus: With typically sharp work from writer-director Nicole Holofcener and finely layered performances, The Land of Steady Habits is one mid-life crisis worth watching.
Synopsis: Feeling trapped in the stifling, wealthy enclave of Westport, Conn., a man retires from his job in finance and leaves... [More]
Directed By: Nicole Holofcener

#32

Locke (2013)
91%

#32
Adjusted Score: 99246%
Critics Consensus: A one-man show set in a single confined location, Locke demands a powerful performance -- and gets it from a never-more-compelling Tom Hardy.
Synopsis: A man's (Tom Hardy) life unravels after he leaves a construction site at a critical time and drives to London... [More]
Directed By: Steven Knight

#30

The One I Love (2014)
82%

#30
Adjusted Score: 85464%
Critics Consensus: The One I Love doesn't take its intriguing premise quite as far as it could, but it still adds up to an ambitious, well-acted look at love and marriage.
Synopsis: A couple (Mark Duplass, Elisabeth Moss) whose marriage is crumbling have a surreal experience during a weekend getaway at a... [More]
Directed By: Charlie McDowell

#29
Adjusted Score: 88361%
Critics Consensus: A satisfying must-watch for diehard cineastes, The Other Side of the Wind offers the opportunity to witness a long-lost chapter in a brilliant filmmaker's career.
Synopsis: After years of exile in Europe, a maverick director returns to Hollywood to finish his comeback movie, "The Other Side... [More]
Directed By: Orson Welles

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: 98955%
Critics Consensus: A fascinating portrait of a forgotten musical pioneer, Searching for Sugar Man is by turns informative and mysterious.
Synopsis: Though he faded into obscurity in the U.S., an early '70s musician known as Rodriguez became a huge hit in... [More]
Directed By: Malik Bendjelloul

#26

Super Dark Times (2017)
90%

#26
Adjusted Score: 91769%
Critics Consensus: Rich in atmosphere and period detail, Super Dark Times is an effective teen thriller whose true power lies in its approach to deeper themes.
Synopsis: Teenagers Zach and Josh have been best friends their whole lives, but when a gruesome accident leads to a cover-up,... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Phillips

#25

We the Animals (2018)
92%

#25
Adjusted Score: 97425%
Critics Consensus: Dreamlike and haunting, We the Animals approaches the coming-of-age odyssey with a uniquely documentarian eye.
Synopsis: Manny, Joel, and Jonah tear their way through childhood. Their mother and father have a volatile relationship that makes and... [More]
Directed By: Jeremiah Zagar


COMEDY

#24

About Time (2013)
69%

#24
Adjusted Score: 75254%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully filmed and unabashedly sincere, About Time finds director Richard Curtis at his most sentimental.
Synopsis: When Tim Lake (Domhnall Gleeson) is 21, his father (Bill Nighy) tells him a secret: The men in their family... [More]
Directed By: Richard Curtis

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 44075%
Critics Consensus: Occasionally clever and moderately intelligent, Can't Hardly Wait also contains too many cheap laughs, recycled plotting, and flat characters.
Synopsis: School's out, and an entire graduating class -- from football stars and cool girls to complete nerds -- gathers at... [More]

#23

Cookie's Fortune (1999)
86%

#23
Adjusted Score: 87984%
Critics Consensus: Robert Altman's gift for diffuse storytelling is employed to breezily enjoyable effect in Cookie's Fortune, a mirthful caper that layers on a generous helping of Southern charm.
Synopsis: After learning that her aunt, an elderly Mississippi widow (Patricia Neal), has taken her own life, Camille (Glenn Close) hatches... [More]
Directed By: Robert Altman

#18

Mindhorn (2016)
92%

#18
Adjusted Score: 93848%
Critics Consensus: Led by a committed performance from Julian Barratt, Mindhorn offers audiences a laugh-out-loud comedy whose sublime silliness is enhanced by its more thoughtful moments.
Synopsis: A has-been actor, known for playing British detective Mindhorn, works alongside the police to catch a serial killer who will... [More]
Directed By: Sean Foley

#17

Obvious Child (2014)
90%

#17
Adjusted Score: 96847%
Critics Consensus: Tackling a sensitive subject with maturity, honesty, and wit, Obvious Child serves as a deeply promising debut for writer-director Gillian Robespierre.
Synopsis: An immature, newly unemployed comic (Jenny Slate) must navigate the murky waters of adulthood after her fling with a graduate... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Robespierre

#16

The Sapphires (2012)
91%

#16
Adjusted Score: 96179%
Critics Consensus: While it's plenty predictable and sentimental, The Sapphires also has an irresistible feel-good vibe, winning music and charming performances to spare.
Synopsis: A would-be music promoter (Chris O'Dowd) sees something special in a girl group of four Australian singers and takes them... [More]
Directed By: Wayne Blair

#15

Someone Great (2019)
83%

#15
Adjusted Score: 85480%
Critics Consensus: What Someone Great lacks in originality it makes up for in relatability and charm, thanks in large part to the undeniable chemistry between its talented leads.
Synopsis: Dumped by her long-term boyfriend, a music journalist recruits her two best friends for one last outrageous adventure in New... [More]

#13

Swiss Army Man (2016)
72%

#13
Adjusted Score: 83899%
Critics Consensus: Disarmingly odd and thoroughly well-acted, Swiss Army Man offers adventurous viewers an experience as rewarding as it is impossible to categorize.
Synopsis: Being stranded on a deserted island leaves young Hank (Paul Dano) bored, lonely and without hope. As a rope hangs... [More]

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 88954%
Critics Consensus: Like the best horror/comedies, Tucker & Dale vs. Evil mines its central crazy joke for some incredible scares, laughs, and -- believe it or not -- heart.
Synopsis: Two scruffy pals' (Tyler Labine, Alan Tudyk) backwoods vacation takes a bloody turn when ignorant college students mistake them for... [More]
Directed By: Eli Craig


FAMILY AND KIDS 

#10
Adjusted Score: 89267%
Critics Consensus: The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind earns its predictably uplifting arc through strong performances and impressive work from debuting director Chiwetel Ejiofor.
Synopsis: A 13-year-old boy is thrown out of the school he loves when his family can no longer afford the fees.... [More]
Directed By: Chiwetel Ejiofor

#9

The Breadwinner (2017)
95%

#9
Adjusted Score: 102244%
Critics Consensus: The Breadwinner's stunning visuals are matched by a story that dares to confront sobering real-life issues with uncommon -- and richly rewarding -- honesty.
Synopsis: Parvana is an 11-year-old girl who lives under Taliban rule in Afghanistan in 2001. After the wrongful arrest of her... [More]
Directed By: Nora Twomey

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 97518%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully animated and faithful to the spirit of its classic source material, The Little Prince is a family-friendly treat that anchors thrilling visuals with a satisfying story.
Synopsis: The Aviator introduces a girl to a world where she rediscovers her childhood and learns that it's human connections that... [More]
Directed By: Mark Osborne

#6

Lu Over the Wall (2017)
78%

#6
Adjusted Score: 80020%
Critics Consensus: Lu Over the Wall can be more fun to watch than to follow, but director Masaaki Yuasa's distinctive visual style offers colorful compensation for an occasionally scattered story.
Synopsis: Kai is a lonely teenage boy who lives in a small fishing village. One day, he meets and befriends Lu,... [More]
Directed By: Masaaki Yuasa

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 107767%
Critics Consensus: My Life as a Zucchini's silly title and adorable characters belie a sober story whose colorful visuals delight the senses even as it braves dark emotional depths.
Synopsis: A police officer (Nick Offerman) and some new friends help an orphan adjust to life at a foster home.... [More]
Directed By: Claude Barras

#2
Adjusted Score: 93145%
Critics Consensus: The warmth of traditional Disney animation makes this occasionally lightweight fairy-tale update a lively and captivating confection for the holidays.
Synopsis: Hardworking and ambitious, Tiana (Anika Noni Rose) dreams of one day opening the finest restaurant in New Orleans. Her dream... [More]
Directed By: Ron Clements, John Musker

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 60298%
Critics Consensus: Charming characters; loads of fun for kids and adults.
Synopsis: This animated comedy finds Tommy Pickles (E.G. Daily) trying to return his baby brother to the hospital after being warned... [More]

#2
Adjusted Score: 100864%
Critics Consensus: A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon retains the charm of its small-screen source material while engagingly expanding the title character's world.
Synopsis: When a UFO crash-lands near Mossy Bottom Farm, it's up to Shaun the sheep and his animal friends to help... [More]


Thumbnail image: © Well Go USA, © Gkids, © A24

(Photo by Mary Clavering/Young Hollywood/Getty Images)

Ross Lynch is going from Disney to Dahmer. He’s playing a teenaged Jeffrey in My Friend Dahmer, a prequel to the madness that would drive Dahmer to kill (and rape and consume) 17 people over 15 years. Heady stuff for Lynch, who wasn’t born yet when Dahmer was killed in prison in 1994 while serving multiple life imprisonment sentences. And the role is perhaps even shocking to his fans, who’ve been following his career through Disney Channel’s Austin & Ally, and as 20% of R5, the rock band he fronts with his four siblings.

“I like the idea of shocking people and playing something that was so far from what people were used to seeing me in,” Lynch explains on making this his leading actor debut, “Even when I was on Disney Channel, I had that in the back of my head, and I put it out in the universe that I wanted to do an indie film next. I wanted to do something that was darker and with just a little bit more … something with more substance. A lot of this film is what is not being said.”

As My Friend Dahmer opens in limited release this Friday, we spoke with Lynch to get his Five Favorite Films, and followed up with more on expanding a career into film after conquering radio and TV.


Romeo and Juliet (1968) 95%

It was made in 1968, and it’s kind of old school. I actually ended up watching it for school, but I was home schooled, so I watched it in my house. For whatever reason, when I saw that film, dude, I loved it. I [was] addicted to it. Kind of ended up falling in love with Olivia Hussey. I became a fan girl, I’m not even kidding you. I thought about it nonstop for a long, long time.

The Theory of Everything (2014) 80%

My second favorite film right now… This is also a film that hit me pretty hard. The Theory of Everything. I like what it says about life. It made me appreciative of life, about everything. Ultimately, I think those are some of my favorite movies, where you leave the theater, you sit up and you want to be a better person, or you want to enjoy life more.

About Time (2013) 69%

I’m still debating whether or not I want this on my list, but did you ever see About Time, with Domhnall Gleeson? Same kind of thing. An uplifting film. Makes you appreciate the time you got.

Boogie Nights (1997) 93%

You can’t really go wrong with Boogie Nights. [I first saw this] maybe 16, 17, maybe a little younger. I have a lot of older siblings, so I saw really inappropriate stuff when I was pretty young.

I remember the impact Boogie Nights made when it came out. It’s still carrying on.

Yeah, especially with young filmmakers. That film is very, very often referenced. A lot of it because of the technical aspects, along with, obviously, the acting. The whole vibe of it. ’70s Hollywood is epic.

Django Unchained (2012) 86%

A recent film. But man, I had to pick a Quentin Tarantino film. I’m a really big fan. He’s super unique. I appreciate the people who have a thing that’s completely different than whatever anyone else is doing.

Was it a fight to pick the Tarantino movie you wanted on your list?

I definitely thought about Pulp Fiction for a second. You know what I think it was? I was a little too young to really grasp everything about Pulp Fiction on the first watch. When I saw Django Unchained, I was really immersed in the world and everything that was happening. Based on my personal experience with the film, it’s Django Unchained. But, as far as the better movie, you probably should say Pulp Fiction.


Alex Vo for Rotten Tomatoes: Is there anyone you’re looking at as you make these big steps in your career?

Ross Lynch: I look up to people like Jamie Foxx, the people who do everything. He’s got an Oscar, he’s not an average actor, he’s always playing these awesome roles, like Django Unchained. Or Baby Driver, where he’s this random gangster dude.

Ultimately, I just want to be an artist, really. I want to do films that are interesting and that people probably wouldn’t expect me to do, like My Friend Dahmer. I also want to make music that is maybe a little further left field than the norm of pop radio. Obviously, I still have ambition in mind. I still want to get on the top 40, and all those things like that. I’m always wanting to just be creative.

I also really look up to people like Steve Jobs and Elon Musk, the innovators of today that push the envelope. Maybe in the future, I’ll do something like that, too.


My Friend Dahmer is in theaters this Friday.

This week at the movies, we’ve got the God of thunder (Thor: The Dark World, starring Chris Hemsworth and Natalie Portman) and a time-traveling romantic (About Time, starring Domhnall Gleeson and Rachel McAdams). What do the critics have to say?



Thor: The Dark World

66%

With a half-dozen movie franchises and a network TV series, the Avengers ecosystem has been a commercial juggernaught for Marvel, though one could be forgiven for wondering if the brand is a bit over-extended. Thankfully, critics say Thor: The Dark World is a rock-solid entry in Marvel’s cinematic canon, with enough muscular thrills and goofy humor to compensate for its occasionally confusing plot. This time out, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) must stop an ancient race called the Dark Elves from plunging the cosmos into darkness. Things get personal when one of the elves inhabits the body of Thor’s sweetheart Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), and he’s forced to team up with his untrustworthy brother Loki (Tom Hiddleston) in order to save the universe. The pundits say Thor: The Dark World suffers from a bit too much exposition, but its action sequences are suitably stirring and Tom Hiddleston’s puckish performance nearly steals the show. (Watch our video interviews with Hemsworth, Hiddleston, Portman, and more, and click through our gallery of Marvel movie heroes.)



About Time

69%

Just because a romantic comedy is saccharine, schmaltzy, and predictable doesn’t mean it won’t turn audiences’ hearts to mush. Critics say that’s the case with About Time, an overly sentimental but often sweet and poignant charmer from Love Actually director Richard Curtis. Tim (Domhnall Gleeson) is a single guy who learns from his father that he has the ability to travel back in time to change his fate. However, when he utilizes his strange gift to woo Mary (Rachel McAdams), he discovers that other aspects of his life don’t quite line up the way he’d like them to. The pundits say that About Time is sometimes sappy and illogical, but Gleeson and McAdams make for an appealing onscreen couple. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we count down McAdams’ best-reviewed movies.)



12 Years a Slave

95%

After winning raves in limited release, 12 Years a Slave goes wide this week, and critics say it’s arguably the most powerful cinematic depiction of slavery ever captured on film. Chiwetel Ejiofor stars as Solomon Northup, a free man who’s kidnapped and sold into slavery; he quickly learns that in order to survive, he must suppress his identity and keep his head down while periodically enduring a series of painful and dehumanizing punishments. The pundits say that the Certified Fresh 12 Years a Slave is a painful but important work, thanks to Steve McQueen‘s brilliant direction and an Oscar-worthy performance from Ejiofor.

Also opening this week in limited release:

Rachel McAdams

It’s hard to build any kind of consensus in this crazy modern world, but if there’s one thing pretty much all of us can agree on, it’s that Rachel McAdams is adorable. Her winsome charm, already put to excellent use in a series of hits that includes The Notebook and Midnight in Paris, returns to the big screen this weekend in the date movie of the season: Richard Curtis’ About Time, a romantic comedy with more on its mind than your average meet-cute. In honor of McAdams’ latest outing, we decided to take a look back at some of the brighter critical highlights from her filmography — which contains a lot more variety than you might expect. It’s time for Total Recall!


53%

10. The Notebook

Maligned by critics and boyfriends, 2004’s The Notebook positioned Rachel McAdams and Ryan Gosling for romantic weepie superstardom, placing them opposite one another in a Nick Cassavetes-directed adaptation of the Nicholas Sparks bestseller about star-crossed lovers whose beautifully filmed affair is torn asunder by her controlling parents (and World War II). It’s the kind of stuff that has served as grist for countless Lifetime movies, and not a few scribes rolled their eyes at the swelling music and sweeping cinematography — but for others, The Notebook represented a sensitively assembled, solidly acted paean to a style of filmmaking long out of vogue. Opined an appreciative Rex Reed for the New York Observer, “How rare to see a film that says there is still a value system out there, that being thoughtful and caring is not uncool.”


54%

9. Married Life

McAdams took a stab at a Hitchcock-style psychological thriller with 2008’s Married Life, which found director Ira Sachs co-adapting (with Oren Moverman) John Bingham’s 1953 novel Five Roundabouts to Heaven. Starring Chris Cooper as a middle-aged businessman who embarks on an affair with a pretty young war widow (McAdams), this WWII-set picture takes a dark turn when Cooper’s character decides he wants to end his marriage, but can’t bear to hurt his wife — so he decides to poison her instead, and makes the crucial mistake of telling his friend (Pierce Brosnan), whose own libido ends up putting everyone at risk. “The roundelay structure and Hitchcockian nods could have easily given way to a sardonic puppet theater,” admitted CinePassion’s Fernando F. Croce, “but Sachs and Moverman care too much about their characters to turn them into pawns.”


55%

8. Morning Glory

Remember the cheerfully old-fashioned, beautifully shot workplace comedies of the 1980s? So does Aline Brosh McKenna. The Devil Wears Prada screenwriter scripted this comfortingly old-school entry in the genre, helmed by Notting Hill director Roger Michell and featuring a cast of pleasantly familiar faces. Starring McAdams as the button-cute executive producer of a flailing national morning show, Harrison Ford as the curmudgeonly new co-host, and Diane Keaton as the show’s put-upon longtime anchor, Morning Glory tapped into a neglected filmmaking vein once regularly drawn upon by everyone from James L. Brooks to Mike Nichols. Unfortunately, in spite of its impressive pedigree, Glory failed to find favor with many critics, and its middling grosses seemed to suggest that modern moviegoers were no longer all that interested in the travails of a heel-kicking upper middle-class gal and her lovably dysfunctional co-workers. Still, it found its defenders, among them Dave White of Movies.com, who wrote, “Ford is a snarling cartoon version of his grim political thriller self played for laughs. And McAdams is no Mary Tyler Moore, but she’s just this side of being that appealing.”


59%

7. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows

While it didn’t offer as much screen time as some of her other projects, McAdams’ return to the role of Irene Adler for the Sherlock Holmes sequel, A Game of Shadows, added another top-grossing feature to her résumé — and her rumored million-dollar payday further cemented her status as one of the more in-demand young actors in Hollywood. And although Shadows suffered from the same diminishing critical returns as many sequels, its blend of dark mystery and thrilling action proved sufficiently potent for critics like Joe Neumaier of the New York Daily News, who argued, “Ritchie’s franchise — 7% classic formula, 93% adrenaline — is smart in a showoffy way that flatters its star as well as its audience.”


69%

6. Sherlock Holmes

Over 100 years after he made his debut on the printed page, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s famous detective got the CGI-assisted blockbuster treatment in the aptly titled Sherlock Holmes, starring Robert Downey, Jr. as the intrepid sleuth and Jude Law as his faithful sidekick Watson. Joined by Rachel McAdams as the mysterious Irene Adler and assisted by Guy Ritchie’s action-heavy direction, Holmes made solving 19th-century mysteries cool again — and entertained critics such as Bill Goodykoontz of the Arizona Republic, who wrote, “Playing literature’s greatest detective as a sort of self-loathing action hero, Downey has an absolute blast. And thanks to his performance in Sherlock Holmes, so do we.”

76%

5. Wedding Crashers

R-rated comedies enjoyed a box office renaissance after the turn of the century — including Wedding Crashers, which put stars Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson square in their respective wheelhouses with a storyline about a pair of lecherous buddies whose fondness for shacking up with bridesmaids hits a snag when they meet a pair of sisters (Isla Fisher and McAdams) whose formidable charms prompt some painful re-evaluation. Though some critics had problems with Crashers‘ uneven tone — and the scads of gratuitous flesh on display in the movie’s opening montage — most found it too much fun to resist. “The likes of the sneakily subversive Wilson and Vaughn deserve better,” wrote MaryAnn Johnson of Flick Filosopher, “but this is darn close to a perfect showcase for what they can do, and how much better they do it together.”


79%

4. Red Eye

Red Eye put director Wes Craven back behind the cameras following a five-year break — and delivered a taut, claustrophobic thriller about a hotel manager (Rachel McAdams) who finds herself sitting next to a terrorist (Cillian Murphy) on an overnight flight. The tight-focused setup of Carl Ellsworth’s script eventually gives way to an overblown final act involving an assassination attempt (and an underwater missile), but most critics didn’t mind; as Roger Ebert wrote, “After a summer of crashes, bangs, endless chase scenes and special effects that belittle the actors standing in front of them, what a pleasure to see characters in a thriller doing what people like themselves possibly could do.”


84%

3. Mean Girls

Romantic dramas and teen comedies don’t get a lot of critical love, but McAdams struck gold with entries from both genres in 2004, smooching a sun-dappled Ryan Gosling in The Notebook and piling on the lip gloss to play the strikingly pretty leader of a perfectly vapid high school clique in Mean Girls. Lindsay Lohan got the lion’s share of the attention for her solid work as Cady Heron, the bookish recent transplant who struggles to fit in with the popular crowd at her new school, and Tina Fey earned plenty of praise for her funny, smartly written script. But Mean Girls wouldn’t be Mean Girls without its mean girls, and that McAdams-led trio (rounded out by Amanda Seyfried and Lacey Chabert) was a big part of what made the movie for critics like the Globe and Mail’s Liam Lacey, who called McAdams “deliciously evil” in the role.


84%

2. State of Play

Times are tough for reporters in the real world, but in Hollywood, they’re still good for the occasional hard-bitten thriller. Case in point: Kevin Macdonald’s State of Play, which adapts the BBC miniseries about a reporter (Russell Crowe) and his young mentee (McAdams) investigating the death of a Capitol Hill staffer (Maria Thayer) who had been involved in an extramarital affair with a Congressman (Ben Affleck). Loaded with enough old-school intrigue to provoke a slew of All the President’s Men comparisons, State of Play is the kind of thinking man’s thriller that’s all too rare these days (and with an $87 million gross against its $60 million budget, it’s painfully easy to see why studios have lost interest). Even if audiences weren’t in the mood for a political murder mystery, most critics were taken with Play, including Christopher Tookey of the Daily Mail, who wrote, “Even if you don’t normally bother with movies, cheer yourself up by seeing this. There hasn’t been a more engrossing or intelligent political thriller in the past three decades.”


93%

1. Midnight in Paris

Woody Allen endured some relatively bumpy years during the 1990s and early aughts, but things turned around for 2011’s Midnight in Paris, a late-period smash that brought Allen some of the warmest reviews (and the highest grosses) of his career while telling the the fantasy-infused comedic tale of an ennui-addled screenwriter (Owen Wilson) whose rocky relationship with his dismissive fiancee (McAdams) sends him out for a melancholic walk on the streets of Paris, where he ends up taking much more of a journey than he bargained for. “Woody Allen seemed to have lost his fizz as a filmmaker of late,” observed Jason Best for Movie Talk, “and then he uncorked the sparkling Midnight in Paris, a comic fantasy with all the effervescence of vintage champagne.”


In case you were wondering, here are McAdams’ top 10 movies according RT users’ scores:

1. The Notebook — 84%
2. Midnight in Paris — 82%
3. Sherlock Holmes — 78%
4. Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows — 77%
5. State of Play — 71%
6. Wedding Crashers — 69%
7. Mean Girls — 66%
8. Red Eye — 65%
9. The Vow — 63%
10. The Hot Chick — 62%


Take a look through McAdams’ complete filmography, as well as the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for About Time.

 

A week before the Hemsworth brothers begin their double feature of November tentpoles, the sci-fi entry Ender’s Game opened atop the North American box office and was joined in the top five by fellow new releases Last Vegas and Free Birds, all of which posted moderate or respectable launches.

Debuting to an estimated $28M, the effects-driven futuristic action pic Ender’s Game landed in the number one spot with a performance that was reasonably good, but not especially impressive for an expensive production. Based on the best-selling novel, the PG-13 film averaged $8,218 from 3,407 locations including higher-priced IMAX and other large-format screens. Reviews were mixed for the Lionsgate release and the CinemaScore grade was a middling B+. Tapping into a built-in audience, not having any standout buzz, and facing the arrival of Thor: The Dark World next weekend, Game is not likely to last very long and should finish up with a front-loaded theatrical run.

Bad Grandpa enjoyed the best second weekend hold ever for a Jackass film dipping only 36% to an estimated $20.5M giving Paramount a healthy $62.1M in ten days. The low-cost $15M comedy should end its domestic run with about $110M making for yet another profitable installment for the eleven-year-old franchise. Fan feedback has been excellent.

The old timers comedy Last Vegas opened in third pace with an estimated $16.5M from 3,065 theaters for a respectable $5,390 average. Starring Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman, and Kevin Kline, the PG-13 film about a group of old friends reuniting for a bachelor party in Sin City played to a mature crowd as expected. Critics were not too impressed, but moviegoers came out for the CBS Films release for the starpower and premise.

Audience data showed that 53% were female and an understandably high 83% were 25 and older. With a promising A- CinemaScore grade, a much older target audience, and no major direct competition coming, Vegas should be able to hold up well throughout the November weeks ahead and reach a domestic gross that doubles the $28M production cost.

2013 has been a tough year for animated films – especially those that are not on the very top tier – and Free Birds was the latest to lack excitement with family audiences. The PG-rated turkey flick debuted to an estimated $16.2M from 3,736 theaters for a mild $4,336 average. Relativity had relatively clear sailing for its launch as the only other kidpic out there – Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 – was in its sixth weekend. But the target audience was not excited to spend top dollar for this toon and reviews were lousy.

No animated films open until Thanksgiving so the distributor is hoping that lack of competition will help in the days and weeks ahead. The A- CinemaScore indicates that customers were fairly pleased with their purchase. Even bigger players like DreamWorks, Fox, and Sony have struggled to make toons work this year.

Space juggernaut Gravity fell back to fifth place but still posted a solid frame grossing an estimated $13.1M making for the best fifth weekend gross for any film since The Avengers. Warner Bros. has banked a stunning $219.2M to date making it the highest-grossing non-franchise film of 2013, and number eight overall. The Bullock blockbuster also smashed the $200M international and $400M global marks this weekend. The $27.1M overseas weekend gross pushed the offshore cume to $207.5M with worldwide climbing up to $426.7M.

Captain Phillips, another star-driven survival thriller getting Oscar buzz, followed with an estimated $8.5M. Down only 27%, the Tom Hanks film stands at $82.6M to date.

Fox Searchlight gave another expansion to its awards hopeful 12 Years A Slave which widened from 123 to 410 theaters and more than doubled its weekend gross in the process. The acclaimed period drama took in an estimated $4.6M and posted another promising average with $11,220 putting it in good shape for the road ahead. Many prestige films stumble when expanding to this many markets but Slave is remaining a relevant and much-talked-about film bringing in new audiences thanks in part to stellar reviews. Cume is $8.8M and next weekend it expands again into roughly 1,000 locations.

Three C’s rounded out the top ten. Toon sequel Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 dropped 33% to an estimated $4.2M for a $106.2M cume for Sony. Horror flick Carrie grossed an estimated $3.4M, down 43%, giving Sony $32M to date. Fox’s crime drama The Counselor tumbled 59% in its sophomore round to an estimated $3.3M putting the total at just $13.6M.

Rachel McAdams saw lackluster results for her latest romance About Time which was given a limited release in only 175 locations this weekend by Universal. The R-rated time travel love story bowed to an estimated $1.1M for a mild average of $6,046 which does not bode well for next weekend’s nationwide expansion. Reviews have been mixed.

Generating plenty of must-see awards buzz – especially in the acting categories – was Dallas Buyers Club which delivered a superb platform launch over the weekend as the final release for the current incarnation of Focus Features. The Matthew McConaughey film bowed to an estimated $264,000 from only nine locations in New York, Los Angeles, and Toronto for a strong $29,333 average. The R-rated true story expands on Friday to a dozen new markets – including Dallas – and will be everywhere by November 22. Reviews were sensational and McConaughey is seen as a major contender for the Academy Award for Best Actor.

A week ahead of its domestic launch, the super hero tentpole Thor: The Dark World opened across much of the planet this weekend taking in a sensational $109.4M from 36 markets led by $13.4M in the U.K. The second Thor flick lands in over 3,800 North American theaters this Friday (with first shows beginning at 8:00pm on Thursday night) and has scared away all other new wide releases. China also opens next weekend so the global tally will soar by the end of next weekend.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $118.3M which was even with last year when Wreck-it Ralph opened at number one with $49M; but up 18% from 2011 when Puss in Boots stayed in the top spot with $33.1M in its second weekend.

Follow Gitesh on Twitter.

Richard Curtis, writer and director of Love Actually, brings us his latest heartwarming fare–and this time, it involves time travel. Grae Drake talks to Curtis, as well as stars Bill Nighy and Rachel McAdams, about their New Year’s Eve memories and their favorite romantic memories. Singer/songwriter Ben Folds also talks about his song “The Luckiest,” featured in the movie.

This week at the movies, we’ve got a space-warfare strategist (Ender’s Game, starring Asa Butterfield and Harrison Ford), time-travelling turkeys (Free Birds, with voice performances by Owen Wilson and Woody Harrelson), and a document leaker (Last Vegas, starring Michael Douglas and Robert De Niro). What do the critics have to say?



Ender’s Game

62%

Adapting a beloved novel to the big screen is often a dicey proposition. That said, critics feel that Ender’s Game does a pretty good job of bringing its source material to cinematic life, with strong performances and a thoughtful tone that helps to make up for occasional stretches of solemnity and dullness. Earth is under siege from alien invaders, and the fate of humanity rests on the shoulders of Ender (Asa Butterfield), a bullied teenager whose precocious gifts are cultivated in order to devise a strategy to defeat the enemy. The pundits say Ender’s Game isn’t always emotionally rousing, but it’s still a smart, visually exciting sci-fi film that should (mostly) please fans of Orson Scott Card’s book. (Watch our video interviews with Ford, Butterfield, Viola Davis, and Hailee Steinfeld.)



Free Birds

20%

The idea of an animated action comedy starring turkeys is pretty funny in theory. Unfortunately, critics say that in practice, Free Birds is thin stuff; with its slack pace and less-than-inspired story, this is one turkey toon that never takes flight. Pampered Reggie (voiced by Owen Wilson) and activist Jake (Woody Harrelson) team up to travel back in time to the first Thanksgiving in order to kill the annual tradition of eating turkeys before it starts. The pundits say little kids might enjoy Free Birds, but their parents are likely to find the animation underwhelming and the jokes a bit flat.



Last Vegas

46%

A lot of people go to Vegas in search of a wild, unpredictable good time. Unfortunately, critics say Last Vegas plays things way too safe; while the combined talents of Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman, Kevin Kline, and Mary Steenburgen keep things amiably watchable, the film never ventures outside its comfort zone. Douglas plays a longtime bachelor who’s finally tying the knot, so he meets up with a group of longtime buddies in Sin City to celebrate; revelry and reflection ensue. The pundits say the cast of Last Vegas makes for good company, but there are few surprises to be found on this trip. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we count down Kline’s best-reviewed movies).

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • These Birds Walk, a documentary about a home for Pakistani street children, is at 100 percent.
  • The Pervert’s Guide To Ideology, a documentary in which philosopher Slavoj Zizek riffs on the subtexts undergirding a vast array of popular movies, is at 94 percent.
  • Dallas Buyers Club, starring Matthew McConaughey and Jared Leto in a drama about a man seeking treatment for HIV in the early days of the epidemic, is Certified Fresh at 94 percent.
  • Casting By, a doc about the world of Hollywood casting directors, is at 90 percent.
  • Belgian import The Broken Circle Breakdown, a drama that follows the highs and lows in the relationship between two bluegrass musicians, is at 83 percent.
  • Aftermath, a drama about two brothers who suffer repercussions from their community after digging into the town’s past, is at 75 percent.
  • In the Name Of…, a drama about a young priest who struggles with matters of the flesh while running a halfway house for troubled teens, is at 71 percent.
  • Man of Tai Chi, directed by and starring Keanu Reeves in a martial arts film about a young fighter who competes in an underground fight club, is at 71 percent.
  • Mr. Nobody, starring Jared Leto and Diane Kruger in a sci-fi drama about the repercussions of a child choosing which parent to live with, is at 71 percent.
  • About Time, starring Domhnall Gleeson and Rachel McAdams in a romantic comedy about a guy whose relationship with a beautiful woman is constantly stymied by time-travel problems, is at 65 percent.
  • Running From Crazy, a documentary about Mariel Hemingway and her attempts to come to terms wither famous family’s history, is at 44 percent.
  • Last Love, starring Michael Caine in a dramedy about the relationship between a lonely professor and a plucky young dancer, is at 40 percent
  • Big Sur, starring Kate Bosworth and Josh Lucas in an adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s novel, is at 38 percent.
  • Diana, starring Naomi Watts in a biopic of the Princess of Wales, is at nine percent.

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