Walter Mitty

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22 Most Inspirational Movies

A new year can represent opportunity for new hopes and resolutions, and movies have the gift to inspire that personal change. If you’re eager to turn the page on 2021, here’s 22 of the most inspirational movies to charge your 2022.

Diet and exercise are always high contenders on new year’s resolutions lists, and movies like Brittany Runs a Marathon or Chariots of Fire will get you in motion. There are movies for getting in touch with inner hope (The Shawshank Redemption) and your roots (Lion), along with picking up new skills (Julie & Julia) and rekindling determination (Remember the Titans, Hidden Figures). And those entering 2021 with open hearts ought to seek out Wild and Groundhog Day. And some movies guide us through trauma and disaster, like Life of Pi, and Soul Surfer.

If it’s a new year, it’s a new you: Here’s 22 movies to inspire your 2022.

#1

A Beautiful Mind (2001)
74%

#1
Adjusted Score: 82555%
Critics Consensus: The well-acted A Beautiful Mind is both a moving love story and a revealing look at mental illness.
Synopsis: A human drama inspired by events in the life of John Forbes Nash Jr., and in part based on the... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 99278%
Critics Consensus: Brittany Runs a Marathon is an earnest and hilarious dramedy that finally gives Jillian Bell a role worthy of her gifts.
Synopsis: A hard-partying woman receives a startling wake-up call when a visit to the doctor reveals how unhealthy she is. Motivated... [More]
Directed By: Paul Downs Colaizzo

#3

The Bucket List (2007)
41%

#3
Adjusted Score: 47961%
Critics Consensus: Not even the earnest performances of the two leads can rescue The Bucket List from its schmaltzy script.
Synopsis: Billionaire Edward Cole (Jack Nicholson) and car mechanic Carter Chambers (Morgan Freeman) are complete strangers, until fate lands them in... [More]
Directed By: Rob Reiner

#4

Chariots of Fire (1981)
82%

#4
Adjusted Score: 88074%
Critics Consensus: Decidedly slower and less limber than the Olympic runners at the center of its story, the film nevertheless manages to make effectively stirring use of its spiritual and patriotic themes.
Synopsis: In the class-obsessed and religiously divided United Kingdom of the early 1920s, two determined young runners train for the 1924... [More]
Directed By: Hugh Hudson

#5

Chef (2014)
87%

#5
Adjusted Score: 93975%
Critics Consensus: Chef's charming cast and sharp, funny script add enough spice to make this feel-good comedy a flavorful -- if familiar -- treat.
Synopsis: After a controlling owner (Dustin Hoffman) pushes him too far, chef Carl Casper (Jon Favreau) quits his position at a... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#6

Forrest Gump (1994)
71%

#6
Adjusted Score: 78314%
Critics Consensus: Forrest Gump may be an overly sentimental film with a somewhat problematic message, but its sweetness and charm are usually enough to approximate true depth and grace.
Synopsis: Slow-witted Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks) has never thought of himself as disadvantaged, and thanks to his supportive mother (Sally Field),... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 101368%
Critics Consensus: It follows a predictable narrative arc, but Good Will Hunting adds enough quirks to the journey -- and is loaded with enough powerful performances -- that it remains an entertaining, emotionally rich drama.
Synopsis: Will Hunting (Matt Damon) has a genius-level IQ but chooses to work as a janitor at MIT. When he solves... [More]
Directed By: Gus Van Sant

#8

Groundhog Day (1993)
97%

#8
Adjusted Score: 103334%
Critics Consensus: Smart, sweet, and inventive, Groundhog Day highlights Murray's dramatic gifts while still leaving plenty of room for laughs.
Synopsis: Phil (Bill Murray), a weatherman, is out to cover the annual emergence of the groundhog from its hole. He gets... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#9

Hidden Figures (2016)
93%

#9
Adjusted Score: 117280%
Critics Consensus: In heartwarming, crowd-pleasing fashion, Hidden Figures celebrates overlooked -- and crucial -- contributions from a pivotal moment in American history.
Synopsis: Three brilliant African American women at NASA -- Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson -- serve as the brains... [More]
Directed By: Theodore Melfi

#10

The Intouchables (2011)
75%

#10
Adjusted Score: 79772%
Critics Consensus: It handles its potentially prickly subject matter with kid gloves, but Intouchables gets by thanks to its strong cast and some remarkably sensitive direction.
Synopsis: An unlikely friendship develops between a wealthy quadriplegic (François Cluzet) and his caretaker (Omar Sy), just released from prison.... [More]

#11

Julie & Julia (2009)
77%

#11
Adjusted Score: 86331%
Critics Consensus: Boosted by Meryl Streep's charismatic performance as Julia Child, Julie and Julia is a light, but fairly entertaining culinary comedy.
Synopsis: Frustrated with a soul-killing job, New Yorker Julie Powell (Amy Adams) embarks on a daring project: she vows to prepare... [More]
Directed By: Nora Ephron

#12

Last Holiday (2006)
55%

#12
Adjusted Score: 59859%
Critics Consensus: Although Queen Latifah's bountiful life-affirming spirit permeates the film, director Wayne Wang is unable to revive this remake with any real flair.
Synopsis: The discovery that she has a terminal illness prompts introverted saleswoman Georgia Byrd (Queen Latifah) to reflect on what she... [More]
Directed By: Wayne Wang

#13

Life of Pi (2012)
86%

#13
Adjusted Score: 96913%
Critics Consensus: A 3D adaptation of a supposedly "unfilmable" book, Ang Lee's Life of Pi achieves the near impossible -- it's an astonishing technical achievement that's also emotionally rewarding.
Synopsis: After deciding to sell their zoo in India and move to Canada, Santosh and Gita Patel board a freighter with... [More]
Directed By: Ang Lee

#14

Lion (2016)
84%

#14
Adjusted Score: 99753%
Critics Consensus: Lion's undeniably uplifting story and talented cast make it a moving journey that transcends the typical cliches of its genre.
Synopsis: Five year old Saroo gets lost on a train which takes him thousands of miles across India, away from home... [More]
Directed By: Garth Davis

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 74432%
Critics Consensus: Will Smith's heartfelt performance elevates The Pursuit of Happyness above mere melodrama.
Synopsis: Life is a struggle for single father Chris Gardner (Will Smith). Evicted from their apartment, he and his young son... [More]
Directed By: Gabriele Muccino

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 76982%
Critics Consensus: An inspirational crowd-pleaser with a healthy dose of social commentary, Remember the Titans may be predictable, but it's also well-crafted and features terrific performances.
Synopsis: In Virginia, high school football is a way of life, an institution revered, each game celebrated more lavishly than Christmas,... [More]
Directed By: Boaz Yakin

#17

Rocky (1976)
91%

#17
Adjusted Score: 97731%
Critics Consensus: This story of a down-on-his-luck boxer is thoroughly predictable, but Sylvester Stallone's script and stunning performance in the title role brush aside complaints.
Synopsis: Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone), a small-time boxer from working-class Philadelphia, is arbitrarily chosen to take on the reigning world heavyweight... [More]
Directed By: John G. Avildsen

#18
Adjusted Score: 58866%
Critics Consensus: It doesn't lack for ambition, but The Secret Life of Walter Mitty fails to back up its grand designs with enough substance to anchor the spectacle.
Synopsis: Walter Mitty (Ben Stiller), an employee at Life magazine, spends day after monotonous day developing photos for the publication. To... [More]
Directed By: Ben Stiller

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 96492%
Critics Consensus: The Shawshank Redemption is an uplifting, deeply satisfying prison drama with sensitive direction and fine performances.
Synopsis: Andy Dufresne (Tim Robbins) is sentenced to two consecutive life terms in prison for the murders of his wife and... [More]
Directed By: Frank Darabont

#20

Soul Surfer (2011)
45%

#20
Adjusted Score: 48567%
Critics Consensus: There's an amazing true story at the heart of Soul Surfer -- and unfortunately, it's drowned by waves of Hollywood cheese.
Synopsis: A natural talent in the sport of surfing, teenager Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb) loses an arm in a shark attack.... [More]
Directed By: Sean McNamara

#21

Wild (2014)
88%

#21
Adjusted Score: 99462%
Critics Consensus: Powerfully moving and emotionally resonant, Wild finds director Jean-Marc Vallée and star Reese Witherspoon working at the peak of their respective powers.
Synopsis: Driven to the edge by the loss of her beloved mother (Laura Dern), the dissolution of her marriage and a... [More]
Directed By: Jean-Marc Vallée

#22

Yes Man (2008)
46%

#22
Adjusted Score: 51994%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's comic convulsions are the only bright spots in this otherwise dim and predictable comedy.
Synopsis: Carl Allen (Jim Carrey) is stuck in a rut with his negative ways. Then he goes to a self-help seminar... [More]
Directed By: Peyton Reed

In Theaters This Week:

 



Bears

90%

Rating: G.

The latest family-friendly documentary from Disney’s Disneynature label, following Earth, Oceans, African Cats and Chimpanzees, is mainly an adorably cuddly adventure. It follows a mama bear named Sky and her two cubs, Scout and Amber, as they dig out from their snowy cave in the Alaskan wilderness and head down the mountain in search of food. Perils do await them, though, from larger and hungrier bears and wolves to rising water and the threat of starvation. (If you and your family have seen African Cats, with its bloody zebra mauling, nothing nearly so gory happens here.) There are a couple of tense moments but John C. Reilly’s amiable narration lets you know everything will be all right. And the film is beautiful, intimately shot, so it’s at least worthwhile from a visual perspective. Fine for all ages.



Transcendence

19%

Rating: PG-13, for sci-fi action and violence, some bloody images, brief strong language and sensuality.

Christopher Nolan’s longtime cinematographer, Oscar-winner Wally Pfister, makes his directing debut with this thinky sci-fi thriller. It’s full of big ideas about the frightening power of technology — both its potential and its threat to our privacy — but the execution is rather dull and sometimes silly. Johnny Depp stars as a brilliant scientist who’s been experimenting with artificial intelligence alongside his wife (Rebecca Hall). When a terrorist group guns him down, he uploads himself to the Internet to keep his legacy alive. There are lots of shootings and explosions here with quite a bit of blood, but part of the story hinges on medical advancements that allow people to regenerate and heal themselves – so they don’t stay injured for long. The violence, subject matter and nearly two-hour running time make this suitable for tweens and up only.

New On DVD:



The Nut Job

13%

Rating: PG, for mild action and rude humor.

A mostly innocuous but thoroughly unpleasant animated comedy full of unlikable characters. Will Arnett provides the voice of Surly, a squirrel who’s just trying to get a nut – and he’s unwilling to share with the rest of the furry woodland creatures in the park. Trouble is, there’s a food shortage as winter approaches, so Surly must choose between remaining selfish or being a team player. Fart jokes abound here – and many of them take place underground just to make them extra gross. Some of the rodents also wind up in danger on a raging river. Surly and his pals run into some mobster types, but they’re too cartoonish (in every way) to be threatening. And a raccoon voiced by Liam Neeson might just be more devious than he initially seems.



The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty

52%

Rating: PG, for some crude comments, language and action violence.

Ben Stiller directs and stars as the title character in this big-budget version of the classic James Thurber story. The milquetoast Mitty enjoys a vivid fantasy world which becomes reality when he’s forced to embark on a globetrotting adventure. The special effects are pretty spectacular here – and they’re the main reason to recommend this movie. There are a couple scenes of peril: a chase through the crowded streets of Manhattan, as well as an erupting volcano. And Walter’s boss, played by an arrogant Adam Scott, is a total jerk. But for the most part this inanely uplifting story about overcoming your fears and chasing your dreams is pretty darn harmless.



Ride Along

18%

Rating: PG-13, for sequences of violence, sexual content and brief strong language.

Ice Cube and Kevin Hart co-star in this clichéd, mismatched buddy-cop comedy that strains desperately to be funny. Hart plays a fast-talking security guard with dreams of becoming a police officer. He also dreams of marrying his longtime girlfriend (Tika Sumpter), whose brother is the toughest detective in all of Atlanta. Hart goes for a ride along with Cube — hence the title — to prove his worth. Shootings, showdowns with generic Serbian bad guys and explosions ensue. There’s also plenty of language and suggestive sexual jokes involving the various positions and tricks Hart likes to employ in the bedroom. (And his nickname is Black Hammer, supposedly a reference to his manhood.) This is probably OK for older kids, but you may want to show them The Other Guys or even 21 Jump Street instead.

This week on home video, we’ve got an ambitious project from Ben Stiller, a small Oscar-nominated drama from the UK, a surprise hit action comedy, and an underperforming animation, as well as the usual list of smaller films. Read on for the full list:



The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

52%

Ben Stiller has proven he knows what it takes to craft a memorable film; his first three feature directorial efforts — Reality Bites, The Cable Guy, and Zoolander — have all earned cult followings, and his 2008 action comedy Tropic Thunder was a smash hit with both critics and audiences. The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, though? Not so much. Stiller plays the titular daydream-prone Life magazine photo manager, who embarks on a globetrotting adventure to track down an elusive photographer (Sean Penn) when he discovers the negative for a cover photo is missing. Can he secure the image and win the heart of his crush (Kristen Wiig) before Life shuts down for good? Critics acknowledged Stiller’s ambition in adapting the James Thurber short story and praised the striking visuals, but many of them felt there simply wasn’t enough substance behind all the razzle dazzle, leading to an underwhelming 49% on the Tomatometer.



Ride Along

18%

Tim Story’s odd-couple buddy-cop comedy Ride Along didn’t impress a whole lot of critics, but you know what? It made a lot of money, and audiences were much kinder to it, so he’s already been tapped for a sequel. Kevin Hart stars as Ben Barber, a spunky security guard and video game junkie who agrees to accompany no-nonsense Atlanta detective James Payton (Ice Cube) on a 24-hour ride along (natch) in an effort to convince him he?s man enough to marry James’ sister, Anglea (Tika Sumpter). When Ben unwittingly helps uncover a new lead in a heavy case James is working, the two must work together to survive. Unfortunately, critics found Ride Along too predictable and overly reliant on familiar genre mechanics to recommend it to anyone who’s seen any number of similar films. Kevin Hart’s manic energy helped pick up the pace from time to time, but even that couldn’t save the film from its 18% Tomatometer score.



Philomena

91%

Stephen Frears’ based-on-true-events story was the acclaimed director’s first hit since 2006’s The Queen, and it earned a multitude of accolades, including four Oscar nods in fairly hefty categories. Adapted from the book The Lost Child of Philomena Lee, the film stars Steve Coogan as journalist Martin Sixsmith, who takes it upon himself to investigate further when he learns the story of Philomena Lee (Judi Dench), an elderly woman who was forced to give up a son for adoption fifty years prior. Together, Martin and Philomena travel from Ireland to the US in search of answers and closure. Critics largely credited the performances here — especially Dench, who was nominated for Best Actress — for the film’s charm and power, which helped elevate Philomena beyond your typical human interest drama, and the film earned a Certified Fresh 92% on the Tomatometer as a result.



The Nut Job

13%

It’s got talking animals, a celebrity voice cast, and a barrel of slapstick yuks, but The Nut Job failed do much of anything with all that. Will Arnett lends his gravelly inflections to Surly, a misfit squirrel banished from his park community of wild critters after an attempted peanut cart theft goes awry. Left to fend for himself, Surly happens upon a criminal plot to rob a bank and leave nuts in place of the cash, and, with the help of some friends, he plots his own heist to nick the nuts. Based on a short film called Surly Squirrel by director Peter Lepeniotis, The Nut Job drew groans from most critics, who found Surly too unlikable a character and the film’s story a paper thin facsimile of its source material that wears out its welcome fairly quickly. At 11% on the Tomatometer, this is one for the easily entertained little ones, but probably no one else.

Also available this week:

  • Mike Newell’s adaptation of Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations (66%), starring Jeremy Irvine, Helena Bonham Carter, and Ralph Fiennes.
  • Black Nativity (48%), starring Forest Whitaker and Angela Basset in a drama inspired by Langston Hughes’ stage play.
  • Quentin Dupieux’s ensemble comedy Wrong Cops (44%), featuring Marilyn Manson, Eric Wareheim, and more in a story about crooked cops trying to hide a body.
  • Ronald F. Maxwell’s Copperhead (22%), a Civil War movie about a Northern pacifist who is increasingly harassed for his views.
  • Better Living Through Chemistry (21%), starring Sam Rockwell and Olivia Wilde in a dark comedy about a straight-laced pharmacist who sheds his inhibitions after meeting a woman in his neighborhood.
  • And Criterion releases another updated Blu-ray/DVD combo pack: Lars von Trier’s breakout 1996 film Breaking the Waves (86%), starring Emily Watson and Stellan Skarsgård.
  • Season 2 of period crime drama Ripper Street (100%).

This week in new streaming video, we’ve got a Kevin Hart-Ice Cube comedy, an imaginative short story adaptation by Ben Stiller, one of Matthew McConaughey’s acclaimed films from last year, and a bunch of new additions to Netflix. Read on for the full list:


Ride Along
18%

Hard-nosed detective James (Ice Cube) is less than pleased that his sister is dating a slacker like Ben (Kevin Hart). When Ben is accepted to the police force, he hopes to win James’ respect by joining him on the beat.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


The Secret Life of Walter Mitty
52%

Ben Stiller stars as a reverie-prone Life magazine photo editor with problems at work: he’s derided by his boss, he’s got an unrequited crush on a co-worker (Kristen Wiig), and he can’t find an image that’s set to run in the next issue. He escapes into a globe-spanning fantasyland of his own creation — which might be just the thing that snaps him out of his rut.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Mud
97%

Matthew McConaughey and Reese Witherspoon star in this critically acclaimed drama about a pair of teenagers who befriend a reclusive criminal.

Available now on: Amazon Prime, Netflix


20 Feet from Stardom
99%

This Oscar-winning documentary tribute to some of rock’s finest backup singers features interviews with Mick Jagger, Stevie Wonder, Sting, and many more singing the praises of some of music’s most talented and unheralded voices.

Available now on: Netflix


The Grandmaster
78%

Wong Kar Wai directs Tony Leung and Ziyi Zhang in this period biopic about a legendary martial arts master.

Available now on: Netflix


The Punk Singer
91%

This rockumentary offers a portrait of the trials and tribulations of Kathleen Hanna, the outspoken lead singer of Bikini Kill and Le Tigre.

Available now on: Netflix


Jobs
28%

This biopic follows Steve Jobs (Ashton Kutcher) from the early days of Apple to the triumph of the iPod.

Available now on: Netflix


Turbo
67%

When a freak accident imbues a garden snail named Theo (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) with super speed, he sees an opportunity to fulfill his dream and attempts to enter the Indy 500.

Available now on: Netflix


How I Live Now
65%

Saoirse Ronan stars in a sci-fi drama about a teenager whose carefree existence is upended when war breaks out across the UK.

Available now on: Netflix


Mr. Nobody
68%

Jared Leto and Diane Kruger star in a sci-fi drama about the repercussions of a child choosing which parent to live with.

Available now on: Netflix

In Theaters This Week:



The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

52%

Rating: PG, for some crude comments, language and action violence.

Ben Stiller’s take on the classic James Thurber story feels like the actor-director is working through a mid-life crisis with a big budget and blockbuster special effects. Stiller stars as the meek title character, whose vivid fantasy world becomes reality when he’s forced to embark on a globetrotting adventure. There are a couple scenes of peril: a pursuit through the packed streets of Manhattan, an erupting volcano. And Walter’s boss, played by an arrogant Adam Scott, is a total jerk. But for the most part this inanely uplifting story about overcoming your fears and chasing your dreams is pretty darn harmless.



Justin Bieber’s Believe

53%

Rating: PG, for brief language and mild thematic material.

This second documentary chronicling the behind-the-scenes life of pop phenom Justin Bieber wasn’t shown to critics before its Christmas Day opening. But it comes from Jon M. Chu, the same director who brought us 2011’s Justin Bieber: Never Say Never. That first film was a big, glossy celebration of a musical superstar on the rise, a young man with talent and poise beyond his years. Since then, Bieber has proven himself human, and fallible, as he’s made the sort of high-profile mistakes so many young celebrities do. Clips from the new film suggest that he’s achieved an awareness of the perils of fame while still exuding enough impish enthusiasm to keep his loyal fans squealing with glee. Oh yes, and it’s got tons of concert footage to appease those fervent Beliebers.

Merry Christmas! This week at the movies, we’ve got a financial fraudster (The Wolf of Wall Street, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill); a timid daydreamer (The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty, starring Ben Stiller and Kristen Wiig); a pair of aging prizefighters (Grudge Match, starring Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro); a legendary warrior (47 Ronin, starring Keanu Reeves and Hiroyuki Sanada); a pop music sensation (the documentary Justin Bieber’s Believe); and a human rights hero (Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, starring Idris Elba and Naomie Harris). What do the critics have to say?



The Wolf of Wall Street

79%

Martin Scorsese knows how to capture the vicarious allure of criminality better than just about any other filmmaker. Critics say he’s in fine form with The Wolf of Wall Street, a slick, sleek, and surprisingly funny tale of financial fraud that features a riveting performance from Leonardo DiCaprio. The film follows the rise of Jordan Belfort (DiCaprio), the founder of a boiler room that sold worthless stocks to naïve customers. Belfort’s ill-gotten gains finance a staggering level of conspicuous debauchery, but he’s shrewd enough to stay one step ahead of the government — for a while, anyway. The pundits say the Certified Fresh Wolf of Wall Street has the hyperkinetic energy you’d expect from Scorsese, but what distinguishes it from past triumphs is its wild, ribald sense of humor.



The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty

52%

For all its evocative detail, James Thurber’s 1939 short story The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty is pretty brief, so it takes an imagination worthy of the title character to extend it to feature film length. Critics say Ben Stiller’s fantasy world looks great and has an optimistic tone, but its story often feels episodic and tonally uneven. Stiller stars as a reverie-prone Life magazine photo editor with problems at work: he’s derided by his boss, he’s got an unrequited crush on a co-worker (Kristen Wiig), and he can’t find an image that’s set to run in the next issue. He escapes into a globe-spanning fantasyland of his own creation — which might be just the thing that snaps him out of his rut. The pundits say that The Secret Life of Walter Mitty is well-meaning and ambitious, but it pushes its emotional buttons too hard to make up for a slight story.



Grudge Match

31%

Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro played two of cinema’s most iconic boxers, and Grudge Match purports to be a lighthearted fantasy bout between Rocky Balboa and Jake “The Raging Bull” LaMotta. Unfortunately, critics say it’s more tomato can than contender — a film with a promising premise that rarely punches above its weight. Thirty years after hanging up the gloves after splitting their two matchups, bitter rivals Henry “Razor” Sharp (Stallone) and Billy “The Kid” McDonnen (De Niro) have a fisticuffs-filled reunion while performing motion capture for a video game. When news of their punch-up spreads, the two fighters agree to a long-delayed rubber match — and a lot more than pride is on the line. The pundits say Grudge Match is sporadically funny but surprisingly lumbering, its strong cast largely mired in a plot that’s overrun with clichés.



47 Ronin

16%

From the silent era to the present, the tale of the 47 Ronin has inspired some of Japan’s greatest filmmakers. Now it gets a big-budget Western adaptation, but unfortunately, critics say the human element gets lost under a barrage of overblown CGI effects. When a disgraced feudal lord is compelled to commit suicide after a confrontation with a corrupt official, his disgraced followers (a group that includes an orphaned swashbuckler played by Keanu Reeves). The pundits say 47 Ronin is a surprisingly dull fantasy adventure, one that leaves its talented international cast stranded within one dimensional roles.



Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

62%

Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom goes into wide release this week, and critics say it’s a decent if not always inspired look at Nelson Mandela’s life that’s bolstered by a terrific central performance by Idris Elba in the title role. Based upon Mandela’s autobiography, the film follows the South African political leader’s life from his early activism to his time in prison to his election to president in the first post-Apartheid elections. The pundits say the Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom tries to cover too much ground in the great man’s life, but it’s a sincere and powerfully acted biopic that serves as a good first step for those who want to learn more about one of the great human rights champions or our era.



Justin Bieber’s Believe

53%

Sorry, Beliebers: we’d love to tell you what the critics thought of Justin Bieber’s Believe, but it wasn’t screened for critics prior to its release in theaters. If Bieber’s previous doc, Never Say Never, captured the rise of the pop star, Believe purports to show how his world has changed now that he’s on the cusp of adulthood. Hey everybody, take a break from yuletide festivities and guess the Tomatometer!

Also opening this week in limited release:

At the AFI Red Carpet for The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, Dan Deevy talks to Ben Stiller, Kathryn Hahn, Adrian Martinez, and Jonathan C. Daly about what they daydream about and whether or not its changed since they were young.

 

Click here to watch more video interviews

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