Lionsgate courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by Lionsgate courtesy Everett Collection)

All Jason Statham Movies, Ranked By Tomatometer

Once, during a long-ago era called The ’80s, Hollywood action heroes roamed the Earth with bulging biceps and names like Sly, Arnold, and Bruce. With a limitless supply of weapons and wisecracks, they saved the world countless times, only to be exiled to the land of Direct-to-Video for their trouble, where they wandered lost throughout the ’90s and much of the aughts. But they’re fighting their way back from extinction, thanks in large part to the tenacious efforts of steely-eyed roughnecks like Jason Statham, the veteran of latter-day genre classics like Crank, The Bank Job, and recent Fast and Furious sequels and spinoffs, who rose to stardom on the strength of his appearances in Guy Ritchie‘s Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch. To celebrate his bravery in the face of indie dramas and romantic comedies, we’ve rounded up all of his major roles to offer a comprehensive look back at all Jason Statham movies, sorted by Tomatometer.

#40
Adjusted Score: 4685%
Critics Consensus: Featuring mostly wooden performances, laughable dialogue, and shoddy production values, In the Name of the King fulfills all expectations of an Uwe Boll film.
Synopsis: As war looms in an idyllic kingdom, a man named Farmer (Jason Statham) begins a heroic quest to find his... [More]
Directed By: Uwe Boll

#39

Turn It Up (2000)
8%

#39
Adjusted Score: 7910%
Critics Consensus: Reviewers say Turn It Up has a derivative feel, running through too many urban movie cliches.
Synopsis: In the ghetto, the only thing more dangerous than a gun is a dream. And gifted Brooklyn hip-hop artist Diamond... [More]
Directed By: Robert Adetuyi

#38

13 (2010)
8%

#38
Adjusted Score: 4631%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A desperate man (Sam Riley) takes part in an underworld game of Russian roulette in which gamblers place bets on... [More]
Directed By: Gela Babluani

#37

War (2007)
13%

#37
Adjusted Score: 14871%
Critics Consensus: Jet Li and Jason Statham find themselves on opposing sides in the immensely boring War, which is full of clichés but short on action.
Synopsis: After his partner and family are killed, FBI agent Jack Crawford (Jason Statham) becomes obsessed with revenge on an assassin... [More]
Directed By: Philip G. Atwell

#36

London (2005)
14%

#36
Adjusted Score: 13806%
Critics Consensus: Hampered by pretension and undermined by unlikable characters, London proves that the novelty of seeing actors play against type isn't enough to rescue a deeply flawed film.
Synopsis: Upon learning that his ex-lover (Jessica Biel) is leaving New York, a man (Chris Evans) named Syd crashes her going-away... [More]
Directed By: Hunter Richards

#35

The One (2001)
13%

#35
Adjusted Score: 15993%
Critics Consensus: The One plays more like a video game than a movie and borrows freely from other, better sci-fi actioners, burying Jet Li's spectacular talents under heaps of editing and special effects.
Synopsis: In a stunning dual role, international star Jet Li portrays Gabriel Yulaw, a police officer confronted with a sinister form... [More]
Directed By: James Wong

#34

Revolver (2005)
15%

#34
Adjusted Score: 16007%
Critics Consensus: In attempting to meld his successful previous formulas with philosophical musings, Guy Ritchie has produced an incoherent misfire.
Synopsis: Jake Green is a hotshot gambler, long on audacity and short on common sense. Jake served seven years in jail... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#33
Adjusted Score: 25890%
Critics Consensus: John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars is not one of Carpenter's better movies, filled as it is with bad dialogue, bad acting, confusing flashbacks, and scenes that are more campy than scary.
Synopsis: Long inhabited by human settlers, the Red Planet has become the manifest destiny of an over-populated Earth. Nearly 640,000 people... [More]
Directed By: John Carpenter

#32

Killer Elite (2011)
28%

#32
Adjusted Score: 31471%
Critics Consensus: A rote, utterly disposable Jason Statham vehicle that just happens to have Clive Owen and Robert De Niro in it.
Synopsis: Danny Bryce (Jason Statham), one of the world's deadliest special-ops agents, returns from self-imposed exile after his mentor, Hunter (Robert... [More]
Directed By: Gary McKendry

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 32989%
Critics Consensus: With little to recommend beyond a handful of entertaining set pieces, Mechanic: Resurrection suggests this franchise should have remained in its tomb.
Synopsis: Living under cover in Brazil, master assassin Arthur Bishop (Jason Statham) springs back into action after an old enemy (Sam... [More]
Directed By: Dennis Gansel

#30

Wild Card (2015)
31%

#30
Adjusted Score: 32599%
Critics Consensus: Hardcore Jason Statham fans may enjoy parts of Wild Card, but all other action aficionados need not apply.
Synopsis: A bodyguard (Jason Statham) goes after the sadistic thug who beat his friend, only to find that the object of... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 39220%
Critics Consensus: Like its predecessors, Expendables 3 offers a modicum of all-star thrills for old-school action thriller aficionados -- but given all the talent assembled, it should have been a lot more fun.
Synopsis: Years ago, Barney Ross (Sylvester Stallone) co-founded the Expendables with Conrad Stonebanks (Mel Gibson). After Stonebanks became an arms dealer,... [More]
Directed By: Patrick Hughes

#28

Mean Machine (2001)
34%

#28
Adjusted Score: 34356%
Critics Consensus: Despite some genuine wit, this crowd pleaser is filled with too many cliches.
Synopsis: In a rough-and-tumble British prison, where murderers, thieves and assorted madmen are locked away, inmate Danny Meehan (Vinnie Jones) is... [More]
Directed By: Barry Skolnick

#27

Transporter 3 (2008)
40%

#27
Adjusted Score: 44639%
Critics Consensus: This middling installment in the Transporter franchise is a few steps down from its predecessors, featuring generic stunts and a lack of energy.
Synopsis: Mob courier Frank Martin's (Jason Statham) latest assignment pairs him with Valentina (Natalya Rudakova), the cynical daughter of a Ukrainian... [More]
Directed By: Olivier Megaton

#26

Parker (2013)
40%

#26
Adjusted Score: 43880%
Critics Consensus: Jason Statham is game as usual, but Parker is a thoroughly generic and convoluted heist movie.
Synopsis: Daring, ruthless and meticulous, Parker (Jason Statham) is one of the most successful thieves in the business. But when his... [More]
Directed By: Taylor Hackford

#25

Death Race (2008)
42%

#25
Adjusted Score: 47169%
Critics Consensus: Mindless, violent, and lightning-paced, Death Race is little more than an empty action romp.
Synopsis: Framed for a murder he did not commit, three-time speedway champ Jensen Ames (Jason Statham) finds himself at Terminal Island,... [More]
Directed By: Paul W.S. Anderson

#24

The Expendables (2010)
42%

#24
Adjusted Score: 49868%
Critics Consensus: It makes good on the old-school action it promises, but given all the talent on display, The Expendables should hit harder.
Synopsis: Mercenary leader Barney Ross (Sylvester Stallone) and his loyal men take on what they think is a routine assignment: a... [More]
Directed By: Sylvester Stallone

#23

Homefront (2013)
42%

#23
Adjusted Score: 46341%
Critics Consensus: While it boasts a capable cast, the disappointingly dull Homefront hearkens back to classic action thrillers without adding anything to the genre.
Synopsis: Hoping to escape from his troubled past, former DEA agent Phil Broker (Jason Statham) moves to a seemingly quiet backwater... [More]
Directed By: Gary Fleder

#22

The Meg (2018)
46%

#22
Adjusted Score: 63726%
Critics Consensus: The Meg sets audiences up for a good old-fashioned B-movie creature feature, but lacks the genre thrills -- or the cheesy bite -- to make it worth diving in.
Synopsis: Previously thought to be extinct, a massive creature attacks a deep-sea submersible, leaving it disabled and trapping the crew at... [More]
Directed By: Jon Turteltaub

#21

Blitz (2011)
48%

#21
Adjusted Score: 48077%
Critics Consensus: A middling crime thriller largely assembled from wearyingly familiar parts, Blitz sacks a game Jason Statham's performance behind the line of genre scrimmage.
Synopsis: A tough cop (Jason Statham) goes after a serial killer who targets police officers.... [More]
Directed By: Elliott Lester

#20

Redemption (2013)
49%

#20
Adjusted Score: 50284%
Critics Consensus: While it certainly has more on its mind than the average Jason Statham action thriller, Redemption doesn't quite capitalize on its premise -- or on its star's strong, committed performance.
Synopsis: A troubled war veteran (Jason Statham) assumes a new identity and becomes a vigilante in a bid to atone for... [More]
Directed By: Steven Knight

#19

Transporter 2 (2005)
52%

#19
Adjusted Score: 56649%
Critics Consensus: A stylish and more focused sequel to The Transporter, the movie is over-the-top fun for fans of the first movie.
Synopsis: Mercenary Frank Martin (Jason Statham) has accepted a job that seems easy enough, as chauffeur and bodyguard to young Jack... [More]
Directed By: Louis Leterrier

#18

The Mechanic (2011)
53%

#18
Adjusted Score: 59225%
Critics Consensus: Jason Statham and Ben Foster turn in enjoyable performances, but this superficial remake betrays them with mind-numbing violence and action thriller cliches.
Synopsis: One of an elite group of assassins, Arthur Bishop (Jason Statham) may be the best in the business. Bishop carries... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#17

The Transporter (2002)
54%

#17
Adjusted Score: 56855%
Critics Consensus: The Transporter delivers the action at the expense of coherent storytelling.
Synopsis: Ex-Special Forces operator Frank Martin (Jason Statham) lives what seems to be a quiet life along the French Mediterranean, hiring... [More]
Directed By: Corey Yuen

#16

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011)
55%

#16
Adjusted Score: 59557%
Critics Consensus: While it has moments of inspiration, Gnomeo and Juliet is often too self-referential for its own good.
Synopsis: In Stratford-Upon-Avon, birthplace of William Shakespeare, Miss Capulet and Mr. Montague feud over whose garden is the better. Garden gnomes... [More]
Directed By: Kelly Asbury

#15

Cellular (2004)
55%

#15
Adjusted Score: 60201%
Critics Consensus: Though it's gimmicky and occasionally feels like a high-end cell phone ad, Cellular is also an energetic and twisty thriller.
Synopsis: Schoolteacher Jessica Martin (Kim Basinger) is abducted by ruthless crook Ethan (Jason Statham) and brought to a remote hideout, where... [More]
Directed By: David R. Ellis

#14

Safe (2012)
59%

#14
Adjusted Score: 62362%
Critics Consensus: While hard-hitting and violently inventive, Safe ultimately proves too formulaic to set itself apart from the action thriller pack -- including some of its star's better films.
Synopsis: Luke Wright (Jason Statham) is a two-bit cage fighter, until the day he throws a fixed match. In retaliation, the... [More]
Directed By: Boaz Yakin

#13

Crank (2006)
61%

#13
Adjusted Score: 64601%
Critics Consensus: Crank's assaultive style and gleeful depravity may turn off casual action fans, but audiences seeking a strong dose of adrenaline will be thrilled by Jason Statham's raucous race against mortality.
Synopsis: Chev Chelios (Jason Statham), a hit man wanting to go straight, lets his latest target slip away, then he awakes... [More]

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 66825%
Critics Consensus: Crank: High Voltage delivers on its promises: a fast-paced, exciting thrill ride that doesn't take itself too seriously.
Synopsis: After surviving an incredible plunge to near-certain death, Chev Chelios (Jason Statham) is abducted by Chinese mobsters. Waking up three... [More]

#11

Wrath of Man (2021)
66%

#11
Adjusted Score: 79658%
Critics Consensus: Wrestling just enough stakes out of its thin plot, Wrath of Man sees Guy Ritchie and Jason Statham reunite for a fun, action-packed ride.
Synopsis: Mysterious and wild-eyed, a new security guard for a cash truck surprises his co-workers when he unleashes precision skills during... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 72358%
Critics Consensus: Taut, violent, and suitably self-deprecating, The Expendables 2 gives classic action fans everything they can reasonably expect from a star-studded shoot-'em-up -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Mercenary leader Barney Ross (Sylvester Stallone), Lee Christmas (Jason Statham) and the rest of the Expendables team reunite when Mr.... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 90558%
Critics Consensus: The Fate of the Furious opens a new chapter in the franchise, fueled by the same infectious cast chemistry and over-the-top action fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: With Dom and Letty married, Brian and Mia retired and the rest of the crew exonerated, the globe-trotting team has... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#8
Adjusted Score: 88516%
Critics Consensus: Hobbs & Shaw doesn't rev as high as the franchise's best installments, but gets decent mileage out of its well-matched stars and over-the-top action sequences.
Synopsis: Brixton Lorr is a cybernetically enhanced soldier who possesses superhuman strength, a brilliant mind and a lethal pathogen that could... [More]
Directed By: David Leitch

#7

Fast & Furious 6 (2013)
71%

#7
Adjusted Score: 78644%
Critics Consensus: With high-octane humor and terrific action scenes, Fast & Furious 6 builds upon the winning blockbuster formula that made Fast 5 a critical and commercial success.
Synopsis: Since Dom (Vin Diesel) and Brian's (Paul Walker) heist in Rio left them and their crew very rich people, they've... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#6

The Italian Job (2003)
73%

#6
Adjusted Score: 78188%
Critics Consensus: Despite some iffy plot elements, The Italian Job succeeds in delivering an entertaining modern take on the original 1969 heist film, thanks to a charismatic cast.
Synopsis: After a heist in Venice, Steve (Edward Norton) turns on his partners in crime, killing safecracker John Bridger (Donald Sutherland)... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#5

Snatch (2000)
74%

#5
Adjusted Score: 78253%
Critics Consensus: Though perhaps a case of style over substance, Guy Ritchie's second crime caper is full of snappy dialogue, dark comedy, and interesting characters.
Synopsis: Illegal boxing promoter Turkish (Jason Statham) convinces gangster Brick Top (Alan Ford) to offer bets on bare-knuckle boxer Mickey (Brad... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#4
Adjusted Score: 77268%
Critics Consensus: Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels is a grimy, twisted, and funny twist on the Tarantino hip gangster formula.
Synopsis: Eddy (Nick Moran) convinces three friends to pool funds for a high-stakes poker game against local crime boss Hatchet Harry... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#3

The Bank Job (2008)
80%

#3
Adjusted Score: 85344%
Critics Consensus: Well cast and crisply directed, The Bank Job is a thoroughly entertaining British heist thriller.
Synopsis: Self-reformed petty criminal Terry Leather (Jason Statham) has become a financially struggling car dealer and settled into a pedestrian London... [More]
Directed By: Roger Donaldson

#2

Furious 7 (2015)
82%

#2
Adjusted Score: 92420%
Critics Consensus: Serving up a fresh round of over-the-top thrills while adding unexpected dramatic heft, Furious 7 keeps the franchise moving in more ways than one.
Synopsis: After defeating international terrorist Owen Shaw, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel), Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and the rest of the crew... [More]
Directed By: James Wan

#1

Spy (2015)
95%

#1
Adjusted Score: 104613%
Critics Consensus: Simultaneously broad and progressive, Spy offers further proof that Melissa McCarthy and writer-director Paul Feig bring out the best in one another -- and delivers scores of belly laughs along the way.
Synopsis: Despite having solid field training, CIA analyst Susan Cooper (Melissa McCarthy) has spent her entire career as a desk jockey,... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

Dwayne Johnson

(Photo by Universal/courtesy Everett Collection. Thumbnail image: Sony Pictures, Warner Bros./courtesy Everett Collection.)

All Dwayne Johnson Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

If we had known that The Rock was indeed cooking a biggest-star-in-the-world movie career, we would’ve stuck our noses up in there a lot sooner. Yes, we would have sniffed up those early stinkers Doom and Be Cool, because at least nestled somewhere in there was The Rundown, which featured peak Seann William Scott and a cameo from Arnold Schwarzenegger passing the action torch to this upstart, the man who would be Dwayne Johnson. And indeed Johnson was the action man of the mid-aughts, tacking on the likes of Walking Tall to his brawny resume. And like his action forebears, he made a curve into family comedy, releasing The Game Plan, The Tooth Fairy, and Race to Witch Mountain to the delight, we assume, of some people. On a scale between Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot to Kindergarten Cop, we rate Johnson’s comedy career detour Top Dog.

But things turned around in 2010. That’s the year he jumped face first off a building into the pavement. And thus was born a new action/comedy classic: The Other Guys. Meanwhile, ’70s-style throwback Faster showed a leaner, meaner Johnson back in a hard-hitting groove. He was invited into the Fast & Furious family, helping turn Fast Five into the franchise’s first Certified Fresh entry and a global phenomenon. San Andreas, Rampage, and Skyscraper turned him into the master of disaster, while Moana and Fighting With My Family, which he also produced, are among his highest-rated movies.

Central Intelligence was the first collaboration Johnson had with Kevin Hart, which was merely the opening for the main course: Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle, the unlikely reboot-sequel that connected with audiences and critics worldwide. He, Hart, Jack Black, and Karen Gillan all came back for Jumanji: The Next Level, and we’re taking a look back on all of Dwayne Johnson’s movies ranked by Tomatometer!

#35

Tooth Fairy (2010)
17%

#35
Adjusted Score: 21926%
Critics Consensus: Dwayne Johnson brings the full force of his charm (and his appropriately pale chompers) to the title role, but flat direction and a committee-written script render The Tooth Fairy unacceptably dull.
Synopsis: Rough-and-tumble hockey player Derek Thompson (Dwayne Johnson) is a terror on the ice, earning the nickname "Tooth Fairy" by separating... [More]
Directed By: Michael Lembeck

#34

Baywatch (2017)
17%

#34
Adjusted Score: 35368%
Critics Consensus: Baywatch takes its source material's jiggle factor to R-rated levels, but lacks the original's campy charm -- and leaves its charming stars flailing in the shallows.
Synopsis: When a dangerous crime wave hits the beach, the legendary Mitch Buchannon leads his elite squad of lifeguards on a... [More]
Directed By: Seth Gordon

#33

Doom (2005)
18%

#33
Adjusted Score: 23809%
Critics Consensus: The FPS sections are sure to please fans of the video game, but lacking in plot and originality to please other moviegoers.
Synopsis: A team of space marines known as the Rapid Response Tactical Squad, led by Sarge (The Rock), is sent to... [More]
Directed By: Andrzej Bartkowiak

#32

Planet 51 (2009)
23%

#32
Adjusted Score: 26831%
Critics Consensus: Planet 51 squanders an interesting premise with an overly familiar storyline, stock characters, and humor that alternates between curious and potentially offensive.
Synopsis: When astronaut Capt. Charles "Chuck" Baker lands on Planet 51, he thinks he is the first life form to set... [More]
Directed By: Jorge Blanco

#31

Walking Tall (2004)
26%

#31
Adjusted Score: 30747%
Critics Consensus: The Rock makes a competent hero, but the movie is content to let a 2x4 do all the talking.
Synopsis: When decorated military officer Chris Vaughn (The Rock) returns to his hometown in the state of Washington to find work,... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Bray

#30

The Game Plan (2007)
29%

#30
Adjusted Score: 32928%
Critics Consensus: Despite The Rock's abundant charisma, The Game Plan is just another run-of-the-mill Disney comedy.
Synopsis: Bachelor football star Joe Kingman (Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson) seems to have it all. He is wealthy and carefree, and... [More]
Directed By: Andy Fickman

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 35104%
Critics Consensus: Though arguably superior to its predecessor, G.I. Joe: Retaliation is overwhelmed by its nonstop action and too nonsensical and vapid to leave a lasting impression.
Synopsis: In the continuing adventures of the G.I. Joe team, Duke (Channing Tatum), second-in-command Roadblock (Dwayne Johnson), and the rest of... [More]
Directed By: Jon M. Chu

#28

Be Cool (2005)
30%

#28
Adjusted Score: 36687%
Critics Consensus: Be Cool is tepid, square, and lukewarm; as a parody of the music business, it has two left feet.
Synopsis: Having made the transition from gangster to movie producer, Chili Palmer (John Travolta) is ready for the next big move.... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#27

Southland Tales (2006)
40%

#27
Adjusted Score: 44424%
Critics Consensus: Southland Tales, while offering an intriguing vision of the future, remains frustratingly incoherent and unpolished.
Synopsis: With the United States under the threat of nuclear attack, the lives of several people converge in a dystopian Los... [More]
Directed By: Richard Kelly

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 44194%
Critics Consensus: Action adventure doesn't get much cheesier than The Scorpion King.
Synopsis: Inspired by the legendary Egyptian warrior, "The Scorpion King" is set 5000 years ago in the notorious city of Gomorrah,... [More]
Directed By: Chuck Russell

#25

Gridiron Gang (2006)
42%

#25
Adjusted Score: 46265%
Critics Consensus: The role of probation officer Sean Porter fits Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson like a glove; however, the execution is so cliched, the youths' stories (based on real events), fail to inspire.
Synopsis: A counselor (The Rock) at a juvenile detention facility decides to turn the young inmates in his charge into a... [More]
Directed By: Phil Joanou

#24

Faster (2010)
42%

#24
Adjusted Score: 46457%
Critics Consensus: It's good to see Dwayne Johnson back in full-throttle action mode, but Faster doesn't deliver enough of the high-octane thrills promised by its title.
Synopsis: Following a 10-year prison stint, Driver (Dwayne Johnson) sprints through the gates to take vengeance on those responsible for his... [More]
Directed By: George Tillman Jr.

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: 48100%
Critics Consensus: Despite the best efforts of a talented cast, Race to Witch Mountain is a tepid reboot that lacks the magic of the original.
Synopsis: Jack Bruno (Dwayne Johnson), a Las Vegas taxi driver, is swept up in the adventure of a lifetime when he... [More]
Directed By: Andy Fickman

#22
Adjusted Score: 49216%
Critics Consensus: Aggressively unambitious, Journey 2 might thrill tween viewers, but most others will find it too intense for young audiences and too cartoonishly dull for adults.
Synopsis: Now 17, Sean Anderson (Josh Hutcherson) receives a coded distress signal from an island where none should exist. Knowing that... [More]
Directed By: Brad Peyton

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 52208%
Critics Consensus: In The Mummy Returns, the special effects are impressive, but the characters seem secondary to the computer generated imagery.
Synopsis: Ten years after the events of the first film, Rick (Brendan Fraser) and Evelyn (Rachel Weisz) O'Connell are settled in... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#20

Skyscraper (2018)
48%

#20
Adjusted Score: 65814%
Critics Consensus: Well-cast yet derivative, Skyscraper isn't exactly a towering action thriller feat, but it's solidly constructed enough to stand among the genre's more mildly diverting features.
Synopsis: Will Sawyer is a former FBI agent and U.S. war veteran who now assesses security for skyscrapers. While he's on... [More]

#19

San Andreas (2015)
49%

#19
Adjusted Score: 58254%
Critics Consensus: San Andreas has a great cast and outstanding special effects, but amidst all the senses-shattering destruction, the movie's characters and plot prove less than structurally sound.
Synopsis: A seemingly ideal day turns disastrous when California's notorious San Andreas fault triggers a devastating, magnitude 9 earthquake, the largest... [More]
Directed By: Brad Peyton

#18

Pain & Gain (2013)
50%

#18
Adjusted Score: 58123%
Critics Consensus: It may be his most thought-provoking film to date, but Michael Bay's Pain & Gain ultimately loses its satirical edge in a stylized flurry of violent spectacle.
Synopsis: Danny Lupo (Mark Wahlberg), manager of the Sun Gym in 1990s Miami, decides that there is only one way to... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#17

Get Smart (2008)
51%

#17
Adjusted Score: 60462%
Critics Consensus: Get Smart rides Steve Carell's considerable charm for a few laughs, but ultimately proves to be a rather ordinary action comedy.
Synopsis: When members of the nefarious crime syndicate KAOS attack the U.S. spy agency Control, the Chief (Alan Arkin) has to... [More]
Directed By: Peter Segal

#16

Rampage (2018)
51%

#16
Adjusted Score: 68234%
Critics Consensus: Rampage isn't as fun as its source material, but the movie's sheer button-mashing abandon might satisfy audiences in the mood for a brainless blockbuster.
Synopsis: Primatologist Davis Okoye shares an unshakable bond with George, an extraordinarily intelligent, silverback gorilla that's been in his care since... [More]
Directed By: Brad Peyton

#15

Snitch (2013)
57%

#15
Adjusted Score: 61902%
Critics Consensus: Though it features one of Dwayne Johnson's more thoughtful performances, the presentation of Snitch's underlying message is muddled by lackluster storytelling and some tonal inconsistencies.
Synopsis: At 18 years old, Jason receives a mandatory 10-year prison sentence after being caught with a package that contained illegal... [More]
Directed By: Ric Roman Waugh

#14

Hercules (2014)
58%

#14
Adjusted Score: 62764%
Critics Consensus: Hercules has Brett Ratner behind the cameras and Dwayne Johnson rocking the loincloth -- and delivers exactly what any reasonable person reading that description might expect.
Synopsis: Though he is famous across the ancient world for his larger-than-life exploits, Hercules (Dwayne Johnson), the son of Zeus and... [More]
Directed By: Brett Ratner

#13

Jungle Cruise (2021)
62%

#13
Adjusted Score: 79533%
Critics Consensus: Its craft isn't quite as sturdy as some of the classic adventures it's indebted to, but Jungle Cruise remains a fun, family-friendly voyage.
Synopsis: Join fan favorites Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt for the adventure of a lifetime on Disney's JUNGLE CRUISE, a rollicking... [More]
Directed By: Jaume Collet-Serra

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 90558%
Critics Consensus: The Fate of the Furious opens a new chapter in the franchise, fueled by the same infectious cast chemistry and over-the-top action fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: With Dom and Letty married, Brian and Mia retired and the rest of the crew exonerated, the globe-trotting team has... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#11
Adjusted Score: 88516%
Critics Consensus: Hobbs & Shaw doesn't rev as high as the franchise's best installments, but gets decent mileage out of its well-matched stars and over-the-top action sequences.
Synopsis: Brixton Lorr is a cybernetically enhanced soldier who possesses superhuman strength, a brilliant mind and a lethal pathogen that could... [More]
Directed By: David Leitch

#10

The Rundown (2003)
69%

#10
Adjusted Score: 74947%
Critics Consensus: The Rundown doesn't break any new ground, but it's a smart, funny buddy action picture with terrific comic chemistry between Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson and Seann William Scott.
Synopsis: Beck (The Rock) is a tight-lipped bounty hunter who doesn't like to use a gun and accepts any job without... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 81511%
Critics Consensus: Kevin Hart and Dwayne Johnson make for well-matched comic foils, helping Central Intelligence overcome a script that coasts on their considerable chemistry.
Synopsis: Bullied as a teen for being overweight, Bob Stone (Dwayne Johnson) shows up to his high school reunion looking fit... [More]

#8

Fast & Furious 6 (2013)
71%

#8
Adjusted Score: 78644%
Critics Consensus: With high-octane humor and terrific action scenes, Fast & Furious 6 builds upon the winning blockbuster formula that made Fast 5 a critical and commercial success.
Synopsis: Since Dom (Vin Diesel) and Brian's (Paul Walker) heist in Rio left them and their crew very rich people, they've... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 86149%
Critics Consensus: Like many classic games, Jumanji: The Next Level retains core components of what came before while adding enough fresh bits to keep things playable.
Synopsis: When Spencer goes back into the fantastical world of Jumanji, pals Martha, Fridge and Bethany re-enter the game to bring... [More]
Directed By: Jake Kasdan

#6
Adjusted Score: 93742%
Critics Consensus: Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle uses a charming cast and a humorous twist to offer an undemanding yet solidly entertaining update on its source material.
Synopsis: Four high school kids discover an old video game console and are drawn into the game's jungle setting, literally becoming... [More]
Directed By: Jake Kasdan

#5

Fast Five (2011)
77%

#5
Adjusted Score: 86764%
Critics Consensus: Sleek, loud, and over the top, Fast Five proudly embraces its brainless action thrills and injects new life into the franchise.
Synopsis: Ever since ex-cop Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and Mia Torretto (Jordana Brewster) broke her brother Dom (Vin Diesel) out of... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#4

The Other Guys (2010)
78%

#4
Adjusted Score: 87678%
Critics Consensus: A clever parody of cop-buddy action-comedies, The Other Guys delivers several impressive action set pieces and lots of big laughs, thanks to the assured comic chemistry between Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg.
Synopsis: Unlike their heroic counterparts on the force, desk-bound NYPD detectives Gamble (Will Ferrell) and Hoitz (Mark Wahlberg) garner no headlines... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#3

Furious 7 (2015)
82%

#3
Adjusted Score: 92420%
Critics Consensus: Serving up a fresh round of over-the-top thrills while adding unexpected dramatic heft, Furious 7 keeps the franchise moving in more ways than one.
Synopsis: After defeating international terrorist Owen Shaw, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel), Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and the rest of the crew... [More]
Directed By: James Wan

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 106871%
Critics Consensus: Much like the sport it celebrates, Fighting with My Family muscles past clichés with a potent blend of energy and committed acting that should leave audiences cheering.
Synopsis: Born into a tight-knit wrestling family, Paige and her brother Zak are ecstatic when they get the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Merchant

#1

Moana (2016)
95%

#1
Adjusted Score: 112963%
Critics Consensus: With a title character as three-dimensional as its lush animation and a story that adds fresh depth to Disney's time-tested formula, Moana is truly a family-friendly adventure for the ages.
Synopsis: An adventurous teenager sails out on a daring mission to save her people. During her journey, Moana meets the once-mighty... [More]
Directed By: John Musker, Ron Clements

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How to Watch Fast & Furious Movies In Order

You wouldn’t expect a burly international action franchise like Fast & Furious to have the most complicated timeline. Then again, who predicted the 2001 original about some humble street racing would witness its sequels dragging bank vaults across asphalt, jumping out of planes, sliding off submarines, and likely soon making contact with alien life in deep space?

Some of these Fast & Furious sequels are set later in the timeline, even though they were made earlier than others. To watch the F&F movies in chronological order as the events unfolded, you can still start with the first two: The Fast and the Furious and 2 Fast 2 Furious. Tokyo Drift is the third in the series but actually set way later in the timeline, so you’ll want to skip that and jump to Fast & Furious, Fast Five, and Fast & Furious 6. Then you can watch Tokyo Drift.

After that, hop to franchise best Furious 7. Follow it up with The Fate of the Furious and spin-off Hobbs & Shaw and then the latest: F9.

See below for the full list if you want to watch Fast & Furious movies in order! (And check out the Fast Saga ranked by Tomatometer!)

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 58908%
Critics Consensus: Sleek and shiny on the surface, The Fast and the Furious recalls those cheesy teenage exploitation flicks of the 1950s.
Synopsis: Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) enjoys the adrenaline of street car racing and his fans treat him like a rock star.... [More]
Directed By: Rob Cohen

#9

2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)
36%

#9
Adjusted Score: 42058%
Critics Consensus: Beautiful people and beautiful cars in a movie that won't tax the brain cells.
Synopsis: This sequel focuses on ex-police officer Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker), who relocates from Los Angeles to Miami to start over.... [More]
Directed By: John Singleton

#8

Fast & Furious (2009)
28%

#8
Adjusted Score: 35056%
Critics Consensus: While Fast and Furious features the requisite action and stunts, the filmmakers have failed to provide a competent story or compelling characters.
Synopsis: When a crime brings them back to the mean streets of Los Angeles, fugitive ex-convict Dom Toretto (Vin Diesel) and... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#7

Fast Five (2011)
77%

#7
Adjusted Score: 86764%
Critics Consensus: Sleek, loud, and over the top, Fast Five proudly embraces its brainless action thrills and injects new life into the franchise.
Synopsis: Ever since ex-cop Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and Mia Torretto (Jordana Brewster) broke her brother Dom (Vin Diesel) out of... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#6

Fast & Furious 6 (2013)
71%

#6
Adjusted Score: 78644%
Critics Consensus: With high-octane humor and terrific action scenes, Fast & Furious 6 builds upon the winning blockbuster formula that made Fast 5 a critical and commercial success.
Synopsis: Since Dom (Vin Diesel) and Brian's (Paul Walker) heist in Rio left them and their crew very rich people, they've... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#5
Adjusted Score: 42576%
Critics Consensus: Eye-popping driving sequences coupled with a limp story and flat performances make this Drift a disappointing follow-up to previous Fast and Furious installments.
Synopsis: Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) always feels like an outsider, but he defines himself through his victories as a street racer.... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#4

Furious 7 (2015)
82%

#4
Adjusted Score: 92420%
Critics Consensus: Serving up a fresh round of over-the-top thrills while adding unexpected dramatic heft, Furious 7 keeps the franchise moving in more ways than one.
Synopsis: After defeating international terrorist Owen Shaw, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel), Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and the rest of the crew... [More]
Directed By: James Wan

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 90558%
Critics Consensus: The Fate of the Furious opens a new chapter in the franchise, fueled by the same infectious cast chemistry and over-the-top action fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: With Dom and Letty married, Brian and Mia retired and the rest of the crew exonerated, the globe-trotting team has... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#2
Adjusted Score: 88516%
Critics Consensus: Hobbs & Shaw doesn't rev as high as the franchise's best installments, but gets decent mileage out of its well-matched stars and over-the-top action sequences.
Synopsis: Brixton Lorr is a cybernetically enhanced soldier who possesses superhuman strength, a brilliant mind and a lethal pathogen that could... [More]
Directed By: David Leitch

#1

F9 The Fast Saga (2021)
59%

#1
Adjusted Score: 75920%
Critics Consensus: F9 sends the franchise hurtling further over the top than ever, but director Justin Lin's knack for preposterous set pieces keeps the action humming.
Synopsis: Vin Diesel's Dom Toretto is leading a quiet life off the grid with Letty and his son, little Brian, but... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

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(Photo by Universal/courtesy Everett Collection)

All Fast & Furious Movies Ranked

From bursting out the nose of an exploding plane, to skipping skyscraper to skyscraper, to gently guiding a bank safe across public roads and additional civil engineering, the Fast & Furious franchise has made its mission delivering more outrageous action than the previous movies could ever muster. And as the stunts got crazier for Dom (Vin Diesel), Brian (Paul Walker), Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) and the whole F&F-in’ family, critics were just as willing to go along for the ride. It was finally the fifth Furious film that earned the franchise’s first Fresh. And since then it’s been on a skyward trajectory, like a souped-up Karmann Ghia ramping off an Arrakis sandworm and barrel rolling between a fleet of nuclear dirigibles (you know we’re heading in this direction). Furious 7 reached a high emotional crescendo in the wake of Walker’s death, while follow-up F8 saw a dip, though stayed in the Fresh lane.

The latest include spin-off Hobbs & Shaw and the long-delayed F9. Now that the whole family’s here, see all Fast & Furious movies ranked by Tomatometer!

#10

Fast & Furious (2009)
28%

#10
Adjusted Score: 35056%
Critics Consensus: While Fast and Furious features the requisite action and stunts, the filmmakers have failed to provide a competent story or compelling characters.
Synopsis: When a crime brings them back to the mean streets of Los Angeles, fugitive ex-convict Dom Toretto (Vin Diesel) and... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#9

2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)
36%

#9
Adjusted Score: 42058%
Critics Consensus: Beautiful people and beautiful cars in a movie that won't tax the brain cells.
Synopsis: This sequel focuses on ex-police officer Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker), who relocates from Los Angeles to Miami to start over.... [More]
Directed By: John Singleton

#8
Adjusted Score: 42576%
Critics Consensus: Eye-popping driving sequences coupled with a limp story and flat performances make this Drift a disappointing follow-up to previous Fast and Furious installments.
Synopsis: Sean Boswell (Lucas Black) always feels like an outsider, but he defines himself through his victories as a street racer.... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 58908%
Critics Consensus: Sleek and shiny on the surface, The Fast and the Furious recalls those cheesy teenage exploitation flicks of the 1950s.
Synopsis: Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) enjoys the adrenaline of street car racing and his fans treat him like a rock star.... [More]
Directed By: Rob Cohen

#6

F9 The Fast Saga (2021)
59%

#6
Adjusted Score: 75920%
Critics Consensus: F9 sends the franchise hurtling further over the top than ever, but director Justin Lin's knack for preposterous set pieces keeps the action humming.
Synopsis: Vin Diesel's Dom Toretto is leading a quiet life off the grid with Letty and his son, little Brian, but... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#5
Adjusted Score: 88516%
Critics Consensus: Hobbs & Shaw doesn't rev as high as the franchise's best installments, but gets decent mileage out of its well-matched stars and over-the-top action sequences.
Synopsis: Brixton Lorr is a cybernetically enhanced soldier who possesses superhuman strength, a brilliant mind and a lethal pathogen that could... [More]
Directed By: David Leitch

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 90558%
Critics Consensus: The Fate of the Furious opens a new chapter in the franchise, fueled by the same infectious cast chemistry and over-the-top action fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: With Dom and Letty married, Brian and Mia retired and the rest of the crew exonerated, the globe-trotting team has... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#3

Fast & Furious 6 (2013)
71%

#3
Adjusted Score: 78644%
Critics Consensus: With high-octane humor and terrific action scenes, Fast & Furious 6 builds upon the winning blockbuster formula that made Fast 5 a critical and commercial success.
Synopsis: Since Dom (Vin Diesel) and Brian's (Paul Walker) heist in Rio left them and their crew very rich people, they've... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#2

Fast Five (2011)
77%

#2
Adjusted Score: 86764%
Critics Consensus: Sleek, loud, and over the top, Fast Five proudly embraces its brainless action thrills and injects new life into the franchise.
Synopsis: Ever since ex-cop Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and Mia Torretto (Jordana Brewster) broke her brother Dom (Vin Diesel) out of... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#1

Furious 7 (2015)
82%

#1
Adjusted Score: 92420%
Critics Consensus: Serving up a fresh round of over-the-top thrills while adding unexpected dramatic heft, Furious 7 keeps the franchise moving in more ways than one.
Synopsis: After defeating international terrorist Owen Shaw, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel), Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and the rest of the crew... [More]
Directed By: James Wan

We continue our series of “Peacock presents” recommendations with 10 movies that will satisfy everyone in the room – from toddlers to grandparents. After thrills? We got you with two Fresh flicks from the Dark Knight trilogy. Looking to get a bit emotional? Try A Beautiful Mind. Feeling retro? We’ve got plenty to scratch that itch. So, slather that popcorn with butter and dim the lights, because these family flicks – all available now on Peacock – are going to make weekends at your place that much more fun.

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Batman Begins (2005)

84%

A young Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) travels to the Far East, where he’s trained in the martial arts by Henri Ducard (Liam Neeson), a member of the mysterious League of Shadows. When Ducard reveals the League’s true purpose – the complete destruction of Gotham City – Wayne returns to Gotham intent on cleaning up the city without resorting to murder. With the help of Alfred (Michael Caine), his loyal butler, and Lucius Fox (Morgan Freeman), a tech expert at Wayne Enterprises, Batman is born.

Critics Consensus: Brooding and dark, but also exciting and smart, Batman Begins is a film that understands the essence of one of the definitive superheroes.


The Dark Knight (2008)

94%

With the help of allies Lt. Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) and DA Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart), Batman (Christian Bale) has been able to keep a tight lid on crime in Gotham City. But when a vile young criminal calling himself the Joker (Heath Ledger) suddenly throws the town into chaos, the caped Crusader begins to tread a fine line between heroism and vigilantism.

Critics Consensus: Dark, complex, and unforgettable, The Dark Knight succeeds not just as an entertaining comic book film, but as a richly thrilling crime saga.


Bernie (2011)

88%

Assistant funeral director Bernie Tiede (Jack Black) is one of the most-beloved residents in the small Texas town of Carthage. Sunday-school teacher, choir member and creator of spectacular funerals, Bernie is a friend to everyone, including Marjorie Nugent (Shirley MacLaine), a rich but nasty widow whom no one else likes. When Marjorie is found shot to death and stuffed in a freezer, Bernie is charged with the murder, and concerned Carthage citizens immediately spring to his defense.

Critics Consensus: Richard Linklater’s Bernie is a gently told and unexpectedly amusing true-crime comedy that benefits from an impressive performance by Jack Black.


A Beautiful Mind (2001)

74%

A human drama inspired by events in the life of John Forbes Nash Jr. (Russell Crowe), and in part based on the biography A Beautiful Mind by Sylvia Nasar. From the heights of notoriety to the depths of depravity, John Forbes Nash Jr. experienced it all. A mathematical genius, he made an astonishing discovery early in his career and stood on the brink of international acclaim. But the handsome and arrogant Nash soon found himself on a painful and harrowing journey of self-discovery.

Critics Consensus: The well-acted A Beautiful Mind is both a moving love story and a revealing look at mental illness.


Meet Joe Black (1998)

45%

Bill Parrish (Anthony Hopkins), businessman and devoted family man, is about to celebrate his 65th birthday. However, before he reaches that landmark, he is visited by Death (Brad Pitt), who has taken human form as Joe Black, a young man who recently died. Joe and Bill make a deal: Bill will be given a few extra days of his life, and Joe will spend the same time getting to know what it’s like to be human. It seems like a perfect arrangement, until Joe falls in love – with Bill’s daughter.

Critics Consensus: Meet Joe Black is pretty to look at and benefits from an agreeable cast, but that isn’t enough to offset this dawdling drama’s punishing three-hour runtime.


Tremors (1990)

86%

Repairmen Val McKee (Kevin Bacon) and Earl Bassett (Fred Ward) are tired of their dull lives in the small desert town of Perfection, Nev. But just as the two try to skip town, they happen upon a series of mysterious deaths and a concerned seismologist (Finn Carter) studying unnatural readings below the ground. With the help of an eccentric couple (Reba McEntire, Michael Gross), the group fights for survival against giant, worm-like monsters hungry for human flesh.

Critics Consensus: An affectionate throwback to 1950s creature features, Tremors reinvigorates its genre tropes with a finely balanced combination of horror and humor.


Cinderella Man (2005)

80%

During the Great Depression, ex-boxer James J. Braddock (Russell Crowe) works as a day laborer until his former manager Joe Gould (Paul Giamatti) offers him a one-time slot against a rising young contender. After he wins a shocking upset, Braddock goes back into the ring full time, against the wishes of his frightened wife, Mae (Renée Zellweger). Dubbed “The Cinderella Man” for his rags-to-riches story, Braddock sets his sights on the defending champion, the fearsome Max Baer (Craig Bierko).

Critics Consensus: With grittiness and an evocative sense of time and place, Cinderella Man is a powerful underdog story. And Ron Howard and Russell Crowe prove to be a solid combination.


Cal Weaver (Steve Carell) is living the American dream. He has a good job, a beautiful house, great children and a beautiful wife, named Emily (Julianne Moore). Cal’s seemingly perfect life unravels, however, when he learns that Emily has been unfaithful and wants a divorce. Over 40 and suddenly single, Cal is adrift in the fickle world of dating. Enter, Jacob Palmer (Ryan Gosling), a self-styled player who takes Cal under his wing and teaches him how to be a hit with the ladies.

Critics Consensus: It never lives up to the first part of its title, but Crazy, Stupid, Love‘s unabashed sweetness – and its terrifically talented cast – more than make up for its flaws.


Ride Along (2014)

18%

For two years, security guard Ben (Kevin Hart) has tried to convince James (Ice Cube), a veteran cop, that he is worthy of James’ sister, Angela. When Ben is finally accepted into the police academy, James decides to test his mettle by inviting him along on a shift deliberately designed to scare the trainee. However, events take an unexpected turn when their wild night leads to Atlanta’s most-notorious criminal and Ben’s rapid-fire mouth proves as dangerous as the bullets whizzing by them.

Critics Consensus: Kevin Hart’s livewire presence gives Ride Along a shot of necessary energy, but it isn’t enough to rescue this would-be comedy from the buddy-cop doldrums.


Blues Brothers 2000 (1998)

46%

The now-brotherless Ellwood Blues (Dan Aykroyd) is finally out of prison, attempting to reunite the old band and find a few new partners in crime – played by John Goodman and J. Evan Bonifant. In this sequel to the original Blues Brothers comedy/musical, Ellwood battles the Chicago police, sings and dances his way out of numerous sticky situations, and manages to get the old band on the road for a hair-raising adventure.

Critics Consensus: Braving onward without the late John Belushi, Blues Brothers 2000 gets the band back together with a spirited soundtrack, but a mission that’s far less divine.

Thumbnail: (c) Paramount/courtesy Everett Collection, © Universal, © Warner Bros.

As we all settle in to stay at home and socially distance ourselves, the planet has been given a unique resource not often afforded in the modern world: time. With no place to go, what shall we do with this new abundance of free hours? Time to finish that book you have had on your bedside table? Maybe take an online French class or learn to play an instrument? Time to binge every series that ever was? Or perhaps, like us, you’re thinking of all the films you wished you’d seen but never had the time to before.

Maybe one of those epic movie franchises that seemed too daunting to jump into late in the game – don’t ever admit you’ve never seen an MCU movie, ever – or a series of which you’ve caught a few entries but want to fill in the gaps. Fear not  we have you covered with our Epic Franchise Movie Binge Guide. Read below as we break down some of the most beloved long-running movie franchises – like The Lord of the Rings, Mission Impossible, or the granddaddy of them all, the Marvel Cinematic Universe – and tell you the best way to approach watching them, how long the binge will take, and which titles you can skip. Because hey, even all the time in the world may not be enough time to make you sit through A Good Day to Die Hard.

Disagree with our picks or have a suggestion for a franchise movie binge? Let us know in the comments. 


The Lord of the Rings

What is it: The film adaptations of the fantasy novels by J.R.R. Tolkien, set in ”Middle-earth,” the fictitious medieval land where elves, men, dwarves, wizards, and hobbits co-exist, often not so peacefully. Over the course of several films, we follow hobbit Bilbo Baggins and later his young heir Frodo Baggins as they go on adventures and battle against the forces of evil. 

How many hours: Extended editions: 20 hours 30 minutes; Theatrical cuts: 17 hours and 12 minutes.

Starts with:  The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012)  

Ends with: The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)  

Best way to watch: Some would argue the second trilogy – though the first by story chronology – from Peter Jackson was an unnecessary and bloated cash grab that should be avoided at all costs, but we have a better suggestion. We suggest you begin with the LOTR animated film from 1978, which will give you all the events of the films in a quicker and to-the-point format. Then, if you are compelled to see the best of The Hobbit live-action series, we would say check out the standard edition of The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, which is the best of the three. We would also suggest you try to watch the extended editions of the original live-action LOTR series – they are more than worth it for the extra content. This recommendation would make for a shorter, 16-hour watch, which could be broken up easily over two days. 

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. The Two Towers and The Lord of The Rings: The Return of the King standard editions are streaming on Netflix.


Marvel Cinematic Universe

What is it: The 23-film saga that chronicles the epic adventures of various superheroes, based on the comics first distributed by Marvel and its subsidiaries. 

How many hours: 50 hours and 3 minutes.

Starts with:   Iron Man (2008)  

Ends with:  Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)

Best way to watch: Not surprising for a franchise that grossed over $22 billion at the global box office, but Marvel Studios’ 23-film, decade-long opus is quite watchable as is. Some folks would have argued in 2010 that Avengers: The Age of Ultron is a skippable mess, but as we detail here, it is essential viewing to truly appreciate the first four phases of the saga that culminated with Avengers: Endgame. Sorry for those looking for a shortcut, but watching it all is worth it. Viewing all 23 movies straight through, without breaks, however, is not the way to do it.

Instead, we suggest you go in release order and complete each day as follows: day one after Avengers; day two after Ant-man; day three after Black Panther; and finish on day four with Spider-Man: Far From Home. If you’ve previously watched the MCU and are looking to watch it in a new way, use our guide here to watch in chronological order based on the events of each film. If the thought of 50 hours of superheroes is still too intimidating for you, but you want to understand enough to get by, watch these character introduction films (Captain America, Thor, Iron Man, Black Panther, Captain Marvel, Ant-Man, Guardians of the Galaxy) and these team-up films (Civil War, Winter Soldier, Avengers, Ultron, Infinity War, Endgame). Once you have finished that, check out our Oral Histories of the MCU, in which the directors, producer, and casting director who worked on the epic franchise break down all the behind-the-scene secrets.

Where to watch: FandangoNOW, Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. All of the films save The Incredible Hulk and the Spider-Man films are streaming on Disney+. The Avengers: Infinity War and The Avengers: Endgame are streaming on Netflix; and Captain America: The First Avenger, The Avengers, and Thor are streaming on Amazon Prime.


Die Hard Franchise

What is it: Follow John McClane, a police detective who seems to be a magnet for maniacal criminals no matter which city/structure he is in, and proves to be a tough man to kill.

How many hours: 10 hours and 14 minutes.

Starts with:  Die Hard (1988)

Ends with: A Good Day to Die Hard (2013)

Best way to watch: The original Die Hard is so beloved that many argue it’s the greatest action film ever made – or maybe the greatest Christmas movie, but that is a debate for another day. The film and its follow-ups have a loyal fanbase, and though the second and third entries pale in comparison to the first, we still say they’re worth a watch. The fourth film, Live Free or Die Hard, is a true return to form and, frankly, it’s where you should stop unless you are a true completist. The series’ most recent film, A Good Day to Die Hard, is the only PG-13 entry on the list, and without McClane’s iconic “Yippee-ki-yay, motherf–ker,” there’s really no point pushing play.

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discounted Bundle), Amazon,  iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. Die Hard and Die Hard with a Vengeance are streaming now on CinemaxGoLive Free or Die Hard is streaming on the Starz app.


The Fast & Furious Franchise

What is it: Follow Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel) and his crew, which he calls his family, as they shift from illegal street-racing criminals to heist experts and then finally emerge as a new crime-fighting unit that tackles the world of espionage.

How many hours: 15 hours and 57 mins. 

Starts with: The Fast and the Furious (2001)

Ends with:  Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw (2019)

Best way to watch: As Dom and everyone in the Fast franchise says – quite often – this is about family. So, if you’re looking for something to skip, it’s hard to imagine who you’d want to kick out one of the family – though, let’s be honest, 2 Fast 2 Furious is definitely not Dad’s favorite. Without Vin Diesel, that entry can barely call itself a Fast and Furious movie, and the 2009 series soft reboot, Fast & Furious, is not much better and an easy call to skip, as well. We would caution against skipping third entry Toyko Drift; its charms are significantly more than its 37% Tomatometer score would suggest (something we wax about in our book Rotten Movies We Love). Not to spoil anything, but when we finally get Fast 9 in 2021, you’ll need to have seen Tokyo Drift to understand everything fully – check out #JusticeForHan after you finish the series, and you will understand. 

Where to watch: FandangoNOW, Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. Hobbs & Shaw and Fast Five are streaming on HBOnow; Fast 6 is streaming on FXnow.


Rocky Franchise

What is it: Follow Philly underdog boxer-turned-champion, Rocky Balboa, as he battles various fighters in the ring, as well as his own issues outside of it, and later trains the next generation of champions.

How many hours: 14 hours and 55 minutes. 

Starts with: Rocky (1976)

Ends with:  Creed II (2018)

Best way to watch: This one’s real simple: trust us and skip Rocky V. Just pretend it didn’t happen; we’re pretty sure Sylvester Stallone did. 

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, iTunes, VuduGooglePlayRocky Balboa is streaming on the Starz appCreed II is streaming on Hulu and Amazon.


Harry Potter / Wizarding World Franchise

What is it: The franchise based on JK Rowling’s phenomenally successful novels follows the adventures of Harry Potter, an orphan-turned-famed wizard, the evil He Who Must Not Be Named, and the Wizarding World they inhabit.

How many hours: 24 hours and 6 minutes. 

Starts with:   Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them (2016)

Ends with:  Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001)

Best way to watch: As this is a British series, allow us to put this as politely as possible: Fantastic Beasts is simply not quite on form. The first entry is saved by Eddie Redmayne and mesmerizing magical effects; the second entry is the first and only Rotten flick from the Wizarding World and very skippable at this stage. The original seven films are near perfect, but if you wanted to pass over The Chamber of Secrets you wouldn’t miss much – you won’t be too confused later in the series. (Though if watching as a family, this is one the kids tend to like.) If you follow that suggestion, you can finish the entire series in one day.

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlayFantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald is streaming on HBONow.


X-Men Franchise

What Is It: Follow Professor Charles Xavier and his X-Men as they try to save the world and the lives of their fellow Mutants. Professor X and co. work with, and sometimes against, mutants like the powerful Magneto, Wolverine, and the wisecracking mercenary Deadpool.
How many hours: 21 hours and 43 minutes.

Starts with:   X-Men: First Class (2011)

Ends with:  Logan (2017)

How to watch: The critics will tell you that both X-Men: The Last Stand (the third of the original films) and X-Men: Apocalypse (the third of the rebooted, second-gen films) are shells of their brilliant predecessors. And with the last X-Men film to enter theaters, Dark Phoenix, disappointing on the Tomatometer and at the box office, you should essentially skip any film that has anything to do with Jean Gray’s Dark Phoenix. X-Men Origins: Wolverine is admittedly a hard watch to suffer through, but you kinda have to just to appreciate the brilliance of Deadpool and its sequel, if only for what they did differently with the character. Every film that character is in after Origins highlights why Ryan Reynolds was born to play the “Merc with a Mouth.”

Watching in the order of events is the best way to approach things if you don’t want to be confused by the time travel that happens later in the series. That order is: First Class, Days of Future Past, X-Men Origins: Wolverine, X-Men Apocalypse, Dark Phoenix, X-Men, X2, X-Men: The Last Stand, The Wolverine, Deadpool, Deadpool 2, Logan. If you leave off the aforementioned weakest entries (The Last Stand, Apocalypse, Dark Phoenix) you can complete the entire series in one day.

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. X-Men: Days of Future Past and Deadpool are streaming on FXNowX-Men Origins: Wolverine is available to stream on the Starz app. 


Jurassic Park Franchise

What is it: In these films, we welcome you to Jurassic Park, a theme park – and eventually various associated islands, mansions, West Coast cities – where dinosaurs have been genetically recreated to walk the Earth alongside humans. Over the course of series we watch as that combination invariably doesn’t work out well for the humans.

How many hours: 10 hours and 1 minute.

Starts with:  Jurassic Park (1993)

Ends with:  Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018)

Best way to watch: This was a subject of contentious debate among the RT staff: some thought the Jurassic World part of the franchise is unwatchable, while others had strong takes on Jurassic Park 3 and The Lost World. As this is only a five-film series so far, we compromised: Watch them all and make your own determinations. Either way, we all agreed that the original Jurassic Park is a bona fide classic, and if you haven’t seen it, please remedy this injustice as soon as possible. It only takes a day to watch them all. 

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom is streaming on CinemaxGo.


Mission Impossible Franchise

What is it: Watch secret agent Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his crew of talented spies as they battle the world’s most dangerous criminals along with the bureaucracy of his own organization, the IMF. The films are based on the 1960s television show.

How many hours: 13 hours and 3 minutes.

Starts with:   Mission: Impossible (1996)

Ends with:  Mission: Impossible -- Fallout (2018)

Best way to watch: It’s apparent after six films (with a seventh on the way): Tom Cruise really likes playing Ethan Hunt. And with every film, Cruise looks to top the jaw-dropping stunts from the last. Still, there is a stark contrast between the first three films and the rest, in regards to quality and scope. Many will tell you the second film, directed by John Woo, and the third, directed by J.J. Abrams, are the weakest of the set, but they’re still thoroughly enjoyable and feature some truly astonishing stunts – so we suggest you watch them all. And thankfully this is not – yes, we’re gonna say it – impossible to do in one or two days. 

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. Mission Impossible: Fallout is streaming on Amazon Prime and Hulu; Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol and Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation are streaming on FXNow.


James Bond Franchise

What is it: James Bond, MI6 intelligence officer and international playboy, charms women, thwarts terrorist plots, and sips a shaken martini in well-tailored suits. Based on Ian Fleming’s iconic novels.

How many hours: 55 hours and 11 minutes.

Starts with:  Dr. No (1962)

Ends with:   Spectre (2015)

Best way to watch: For completists, we recommend you start with the Connery films on day one, then do a day of Timothy Dalton, David Niven (the satire Casino Royale from 1967), and George Lazenby’s films, adding one or two of Roger Moore’s. Finish with Moore on day three, then do a full day of Pierce Brosnan for day four, and end the series on day five with Daniel Craig. If that’s a bit too daunting, you can break up the films we suggested for one day across two days instead. If you’re looking for a few to skip, we’d suggest A View to Kill and Octopussy. We’d also suggest you skip Never Say Never Again, as it is a shadow of Connery’s older work; Moonraker is only enjoyable for how laughable it is; and there’s not enough vodka on earth to make The World is Not Enough a good time. Quantum of Solace is another one you can miss, but at least watch the opening scene – it’s fantastic.

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, Itunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. Goldeneye, Tomorrow Never Dies, The World is Not Enough, and Die Another Day are streaming on NetflixQuantum of Solace and Casino Royale (1967) are streaming on HBONow.


Star Trek Franchise

What is it: These are the stories of the USS Enterprise, crafted for the silver screen. Watch Captain Kirk (William Shatner) and later Captain Picard (Patrick Stewart) as they lead their crews to the furthest reaches of the universe on a peacekeeping mission to discover new worlds. The films are based on the Star Trek television series and its subsequent spin-offs.

How many hours: 25 hours and 17 minutes.

Starts with:  Star Trek: The Motion Picture (1979)

Ends with:  Star Trek Beyond (2016)

Best way to watch: At the risk of angering the original series Trekkies, the first film – Star Trek: The Motion Picture – is simply not very good (it’s 42% on the Tomatometer). The same can be said of The Final Frontier. When we shift into The Next Generation part of the franchise, the series starts off strong but fizzles with Star Trek: Nemesis. We suggest you should skip those four. When you start the reboot franchise, some would advise you to skip Star Trek: Into Darkness, which was much maligned by the fandom but which we say is worth seeing for Benedict Cumberbatch, if nothing else. As far as ordering your binge, watching the series as the films were released is the way to go. Begin with the first set of films featuring the original series characters, followed by the films centering on the cast of The Next Generation, and finish with the reboot films that started in 2009. If you are skipping films following our advice, the new order is original series (The Wrath of Khan, Search for Spock, The Voyage HomeUndiscovered Country), followed by the Next Generation films (Generations, First Contact, Insurrection), and finishing with the 2009 reboot films (Star Trek, Into Darkness, Beyond).

Where to watch: FandangoNOW (Discount Bundle), Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, GooglePlay. Star Treks 1-6, First Contact, Insurrection, and Generations are streaming AmazonStar Trek: Into Darkness is streaming on FXnow; and Star Trek Nemesis, First Contact, Generations are streaming on Crackle.


Thumbnail image: yParamount, Paramount, courtesy of the Everett Collection 

We bet those pesky xenomorphs are getting smug now that their last two movies, Prometheus and Alien: Covenant, have gone Certified Fresh.

Enough with the space jockeys, unqualified cartographers, and people who run in straight lines: How about terrorizing someone who can put up a real fight? Vote on our 10 suggestions below or leave your dream Alien deathmatch in the comments!

There’s no shortage of movies playing at your local cineplex this weekend, but for filmgoers craving high-octane action, there’s really only one option: The Fate of the Furious, which brings the blockbuster Fast & Furious franchise roaring to its eighth installment. While we wait to see what Dom, Luke, Letty, Roman, and the rest of the gang are up to this time out, we decided to take a look back at the rest of the series by Tomatometer — and you know what that means. Buckle up, it’s time for Total Recall!


Use the up and down arrows to rank the movies, or click here to see them ranked by Tomatometer!

Seven movies. Dozens of featured cars. Hundreds of millions in property damage. As the eighth Fast & Furious movie, The Fate of the Furious, exits the garage, now’s the time to take our gallery quiz matching F&F stars to their badass cars!

Vin Diesel‘s journey in the movie biz has taken him from bit player to $100 million-grossing franchise topliner, multi-hyphenate media mogul, social media star, and multi-franchise hero. Get your engine revved up for plenty of action, folks – now it’s time to look at the 10 best-reviewed movies of Diesel’s career!


10. Pitch Black (2000) 60%

Pitch-Black

Any film that takes place in the 46th century — and suffers the ignominy of being dumped into theaters in February — faces a fairly steep uphill battle with critics. Although Pitch Black didn’t quite make it over the hump, running out of steam at 57 percent on the Tomatometer, it did far better than most would have guessed — and it helped make a star out of Vin Diesel, whose turn as the hulking, creepy-eyed escaped convict Richard B. Riddick helped David Twohy’s low-budget sci-fi epic transcend its less inspired moments. In the end, Pitch Black became the rare winter feature that ends up spawning a sequel, thanks in part to the begrudging respect of writers like Entertainment Weekly’s Lisa Schwarzbaum, who praised it as “so jaunty, so limber, and so visually self-assured that art peeks through where crap has traditionally made its home.”

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9. Riddick (2013) 57%

Riddick

After the relative failure of 2004’s Pitch Black sequel The Chronicles of Riddick, Diesel labored for nearly a decade to give the franchise another installment — first trading a cameo in The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift in exchange for the rights to the character, then laboring for years with director and screenwriter David Twohy over ideas for the script. Ultimately, Diesel ended up mortgaging his home and heavily investing his own money into 2013’s Riddick, which finds our hero marooned on a distant planet and beset by ravenous beasts as well as a pack of mercenaries. The picture found a warmer reception at the box office, where it brought in nearly $100 million, but critics weren’t entirely sold — Riddick ultimately ended up just shy of Fresh territory, and even its fans openly conceded that it was more of a goofy good time than a serious piece of sci-fi. As Stephanie Merry wrote for the Washington Post, “Riddick can be cheesy and silly, not to mention excessively violent, but it’s also fun.”

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8. Find Me Guilty (2006) 62%

Find-Me-Guilty

The same year he starred in The Pacifier, Diesel packed on 30 pounds — and grew hair! — to take the lead in Sidney Lumet’s Find Me Guilty, a legal dramedy based on the true story of the longest Mafia trial in American history. As reputed mobster Jackie DiNorscio, who famously represented himself during the trial, Diesel finally won the nearly unanimous critical praise that escaped him in earlier films; sadly, critics found fault with just about every other aspect of Find Me Guilty, including what many saw as an irresponsibly rosy portrait of the real-life mobsters at the heart of Lumet’s screenplay. Still, even if it is, in the words of the Hollywood Reporter’s Kirk Honeycutt, “guilty of moral stupidity and misguided hero worship,” Diesel could take comfort in praise from the likes of the New York Post’s Lou Lumenick, who wrote that his “volatile performance finally proves he is much more than an action star.”

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7. Boiler Room (2000) 66%

Boiler-Room

A sort of miniature blend of Glengarry Glen Ross and Wall Street, Ben Younger’s Boiler Room looked at the seedy underbelly of the tech bubble’s millionaire boom, peeking inside the price-fixing exploits of a seedy Long Island “chop shop” brokerage firm. It wasn’t a big hit, and critics were fairly divided in their opinions, but it gave Diesel the opportunity to deliver a nicely understated dramatic supporting role, and with just a few more reviews from writers like the New York Times’ A.O. Scott — who said it “reflects the sensibility of the generation it holds up to critical scrutiny, and it’s a cunningly ambiguous act of self-portraiture” — Boiler Room would have a nice fresh tomato next to its title.

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6. Fast & Furious 6 (2013) 71%

Fast-Furious-6

After shifting into a higher critical and commercial gear with Fast Five in 2011, the Fast & Furious franchise kept the pedal to the medal with Fast & Furious 6 two years later, retaining the series’ new heist thriller approach (and recent cast addition Dwayne Johnson) for another round of souped-up action and automotive mayhem. While the series’ sixth installment ultimately fell a few percentage points shy of its predecessor, it still went down as one of the summer of 2013’s better-performing blockbusters, rolling up nearly $800 million in worldwide grosses — along with applause from critics like Colin Covert of the Minneapolis Star Tribune, who wrote, “It’s a ripsnorting carmageddon that stylizes automotive annihilation the way John Woo used to choreograph death and destruction with guns and explosions.”

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5. Fast Five (2011) 77%

Fast-Five

Very few franchises notch critical high marks with their fifth installments, and The Fast and the Furious series — a perennial critics’ target since its debut in 2001 — hardly seemed like a logical candidate for ever achieving Certified Fresh status. But lo and behold, that’s exactly what happened in 2011, when Fast Five roared off to 77 percent on the Tomatometer (and over $625 million in worldwide grosses). So what changed? Well, it didn’t hurt that Five’s storyline took a “heist action” approach rather than the “street racing action drama” of previous installments, and the returning cast members (including Paul Walker, Jordana Brewster, Tyrese Gibson, and of course Vin Diesel) benefited from the copious charisma of new addition Dwayne Johnson. Whatever the reasons, longtime Furious fans had company in critics like Connie Ogle of the Miami Herald, who called Five “Embarrassingly fun, the sort of speedy, senseless, violence-crammed action flick that virtually defines the summer season, with superheroes who aren’t gods or crusaders in tights but guys in T-shirts and jeans who can drive cars really fast.”

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4. Furious 7 (2015) 82%

Furious-7

The Fast and Furious franchise has openly defied the laws of diminishing box-office returns — not to mention physics — over the course of its long lifespan, but it isn’t entirely immune to real-world concerns, as fans were sadly reminded when star Paul Walker was suddenly killed in a car crash while still in the midst of production on Furious 7. Walker’s death cast a shadow over the movie, adding a dash of poignancy to the action, and his surviving cast members proved up to the responsibility of sending off their co-star with one of the hugely lucrative saga’s more critically successful entries. “When a film is this exciting in its action set pieces and this meaningful in its quiet moments,” argued Tulsa World’s Michael Smith, “the filmmakers are getting it right.”

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3. Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) 92%

Guardians-Galaxy-Groot

We come here to praise Vin Diesel, not bury him — and yet we’re compelled here to point out that he’s delivered some of his finest, most emotionally affecting work with a bare minimum of dialogue. All of which is to say that while some may have raised a quizzical eyebrow or let slip with a chuckle when word got out Diesel had been cast as the monosyllabic treelike alien Groot in Guardians of the Galaxy, longtime fans knew he could deliver — and he didn’t disappoint, anchoring the ensemble MCU space adventure with action, humor, and even a little heartstring-tugging pathos despite only ever uttering varying inflections on the phrase “I am Groot.” As Joe Williams wrote for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, “If you’re old enough to remember when sci-fi and comic books were fun, Guardians of the Galaxy will be your new favorite movie. If you’re not, it will set a standard for everything you see.”

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2. Saving Private Ryan (1998) 93%

Saving-Private-Ryan

Movies like xXx and The Pacifier make it easy to forget this, but Vin Diesel has always been more than your average action star; in fact, he wrote, produced, directed, and starred in his film debut, 1995’s Strays — and managed to have it screened at Cannes, where it attracted the attention of Steven Spielberg, who was inspired to create the role of PFC Adrian Caparzo in Saving Private Ryan specifically for Diesel. And while it wasn’t the film’s biggest role — in fact, Diesel’s character is the first member of the squad to be killed — it still gave him a nice leg up from one of the biggest directors in the business, and allowed him to be a part of what James Berardinelli of ReelViews called “a singular motion picture experience.”

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1. The Iron Giant (1999) 96%

Iron-Giant

Today, he’s animation royalty, but in 1999, Brad Bird was still a relative unknown getting his first big break with a Warner Bros. feature based on Ted Hughes’ 1968 children’s book, The Iron Man. Commercially speaking, Giant was a less than auspicious debut — thanks to what many saw as a misguided promotional campaign on the studio’s part, the movie only managed a pitiful $23 million domestic gross — but the adventures of young Hogarth Hughes and his imposing metal friend struck a deep chord with critics like the Chicago Tribune’s Mark Caro, who wrote that “animated films excel in conjuring up colorful fantasy worlds, but few evoke an actual time and place as vividly — and playfully — as The Iron Giant does.” Diesel, of course, was the voice of the titular giant — and lest you scoff that lending your voice to an animated robot doesn’t require much in the way of actual, you know, acting, we defy you to watch the film’s climactic sequence without having your heart torn out by Big Vin’s delivery of one simple word: “Superman.”

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This week on streaming services, we’ve got a handful of hugely popular TV series, a classic live-action animated comedy, and a couple of Certified Fresh smaller films you might have missed, plus a great selection of new choices available on FandangoNOW. Read on for details.


New on Netflix

 

Archer: P.I. (2016) 100%

H. Jon Benjamin voices the titular superspy, one of a handful of agents and skilled operatives of dubious moral fiber in the employ of an espionage outfit run by his mother.

Available now on: Netflix


Better Call Saul: Season 2 (2016) 97%

AMC’s follow-up to Breaking Bad follows Bob Odenkirk’s character before he became Saul Goodman, when he was still a scheming attorney who fell into some hard times and partnered up with former cop Mike Ehrmantraut (Jonathan Banks).

Available now on: Netflix


Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988) 97%

Robert Zemeckis’ mind-bending animation/live-action hybrid follows a star cartoon rabbit who is framed for murder and the private eye who reluctantly agrees to help clear his name.

Available now on: Netflix


How to Get Away With Murder: Season 3 (2017) 90%

Viola Davis stars in this drama about an esteemed law professor whose interns become implicated in a complicated web of murder and deception.

Available now on: Netflix


The Square (2008) 86%

This Australian thriller, written by Joel Edgerton (who also co-stars) and directed by his brother Nash, centers on a small town couple having an affair who make plans to leave their spouses — one of them a dangerous gangster — and run off together.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Amazon Prime

 

Gimme Danger (2016) 95%

Jim Jarmusch’s Certified Fresh documentary is a tribute to the pioneering punk band The Stooges, charting their rise and fall through first-hand accounts from Iggy Pop, his bandmates, and others close to the band.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on FandangoNOW

 

The Grapes of Wrath (1940) 100%

Henry Fonda stars in John Ford’s adaptation of the John Steinbeck novel about a Great Depression-era Oklahoma family who are evicted from their home and journey westward to California.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Hidden Figures (2016) 93%

Taraji P. Henson, Octavia spencer, and Janelle Monáe star in this historical drama about three gifted African-American women who played a substantial role in launching NASA’s first manned spaceflight missions.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Lion (2016) 84%

Dev Patel stars in this true story about a man, adopted by an Australian family as a boy, who uses Google Earth to track down the small Indian village from which he disappeared as a child.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Furious 7 (2015) 82%

This time out, rogue ex-secret agent Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham) seeks revenge on our heroes after they injured his brother in the previous film, and in turn, the gang teams up with the government to bring him down. It’s now available in an Ultra HD Extended Edition.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


The Blackcoat's Daughter (2015) 74%

Kiernan Shipka and Emma Roberts star in this horror film about a pair of girls who encounter a malevolent presence during a winter holiday they’re forced to spend alone at their boarding school.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Fast & Furious 6 (2013) 71%

Paul Walker, Vin Diesel, and the rest of the Furious gang reunite when Agent Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) coaxes them into helping with an international investigation by revealing a secret from their past. It’s now available in an Extended Edition.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Cliffhanger (1993) 67%

Sylvester Stallone and John Lithgow star in this high altitude thriller about a former rock climber who is taken hostage by a group of mercenaries who have crashed in the mountains with millions in stolen cash.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


The 100-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared (2013) 68%

This Swedish comedy is the story of a 100-year-old man who climbs out a window and disappears. Yup.

Available now on: FandangoNOW

Time flies when you’re watching a franchise spiral into the crazy nebula: We are now approaching the sixth Resident Evil movie, mercifully dubbed The Final Chapter, none of which have ever been fully embraced by critics. But, hey, just because a franchise is long in the tooth doesn’t mean it’s rotten at the root! There’s plenty of Fresh movies in this week’s gallery: 24 best and worst Part 6s in movie history!

The Rock
From the football field to the professional wrestling arena to the big screen, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson has dominated every field he’s entered — and with his latest action outing, Brett Ratner’s Hercules, flexing its way into cineplexes this weekend, we figured now would be a pretty good time to honor that success by taking a fond look back at what he’s been cooking at theaters since breaking into the movie business. Oil up those pecs, because it’s time for Total Recall!


42%

10. Gridiron Gang

When Dwayne Johnson moved out of the wrestling ring and into family-friendly filmmaking, many of the roles available to him tended toward the excessively kiddie end of the spectrum, a la 2010’s Tooth Fairy. But at least in terms of its outline, 2006’s Gridiron Gang would seem to have offered the best of both worlds — a wholesomely uplifting drama about a tough-as-nails probation officer who lifts L.A. kids out of their lives of juvie crime by offering them a strong example of positive male leadership. Alas, most critics felt that this Gang didn’t flash enough of the right signs during its time on the screen; although few writers argued against the movie’s undeniably admirable aims, they felt screenwriter Jeff Maguire’s script did a poor job of bringing dramatic life to a real-life situation that deserved more depth. Still, for some scribes, the ends justified the means; as Claudia Puig wrote for USA Today, “Gridiron entertains and makes a powerful point about the faults inherent in the penal system, particularly for youths with hopes of rehabilitation.”


45%

9. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island

As acting gigs go, the prospect of taking over the reins of an effects-driven franchise from Brendan Fraser probably don’t rank high on many movie stars’ wish lists — but after Journey to the Center of the Earth made more than $240 million in 2008, a sequel was pretty much a foregone conclusion, and by securing the services of Johnson and Vanessa Hudgens to round out the cast with returning young lead Josh Hutcherson, the producers of Journey 2: The Mysterious Island probably felt like they had the makings of an all-ages blockbuster waiting to happen. In financial terms, they were right — Journey 2 broke the $300 million mark — but critically speaking, the results proved a letdown, with many writers questioning the clunky mishmash of dopey plotting and Hudgens cleavage shots. For others, though, those were minor missteps worth looking past to see a good old-fashioned adventure; Beliefnet’s Nell Minow, for example, called it “A well-paced and highly entertaining family film made with good humor, panache, and imagination.”


42%

8. Faster

Dwayne Johnson against Billy Bob Thornton in an action thriller about an ex-con out to avenge his brother’s death while on the lam from an aging lawman and psychotic hitman? By all rights, 2010’s Faster should have been exactly the sort of out-and-out smash that makes absolutely no bones about playing squarely to each of its participants’ strengths — especially given that it saw Johnson’s return to R-rated action after an uneven stretch of family-friendly fare. Sadly, most critics felt Faster failed to live up to its title, and audiences seemed to agree, sending the film to an ignominious $35 million total at the box office. Once again, however, our star’s work was singled out as a bright spot in an otherwise disappointing movie: “Johnson’s performance is one of seething rage camouflaging emotional scars as ugly as the physical ones,” wrote Gary Dowell of the Dallas Morning News, calling Johnson’s Driver “a grim, single-minded figure straight out of a Jim Thompson or Richard Stark novel.”


42%

7. Race to Witch Mountain

For viewers of a certain age, Disney’s Witch Mountain movies — adapted from Alexander Key’s classic novels — rank among the studio’s better live-action efforts, although it would be hard to argue the notion that the films’ acting and/or special effects offered room for improvement. So when director Andy Fickman took the helm for a franchise reboot in 2009, with Johnson attached to play a cab driver who ends up acting as reluctant protector for a pair of mysterious kids (AnnaSophia Robb and Alexander Ludwig) on the run from a cruel Defense Department goon (Ciarán Hinds), it didn’t seem altogether out of the question that they might produce compelling results. Unfortunately, Race to Witch Mountain wasn’t quite the sequel-starter the studio seemed to be hoping for; although it did decent business, racking up more than $145 million in worldwide grosses, many critics were let down by the movie’s lack of depth and reluctance to explore the poignant, intelligent themes in Key’s books. As tends to be the case with even his worst-reviewed films, however, Johnson earned praise for his charismatic performance. “The star of this movie universe is undeniably Dwayne. His cinematic charisma is as big as his biceps,” wrote Film.com’s Christine Champ. “Hard and soft in all the right spots, he’s a badass hero with heart, armed with world-weary one-liners and wicked comic timing.”


50%

6. Pain & Gain

Michael Bay movies are frequently derided for their general insensitivity — to character development, to all notions of filmmaking subtlety, to the art of storytelling, to viewers’ eardrums — but if ever a movie seemed like it might call for that treatment, it should have been Pain & Gain, which adapts the true-life story of a group of Miami gym rats (Johnson, Mark Wahlberg, and Anthony Mackie) whose thirst for wealth leads them to make a series of spectacularly ill-advised decisions, including kidnapping, theft, and murder. Unfortunately, Bay’s insensitivity hampered him here, too; in the eyes of many critics, his decision to treat the story as a sort of gaudy action comedy felt wrong, given that it’s a movie about horrible things that happened to real people. Set that aside, however, and you might just enjoy Pain & Gain on its own merits: “Might this be the best Michael Bay film ever?” asked Tara Brady for the Irish Times. “We know what you’re thinking. But we mean it in a good way.”


51%

5. Get Smart

By 2008, Steve Carell’s work as Michael Scott on NBC’s The Office had elevated him to the ranks of comedy’s preeminent doofuses, so he was a natural choice to step into Don Adams’ hallowed shoe phones when Warner Bros. decided to put together a modernized film adaptation of the classic 1960s TV spy comedy Get Smart. Alas, in spite of Carell’s suitably bumbling turn as clueless spy Maxwell Smart — and the presence of a strong supporting cast that included Alan Arkin as Smart’s exasperated chief, Anne Hathaway as the inexplicably amorous Agent 99, and Dwayne Johnson as the impossibly smooth Agent 23 — Smart left many critics cold. For others, the key to enjoyment was lowered expectations; as Susan Tavernetti argued for Palo Alto Weekly, “You’ll have a better time if you don’t expect this re-imagined work to resemble the original. The phone shoe does fit Carell, and he wears it well.”


57%

4. Snitch

It’s got a one-word title and a tough-lookin’ Dwayne Johnson behind the wheel of a truck, but Snitch isn’t your average Rock action thriller. Directed by Ric Roman Waugh, it’s actually something of a message movie, starring Johnson as the anguished father of a boy (Rafi Gavron) whose trumped-up drug-dealing charges could send him to prison for at least 10 years — unless Dad follows through on a hastily struck deal with the US Attorney’s office, the terms of which require him to infiltrate a local drug kingpin with no support from law enforcement. With Johnson in the lead, the temptation to turn Snitch into a typically overdriven action flick had to have been high, and it’s to Waugh’s credit that he actually practices a modicum of restraint; unfortunately, many critics felt that left the movie stranded in a rather dull no-man’s-land between thoughtful drama and brainless thrills. Still, it wasn’t without its admirers; as Tom Russo wrote for the Boston Globe, “Nobody is going to confuse a Dwayne Johnson movie with Les Misérables. But Snitch gets a decent amount of drama (and action, of course) out of the argument that there’s paying for a crime, and then there’s overpaying.”


71%

3. Fast & Furious 6

Retooled into an action franchise that just happened to include lots of cars, the Fast & Furious series roared into its sixth installment with a lot more momentum than most similarly persistent film properties, and although the reviews for Fast & Furious 6 weren’t quite as kind as they’d been for Fast Five, critics were still generally on board for another round of Johnson, Vin Diesel, and Paul Walker wreaking extralegal mayhem in order to bring down a truly nasty bad guy. The heavy this time around is Shaw (Luke Evans), whose nefarious plot stretches beyond your average multi-national criminal ring; in fact, he’s gone and — you guessed it — made things personal for our heroes. “Some of the action sequences are insane,” enthused the Denver Post’s Lisa Kennedy. “No, really. Absurd, impossible, physics defying, triage-required stuff. No matter. That’s the foolish rush of a franchise that must go faster and faster and furiouser and furiouser.”


69%

2. The Rundown

It’s a formula as old as film: Take a big, strong guy, give him a more averagely built comedic foil, and stand back while the laff-a-minute hijinks fly. Kind of a cheap cinematic trick, but one that still tends to work pretty well; why, just take a look at The Rundown, which throws Johnson and Seann William Scott together in an action caper about a retiring bounty hunter (Johnson) who’s wheedled into hunting down his boss’s twerpy wayward son (Scott) in a Brazilian rainforest where he’s managed to tick off an unscrupulous mining kingpin (Christopher Walken) while pursuing some treasure. It’s the kind of movie that delivers the expected beats at the expected moments, but thrives on the charisma of its stars; as James Berardinelli wrote for ReelViews, “The Rundown offers everything a good movie of this sort should: plenty of suspenseful action, a few good laughs, and a share of obligatory ‘reluctant buddy’ bonding.”


77%

1. Fast Five

The Fast and the Furious franchise seemed to be petering out after 2006’s Tokyo Drift, but things got back on track with 2009’s The Fast and the Furious — which in turn set up 2011’s Fast Five, the fifth installment that turned the series into the sequel-churning heist thriller factory it’s become. Aside from jump-starting FF‘s creative prospects, Five also gave Johnson the part he may have been born to play: government agent Luke Hobbs, the bounty hunter-turned-U.S. Marshal who goes bicep-for-bicep against series mainstays Vin Diesel and Paul Walker. This time around, even critics — who’d always been notoriously recalcitrant where the Fast and Furious movies were concerned — climbed on board, including Connie Ogle of the Miami Herald, who applauded it as “Embarrassingly fun, the sort of speedy, senseless, violence-crammed action flick that virtually defines the summer season, with superheroes who aren’t gods or crusaders in tights but guys in T-shirts and jeans who can drive cars really fast.”


In case you were wondering, here are Johnson’s top 10 movies according RT users’ scores:

1. Fast & Furious — 84%
2. Gridiron Gang — 82%
3. Fast Five — 82%
4. The Game Plan — 70%
5. Get Smart — 67%
6. The Rundown — 67%
7. Snitch — 62%
8. Walking Tall — 61%
9. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island — 60%
10. G.I. Joe: Retaliation — 49%


Take a look through Johnson’s complete filmography, as well as the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for Hercules.

Finally, here’s Mr. Johnson’s famous catch phrase:

This week on home video, we’ve got Paul Walker’s immensely popular blockbuster swan song, a worthy animated sequel, and a very special episode of an international hit TV series. Then, we’ve also got a gripping Danish drama, Keanu Reeves’ pet project kung fu flick, and a number of other small releases, followed by a couple of anniversary reissues and some more notable selections from the Criterion Collection. Read on for the full list:



Fast & Furious 6

71%

As most of you likely already know, Paul Walker died tragically just over a week ago, which makes this a particularly bittersweet release. Say what you will about Walker’s general acting prowess, but as most fans of the Fast and Furious franchise will tell you, he was a major part of the series’ success, and he will be missed. No subsequent installment may ever feel the same again, but for now, we have the home release of Fast & Furious 6, which reunites Walker’s Brian O’Conner with Vin Diesel’s Dom Toretto and the rest of the gang for another action-packed adventure. Brian and Dom are content to be out of the crime business, having retired off the spoils of Fast Five, but when Agent Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) shows up with a recent photo of the presumed-dead Letty (Michelle Rodriguez), they’re coaxed into helping take down a former British Special Forces soldier attempting to commandeer a secret weapon for personal profit. Critics mostly felt Fast & Furious 6 successfully built upon the winning formula of its predecessor, utilizing humor and its street-racing origins as the basis for a big action blockbuster. If you’re looking for an explosive adventure, or just a farewell to Paul Walker, this is the movie for you.



Despicable Me 2

75%

Gru (Steve Carell) and his minions — who play a decidedly larger role — return for this sequel to the 2010 hit from Illumination Entertainment and Universal. Gru has given up supervillainy and settled into his fatherly duties watching over Margo, Edith, and Agnes, but the Anti-Villain League comes calling when a powerful chemical weapon is stolen. With the help of an AVL agent (Kristen Wiig), Gru opens up a bakery (aka undercover sting operation) in the local mall, where a supervillain from the past may be operating incognito. Despicable Me 2 didn’t earn quite the same high acclaim the first installment did, but it came pretty close at a Certified Fresh 75% on the Tomatometer, with critics calling it a funny, visually engaging family movie and one of the most satisfying animated sequels to date.



Man of Tai Chi

71%

After toiling for five years on the script, Keanu Reeves marked his directorial debut with this martial arts flick, giving him the opportunity to make a more immediate impact on the film. The story follows a man named Tiger Chen (which happens to be his real name), a courier by profession who is also the last student of the Ling Kong Tai Chi style. When his master’s temple is scheduled for demolition after it’s found to be violating safety regulations, Tiger decides to accept an opportunity to “work” for a wealthy but shady security mogul (Reeves); soon, Tiger finds himself fighting in a series of gradually more brutal underground matches, losing his humanity with each victory. Critics appreciated Man of Tai Chi‘s old school martial arts sensibilities, rewarding it with a solid 71% on the Tomatometer and calling it a decent first outing for Reeves. If you’re looking for a few visceral thrills and a Faustian storyline in the form of a kung fu flick, this is for you.



The Hunt

93%

Mads Mikkelsen plays creepy about as well as anyone possibly could, as he demonstrated so well in Casino Royale and the new NBC drama Hannibal, but in Thomas Vinterberg’s The Hunt, it sort of works against his character. Mikkelsen plays Lucas, a kindergarten teacher in a small Danish town who is falsely accused by his best friend’s daughter of sexually inappropriate conduct. The local community immediately ostracizes Lucas as a sexual predator, and as his personal life unravels, he quietly fights alone for vindication. Critics called The Hunt a gripping, well- written, thought-provoking drama centered around a powerful performance from Mikkelsen — which won him Best Actor honors earlier last year at Cannes — and for its efforts, it earned a Certified Fresh 95% on the Tomatometer.



Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Special: The Day of the Doctor

100%

The eagerly anticipated Christmas Day airing of Doctor Who‘s 800th individual episode (side note: Wow!), “The Time of the Doctor,” which will mark the end of Matt Smith’s time as the Eleventh Doctor, concludes a sort of unofficial trilogy of episodes that began with “The Name of the Doctor” back in May and continued with the series’ 50th Anniversary Special, “The Day of the Doctor,” which aired on November 21 simultaneously in 94 countries and released concurrently in a handful of theaters. Those of you who are hardcore Whovians can now own that 50th Anniversary Special on Blu-ray, and it will come with a few bonus features, including the 7-minute mini episode “The Night of the Doctor.” We don’t want to give anything away for those who haven’t seen it, but suffice it to say there’s a little something for past and present Whovians, as well as a glimpse into the future which should come full circle in the upcoming Christmas special.

Also available this week:

  • Ken Loach’s The Angels’ Share (89%), about a young Scottish layabout who finds new hope for life at a whiskey distillery after his son is born.
  • Sightseers (85%), a dark comedy about a man who takes his sheltered girlfriend on a road trip through the British Isles and slowly loses control.
  • Berberian Sound Studio (83%), a psychological thriller about a sound technician working on a horror film whose difficult work takes a toll on his psyche.
  • Touchy Feely (34%), a comedy about a brother and sister who come to grips with simultaneous sudden transformations in their lives.
  • Billy Bob Thornton’s Jayne Mansfield’s Car (33%), a dramedy about long distant relatives coming together for the funeral of the family matriarch.
  • Adore (33%), starring Naomi Watts and Robin Wright in a drama about two women who begin affairs with each other’s sons.
  • Battle of the Year (4%), a dance movie about a group of b-boys trying to win an international competition.
  • A 50th Anniversary edition of Mary Poppins (98%) is available on DVD and Blu-ray this week, featuring over four hours of bonus content.
  • A 25th Anniversary Blu-ray of classic ’80s comedy Big arrives as well, with many of the same features as the previous Blu-ray, but including one of three Zoltar fortune teller cards and collectible sound chip packaging.
  • Volume 8 of Matt Groening’s Futurama is available, collecting the 13 episodes that make up the second half of its final season (7), which aired earlier this year.
  • And of course, two more choices from the Criterion Collection: Grey Gardens (89%) is available on Blu-ray for the first time, and Martin Scorsese’s World Cinema Project launches its first volume, collecting six rarely screened films from around the world as part of an effort to preserve them.

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