Elizabeth Goodenough/Everett Collection

(Photo by Warner Bros/Everett Collection)

All Ryan Gosling Movies Ranked

Not every child actor grows up to be a multiple Oscar nominee, but then, not every child actor is Ryan Gosling. After a stint singing and dancing alongside Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears on The Mickey Mouse Club, Gosling flashed early signs of his potential in movies like Remember the Titans and The Believer, then melted hearts everywhere as Noah Calhoun in The Notebook. Just two years later, he’d garner his first Best Actor nod for Half Nelson, as he starred in a string of acclaimed independent films like Lars and the Real Girl and Blue Valentine. Even as he’s risen to the A-list, he continues to star in a wide variety of projects, from cult favorites like Drive and The Nice Guys to high-profile spectacles like Blade Runner 2049 and La La Land, which earned him his second Oscar nomination. With all of that in mind, we’ve rounded up all Ryan Gosling movies and sorted them by Tomatometer. Have look below and see where your favorites land!

#24

Stay (2005)
27%

#24
Adjusted Score: 30540%
Critics Consensus: A muddled brain-teaser, Stay has a solid cast and innovative visuals but little beneath the surface.
Synopsis: Sam Foster (Ewan McGregor), a psychiatrist, has a new patient, Henry Letham (Ryan Gosling), who claims to be suicidal. In... [More]
Directed By: Marc Forster

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: 34886%
Critics Consensus: A predictable police procedural that works better as a character study rather than a thriller.
Synopsis: The body of a young woman is found in a ditch in the woods of the small California coastal town... [More]
Directed By: Barbet Schroeder

#22

Gangster Squad (2013)
31%

#22
Adjusted Score: 38313%
Critics Consensus: Though it's stylish and features a talented cast, Gangster Squad suffers from lackluster writing, underdeveloped characters, and an excessive amount of violence.
Synopsis: Ruthless, Brooklyn-born mobster Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn) has 1949 Los Angeles in an iron fist, as he accumulates a fortune... [More]
Directed By: Ruben Fleischer

#21
Adjusted Score: 36652%
Critics Consensus: The United States of Leland has its moments, but they're undermined by a muddled plot, unsympathetic characters, and frustratingly uneven performances.
Synopsis: A withdrawn young man, Leland Fitzgerald (Ryan Gosling) is imprisoned for the murder of a mentally disabled boy, who also... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Ryan Hoge

#20

All Good Things (2010)
35%

#20
Adjusted Score: 37222%
Critics Consensus: It's well-acted, and the true story that inspired it offers plenty of drama -- which is why it's so frustrating that All Good Things is so clichéd and frustratingly ambiguous.
Synopsis: Heir to a real-estate dynasty, David Marks (Ryan Gosling) lives in the shadow of his father, Sanford (Frank Langella). He... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Jarecki

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 47522%
Critics Consensus: Director Refn remains as visually stylish as ever, but Only God Forgives fails to add enough narrative smarts or relatable characters to ground its beautifully filmed depravity.
Synopsis: In Thailand, a drug trafficker's (Ryan Gosling) icy mother (Kristin Scott Thomas) sends him on a mission to avenge his... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

#18

Song to Song (2017)
44%

#18
Adjusted Score: 52286%
Critics Consensus: As visually sumptuous as it is narratively spartan, Terrence Malick's Song to Song echoes elements of the writer-director's recent work -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Set against the Austin, Texas, music scene, two entangled couples -- struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling),... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#17

The Notebook (2004)
53%

#17
Adjusted Score: 59400%
Critics Consensus: It's hard not to admire its unabashed sentimentality, but The Notebook is too clumsily manipulative to rise above its melodramatic clichés.
Synopsis: In 1940s South Carolina, mill worker Noah Calhoun (Ryan Gosling) and rich girl Allie (Rachel McAdams) are desperately in love.... [More]
Directed By: Nick Cassavetes

#16

Fracture (2007)
71%

#16
Adjusted Score: 78326%
Critics Consensus: Though Fracture's plot is somewhat implausible, the onscreen face-off between Gosling and Hopkins overshadows any faults.
Synopsis: Willy Beachum (Ryan Gosling), a hotshot prosecutor, is about to leave his post for a lucrative job at a private... [More]
Directed By: Gregory Hoblit

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 76982%
Critics Consensus: An inspirational crowd-pleaser with a healthy dose of social commentary, Remember the Titans may be predictable, but it's also well-crafted and features terrific performances.
Synopsis: In Virginia, high school football is a way of life, an institution revered, each game celebrated more lavishly than Christmas,... [More]
Directed By: Boaz Yakin

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 74217%
Critics Consensus: A bleak but original indie, The Slaughter Rule benefits from outstanding performances by Ryan Gosling and David Morse.
Synopsis: Roy (Ryan Gosling) gets cut from his high school football team just days after his estranged father dies. For him,... [More]

#13
Adjusted Score: 86075%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious to a fault, The Place Beyond the Pines finds writer/director Derek Cianfrance reaching for -- and often grasping -- thorny themes of family, fatherhood, and fate.
Synopsis: In upstate New York, two men (Ryan Gosling, Bradley Cooper), and later, their sons (Dane DeHaan, Emory Cohen) must deal... [More]
Directed By: Derek Cianfrance

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 88253%
Critics Consensus: It never lives up to the first part of its title, but Crazy, Stupid, Love's unabashed sweetness -- and its terrifically talented cast -- more than make up for its flaws.
Synopsis: Cal Weaver (Steve Carell) is living the American dream. He has a good job, a beautiful house, great children and... [More]
Directed By: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 86187%
Critics Consensus: Lars and the Real Girl could've so easily been a one-joke movie. But the talented cast, a great script, and direction never condescends to its character or the audience.
Synopsis: Extremely shy Lars (Ryan Gosling) finds it impossible to make friends or socialize. His brother (Paul Schneider) and sister-in-law (Emily... [More]
Directed By: Craig Gillespie

#10

The Believer (2001)
83%

#10
Adjusted Score: 84526%
Critics Consensus: Gosling commands the screen with a raw, electrifying performance.
Synopsis: A little knowledge is a dangerous thing -- an adage proven with shocking ramifications in Henry Bean's "The Believer." The... [More]
Directed By: Henry Bean

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 92727%
Critics Consensus: While not exactly exposing revelatory truths, The Ides of March is supremely well-acted drama that moves at a measured, confident clip.
Synopsis: As Ohio's Democratic primary nears, charming Gov. Mike Morris (George Clooney) seems a shoo-in for the nomination over his opponent,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#8

Blue Valentine (2010)
86%

#8
Adjusted Score: 94133%
Critics Consensus: This emotionally gripping examination of a marriage on the rocks isn't always easy to watch, but Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling give performances of unusual depth and power.
Synopsis: Dean (Ryan Gosling) and Cindy (Michelle Williams) live a quiet life in a modest neighborhood. To the casual observer, everything... [More]
Directed By: Derek Cianfrance

#7

First Man (2018)
87%

#7
Adjusted Score: 115362%
Critics Consensus: First Man uses a personal focus to fuel a look back at a pivotal moment in human history - and takes audiences on a soaring dramatic journey along the way.
Synopsis: Hoping to reach the moon by the end of the decade, NASA plans a series of extremely dangerous, unprecedented missions... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 120782%
Critics Consensus: Visually stunning and narratively satisfying, Blade Runner 2049 deepens and expands its predecessor's story while standing as an impressive filmmaking achievement in its own right.
Synopsis: Officer K (Ryan Gosling), a new blade runner for the Los Angeles Police Department, unearths a long-buried secret that has... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#5

The Big Short (2015)
89%

#5
Adjusted Score: 101774%
Critics Consensus: The Big Short approaches a serious, complicated subject with an impressive attention to detail -- and manages to deliver a well-acted, scathingly funny indictment of its real-life villains in the bargain.
Synopsis: In 2008, Wall Street guru Michael Burry realizes that a number of subprime home loans are in danger of defaulting.... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#4

Half Nelson (2006)
91%

#4
Adjusted Score: 96526%
Critics Consensus: Half Nelson features powerful performances from Ryan Gosling and Shareeka Epps. It's a wise, unsentimental portrait of lonely people at the crossroads.
Synopsis: Dan Dunne (Ryan Gosling) is a history teacher at a Brooklyn school. Though well-liked by his students and colleagues, he... [More]
Directed By: Ryan Fleck

#3

La La Land (2016)
91%

#3
Adjusted Score: 120063%
Critics Consensus: La La Land breathes new life into a bygone genre with thrillingly assured direction, powerful performances, and an irresistible excess of heart.
Synopsis: Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) are drawn together by their common desire to do what they love. But... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#2

The Nice Guys (2016)
91%

#2
Adjusted Score: 110270%
Critics Consensus: The Nice Guys hearkens back to the buddy comedies of a bygone era while adding something extra courtesy of a knowing script and the irresistible chemistry of its leads.
Synopsis: Holland March (Ryan Gosling) is a down-on-his-luck private eye in 1977 Los Angeles. Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe) is a hired... [More]
Directed By: Shane Black

#1

Drive (2011)
93%

#1
Adjusted Score: 102675%
Critics Consensus: With its hyper-stylized blend of violence, music, and striking imagery, Drive represents a fully realized vision of arthouse action.
Synopsis: Driver is a skilled Hollywood stuntman who moonlights as a getaway driver for criminals. Though he projects an icy exterior,... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

(Photo by DreamWorks Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection)

All George Clooney Movies Ranked

Having the #1 TV show to fall back on when starting a movie career was a good thing for George Clooney, especially when he was alternately starring in groovy, off-beat genre flicks (From Dusk till Dawn, Out of Sight) and helping destroy a comic book franchise (Batman & Robin). But by 1999, Clooney was ready to cut the cord on ER, paving the way for immediate movie breakthroughs in comedy (O Brother, Where Art Thou?), blockbusters (Ocean’s Eleven), and even as a director himself, with Confessions of a Dangerous Mind, which we’re including on this list because he also stars.

As seen beginning with Confessions, the cross-section of politics and media would be a driving concern for Clooney’s acting choices, such as Syriana, Michael Clayton, The Ides of March, Money Monster, and Good Night, and Good Luck. Yet he also switches to the broad buffoon with ease, especially with the Coen brothers, as in O Brother, Burn After Reading, and Hail, Caesar!. Somewhere in between this Bawdy George and Serious George, you’ll find material that has drawn Clooney some of his highest marks: Fantastic Mr. Fox, Up In the Air, and The Descendants, the latter two for which he was Best Actor Oscar-nominated.

Up until directing himself in 2020’s The Midnight Sky, Clooney hadn’t appeared in a narrative feature since 2016. Meanwhile, he got top billing in Grizzly II: Revenge, a film shot in 1983 that wasn’t completed and released until 2021. Will the movie finally restore Clooney’s rightful original career path as horror movie maven? We’ll just have to wait an see — until then, we’re looking back on all George Clooney movies, ranked by Tomatometer!

#36
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: The insane Dr. Gangrene develops a new strain of violent vegetable in this sequel to the 1977 cult classic.... [More]
Directed By: John De Bello

#35
#35
Adjusted Score: 8271%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: All hell breaks loose when a 15-ft grizzly bear, reacting to the slaughter of her cub by poachers, seeks revenge... [More]
Directed By: Andre Szots

#34

Batman & Robin (1997)
12%

#34
Adjusted Score: 17028%
Critics Consensus: Joel Schumacher's tongue-in-cheek attitude hits an unbearable limit in Batman & Robin resulting in a frantic and mindless movie that's too jokey to care much for.
Synopsis: This superhero adventure finds Batman (George Clooney) and his partner, Robin (Chris O'Donnell), attempting to the foil the sinister schemes... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#33
#33
Adjusted Score: 40936%
Critics Consensus: Its intentions are noble and its cast is impressive, but neither can compensate for The Monuments Men's stiffly nostalgic tone and curiously slack narrative.
Synopsis: During World War II, the Nazis steal countless pieces of art and hide them away. Some over-the-hill art scholars, historians,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#32

The Good German (2006)
34%

#32
Adjusted Score: 39241%
Critics Consensus: Though Steven Soderbergh succeeds in emulating the glossy look of 1940s noirs, The Good German ultimately ends up as a self-conscious exercise in style that forgets to develop compelling characters.
Synopsis: Jake Geismar (George Clooney), an Army correspondent, helps his former lover, Lena Brandt (Cate Blanchett), comb post-World War II Berlin... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 50982%
Critics Consensus: While the special effects are well done and quite impressive, this film suffers from any actual drama or characterization. The end result is a film that offers nifty eye-candy and nothing else.
Synopsis: Based on a true story, the film tells of the courageous men and women who risk their lives every working... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Petersen

#30

Tomorrowland (2015)
50%

#30
Adjusted Score: 61476%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious and visually stunning, Tomorrowland is unfortunately weighted down by uneven storytelling.
Synopsis: Whenever Casey Newton (Britt Robertson) touches a lapel pin with the letter T on it, she finds herself transported to... [More]
Directed By: Brad Bird

#29

The Midnight Sky (2020)
50%

#29
Adjusted Score: 67215%
Critics Consensus: The Midnight Sky lacks the dramatic heft to match its narrative scale, but its flaws are often balanced by thoughtful themes and a poignant performance from director-star George Clooney.
Synopsis: A lone scientist in the Arctic races to contact a crew of astronauts returning home to a mysterious global catastrophe.... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#28
Adjusted Score: 58906%
Critics Consensus: Though The Men Who Stare at Goats is a mostly entertaining, farcical glimpse of men at war, some may find its satire and dark humor less than edgy.
Synopsis: Struggling reporter Bob Wilton (Ewan McGregor) gets the scoop of a lifetime when he meets Lyn Cassady (George Clooney), who... [More]
Directed By: Grant Heslov

#27

One Fine Day (1996)
51%

#27
Adjusted Score: 52503%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Melanie Parker (Michelle Pfeiffer) is an architect who needs to give a very important presentation. Jack Taylor (George Clooney) is... [More]
Directed By: Michael Hoffman

#26

Leatherheads (2008)
52%

#26
Adjusted Score: 57622%
Critics Consensus: Despite a good premise and strong cast, this pro football romcom is half screwball and half fumble.
Synopsis: Dodge Connolly (George Clooney), captain of a 1920s football team, wants to give the sagging sport a boost and capture... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#25

Ocean's Twelve (2004)
54%

#25
Adjusted Score: 60689%
Critics Consensus: While some have found the latest star-studded heist flick to be a fun, glossy star vehicle, others declare it's lazy, self-satisfied and illogical.
Synopsis: After successfully robbing five casinos in one night, Danny Ocean (George Clooney) and his crew of thieves have big problems.... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 56540%
Critics Consensus: Contains some funny moments, but it's still a very lightweight comedy.
Synopsis: Five hapless misfits from the hard-luck streets of Cleveland band together to try and pull off the greatest job they've... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo

#23

Money Monster (2016)
59%

#23
Adjusted Score: 77023%
Critics Consensus: Money Monster's strong cast and solidly written story ride a timely wave of socioeconomic anger that's powerful enough to overcome an occasionally muddled approach to its worthy themes.
Synopsis: Lee Gates is a Wall Street guru who picks hot stocks as host of the television show "Money Monster." Suddenly,... [More]
Directed By: Jodie Foster

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 64581%
Critics Consensus: A pulpy crime drama/vampire film hybrid, From Dusk Till Dawn is an uneven but often deliriously enjoyable B-movie.
Synopsis: On the run from a bank robbery that left several police officers dead, Seth Gecko (George Clooney) and his paranoid,... [More]
Directed By: Robert Rodriguez

#21

The American (2010)
66%

#21
Adjusted Score: 73593%
Critics Consensus: As beautifully shot as it is emotionally restrained, The American is an unusually divisive spy thriller -- and one that rests on an unusually subdued performance from George Clooney.
Synopsis: When an assignment in Sweden ends badly, master assassin Jack (George Clooney) retreats to the Italian countryside with the intention... [More]
Directed By: Anton Corbijn

#20

Solaris (2002)
66%

#20
Adjusted Score: 72962%
Critics Consensus: Slow-moving, cerebral, and ambiguous, Solaris is not a movie for everyone, but it offers intriguing issues to ponder.
Synopsis: Based on the classic science fiction novel by Stanislaw Lem, "Solaris" centers on a psychologist (George Clooney) sent to investigate... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#19

Ocean's Thirteen (2007)
69%

#19
Adjusted Score: 77666%
Critics Consensus: Ocean's Thirteen reverts to the formula of the first installment, and the result is another slick and entertaining heist film.
Synopsis: Danny Ocean (George Clooney) and his gang hatch an ambitious plot for revenge after ruthless casino owner Willy Bank (Al... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#18

Syriana (2005)
73%

#18
Adjusted Score: 79849%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious, complicated, intellectual, and demanding of its audience, Syriana is both a gripping geopolitical thriller and wake-up call to the complacent.
Synopsis: The Middle Eastern oil industry is the backdrop of this tense drama, which weaves together numerous story lines. Bennett Holiday... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Gaghan

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 81382%
Critics Consensus: Though more mainstream than other Coen films, there are still funny oddball touches, and Clooney and Zeta-Jones sizzle like old-time movie stars.
Synopsis: Miles Massey (George Clooney) is an exceptional divorce lawyer who specializes in saving cheating husbands from having to pay expensive... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 88209%
Critics Consensus: With Burn After Reading, the Coen Brothers have crafted another clever comedy/thriller with an outlandish plot and memorable characters.
Synopsis: When a disc containing memoirs of a former CIA analyst (John Malkovich) falls into the hands of Linda Litzke (Frances... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#15
Adjusted Score: 82824%
Critics Consensus: Though not as good as Coen brothers' classics such as Blood Simple, the delightfully loopy O Brother, Where Art Thou? is still a lot of fun.
Synopsis: Ulysses Everett McGill (George Clooney) is having difficulty adjusting to his hard-labor sentence in Mississippi. He scams his way off... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#14
Adjusted Score: 83261%
Critics Consensus: Rockwell is spot-on as Barris, and Clooney directs with entertaining style and flair.
Synopsis: Game show television producer Chuck Barris (Sam Rockwell) is at the height of his career. His creation, "The Dating Game,"... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 85726%
Critics Consensus: The Thin Red Line is a daringly philosophical World War II film with an enormous cast of eager stars.
Synopsis: In 1942, Private Witt (Jim Caviezel) is a U.S. Army absconder living peacefully with the locals of a small South... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 92727%
Critics Consensus: While not exactly exposing revelatory truths, The Ides of March is supremely well-acted drama that moves at a measured, confident clip.
Synopsis: As Ohio's Democratic primary nears, charming Gov. Mike Morris (George Clooney) seems a shoo-in for the nomination over his opponent,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#11

Ocean's Eleven (2001)
83%

#11
Adjusted Score: 90210%
Critics Consensus: As fast-paced, witty, and entertaining as it is star-studded and coolly stylish, Ocean's Eleven offers a well-seasoned serving of popcorn entertainment.
Synopsis: Dapper Danny Ocean (George Clooney) is a man of action. Less than 24 hours into his parole from a New... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#10

Hail, Caesar! (2016)
85%

#10
Adjusted Score: 108008%
Critics Consensus: Packed with period detail and perfectly cast, Hail, Caesar! finds the Coen brothers delivering an agreeably lightweight love letter to post-war Hollywood.
Synopsis: In the early 1950s, Eddie Mannix is busy at work trying to solve all the problems of the actors and... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#9

The Descendants (2011)
87%

#9
Adjusted Score: 96589%
Critics Consensus: Funny, moving, and beautifully acted, The Descendants captures the unpredictable messiness of life with eloquence and uncommon grace.
Synopsis: Native islander Matt King (George Clooney) lives with his family in Hawaii. Their world shatters when a tragic accident leaves... [More]
Directed By: Alexander Payne

#8

Up in the Air (2009)
90%

#8
Adjusted Score: 102108%
Critics Consensus: Led by charismatic performances by its three leads, director Jason Reitman delivers a smart blend of humor and emotion with just enough edge for mainstream audiences.
Synopsis: An idea from a young, new co-worker (Anna Kendrick) would put an end to the constant travel of corporate downsizer... [More]
Directed By: Jason Reitman

#7

Michael Clayton (2007)
91%

#7
Adjusted Score: 98809%
Critics Consensus: Michael Clayton is one of the most sharply scripted films of 2007, with an engrossing premise and faultless acting. Director Tony Gilroy succeeds not only in capturing the audience's attention, but holding it until the credits roll.
Synopsis: Former prosecutor Michael Clayton (George Clooney) works as a "fixer" at the corporate law firm of Kenner, Bach and Ledeen,... [More]
Directed By: Tony Gilroy

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 102151%
Critics Consensus: Fantastic Mr. Fox is a delightfully funny feast for the eyes with multi-generational appeal -- and it shows Wes Anderson has a knack for animation.
Synopsis: After 12 years of bucolic bliss, Mr. Fox (George Clooney) breaks a promise to his wife (Meryl Streep) and raids... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#5
Adjusted Score: 102101%
Critics Consensus: A passionate and concise cinematic civics lesson, Good Night, And Good Luck has plenty to say about today's political and cultural climate, and its ensemble cast is stellar.
Synopsis: When Senator Joseph McCarthy begins his foolhardy campaign to root out Communists in America, CBS News impresario Edward R. Murrow... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#4

Out of Sight (1998)
93%

#4
Adjusted Score: 97885%
Critics Consensus: Steven Soderbergh's intelligently crafted adaptation of the Elmore Leonard novel is witty, sexy, suprisingly entertaining, and a star-making turn for George Clooney.
Synopsis: Meet Jack Foley (George Clooney), the most successful bank robber in the country. On the day he busts out of... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#3

Three Kings (1999)
94%

#3
Adjusted Score: 98635%
Critics Consensus: Three Kings successfully blends elements of action, drama, and comedy into a thoughtful, exciting movie on the Gulf War.
Synopsis: Just after the end of the Gulf War, four American soldiers decide to steal a cache of Saddam Hussein's hidden... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#2

Gravity (2013)
96%

#2
Adjusted Score: 109985%
Critics Consensus: Alfonso Cuarón's Gravity is an eerie, tense sci-fi thriller that's masterfully directed and visually stunning.
Synopsis: Dr. Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) is a medical engineer on her first shuttle mission. Her commander is veteran astronaut Matt... [More]
Directed By: Alfonso Cuarón

#1

Fail Safe (2000)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 22155%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: During the 1960s, a computer error in Nebraska unwittingly sets off a perilous chain of events leading to a Cold... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Frears

Spider-Man: Homecoming swings its way into theaters this weekend, giving filmgoers their first feature-length look at the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s new version of the friendly neighborhood wall-crawler — and his long-suffering Aunt May, now played by the one and only Marisa Tomei. To celebrate Ms. Tomei’s return to the cineplex, we decided now would be the perfect time to take a fond look back at some of her brightest critical highlights, and give you the opportunity to rank your favorites in the bargain. You know what that means: it’s time for Total Recall!


Use the up and down arrows to rank the movies, or click here to see them ranked by Tomatometer!

Ryan Gosling reunites with his Crazy, Stupid, Love. and Gangster Squad co-star Emma Stone for this weekend’s La La Land — and even though it’s only opening in New York and L.A., this festival favorite is already Certified Fresh and well on its way to ending up as one of the better-reviewed movies of the year. In honor of its arrival, we decided to take a fond look back at some of the brighter highlights from Mr. Gosling’s growing filmography, and you know what that means, folks: It’s time for Total Recall!


10. The Place Beyond the Pines (2012) 78%

gosling-place-beyond-pines

After accruing critical acclaim together with Blue Valentine, Gosling and writer-director Derek Cianfrance reunited for 2013’s The Place Beyond the Pines — a very different sort of drama that, instead of picking over the bones of a doomed relationship, traces the aftermath of a man’s fateful decision to turn to crime in order to support his child. Starring Gosling in the lead opposite Bradley Cooper as the cop who targets his character after he breaks the law, Pines earned its hefty 140-minute running time with an ambitious multi-generational story that proved Valentine‘s accolades were no fluke; as Steven Rea wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer, “This is a story about legacy, the sins of the father, the restlessness in our souls. It’s powerful, it’s bold, it hits you hard.”

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9. Lars and the Real Girl (2007) 81%

gosling-lars-real-girl

It may have a perfectly tasteless-sounding plot, but Lars and the Real Girl is actually far more empathetic, wise, and finely shaded than any movie about a man in a relationship with a sex doll has a right to be — and that’s largely because few actors could have grounded its largely inscrutable and possibly demented central character as sensitively as Gosling, who earned a Golden Globe nomination for his work. Gosling was supported with a solid cast and a tender script that, in the words of the Globe and Mail’s Rick Groen, offered “A sweet little fable about how a delusional man-child is helped by the loving ministrations of his family and community, the kind of throwback flick where human nature is seen as inherently good — a notion so quaint that it feels damn near buoyant.”

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8. The Believer (2001) 83%

gosling-the-believer

Less than a decade removed from his early career as a children’s TV fixture on shows like Young Hercules and the mid-’90s Mickey Mouse Club revival — and just a year after popping up briefly in Remember the Titans — Gosling scored the lead role in Henry Bean’s The Believer, a harrowing dramatization of the incredible life story of Jewish Neo-Nazi Daniel Burros. While Gosling’s character in the film achieves a somewhat happier ending than the real-life Burros, who shot himself after his heritage was publicly revealed, that doesn’t make the rest of The Believer any easier to watch — and neither does it detract from Gosling’s searing performance. “It’s blunt, controversial and never takes the easy road through its themes and situations,” observed Rich Cline of Shadows on the Wall. “It’s also profoundly moving.”

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 7. The Ides of March (2011) 84%

gosling-ides-of-march

Howard Dean’s 2004 presidential campaign may not have amounted to much besides a lot of mocking soundbites from pundits, but it did provide the inspiration for Beau Willimon’s well-reviewed play Farragut North — which, in turn, inspired George Clooney to adapt its script into the screenplay for The Ides of March, a solidly reviewed 2011 political drama about, as Willimon put it, “the lust for power and the costs one will endure to achieve it.” While it wasn’t exactly a blockbuster, Ides outperformed at the box office considering its Beltway subject matter — and it found no shortage of critical accolades for Clooney (who starred, directed, and earned an Oscar nomination for his screenplay), Gosling (who picked up another Golden Globe nomination for his work as a conflicted campaign manager), or the film itself. As Charlie McCollum put it for the San Jose Mercury News, “This is intelligent filmmaking, and a provocative moral fable. It may not be perfect, but it stands as one of the better, most realistic movies about the way we elect our leaders.”

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6. The Big Short (2015) 89%

gosling-big-short

How do you take the 2008 financial crisis and turn it into an entertaining movie? Hand the reins to ex-SNL writer and frequent Will Ferrell confederate Adam McKay, stock the larder with a top-shelf cast that includes Brad Pitt, Steve Carrell, Christian Bale, and Ryan Gosling, and focus your story on the trials and tribulations of a hedge fund manager — oh, and while you’re at it, line up Margot Robbie and Selena Gomez to explain modern finance. The end result is The Big Short, an all-star dramedy that manages to make banking shenanigans entertaining — no small feat, especially considering that many people are still dealing with the real-life effects of the story. As Dana Stevens put it for Slate, “One of the most appealing things about this very appealing movie — a stylistic Chex Mix of storytelling, satire, advocacy, and clip art — is its high regard for the intellect of the viewer.”

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5. Blue Valentine (2010) 86%

gosling-blue-valentine

Writer/director Derek Cianfrance struggled for years to find funding for Blue Valentine, but his faith was handsomely rewarded when the film’s sensitive, non-linear portrayal of a young urban couple’s courtship and divorce ended up earning some of the most passionate critical accolades of 2010 — including a Golden Globe nomination for Gosling and an Academy Award nomination for Michelle Williams. Boasting improvised dialogue and appropriately raw performances, Valentine enraptured critics like Mike Scott of the Times-Picayune, who observed, “It’s at its root a hard-to-resist character study. That’s because the character being studied is you and me and everyone else who has ever fallen in, and out of, love.”

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4. Half Nelson (2006) 91%

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Gosling earned an Academy Award nomination for his work in this Sundance favorite, a piercing drama about a middle-school teacher whose worsening drug problem complicates — and serves as an unlikely basis for — his friendship with a student (Shareeka Epps) who’s facing her own substance-related struggles. Though it was far from a big hit at the box office, Half Nelson proved definitively that its star could carry more than just handsomely lensed weepies like The Notebook — and it proved an instant favorite for critics like Terry Lawson of the Detroit Free Press, who wrote, “Although the subject promises more than the film can deliver, there is compensation in Gosling’s convincing, unromanticized portrayal of someone seeking escape from longing and loss that neither he nor the movie can really define.”

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3. Drive (2011) 93%

gosling-drive

He didn’t have much dialogue — or even really a name — but Ryan Gosling’s character in Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive came equipped with enough cool to rock a satin scorpion jacket — and enough hard-won knowledge of the L.A. underworld to try and make a difference in the lives of his alluringly sad neighbor (Carey Mulligan) and her recently returned ex-con husband (Oscar Isaac). Sleek, dark, and stylish, Drive doled out a heaping helping of action thrills without sacrificing smarts or character; as Jason Best put it for Movie Talk, “From its opening shots, Refn’s movie is as cool and controlled as its protagonist… at once unhurriedly stylish and intensely gripping. You’d like to lean back and admire, but the action keeps pulling you to the edge of your seat.”

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2. The Nice Guys (2016) 91%

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In the right hands, even the most well-worn formula can make for entertaining viewing, and The Nice Guys offers delightfully profane proof. Starring Gosling alongside Russell Crowe as a pair of LAPD detectives who stumble into a conspiracy while investigating the death of a porn star, it highlights its leads’ comic chemistry while underscoring director/co-writer Shane Black’s way with a buddy cop picture — plus, its ’70s setting makes room for a cool soundtrack and all sorts of questionable wardrobe choices. “The Nice Guys flies high on the chemistry between Gosling and Crowe, and Black gives them plenty to chew on,” wrote Adam Graham for the Detroit News. “It’s a gourmet summer treat. Nice, guys.”

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1. La La Land (2016) 91%

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Not many screen couples get the opportunity to team up for more than one movie — and those who do often learn the hard way that lightning rarely strikes twice. Gosling and Emma Stone suffered the sophomore jinx with their second outing, Gangster Squad, but their effervescent onscreen chemistry rebounded in a big way with La La Land. In this throwback musical from Whiplash writer-director Damian Chizelle, Stone plays an aspiring starlet and Gosling is a musician dedicated to a dream — a time-tested setup that pays an affectionate debt to the classics of yesteryear while unfolding against the backdrop of a lovingly filmed Los Angeles. To say critics were charmed would be an understatement; after wowing festival crowds and a rapturously received limited theatrical release, La La Land ranked among the best-reviewed films of 2016. “Catch the film on the largest screen you can find, with a sound system to match,” urged the New Yorker’s Anthony Lane. “Even if that means journeying all day.”

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This week on home video, we’ve got an interesting mix of really good and really bad (oh, so bad). But before we get to those, let’s mention some of the other items coming out this week that we won’t be mentioning: The Robin Williams classic Good Morning, Vietnam is getting a 25th Anniversary Blu-ray, Criterion releases a new Blu-ray of Steven Soderbergh’s Traffic, and the recent Journey to the Center of the Earth gets the hi-def 3D treatment… you know, for the kiddies. As far as new stuff, there’s the George Clooney directed political drama starring Ryan Gosling, the new Christian film from the makers of Fireproof, two of the moldiest movies to come out in 2011, and a retro coming-of-age tale. Finally, Criterion is also introducing its new transfer of a Luis Bunuel classic featuring one of Catherine Deneuve’s most iconic roles. See below for the full list!



The Ides of March

84%

Now that awards season is fully under way, 2011 is shaping up to be a pretty good year for George Clooney. He’s already picked up a couple of awards for his work in The Descendants (which has garnered its own fair share of accolades), but his latest directorial effort, The Ides of March, was nominated for four Golden Globes, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Screenplay. The star-studded cast includes Ryan Gosling (that fourth Golden Globe nom went to him for Best Actor) as an idealistic campaign manager who becomes increasingly jaded by politics, Philip Seymour Hoffman as his wily boss, Paul Giamatti as a competitor trying to woo Gosling away from his candidate, Marisa Tomei as a persistent reporter hungry for a scoop, and, of course, Clooney himself as the seemingly perfect presidential candidate who has a few secrets of his own. With talent like that and a timely story, the film was almost destined to do well, and it indeed managed a Certified Fresh 85% on the Tomatometer. Even if you’re not so much into politics, it’s still an expertly acted, smartly written drama.



Courageous

36%

Independent Christian dramas have been the subject of some ridicule, primarily because they’re often low budget affairs that wear their messages on their sleeves and feature sometimes questionable acting. According to critics, Courageous manages at least to exhibit competent filmmaking, even if, as with previous films of its kind, it caters a little too heavily to a very specific demographic to be openly enjoyable for all. Set against the backdrop of the drug trade in Georgia, Courageous follows four deputies — all fathers — who are urged by their sheriff to spend more time with their families. When tragedy befalls one of the deputies, all four of them make a formal pact to change their lives and honor God in all that they do. The primary complaint coming from most critics had nothing to do with the message of the film itself; rather, they found Courageous to be a bit melodramatic and heavy-handed, choosing to gloss over complex issues with broad platitudes. If you’re a believer, you may find yourself nodding in approval at the film, but at 35%, don’t expect Courageous to do much more than spoonfeed you what you already know it’s going to say.



Abduction

5%

Let’s be fair here: some inspirational cinema may be a bit obtuse and unsophisticated, but there are plenty of worse films that don’t preach any particular spiritual message. Case in point: Abduction, which stars Twilight heartthrob Taylor Lautner as Nathan Harper, a teen who, while researching for a school project on missing children, discovers that his true identity has been kept hidden from him all his life. As Nathan uncovers more about his past, he and his friend Karen (Lily Collins) are plunged into the dangerous world of his biological father, a former CIA agent embroiled in an espionage war. Apart from Lautner, who has yet to establish himself as an actor of some range, the cast is surprisingly solid: Alfred Molina, Sigourney Weaver, Jason Isaacs, Maria Bello, and even the original Dragon Tattoo star, Michael Nyqvist are all on board here. We say “surprisingly” because, despite this pedigree, Abduction only managed to eke out a 4% on the Tomatometer, making it one of the worst-reviewed films of the year, with critics calling it soulless and incompetent. Things could have been worse though, and speaking of which…



Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star

3%

If you haven’t heard of Bucky Larson: Born to Be a Star, then you are one of three things: 1) only a sporadic reader of RT, 2) extremely fortunate, or 3) both. Considering it only made about $2.5 million in box office receipts and left theaters after two weeks, it’s an understandable oversight. Produced by Adam Sandler’s Happy Madison studio, the film stars comic Nick Swardson as the titular Bucky, a man-child who discovers his uptight parents were once famous porn stars. With this newfound knowledge, Bucky decides to follow in his parents’ footsteps and sets his sights on Hollywood, where his small genitalia make him a popular gimmick. There’s more to the story, but it’s really not worth getting into. At a whopping 0% on the Tomatometer, this aggressively unfunny and severely misguided comedy is the worst-reviewed movie of the year and winner of the Moldy Tomato; do what you will with that information.



Dirty Girl

34%

Though it may not seem obviously so, coming-of-age films are difficult to pull off, because the balance one must maintain in order to offer just the right amount of sentimentality — without crossing over into schmaltz — is a tricky feat to master. In Dirty Girl, first-time writer/director Abe Sylvia makes things even harder for himself by setting the film in the nostalgic 1980s and promising a subversive edginess in his titular protagonist, a promiscuous high schooler named Danielle (Juno Temple) who embarks on a cross-country road trip with an unlikely partner in crime: a closeted bisexual classmate named Clarke (Jeremy Dozier). According to most critics, unfortunately, Sylvia fails to bring it all together and make it work; they found Dirty Girl tame and uneven, never quite bringing the Dirty and then trying to tie it all up in a sentimental bow that’s wholly unearned. Despite an experienced cast that includes William H. Macy and Mary Steenburgen, Dirty Girl sits at 25% on the Tomatometer.



Belle de jour – Criterion Collection

95%

Celebrated Spanish-born surrealist director Luis Bunuel made a career out of exploring the various ways in which fantasy and reality intertwine, from his early work like film school staple Un chien andalou all the way up to his final film, That Obscure Object of Desire. 1967’s Belle de jour is one of the better known examples of his aesthetic, featuring a smoldering Catherine Deneuve in one of her most iconic roles. Here, Deneuve plays Severine, a wealthy Parisian housewife who, bored of her sexless marriage, entertains lurid fantasies and ultimately begins to visit and offer her services at a nearby brothel under the titular pseudonym. When she becomes involved with a gangster named Marcel (Pierre Clementi) and attempts to quit the brothel, jealousies lead to an explosive confrontation with rather ambiguous results; fusing daydreams with reality throughout the film, Bunuel leaves the end open for interpretation. This week, Criterion releases their brand new edition of Belle de jour, which comes packed with extras like a video examination of sexual politics, a new interview with screenwriter Jean-Claude Carriere, and an excerpt from a television interview with Carriere and Deneuve.

This week at the movies, we’ve got boxing robots (Real Steel, starring Hugh Jackman and Anthony Mackie) and a political scandal (The Ides of March, starring Ryan Gosling and George Clooney). What do the critics have to say?



Real Steel

60%

You wanna see giant robots punching each other? Then by all means go see Real Steel, say critics, but be prepared for some schmaltz. Hugh Jackman stars as a washed-up pugilist who gets a shot at both professional and personal redemption when he and his estranged son team up to build the ultimate fighting bot and take on all metallic comers. The pundits say Reel Steel is essentially robo-Rocky, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing; if it’s sappy at times, it’s also kinda sweet, and the robot fights are admittedly pretty awesome. (Check out Jackman’s best-reviewed movies here.)



The Ides of March

84%

The Ides of March‘s message isn’t particularly novel — politics is a rough, cynical business — but critics say George Clooney’s latest directorial effort is a still smart tale of political intrigue with a terrific cast. Ryan Gosling stars as Stephen Meyers, the hotshot press secretary for a candidate (Clooney) who’s a tight race for Democratic presidential nomination. The pundits say that the Certified Fresh The Ides of March is able to overcome occasional narrative missteps thanks to outstanding performances and a genuine air of suspense. (Check out our feature on our list of movies with multi-Oscar-nominated casts.)

Also opening this week in limited release:


90%

The Departed

The Oscar-nominated cast: Leonardo DiCaprio, Matt Damon, Jack Nicholson, Alec Baldwin

Few of The Departed‘s main cast were lucky enough to see the end credits. But that’s applying common movie knowledge: If you want to earn your Oscar nomination (or win), you better be able to fake a pretty good death. Thus came in a legendary cast, all for the chance to get shot down in the service for a Best Picture-winning crime tale. Oh, and also to work with Martin Scorsese.


79%

The Hours

The Oscar-nominated cast: Nicole Kidman, Julianne Moore, Meryl Streep, Miranda Richardson, Toni Colette, Ed Harris

Welcome to The Hours. Spread across three generations, Stephen Daldry’s Oscar bait-supreme is the story of women affected by suicide and the novel Mrs. Dalloway — including Virginia Woolf (Kidman) herself. It’s a somber film, relentlessly manicured and dark. But, hey, what do you expect from 16-time Oscar nominee Streep?


95%

Hamlet

The Oscar-nominated cast: Kenneth Branagh, Julie Christie, Gerard Depardieu, John Gielgud, Rosemary Harris, Charlton Heston, Jack Lemmon, John Mills, Robin Williams

Actors can get accused of never leaving their comfort zone — but in the case of Kenneth Branagh, when said comfort zone is bringing Shakespeare to the silver screen, who can blame him? And he’s not just a handsome face on the screen; Branagh in this case also directed this incarnation of Hamlet, a definitive line-for-line adaptation that scoured Hollywood entirely to round out its cast.


87%

Heat

The Oscar-nominated cast: Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Jon Voight

Michael Mann’s heist thriller Heat may not feature as many nominees as some others, but its two distinguished stars had already earned a collective total of 13 nominations (three of which resulted in statuettes) by the time the film opened in 1995. Pitting heavyweights Robert De Niro and Al Pacino against each other as a bank robber and weary LAPD detective, respectively, proved to be a winning formula, and its stellar supporting cast, including Jon Voight (with three Oscar nods of his own), was just the icing on the cake.


98%

The Player

The Oscar-nominated cast: Whoopi Goldberg, Dean Stockwell, Gary Busey, Karen Black, Cher, Peter Falk, Louise Fletcher, Teri Garr, Elliott Gould, Anjelica Huston, Joel Grey, Sally Kellerman, Sally Kirkland, Jack Lemmon, Marlee Matlin, Julia Roberts, Susan Sarandon, Rod Steiger, Lily Tomlin

Robert Altman’s filmography is filled with movies featuring large ensembles comprised almost entirely of esteemed thespians. After his 1970s heyday, Altman fell out of favor with Hollywood for a while, returning in 1992 with the pitch-black movie biz satire The Player. It’s the perfect film for stargazers, since practically every screen star at the time turns up somewhere; better still, it’s a razor-sharp, tremendously entertaining film, one that earned Altman an Oscar nomination for Best Director.


84%

JFK

The Oscar-nominated cast: Sally Kirkland, Jack Lemmon, Sissy Spacek, Joe Pesci, Walter Matthau

Oliver Stone’s controversial biopic of America’s most famous assassination target has more Oscar-nominations among its stars than it does conspiracy theories — which is quite a lot, indeed. Granted, most of them belong to the great Jack Lemmon, while Sally Kirkland, Sissy Spacek, Joe Pesci and Walter Matthau shared the others. Star Kevin Costner would be nominated himself the following year, and Tommy Lee Jones two years later.


62%

A Bridge Too Far

The Oscar-nominated cast: Ryan O’Neal, Gene Hackman, Michael Caine, James Caan, Maximilian Schell, Liv Ullmann, Elliot Gould, Laurence Olivier, Robert Redford

“Hey, fatty — I got a movie for ya.” Sorry, wrong reference. No fridges here, just a cavalcade of Oscar nominees toiling to recreate the ill-fated campaign to capture German bridges in WWII. Academy favorites Ryan O’Neal, Gene Hackman, Michael Caine, James Caan, Maximilian Schell, Liv Ullmann, Elliott Gould, Laurence Olivier and Robert Redford get in on the action — alongside future winners Anthony Hopkins and Sean Connery.


90%

Murder on the Orient Express

The Oscar-nominated cast: Albert Finney, Martin Balsam, Ingrid Bergman, John Gielgud, Wendy Hiller, Anthony Perkins, Vanessa Redgrave, Richard Widmark

Agatha Christie’s mysteries were popular fodder for Hollywood back in the 1970s and 1980s, but 1974’s Murder on the Orient Express, directed by Sidney Lumet, was the first of them. Oscar Nominee Albert Finney plays famous Christie detective Hercule Poirot, who’s asked by a train company director (Martin Balsam) to investigate the murder of an American businessman (Richard Widmark) aboard one of his trains. The all-star cast of suspicious characters includes the likes of Ingrid Bergman, John Gielgud, Vanessa Redgrave, and Anthony Perkins, all previous Oscar nominees themselves at the time.


70%

It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World

The Oscar-nominated cast: Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney, Peter Falk, Buster Keaton

Given the sheer size of its cast, it’s inevitable that there would be a few Oscar nominees in It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World. This wacky road comedy, in which a bunch of strangers hunt for a missing stash of money, often feels like an excuse for every comedian in Hollywood to make a cameo. And despite its madcap antics, Mad World got six Oscar noms, winning one for Best Sound Editing.


87%

The Longest Day

The Oscar-nominated cast: Eddie Albert, Richard Burton, Red Buttons, Henry Fonda, Sal Mineo, Robert Mitchum, Edmond O’Brien, Robert Ryan, Rod Steiger, John Wayne, Richard Todd

World War II movies never fail to bring out the acting heavyweights, with this 1962 epic account of the D-Day invasion told from both the Allied and German point of view and via a roster of men’s men — which included Oscar nominees Eddie Albert, Richard Burton, Red Buttons, Henry Fonda, Sal Mineo, Robert Mitchum, Edmond O’Brien, Robert Ryan, Rod Steiger, John Wayne, and Richard Todd. Ironically, none of the actors received nominations for the film.

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