Priscilla Grant/Everett Collection

(Photo by Priscilla Grant/Everett Collection)

All Melissa McCarthy Movies Ranked

Since breaking out on the big screen with her scene-stealing appearance in the hit 2011 comedy Bridesmaids, Melissa McCarthy has earned a reputation as one of Hollywood’s most fearless — and gut-bustingly funny — stars, proving her willingness to endure even the most awkward situations and ego-bruising pratfalls in follow-up efforts like The Heat, Spy, and Ghostbusters. But McCarthy isn’t just here to make us laugh — she’s also proven her dramatic chops in more subdued fare like St. Vincent and Gilmore Girls, leading up to a Best Lead Actress Oscar nomination for Can You Ever Forgive Me?.

Now, we’re ranking all Melissa McCarthy movies by Tomatometer!

#21

The Back-up Plan (2010)
17%

#21
Adjusted Score: 22333%
Critics Consensus: Jennifer Lopez is as appealing as ever, but The Back-Up Plan smothers its star with unrelatable characters and a predictable plot.
Synopsis: Tired of waiting for Mr. Right while her biological clock ticks away, Zoe (Jennifer Lopez) decides it's time to make... [More]
Directed By: Alan Poul

#20

Identity Thief (2013)
19%

#20
Adjusted Score: 25970%
Critics Consensus: Identity Thief's few laughs are attributable to Melissa McCarthy and Jason Bateman, who labor mightily to create a framework for the movie's undisciplined plotline.
Synopsis: Florida resident Diana (Melissa McCarthy) has a luxurious lifestyle as the queen of retail, buying whatever strikes her fancy --... [More]
Directed By: Seth Gordon

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 28224%
Critics Consensus: Less a comedy than an angrily dark action thriller, The Hangover Part III diverges from the series' rote formula but offers nothing compelling in its place.
Synopsis: It's been two years since the gang known as the Wolfpack narrowly escaped disaster in Bangkok. Now, Phil (Bradley Cooper),... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#18

Thunder Force (2021)
21%

#18
Adjusted Score: 28115%
Critics Consensus: It's got a few chuckles, but Thunder Force is largely a superhero comedy that's neither exciting nor funny -- and an egregious waste of its co-stars' talents.
Synopsis: Two childhood best friends reunite as an unlikely crime-fighting superhero duo when one invents a formula that gives ordinary people... [More]
Directed By: Ben Falcone

#17

The Boss (2016)
22%

#17
Adjusted Score: 33094%
Critics Consensus: Melissa McCarthy remains as fiercely talented as ever, but her efforts aren't enough to prop up the baggy mess of inconsistent gags and tissue-thin writing that brings down The Boss.
Synopsis: Wealthy CEO Michelle Darnell (Melissa McCarthy) always gets her way, until she's busted for insider trading and sent to federal... [More]
Directed By: Ben Falcone

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 37933%
Critics Consensus: The Happytime Murders wastes its intriguingly transgressive premise on a witless comedy that blindly pushes buttons instead of attempting to tell an entertaining story.
Synopsis: Detective Phil Philips is a down-on-his-luck puppet who used to work for the Los Angeles Police Department. When two puppets... [More]
Directed By: Brian Henson

#15

Tammy (2014)
24%

#15
Adjusted Score: 31741%
Critics Consensus: Melissa McCarthy remains an engaging screen presence, but her efforts aren't enough to keep the jumbled Tammy on track.
Synopsis: For Tammy (Melissa McCarthy), a burger-joint waitress, a bad day keeps getting worse. She wrecks her car, loses her job... [More]
Directed By: Ben Falcone

#14

The Kitchen (2019)
23%

#14
Adjusted Score: 37103%
Critics Consensus: With three talented leads struggling to prop up a sagging story, The Kitchen is a jumbled crime thriller in urgent need of some heavy-duty renovation.
Synopsis: Between 8th Ave. and the Hudson River, the Irish mafia runs 20 blocks of a tough New York City neighborhood... [More]
Directed By: Andrea Berloff

#13

Cook Off! (2017)
25%

#13
Adjusted Score: 15703%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: As a buffet of quirky contestants prepares for the renowned Van Rookle Farms Cooking Contest, the heat is on to... [More]
Directed By: Guy Shalem, Cathryn Michon

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 34503%
Critics Consensus: Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel make a charming couple with plenty of chemistry, but that isn't enough to make up for Life as We Know It's formulaic plot and poorly written script.
Synopsis: After a disastrous first date, the only things Holly Berenson (Katherine Heigl) and Eric Messer (Josh Duhamel) have in common... [More]
Directed By: Greg Berlanti

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 34971%
Critics Consensus: You won't need Superintelligence to steer clear of the latest forgettable comedy to fail to take full advantage of Melissa McCarthy's talents.
Synopsis: When an all-powerful Superintelligence, played by James Cordon, chooses to study the most average person on Earth, Carol Peters, played... [More]
Directed By: Ben Falcone

#10

The Third Wheel (2002)
33%

#10
Adjusted Score: 7507%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When Stanley met Diana, he hadn't been on a date in years. She was easily the most appealing woman he'd... [More]
Directed By: Jordan Brady

#9

Pumpkin (2002)
37%

#9
Adjusted Score: 38846%
Critics Consensus: The messy Pumpkin wastes its premise by not making the satire sharp enough.
Synopsis: Carolyn's (Christina Ricci) sorority sisters set their sights on the Sorority of the Year award and coaching challenged athletes is... [More]

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 46022%
Critics Consensus: Life of the Party's good-natured humor and abundance of onscreen talent aren't enough to make up for jumbled direction and a script that misses far more often than it hits.
Synopsis: When her husband suddenly dumps her, longtime and dedicated housewife Deanna turns regret into reset by going back to college.... [More]
Directed By: Ben Falcone

#7

This Is 40 (2012)
51%

#7
Adjusted Score: 60397%
Critics Consensus: Judd Apatow definitely delivers funny and perceptive scenes in This is 40, even if they are buried in aimless self-indulgence.
Synopsis: After many years of marriage, Pete (Paul Rudd) is the sole male in a household that includes his wife, Debbie... [More]
Directed By: Judd Apatow

#6

The Nines (2007)
65%

#6
Adjusted Score: 66873%
Critics Consensus: Though The Nines doesn't solidify as well as writer/director John August would hope for, Ryan Reynolds's strong performance makes each of the film's intriguing segments worth watching.
Synopsis: Three actors (Ryan Reynolds, Hope Davis, Melissa McCarthy) tackle the principal roles in a trio of stories. In "The Prisoner,"... [More]
Directed By: John August

#5

The Heat (2013)
66%

#5
Adjusted Score: 72239%
Critics Consensus: The Heat is predictable, but Melissa McCarthy is reliably funny and Sandra Bullock proves a capable foil.
Synopsis: FBI Special Agent Sarah Ashburn (Sandra Bullock) is a methodical investigator with a long-standing reputation for excellence -- and arrogance.... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

#4

Ghostbusters (2016)
74%

#4
Adjusted Score: 97941%
Critics Consensus: Ghostbusters does an impressive job of standing on its own as a freewheeling, marvelously cast supernatural comedy -- even if it can't help but pale somewhat in comparison with the classic original.
Synopsis: Paranormal researcher Abby Yates (Melissa McCarthy) and physicist Erin Gilbert are trying to prove that ghosts exist in modern society.... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

#3

Bridesmaids (2011)
90%

#3
Adjusted Score: 100623%
Critics Consensus: A marriage of genuine characters, gross out gags, and pathos, Bridesmaids is a female-driven comedy that refuses to be boxed in as Kristen Wiig emerges as a real star.
Synopsis: Annie (Kristen Wiig) is a single woman whose own life is a mess, but when she learns that her lifelong... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

#2

Spy (2015)
95%

#2
Adjusted Score: 104595%
Critics Consensus: Simultaneously broad and progressive, Spy offers further proof that Melissa McCarthy and writer-director Paul Feig bring out the best in one another -- and delivers scores of belly laughs along the way.
Synopsis: Despite having solid field training, CIA analyst Susan Cooper (Melissa McCarthy) has spent her entire career as a desk jockey,... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 117563%
Critics Consensus: Deftly directed and laced with dark wit, Can You Ever Forgive Me? proves a compelling showcase for deeply affecting work from Richard E. Grant and Melissa McCarthy.
Synopsis: Lee Israel is a frustrated, hard-drinking author who can barely afford to pay her rent or bills in 1990s New... [More]
Directed By: Marielle Heller

For almost two decades, Judd Apatow has been the king of a certain kind of American movie comedy – as he described it to Rotten Tomatoes, films about people who are stuck and whose lives are falling apart… because “life falling apart is usually funny.” In movies like Knocked Up, The 40-Year-Old Virgin, and Trainwreck, the writer and director has given us some of recent cinema’s funniest moments, from a chest-waxing scene that almost cost Steve Carell his nipple to an epic breakdown in the principal’s office courtesy of a foul-mouthed Melissa McCarthy in This Is 40. His latest comedy, The King of Staten Island, is a semi-autobiographical feature starring and co-written by Saturday Night Live star Pete Davidson, and it packs in Apatow’s signature mix of big laughs and big feels.

Ahead of the movie’s release, Apatow sat down with us to break down the mechanics and stories behind some of the funniest scenes he’s put on the screen – including an messy pool fight that’s getting the biggest laughs from audiences who’ve seen his newest film.

#1
Adjusted Score: 94319%
Critics Consensus: The King of Staten Island's uncertain tone and indulgent length blunt this coming-of-age dramedy's ability to find itself, but Pete Davidson's soulful performance holds it together.
Synopsis: An aimless slacker dreams of becoming a tattoo artist while living with his mother and hanging out with his friends... [More]
Directed By: Judd Apatow

Melissa McCarthy is going back to college — at her less-than-thrilled daughter’s campus — in this weekend’s Life of the Party, adding another comedy to a filmography that already includes some of the biggest laugh-filled hits in recent memory. In honor of her latest outing, we decided to take the opportunity to look back on some of the brightest critical highlights in McCarthy’s career, while inviting you to rank your own favorites. It’s time for Total Recall!


Use the up and down arrows to rank the movies, or click here to see them ranked by Tomatometer!

This Sunday is Mother’s Day, and many of us will be celebrating the contributions and sacrifices our mothers have made to help us become who we are. But not all moms are created equal, and that’s especially true in cinema, because we know some real crappy movie moms out there — 24 to be exact — and they deserve no flowers, chocolates, or fancy dinners.

Three of this week’s new releases on home video were recognized by the Academy with Oscar nominations this year, so that’s already a pretty good start. The other three selections include two comedies that earned mixed reactions and one French import featuring some impressive performances, and those are followed by a number of notable rereleases. See below for the full list!



The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

64%

After the success of Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings adaptations, it was impossible not to approach his interpretation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Hobbit with high anticipation. When Jackson announced that The Hobbit — a single volume much shorter than the LOTR saga — would also be stretched into a trilogy, however, some fans expressed a bit of concern, and Jackson’s use of the higher frame rate was also met with mixed reactions. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey chronicles the first portion of the tale of young Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), who is swept up in a journey alongside thirteen dwarves to recapture their kingdom, which has been usurped by a fearsome dragon named Smaug. With Gandalf the Grey (Ian McKellen, reprising his role from the Rings series) in tow, their quest leads them into perilous encounters with all sorts of creatures, including Gollum (Andy Serkis), whose fate is intimately tied to Bilbo’s. The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey was an “event movie,” if ever there was one, and while most critics found it both visually spectacular and evident of Jackson’s earnest affection, some also found that its pace was too deliberate and that it ultimately failed to meet the same standard for majesty and wonder that was set so high in Jackson’s previous trilogy. At 65% on the Tomatometer, this is probably still a trip worth taking.



Zero Dark Thirty

91%

Kathryn Bigelow took home a few Oscars for 2008’s The Hurt Locker, and she’s always had a knack for action flicks (“The FBI’s going to pay me to learn to surf?”), so it’s not entirely surprising that her gritty action/procedural about the search for Osama bin Laden, Zero Dark Thirty, garnered five Oscar nods (including Best Picture and Best Actress) of its own. The story follows fledgling CIA operative Maya (Jessica Chastain) over the course of her entire career — which is dedicated to the capture of Osama bin Laden — as she collects intelligence, pursues leads, participates in classified interrogations, and ultimately oversees the mission to raid bin Laden’s compound in Pakistan. There was some controversy over the kinds of access that Bigelow and writer Mark Boal (who also wrote The Hurt Locker) were allegedly given to classified records, as well as some grumbling over whether or not the film condoned torture, but the vast majority of critics simply saw a gripping, intelligently crafted film with an eye for detail. Certified Fresh at 93%, it was one of last year’s highest rated wide releases, so if you’re looking for a solid thriller, this one comes highly recommended.



Les Misérables

70%

Victor Hugo’s classic novel of redemption has been adapted several times before on both stage and screen, so it’s tempting to ask, “Is this a story worth revisiting again?” Most critics say yes, as did the Academy when it honored the film with eight Oscar nominations (it won three of them). Anyone who’s taken high school English will be familiar with the tale: Ex-convict Frenchman Jean Valjean (Hugh Jackman) is released from prison in 1815 at the end of a 19-year sentence, and after benefiting from an act of kindness by a local bishop, he vows to live an honest life. Thus begins a sprawling historical narrative that follows several characters in Valjean’s life and culminates in the June Rebellion of France in 1832. Directed by Tom Hooper (The King’s Speech), Les Misérables received some attention for its actors singing live on set (some better than others), and though its story was familiar, its accomplished cast (including Best Supporting Actress winner Anne Hathaway) helped to elevate the film.



This Is 40

51%

Judd Apatow’s been wearing his Producer hat more often lately, but he decided to jump back behind the camera again for This Is 40, the “sort-of sequel to Knocked Up,” as its poster so proudly proclaims. Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann (Apatow’s wife) reprise their roles from that previous film as upper-middle-class married couple Pete and Debbie, who both celebrate their 40th birthdays. In the week between Debbie’s actual birthday and Pete’s party, audiences bear witness to the conversations, the arguments, the intimate moments, the public meltdowns, and everything in between that the couple experience with each other and their children (played by Maude and Iris Apatow, they of Judd and Leslie’s loins). Unfortunately, there were a lot of critics who just didn’t find This Is 40 to be a winning effort; while many conceded the film successfully made light of some hard truths, most also felt the story was unfocused and muddled, and that it appealed to too specific an audience.



Rust and Bone

82%

We last heard from French filmmaker Jacques Audiard back in 2010, when his acclaimed film A Prophet was nominated for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards. Though his latest effort, Rust and Bone, failed to make it onto the Oscar list this year, it’s received a number of accolades, particularly for its acting. The film stars Matthias Schoenaerts as unemployed single father and aspiring kickboxer Alain, who moves to Antibes to live with his sister and look for work. After securing a job as a bouncer at a night club, Alain meets Stephanie (Marion Cotillard), a whale trainer at the local marine park who forms a close relationship with Alain when she suffers a tragic accident that results in the amputation of her lower legs. A handful of critics felt Rust and Bone‘s third act could have been a little stronger, but most agreed that both Schoenaerts and Cotillard put in powerful performances here, and that Audiard’s script succeeds in being sensitive without veering into melodrama. Certified Fresh at 81%, it’s an unconventional love story that may move you if you give it a chance.



Bachelorette

57%

Much to the chagrin of its producers, Bachelorette was just about to start shooting when Bridesmaids hit theaters back in 2011, thereby snatching up the “female answer to The Hangover” crown. When it finally opened back in September of last year, however, its makers decided to take a chance and release it on Video On Demand a month ahead of time. The story centers around a group of friends who reunite when one of them (Rebel Wilson) announces she’s getting married. What ensues is a series of mishaps as the bridesmaids (Kirsten Dunst, Lizzy Caplan, and Isla Fisher) accidentally ruin the wedding dress and attempt to fix the situation, all after having insulted the bride and ingested copious amounts of booze and drugs. Critics were relatively split on Bachelorette; some thought it was funny and well-written by Leslye Headland (who also directed), but others felt the film’s leads were a bit too unlikeable to fully earn the sentimental ending. It might be a risk at 55%, but the cast — which includes Adam Scott, James Marsden, and Ann Dowd — may win you over.

Also available this week:

  • Two choices from the Criterion Collection: Terence Malick’s Badlands (98%) and Powell and Pressburger’s The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (95%), now both available on DVD and Blu-ray.
  • The HBO original film The Girl, which explores Alfred Hitchcock’s relationship with Tippi Hedren.
  • The 1981 cult favorite sex comedy Porky’s (30%) on Blu-ray.

This week at the movies, we’ve got a cool cop (Jack Reacher, starring Tom Cruise and Rosamund Pike); harried marrieds (This is 40, starring Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann); mother-son bonding (The Guilt Trip, starring Barbra Streisand and Seth Rogen); and a fanciful circus (the performance film Cirque Du Soleil: Worlds Away 3D). What do the critics have to say?



Jack Reacher

63%

Sometimes a relatively generic story can be redeemed by a confident central performance. Case in point: Jack Reacher, which critics say is a solid crime thriller that greatly benefits from Tom Cruise’s movie star charisma. Cruise stars as the title character, a former Army M.P. who’s called in to investigate a mass shooting, and soon discovers that he’s up against a dangerous foe. The pundits say Jack Reacher doesn’t lack for clichés, it’s a competent and tense piece of work, and Cruise is cool and compelling. (Check out this week’s 24 Frames for a pictorial overview of Cruise’s career.)



This Is 40

51%

Judd Apatow‘s films frequently balance laughs and pathos with a deft hand, and while critics say This Is 40 is uneven, it’s thought-provoking and occasionally hilarious. Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann reprise their roles from Knocked Up, playing an affluent married couple dealing with the stresses of parenthood, financial insecurity, familial relations, and hard-to-break habits. The pundits say This Is 40 is overlong and sometimes aimless, but it’s buoyed by a terrific cast, a perceptive script, and some very funny moments.



The Guilt Trip

37%

Barbra Streisand is so rarely in films these days that her starring role in The Guilt Trip should be cause for excitement. Unfortunately, the critics say that while she and Seth Rogen share an easy chemistry, it’s largely wasted in a formulaic plot. Rogen stars as an inventor who plans to drive cross-country to pitch his newest product. He invites his overbearing mom along in an attempt to fix her up with an old boyfriend in San Francisco. The pundits say The Guilt Trip is undeniably sweet, and the leads are in fine form, but there are absolutely no surprises to be found in the script.



Cirque Du Soleil: Worlds Away 3D

45%

If those whimsical acrobats from Cirque Du Soleil aren’t making a tour stop in your town, Cirque Du Soleil: Worlds Away is a decent overview; critics say this 3D extravaganza offers thrilling evidence of the troupe’s skills, even if it doesn’t quite match the experience of seeing them live. Producer James Cameron and director Andrew Adamson utilize a minimal narrative — a girl visits a circus and is transported into Cirque Du Soleil’s dreamworld — as an excuse to create a best-of package of the company’s various stage shows. The pundits say Cirque Du Soleil: Worlds Away features plenty of eye-popping imagery, but it may not win over those who don’t already love the group.



Monsters, Inc. 3D

96%

With Monsters University hitting theaters next year, now is as good a time as any to revisit the world of Monsters, Inc. which is getting the rerelease treatment this week in glorious 3D. This tale of a pair of monsters who can’t seem to frighten one tenacious little girl is one of Pixar’s classics; like most of the studio’s output, it’s Certified Fresh.

Also opening this week in limited release:

It wasn’t too long ago that Megan Fox found herself at the dizzying center of the celebrity maelstrom. Through no particular fault of her own, she was teetering on the brink of media overexposure — the kind that comes from the usual perception of someone (and more often an actress) suddenly becoming too big, and too fast. Fox’s well-publicized (and rather humorous) feud with her Transformers director Michael Bay lead to her being dismissed from the third installment (quick: try and remember the name of her replacement), while her would-be star vehicle — the hopelessly misunderstood Jennifer’s Body — bombed with critics and audiences.

Yet Fox’s career is taking an arguably more interesting turn now that the white light of scrutiny has subsided: she’s got roles in Judd Apatow’s Knocked Up sequel This is 40 and Sacha Baron Cohen’s The Dictator on the way, and this week stars as part of the ensemble cast of Jennifer Westfeldt’s Friends with Kids. In the well-received comedy-drama, Fox plays Mary Jane, the much-younger girlfriend of single-dad-with-a-twist Adam Scott, while getting to act alongside a cast that includes Westfeldt, Jon Hamm, Kristen Wiig and Maya Rudolph.

We got a chance to chat with Fox about the experience recently, as well as her thoughts on doing more of this kind of comedy in the future. Read on for that, but first, she reeled off her five favorite films. (And for being the first person to pick Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, well, we salute her.)

The Lord of the Rings trilogy (Peter Jackson; 2001, 2002, 2003; 92%, 96%, 94% Tomatometers)


Well number one — and we have to count it as one or else it’s take up my whole list — is The Lord of the Rings. That’s pretty self-explanatory. I read the books when I was a kid and Peter Jackson just created this incredible world and environment that you get caught up in. It’s amazing.

How to Train Your Dragon (Peter Hastings and Chris Sanders, 2010; 98% Tomatometer)



Number two — you’re not gonna believe me [laughs] — number two is How to Train Your Dragon. You should see it. It’s sad, it’s sweet — it’s a really good movie.

Kung Fu Panda 2 (Jennifer Yuh, 2011; 81% Tomatometer)



Kung Fu Panda 2. [Laughs] I really love that.

You really like those animated movies, huh.

I really love kids’ movies. I watch them constantly. I don’t know, it’s nostalgic I guess. I don’t know why I love them so much.

The Wizard of Oz (Victor Fleming and King Vidor; 1939; 100% Tomatometer)



The Wizard of Oz, which I grew up with. That has always been one of my favorites. It’s a classic.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles trilogy (Steve Barron, Michael Pressman, Stuart Gillard; 1990, 1991, 1993; 44%, 36%, 27% Tomatometers)



Finally — and this is a series as well — the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movies. The original three are just… [sings] “Go ninja, go ninja, go!” I just really loved those movies.

I do love the first one. How old were you when you saw them?

I was must have been really young — maybe five or six when I first saw them. And I think they still hold up. [Laughs] My husband laughs ’cause he thinks they’re so terrible, but I love the animatronic puppets. I just love the old school, the practical — you know, there’s no CG. I prefer the original Yoda in Star Wars as opposed to the CG Yoda. I love puppets and animatronics.

I’m with you. He needs to go and rewatch those films. That should be your mission.

To make him a believer? [Laughs] I’ll try.

Next, Fox chats about her role in this week’s Friends with Kids, why she enjoys playing comedy, and her experiences working with Judd Apatow and Sacha Baron Cohen.

 

Let’s talk a little about Friends with Kids. This is an ensemble comedy, and a different kind of movie for you. How’d you get involved?

Megan Fox: I think that there were a few names that Jen [director Jennifer Westfeldt] was considering to play Mary Jane, and she came over to my house to meet with me about it. We ended up talking for hours. I think it was maybe three hours, and we were talking about astrology and nothing that had anything to do with the movie — but we ended up getting along well so it sort of came about that way.

Adam Scott, Jon Hamm, Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph — you got a fine cast to work with there. What was that like?

Well they’re all… first of all I feel like they were such a safe choice to make, because the movie’s gonna be amazing because the talent in the movie is so high. There’s so many really strong comedians and fantastic actors in it, and I just wanted the opportunity to get to work with them. I sort of felt the pressure was off of me, you know — I didn’t have to carry it or do anything spectacular to move the story along. It wasn’t really about me, which I really appreciated. I really enjoyed the process of that. And they’re also all good friends, which I feel like is an easier environment to work in and walk in to — as opposed to this sort of awkward, get- to-know-you stage that people go through when the entire cast has not met one another and is not familiar with each other.

With that pressure off, did you get a taste for doing more of these kinds of smaller films?

Yeah, I love it. I also really enjoy being a part of an ensemble cast. It was fun to go to work every day, and that’s a nice feeling to have — to wake up and be happy that you’re going to work. It’s not always that way.

It sounds like you don’t miss being part of a huge juggernaut production.

Ah… I don’t. There is something about filming those types of movies that is so [laughs]… there’s a lot of adrenalin each day because you never know what’s gonna happen, and literally going to work was dangerous. It was like, “Well, who on the crew is gonna almost get blown up today?” Which was, you know, there’s something really fun in it — I mean, it’s psychotic, but there’s something really fun and kind of frighteningly enjoyable about doing that. But you can’t always do that. [Laughs] That’s sort of a once-in-a-lifetime, or you maybe do that a couple of times, but you can’t make a living out of doing that. It’ll kill you.

 

You’ve done comedy before: Jennifer’s Body, for example, which most people unfortunately didn’t get—

[Sighs] I know.

Is comedy something you’d like to pursue?

I mean, I’m much more comfortable doing comedy. It feels, I don’t know — it’s a better environment for me and I just enjoy it more. That’s not to say that I’ll be successful at doing it, but right now I at least have more fun on comedy sets.

There’s less chance of getting blown up.

[Laughs] Exactly.

What was it like working with Judd Apatow on This is 40?

I love him. He’s such a nice guy. I never saw him get angry or impatient; he’s just this big, happy kid who also happens to be a genius. The way he shoots is so open and so creative. There’s so much improv on his set, it’s crazy. I don’t know how he has the foresight to take all of that and make it into a movie, because he has endless hours of material of all of these comedians that just spend all day improv’ing in these scenes. I loved working with him; he’s one of my favorite people.

And you’re in The Dictator — that’s just a cameo?

Yeah, it’s just a cameo I shot one day. [Laughs] But, you know — it’s Sacha, so it’s gonna be really interesting. It pushes some boundaries. I had a good time. He was a gentleman, but he’s really hysterical and very funny. That was a good experience as well. I haven’t seen the movie yet but I think it’s probably going to be really funny.

Did he stay in character while he was filming?

Yeah he did. He was in character the whole time. He would come out of character for a few minutes, but he has this song — he has this sort of chanting — that he would do to get himself back into his Dictator character, which he would do right as we were rolling


Friends with Kids is in theaters this week.

Tag Cloud

directors space Brie Larson DC streaming service Travel Channel YA Marathons ViacomCBS Adult Swim Christmas MCU Disney aapi Extras Freeform Tomatazos wonder woman Starz Film RT History hist 71st Emmy Awards laika cars black art house Funimation Hulu italian Pride Month new zealand slasher Comedy Central DC Comics Interview critics Dark Horse Comics sag awards royal family Trailer Paramount mob SXSW movies politics spain crime drama lord of the rings diversity E3 DirecTV Tags: Comedy black comedy medical drama Grammys sequels Comic Book Black Mirror Star Wars batman trophy zombies live event ABC Family worst movies Disney Channel ghosts 1990s Television Academy dc football Ellie Kemper sports Star Trek IMDb TV doctor who GLAAD VICE Quiz 2020 telelvision asian-american crime thriller Chilling Adventures of Sabrina tv talk Classic Film USA Captain marvel Comic-Con@Home 2021 high school Holiday TV One Heroines Summer Watching Series book adaptation saw comiccon Neflix AMC mission: impossible Pop Television Critics Association Opinion rom-coms Calendar Legendary IFC Films hidden camera nbcuniversal king kong 007 australia hollywood revenge foreign toronto what to watch Crackle Acorn TV venice Tubi sequel HBO Go fast and furious series Wes Anderson Universal cats Box Office YouTube Premium Mary Poppins Returns hispanic heritage month halloween tv A24 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards cooking popular marvel cinematic universe 93rd Oscars FOX Warner Bros. quibi YouTube Red Action docudrama suspense Rocky Premiere Dates Writers Guild of America game show mutant Biopics ABC TV renewals spider-man all-time Cosplay Pop TV war festivals streaming movies die hard See It Skip It parents Video Games The Academy Shondaland international 20th Century Fox Apple TV+ marvel comics 21st Century Fox scary movies BET Rom-Com Spring TV french Holidays composers Nickelodeon A&E casting theme song target gangster children's TV Pacific Islander Academy Awards MTV 73rd Emmy Awards supernatural The Walking Dead indie canceled TV shows political drama Lionsgate Cartoon Network prank Bravo Nat Geo FX Crunchyroll universal monsters finale Song of Ice and Fire Sony Pictures child's play Baby Yoda SundanceTV Mudbound kong versus Superheroes disaster period drama American Society of Cinematographers MSNBC godzilla DGA feel good comic book movie Music green book Amazon Prime Video Anna Paquin Mary poppins Turner Classic Movies Red Carpet TV movies romantic comedy facebook canceled natural history X-Men twilight franchise Set visit scorecard rotten movies we love Valentine's Day Syfy superhero First Reviews ratings ITV new york Amazon Lucasfilm police drama spy thriller comic books teaser Mystery nfl Chernobyl aliens breaking bad new star wars movies reboot Marvel Studios IFC 2018 basketball Discovery Channel 2015 VOD sitcom olympics Superheroe PaleyFest blaxploitation spider-verse james bond Binge Guide screen actors guild E! deadpool serial killer BBC Netflix Horror cops National Geographic Stephen King The Witch Countdown 24 frames thriller animated CNN ESPN dogs Drama scene in color talk show chucky Cannes Winners Trivia south america justice league Fox Searchlight crossover 90s spinoff First Look Musicals Toys Photos 2017 Hallmark Christmas movies spanish BBC One Mindy Kaling Comedy Exclusive Video Ghostbusters scary FXX rt labs Tumblr women video on demand Sneak Peek richard e. Grant strong female leads book biopic Hear Us Out NBA Elton John archives science fiction latino anthology a nightmare on elm street movie fresh screenings Shudder criterion Arrowverse dexter Nominations GIFs vs. renewed TV shows OWN japan Image Comics razzies Apple hispanic Lifetime travel APB adaptation TV Masterpiece dragons sopranos cults Amazon Prime Apple TV Plus name the review Sci-Fi Food Network Fall TV Family Logo slashers TCA Winter 2020 kids true crime Amazon Studios obituary Polls and Games Rocketman stop motion Ovation comic best Teen Pirates Animation transformers Instagram Live action-comedy Mary Tyler Moore Tarantino Disney streaming service adventure stand-up comedy cartoon Pixar golden globe awards Lifetime Christmas movies zombie psychological thriller Awards TIFF boxing Epix Columbia Pictures stoner mcc television CBS concert video nature Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Spike Fargo The Walt Disney Company 72 Emmy Awards singing competition Podcast 2016 superman Character Guide critic resources Women's History Month satire TLC heist movie halloween Hallmark jamie lee curtis Netflix Christmas movies The CW psycho Paramount Network SDCC Certified Fresh WGN HBO mockumentary joker rotten YouTube cinemax 45 2021 Emmys comics harry potter independent documentaries christmas movies Tokyo Olympics cancelled TV shows Spectrum Originals Hollywood Foreign Press Association 2019 discovery know your critic DC Universe Western BAFTA Pet Sematary cancelled television 4/20 Martial Arts Peacock Sundance TV VH1 Marvel Television Comics on TV streaming romance unscripted Paramount Plus Emmy Nominations pirates of the caribbean golden globes CBS All Access historical drama films NYCC posters The Arrangement Election robots blockbusters Creative Arts Emmys comic book movies USA Network dceu social media Universal Pictures TV Land AMC Plus Esquire Kids & Family festival BBC America PlayStation PBS Year in Review biography vampires young adult New York Comic Con werewolf Fox News based on movie spanish language Film Festival boxoffice RT21 Prime Video TNT Country documentary Schedule Winter TV Sundance Now LGBTQ blockbuster GoT Awards Tour comedies rt labs critics edition Britbox Best and Worst Endgame El Rey Marvel Rock Broadway TBS monster movies dark NBC award winner worst WarnerMedia anime ABC Signature CW Seed trailers Super Bowl History crime adenture leaderboard king arthur TruTV Black History Month Fantasy genre Infographic Sundance toy story zero dark thirty dreamworks The Purge dramedy rt archives binge debate miniseries classics Disney Plus Oscars witnail game of thrones jurassic park TCA cancelled TV series technology Disney+ Disney Plus Walt Disney Pictures remakes ID San Diego Comic-Con TCA 2017 news legend live action TCA Awards elevated horror FX on Hulu kaiju BET Awards Vudu CMT 79th Golden Globes Awards President Turner reviews Thanksgiving japanese cancelled Reality Trophy Talk Avengers Reality Competition 99% TCM HBO Max OneApp Musical Showtime docuseries HFPA emmy awards Alien indiana jones LGBT free movies