In Time

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All Justin Timberlake Movies Ranked

Cause for alarm: Justin Timberlake has only been in a few Certified Fresh movies in his career, projects that have really hit with critics – we hope he has a second job to fall back on.

For now, Timberlake will just have to be content with the fact he’s been in some of the really good flicks of the 2010s, like David Fincher’s Best Picture nominee The Social Network, or the Coen brothers’ wry and sly take on the folk music, Inside Llewyn Davis. And no one can blame Timberlake for not being careful in cultivating his movie brand, making a few sex comedies (The Love Guru, Friends With Benefits), throwing in a few sci-fi risks (Southland Tales, In Time), and sweetening the stew with family movies (Yogi Bear, Shrek the Third).

Timberlake’s latest film, his first in three years, certainly falls in that last category: Trolls World Tour, which took the extraordinary step of skipping theatrical and going straight to on-demand. With the movie added to this list, we’re sync as we look back on all Justin Timberlake movies ranked by Tomatometer!

#18

Runner Runner (2013)
7%

#18
Adjusted Score: 11463%
Critics Consensus: It has an impressive cast and an intriguing premise, but Runner Runner wastes them on a bland, haphazardly assembled thriller with very little payoff.
Synopsis: Believing that he has been swindled, Princeton grad student Richie (Justin Timberlake) goes to Costa Rica to confront online-gambling tycoon... [More]
Directed By: Brad Furman

#17

Edison (2005)
13%

#17
Adjusted Score: 4573%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Ambitious young reporter Pollack (Justin Timberlake) suspects insidious corruption in his town's elite police unit, known as F.R.A.T., and finds... [More]
Directed By: David J. Burke

#16

Yogi Bear (2010)
12%

#16
Adjusted Score: 15463%
Critics Consensus: Yogi Bear's 3D effects and all-star voice cast are cold comfort for its aggressively mediocre screenplay.
Synopsis: Yogi (Dan Aykroyd) and his sidekick, Boo Boo (Justin Timberlake), are Jellystone Park's most-notorious troublemakers, hatching countless schemes to separate... [More]
Directed By: Eric Brevig

#15

The Love Guru (2008)
14%

#15
Adjusted Score: 19936%
Critics Consensus: The Love Guru features far too many gross-out gags, and too few earned laughs, ranking as one of Mike Myers' poorest outings.
Synopsis: Born in America and raised in an Indian ashram, Pitka (Mike Myers) returns to his native land to seek his... [More]
Directed By: Marco Schnabel

#14

The Open Road (2009)
29%

#14
Adjusted Score: 8918%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: While playing minor league baseball in Texas, Carlton Garrett (Justin Timberlake) receives word from his grandfather (Harry Dean Stanton) that... [More]
Directed By: Michael Meredith

#13

Wonder Wheel (2017)
31%

#13
Adjusted Score: 45875%
Critics Consensus: Wonder Wheel gathers a charming cast in an inviting period setting, but they aren't enough to consistently breathe life into a Woody Allen project that never quite comes together.
Synopsis: Four peoples' lives intertwine amid the hustle and bustle of the Coney Island amusement park in the 1950s: Ginny, an... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#12

In Time (2011)
37%

#12
Adjusted Score: 42539%
Critics Consensus: In Time's intriguing premise and appealing cast are easily overpowered by the blunt, heavy-handed storytelling.
Synopsis: In a future where time is money and the wealthy can live forever, Will Salas (Justin Timberlake) is a poor... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Niccol

#11

Southland Tales (2006)
40%

#11
Adjusted Score: 43708%
Critics Consensus: Southland Tales, while offering an intriguing vision of the future, remains frustratingly incoherent and unpolished.
Synopsis: With the United States under the threat of nuclear attack, the lives of several people converge in a dystopian Los... [More]
Directed By: Richard Kelly

#10

Shrek the Third (2007)
42%

#10
Adjusted Score: 50245%
Critics Consensus: Shrek the Third has pop culture potshots galore, but at the expense of the heart, charm, and wit that made the first two Shreks classics.
Synopsis: When King Harold suddenly croaks, Shrek (Mike Myers) learns he will have to rule the land of Far, Far Away,... [More]
Directed By: Chris Miller

#9

Bad Teacher (2011)
45%

#9
Adjusted Score: 51219%
Critics Consensus: In spite of a promising concept and a charmingly brazen performance from Cameron Diaz, Bad Teacher is never as funny as it should be.
Synopsis: For most, teaching is an honorable profession -- except for Elizabeth (Cameron Diaz). The foul-mouthed, boozy woman can't wait to... [More]
Directed By: Jake Kasdan

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 58598%
Critics Consensus: Though predictable and somewhat dramatically underwhelming, Trouble with the Curve benefits from Clint Eastwood's grizzled charisma and his easy chemistry with a charming Amy Adams.
Synopsis: For decades Gus Lobel (Clint Eastwood) has been one of baseball's best scouts -- but now his age is catching... [More]
Directed By: Robert Lorenz

#7

Alpha Dog (2006)
54%

#7
Adjusted Score: 59894%
Critics Consensus: A glossy yet unflinching portrait of violent, hedonistic teenagers. Bruce Willis and Sharon Stone chew the scenery, while Justin Timberlake gives a noteworthy performance.
Synopsis: Teenage dealer Johnny Truelove (Emile Hirsch) and his friends kidnap the impressionable younger brother (Anton Yelchin) of a junkie (Ben... [More]
Directed By: Nick Cassavetes

#6

Black Snake Moan (2007)
66%

#6
Adjusted Score: 71848%
Critics Consensus: Uninhibited performances, skillful direction, and a killer blues soundtrack elevate Black Snake Moan beyond its outlandish premise.
Synopsis: After her lover (Justin Timberlake) leaves to serve in the military, Rae (Christina Ricci) gives in to her raging libido... [More]
Directed By: Craig Brewer

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 74315%
Critics Consensus: Friends with Benefits adds nothing new to its well-worn rom-com formula, but the chemistry between Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis is almost enough to carry the movie by itself.
Synopsis: Jamie (Mila Kunis) is a New York-based executive recruiter who entices Dylan (Justin Timberlake), an art director from Los Angeles,... [More]
Directed By: Will Gluck

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 81879%
Critics Consensus: A fun follow-up for fans of the original, Trolls World Tour offers a second helping of colorful animation, infectious energy, and sing-along songs.
Synopsis: Poppy and Branch discover that there are six different troll tribes scattered over six different lands. Each tribe is also... [More]
Directed By: Walt Dohrn

#3

Trolls (2016)
75%

#3
Adjusted Score: 84907%
Critics Consensus: Trolls brings its instantly recognizable characters to the big screen in a colorful adventure that, while geared toward the younger set, isn't without rewards for parents.
Synopsis: After the Bergens invade Troll Village, Poppy (Anna Kendrick), the happiest Troll ever born, and the overly-cautious, curmudgeonly Branch (Justin... [More]
Directed By: Mike Mitchell, Walt Dohrn

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 102851%
Critics Consensus: Smart, funny, and profoundly melancholy, Inside Llewyn Davis finds the Coen brothers in fine form.
Synopsis: In 1961 New York City, folk singer Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) is at a crossroads. Guitar in hand, he struggles... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 107984%
Critics Consensus: Impeccably scripted, beautifully directed, and filled with fine performances, The Social Network is a riveting, ambitious example of modern filmmaking at its finest.
Synopsis: In 2003, Harvard undergrad and computer genius Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) begins work on a new concept that eventually turns... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

As you can probably surmise from the subheadline of this week’s column, the new releases on home video cover a wide variety of topics. From a kid flick to a sci-fi drama to a sex comedy, from a Herzog documentary (he’s so good at those, isn’t he?) to a twee indie dramedy to a horror-comedy, from a romantic drama to a crime caper to a feelgood Paul Rudd vehicle, we’ve said it before but we’ll say it again: there’s probably a little something in here for everyone. With the holiday season in full effect, we should start seeing some good releases, so let’s start with this week’s selections.



Friends with Benefits

68%

Some fuss was made earlier this year when the two stars of Darren Aronofsky’s acclaimed Black Swan separately appeared in two films with identical themes and equally obvious titles: first, Natalie Portman (who actually won the Best Actress Oscar for her role in Black Swan) starred in No Strings Attached, and a few months later, Mila Kunis starred in Friends with Benefits. Both explored the inevitable complications that arise in sex-only relationships, but while the former netted a mere 49% on the Tomatometer, Friends with Benefits impressed critics to the tune of 71%. Here, Kunis plays a corporate headhunter who recruits a hotshot art director (Justin Timberlake) from California for a job at GQ magazine in New York. The two immediately hit it off and agree to engage in a (ahem) no-strings-attached relationship of pure sex until they begin to realize they’re both falling for each other. So what made this film so much better than the Natalie Portman flick? Critics say the chemistry between Kunis and Timberlake is natural and immensely effective, almost carrying the movie by itself. You won’t find anything new to the rom-com formula here, but it sort of works anyway.



30 Minutes or Less

45%

Back in 2009, director Ruben Fleischer burst onto the scene with a bona fide hit in Zombieland, an uproarious take on the zombie flick genre that won both critical acclaim and big box office receipts and marked Fleischer as one to keep an eye on. 30 Minutes or Less, Fleischer’s second feature, was therefore something of a disappointment for many. Loosely based on a true story, 30 Minutes or Less was marred by some controversy over the fact that it made light of events that, in reality, ended in tragedy, but that was only part of the reason critics were left a bit unimpressed. Despite a talented cast, the narrative — about a typical pizza delivery guy (Jesse Eisenberg) who’s forced by dimwitted crooks (Danny McBride, Nick Swardson) to rob a bank with a bomb strapped to his chest — is disjointed, and makes the mistake of substituting crude gags for true lowbrow humor; critics therefore awarded it a mere 44% on the Tomatometer. The film is funny in spots, and the actors certainly know how to pull their weight, so you may get some mileage out of the film, but don’t expect anything on the level of Zombieland.



The Smurfs

21%

Throwbacks to bygone eras are nothing new in Hollywood, and for the past few years, it seems the 1980s have been the decade of choice to reference and mimic, with ’80s themes appearing in both live action and animated fare. Enter The Smurfs, based on those lovable little blue creatures who kept children entertained for years on Saturday mornings. In this film adaptation, a handful of Smurfs are chased through a portal by the evil wizard Gargamel (played with relish by Hank Azaria), only to end up in the real world of Manhattan. There, they befriend a sympathetic couple (Neil Patrick Harris and Glee‘s Jayma Mays) who help them find a way back home. Most critics found almost nothing to like about the movie, which makes sense on some level: The Smurfs was clearly crafted to appeal to the lowest common denominator, and by “lowest” we mean “shortest”… you know, kids. With broad, slapsticky humor and “Smurf”-heavy dialogue, this movie probably won’t do anything for you if you’re over the age of 5, but if you want your little ones to learn in the simplest way what “Greedy” and “Vain” mean, you could possibly do worse.



Our Idiot Brother

70%

There aren’t many actors out there more inherently likable than Paul Rudd, it seems; he might come across a little smug from time to time, but just try to resist that adorable, guileless smile of his. Our Idiot Brother makes the most of this likability by casting Rudd in a role that requires him to be perpetually happy, unflinchingly credulous, and, therefore, more than a little naïve. Ned (Rudd) is a simple farmer who believes strongly in the honest goodness of others; when an unlucky run-in with a cop gets him booted off the farm, he takes turns living with his three sisters (Elizabeth Banks, Emily Mortimer, Zooey Deschanel), who all think he is, well, an idiot. Over time, the sisters, whose routine lives are stressful in their own right, begin to see that Ned’s outlook on life isn’t so idiotic after all. Critics enjoyed Our Idiot Brother well enough, citing Rudd’s innocent charm in the title role as a big plus, even in the midst of the film’s uneven tone, and saw fit to give a 68% on the Tomatometer. It might be a little too cute and coy for some, but it also just might make you go, “Awww, well isn?t that nice?”



Tucker & Dale vs. Evil

85%

Horror-comedies are difficult to pull off effectively; these days, the go-to example of a good one is Shaun of the Dead, which was constantly hilarious, but also managed to get in a few decent thrills. As it turns out, Tucker & Dale vs. Evil does a pretty darn good job of it too, to the tune of an impressive Certified Fresh 86% on the Tomatometer. Accomplished character actor Alan Tudyk (Firefly, Dodgeball) and Tyler Labine (A Good Old Fashioned Orgy) are Tucker and Dale, respectively, a couple of everyday hillbillies who are on vacation in the woods. When they rescue an attractive teen (30 Rock‘s Katrina Bowden) from drowning and take her back to their cabin to nurse her back to health, her group of friends believe they’ve kidnapped her for nefarious purposes, and a hilarious tragedy of misunderstandings ensues. Critics found Tucker & Dale an effective mix of scares, laughs, and (surprisingly enough) heart, and though the movie’s central joke is replayed to death, most say it actually works. Tucker & Dale has actually been available through On Demand for a while now, but if you want a physical copy, now’s the time to pick one up.



Cave of Forgotten Dreams

96%

The Chauvet-Pont-d’Arc Cave in southern France contains the oldest known cave paintings — works of remarkable beauty and detail that are all the more amazing for being more than 30,000 years old. Since access to the cave is highly restricted, Werner Herzog’s Cave of Forgotten Dreams 3D is the next best thing to being there, and what a delightful, awe-inspiring tour it is. The 3D is used to terrific effect here — you can practically smell the dankness of the caves, and you’ll constantly feel the urge to duck stalactites — and the paintings are gobsmackingly beautiful and haunting — “the birth of the modern human soul,” as Herzog describes it. If you don’t have a 3D TV, the Cave Blu-ray/3D Blu-ray combo still allows you to check out the movie, but be aware: this is one movie that really does look better in all three dimensions.



One Day

36%

Blossoming superstar Anne Hathaway put on her sometimes iffy British accent once again for this romantic drama based on the bestselling David Nicholls novel of the same name. The film follows friends Emma (Hathaway) and Dexter (Jim Sturgess) over the course of 20 years, beginning with the day they meet (their University of Edinburgh graduation) and checking in on the same date every year. As the years pass, the pair naturally come to realize they may have been perfect for each other all along. Despite a solid cast, good source material to draw from, some interesting narrative elements, and the fact that director Lone Scherfig’s last effort was the multiple Oscar-nominated An Education, One Day failed to resonate with critics, who simply felt the film lacked the emotion, depth, and insight that made the book such a hit. At 37% on the Tomatometer, this is a risky venture, possibly suitable only for the most diehard of romantics.



Another Earth

66%

You probably won’t be in the middle on Another Earth; either you’ll find it to be a hypnotic meditation on fate and circumstance or a pretentious, self-serious snoozer. Regardless, few would call it conventional. It’s the tale of an aspiring astrophysicist whose carelessness changes the life of a brilliant composer forever; now that a new planet exactly like ours has been discovered, can our heroine get a second chance to make everything right? Brit Marling stars and co-wrote the screenplay for Another Earth, and the film offers proof of her unique talent — just don’t expect a typical sci-fi story. A two-disc Blu-ray/DVD combo also features a digital copy of the film, plus seven deleted scenes, short docs about the making of (and the science behind) the movie, and music video from the band Fall On Your Sword.



The Future

72%

You probably won’t be in the middle on The Future; either you’ll find it to be a hypnotic meditation on fate and circumstance or a pretentious, self-conscious cutefest. Regardless, few would call it conventional. It’s the tale of an eccentric young woman whose relationship with her boyfriend is on the rocks; now that stray cat has been adopted, can our heroine get a second chance to make everything right? Miranda July directed and stars in The Future, and the film offers (continuing) proof of her unique talent — just don’t expect a typical indie dramedy. The DVD features audio commentary with July, plus a deleted scene, and a making-of featurette.

This week at the movies, we’ve got a shield-wielding superhero (Captain America: The First Avenger, starring Chris Evans and Hayley Atwell) and a commitment-free couple (Friends With Benefits, starring Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis). What do the critics have to say?



Captain America: The First Avenger

80%

Good ol’ Captain America. He’s one of Marvel’s oldest heroes. But how does he fare in the 21st Century? Not badly at all, say critics; if Captain America: The First Avenger is a cut below Marvel’s other 2011 blockbusters (Thor and X-Men: First Class, both Certified Fresh), it’s still a rousing, proudly old-fashioned superhero flick with tons of visual flash and an exceptional lead performance from Chris Evans. Steve Rogers (Evans) is a super patriotic lad who’s rejected by the draft board as physically unable to serve. However, he’s enlisted by an expat scientist who’s working on an experiment to create super soldiers, and soon, he’s battling HYDRA, a terrorist organization led by a former Nazi called Red Skull. The pundits say Captain America is a scrappy crowd pleaser that compensates for its lack of originality with strong acting and sense of innocent nostalgia that’s refreshing in our irony-soaked era. (Check out Marvel Movie Madness, in which the RT staff memebers share our thoughts on all of the Marvel movie.)



Friends with Benefits

68%

Will Gluck scored big with Easy A, a teen comedy that brought smarts and freshness to a shopworn subgenre. Can he do the same with a grown up romantic comedy? It appears the answer is “for the most part;” critics say Friends With Benefits has moments of sharp humor and a pair of attractive, lively leads, but too often it veers into predictable territory. Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis star as, yes, friends with benefits: two busy, career-driven pals who agree to share physical intimacy while avoiding the potentially painful trappings of a committed relationship. But what if one starts to actually fall for the other? The pundits say Friends With Benefits gets a major boost from the stars’ easy chemistry and often witty banter, but the movie never fully avoids the clichés it’s attempting to skewer. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we count down co-star Woody Harrelson’s best-reviewed films.)

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • Life in a Day, a synthesis of YouTube videos uploaded by users around the globe in a single day, is at 100 percent.
  • The Woman With The 5 Elephants, a doc about the life and times of a great Russian literature translator, is at 100 percent.
  • World on a Wire, Rainer Werner Fassbinder‘s newly rediscovered 1973 dystopian sci-fi epic, is at 100 percent.
  • Fire in Babylon, a doc about the glory days of West Indian cricket squads in the post-colonial 1970s, is at 89 percent.
  • The Myth Of The American Sleepover, an indie coming-of-age dramedy about a group of teens’ late summer exploits before the beginning of a new school year, is at 83 percent.
  • Sarah’s Key, starring Kristin Scott Thomas in a drama about a journalist who uncovers a dark secret about a family dispossessed by the Nazis, is at 74 percent.
  • Another Earth, an indie sci-fi romance about a pair of damaged souls who attempt to start anew on an exact replica of our planet, is at 64 percent.
  • A Little Help, starring Jenna Fischer and Chris O’Donnell in a dramedy about a suburban woman who suffers a mental breakdown after 9/11, is at 39 percent.

Woody Harrelson

Woody Harrelson has come an awfully long way since he joined the cast of Cheers in 1985, originating the role of hayseed bartender Woody Boyd and kicking off a career that has grown to encompass one of the more eclectic, unusual, and just plain interesting filmographies in modern Hollywood. Comedies? Dramas? Thrillers? Harrelson’s done ’em all — and with his supporting turn in Friends with Benefits making its way to theaters this weekend, we figured now was the perfect time to take a look back at some of the critical highlights in the Harrelson oeuvre, Total Recall style!


77%

10. White Men Can’t Jump

During his Cheers years, Harrelson scored a few small roles in films such as Wildcats, L.A. Story, and Doc Hollywood, but it wasn’t until the show was nearing the end of its run that he got his first major big-screen break: co-starring with Wesley Snipes in Ron Shelton’s hit comedy White Men Can’t Jump. As a pair of bickering street basketball hustlers who form an uneasy partnership in order to pull off one big score, the perfectly matched odd couple helped send Jump to a $90 million worldwide gross — and although they failed to recapture the magic when they reunited for Money Train a few years later, this still stands as one of the more charmingly off-beat comedies of the decade. “This film unfolds in an uncommonly sweet, harmonious climate,” enthused Janet Maslin of the New York Times, “one in which rude remarks are the sine qua non of friendship. And that benign atmosphere becomes a large part of its charm.”


81%

9. The Thin Red Line

Marking director Terrence Malick’s return from a 20-year absence and featuring the work of a stellar ensemble cast that included Harrelson, Adrien Brody, George Clooney, John Cusack, and Sean Penn, The Thin Red Line was the film buff event of 1998. Even with a 170-minute running time, there wasn’t enough Line to go around — in fact, during all the whittling between its five-hour first cut and the theatrical version, Malick excised entire performances by Martin Sheen, Gary Oldman, Billy Bob Thornton, Viggo Mortensen, and others. Given all that, we couldn’t very well leave The Thin Red Line off the list — even if it isn’t Harrelson’s biggest performance, it’s really saying something that it ended up in the movie at all. And for most critics, there was no arguing with the end result; as Norman Green wrote for Film.com, “It wrestles with complexity, speaks to us in poetry, weaves multiple narrative strands into a tapestry, opens the festering wounds of war and gazes inside without blinking.”


80%

8. Welcome to Sarajevo

Filmed on location in war-torn Sarajevo and Croatia, Michael Winterbottom’s gritty, enraged Welcome to Sarajevo aimed a lens at the conflict in Bosnia and Herzegovina — in some cases using footage of actual war atrocities — and finds plenty of condemnation to go around. Harrelson co-stars here as Jimmy Flynn, a hotshot journalist whose quest for a story puts him in the midst of a hellish war zone — and a friendly rivalry with fellow reporter Michael Henderson (Stephen Dillane), who embroils Flynn in his efforts to smuggle orphans out of the country. Calling it “Messy and visceral, with an articulate, pointed anger that’s recognizably British,” Salon’s Charles Taylor praised Sarajevo for “[hitting] with an impact that’s not diminished by the fact that Sarajevo’s uneasy peace has held.”


81%

7. A Prairie Home Companion

One of America’s longest-running radio programs celebrated its 31st birthday in style with this Robert Altman-directed ensemble dramedy, an artful blend of fact and fiction that dramatizes one very important night behind the scenes. Completed mere months before Altman’s death, it provided a worthy closing statement for one of Hollywood’s most dignified careers — and gave Harrelson an opportunity to rub shoulders with a cast that included Meryl Streep, Lily Tomlin, Tommy Lee Jones, John C. Reilly, and Kevin Kline. “It sparkles with a magic all its own as an engagingly performed piece of Midwestern whimsy and stoicism,” wrote Andrew Sarris for the New York Observer, adding, “Mr. Altman’s flair for ensemble spectacle and seamless improvisation in the midst of utter chaos is as apparent as ever.”


86%

6. Wag the Dog

Harrelson took a small but pivotal role in this black political comedy — playing a deranged former soldier whose untimely demise complicates a Presidential adviser’s intricate, daffy, and eerily prescient plans — and although it didn’t amount to much in the way of screen time, it provides a vivid demonstration of Harrelson’s ability to deliver a memorable performance in just a few moments. Calling it “A wicked smart satire on the interlocking worlds of politics and show business,” Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times said “Wag the Dog confirms every awful thought you’ve ever had about media manipulation and the gullibility of the American public.”

88%

5. The People vs. Larry Flynt

The idea of making a biopic about one of America’s most infamous pornographers might have seemed like some kind of joke in 1996, but The People vs. Larry Flynt — starring Harrelson as Hustler publisher Flynt and helmed by One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest director Milos Forman — actually ended up being one of the more serious, thoughtful dramas of the decade. Though it wasn’t a huge box office success, Flynt earned Harrelson his first Academy Award nomination (and scored Courtney Love a Golden Globe nomination in the bargain), as well as heaps of praise from critics like Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle, who quipped that it was “a modern-day Capra film, about an unorthodox businessman who’s persecuted for his originality but eventually is recognized for the lovable, rugged American individualist he truly is.”


90%

4. The Messenger

Harrelson earned his second Oscar nomination for his work in this thoughtful war drama, which centers around a pair of Army officers (played by Harrelson and Ben Foster) saddled with the impossible task of telling the family members of fallen soldiers that their loved ones have died in combat. The directorial debut of screenwriter and former journalist Oren Moverman, The Messenger was ignored at the box office, where its minuscule $1.5 million gross offered further proof that audiences weren’t interested in seeing anything that would remind them of the wars in the Middle East — but it earned almost universal praise from critics like the Chicago Tribune’s Michael Phillips, who observed, “Some jobs are dirtier than others, and after seeing director and co-writer Oren Moverman’s beautifully acted new film, you’ll be better acquainted with some of the most grueling work a human being can be called upon to perform.”


89%

3. Zombieland

With the number of zombie movies that have been released, any new entry in the genre really has to do something different in order to stand out — and that’s just what Ruben Fleischer did with Zombieland, starring Harrelson as a cynical survivalist prowling post-outbreak America in search of a Twinkie, Jesse Eisenberg as a college student whose meek exterior masks a surprisingly effective zombie killer, and Emma Stone and Abigail Breslin as a pair of sisters who join them on their journey to a California amusement park that’s rumored to be zombie-free. Toss in one of the most excellent celebrity cameos in recent memory, and it all added up to a $100 million hit — and the movie Roger Moore of the Orlando Sentinel described as “the funniest zombie movie since Shawn of the Dead, funnier even than Fido” as well as “a 28 Days Later played for laughs — lots of them, endless jokes, one-liners and sight gags.”


91%

2. Transsiberian

Four strangers on a train barreling across the Trans-Siberian Express. What could go wrong? That’s the slowly unraveling mystery at the wintry heart of writer/director Brad Anderson’s Transsiberian, starring Harrelson and Emily Mortimer as a pair of missionaries whose return trip from China takes a series of unexpected turns after they find themselves sharing a train cabin with another couple (played by Eduardo Noriega and Kate Mara). It’s the kind of movie that’s better the less you know going in, so we won’t spoil any further plot details here; suffice it to say that, in the words of Colin Covert of the Minneapolis Star Tribune, “Anderson gives us an artful, shifty-eyed take on human strengths and weakness; his film delivers the pleasure of a conventional tale well told, with clever twists and complex characters.”


93%

1. No Country for Old Men

For a guy who made his name playing a harmless hayseed on a beloved sitcom, Woody Harrelson can come across as pretty menacing when he wants to. But you know who does that trick even better? Javier Bardem, whose character in No Country for Old Men, the terrifying bounty hunter Anton Chigurh, gets the drop on Harrelson’s character, a competing hitman and former acquaintance named Carson Wells — and after a few minutes of deeply disquieting banter, offs Wells with a bolt gun. It’s one of many shudder-worthy moments from the Coen brothers’ Oscar-winning adaptation of the Cormac McCarthy novel, which earned over $170 million at the box office and unqualified praise from critics like Tom Long of the Detroit News, who called it “A cold, rough look at the dissolution of just about everything” and added, “It will bother you afterward. It should.”


In case you were wondering, here are Harrelson’s top 10 movies according RT users’ scores:

1. Zombieland — 87%
2. No Country for Old Men — 84%
3. Natural Born Killers — 80%
4. Seven Pounds — 77%
5. The Thin Red Line — 75%
6. The People Vs. Larry Flynt — 74%
7. Welcome to Sarajevo — 74%
8. North Country — 72%
9. Wag the Dog — 72%
10. The Messenger — 72%


Take a look through Harrelson’s complete filmography, as well as the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for Friends with Benefits.

 

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