(Photo by Peter Iovino/©Universal Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection)

All Anna Kendrick Movies Ranked

Anna Kendrick’s first film was 2003’s Camp, a musical set at a camp for performing artists in upstate New York, a fitting extension of Kendrick’s childhood start in theater around her birthplace of Portland, Maine. The first of many Certified Fresh awards came with her next movie, Rocket Science; being cast as Jessica in the Twilight franchise meant Kendrick would have a high-profile job waiting for her for years to come.

Her career would soon become defined by steady versatility, appearing in a wide range of films like End of Watch, Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, and Cake. Kendrick is particularly adept in comedy hybrids, as seen in in The Voices, A Simple Favor, 50/50, and Up in the Air, the last of which garnered her a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nom. Meanwhile, she’s been one of the 2010s most reliable musical stars – just look at Into the WoodsTrolls and, of course, the Pitch Perfect series.

Her latest films were Stowaway and the Trolls sequel, World Tour. And now, we’re ranking all Anna Kendrick movies by Tomatometer!

#38

Get a Job (2016)
9%

#38
Adjusted Score: 8529%
Critics Consensus: Inauthentic and unfunny, Get a Job is paltry to the point that its long-delayed release feels purely the result of its wasted cast having been promoted to greater fame all these years later.
Synopsis: A young man (Miles Teller) and his girlfriend (Anna Kendrick) struggle to find desirable employment after graduating from college.... [More]
Directed By: Dylan Kidd

#37
#37
Adjusted Score: 9741%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A limousine driver (Jason Schwartzman) who once starred in high-school musicals hopes to cut an album, despite constant reminders of... [More]
Directed By: Todd Louiso

#36
Adjusted Score: 27400%
Critics Consensus: The cast is stocked with likable performers, but What to Expect When You're Expecting is too disjointed -- and too reliant on stock rom-com cliches -- to live up to its distinguished literary namesake.
Synopsis: Challenges of impending parenthood turn the lives of five couples upside down. Two celebrities are unprepared for the surprise demands... [More]
Directed By: Kirk Jones

#35

Rapture-Palooza (2013)
24%

#35
Adjusted Score: 21626%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Left behind after the Rapture, a young woman (Anna Kendrick) and her boyfriend (John Francis Daley) set out to prevent... [More]
Directed By: Paul Middleditch

#34

Table 19 (2017)
25%

#34
Adjusted Score: 33264%
Critics Consensus: Table 19 is marginally more entertaining than actually sitting with a table full of strangers at a wedding -- although most screenings won't come with an open bar, which makes it a wash.
Synopsis: Ex-maid of honor Eloise - having been relieved of her duties after being unceremoniously dumped by the best man via... [More]
Directed By: Jeffrey Blitz

#33
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: At last, Bella (Kristen Stewart) and Edward (Robert Pattinson) are getting married. When Jacob (Taylor Lautner) finds out that Bella... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#32
Adjusted Score: 37559%
Critics Consensus: The Twilight Saga's second installment may satisfy hardcore fans of the series, but outsiders are likely to be turned off by its slow pace, relentlessly downcast tone, and excessive length.
Synopsis: After the abrupt departure of Edward (Robert Pattinson), her vampire love, Bella (Kristen Stewart) finds comfort in her deepening friendship... [More]
Directed By: Chris Weitz

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After the highs of winning the world championships, the Bellas find themselves split apart and discovering there aren't job prospects... [More]
Directed By: Trish Sie

#30
Adjusted Score: 47436%
Critics Consensus: Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates benefits from the screwball premise and the efforts of a game cast, even if the sporadically hilarious results don't quite live up to either.
Synopsis: Mike and Dave Stangle are young, adventurous, fun-loving brothers who tend to get out of control at family gatherings. When... [More]
Directed By: Jake Szymanski

#29

Mr. Right (2015)
44%

#29
Adjusted Score: 46590%
Critics Consensus: Sam Rockwell and Anna Kendrick work well together, but Mr. Right is too much of a tonal jumble to take advantage of their chemistry.
Synopsis: A woman (Anna Kendrick) comes to a crossroad when she finds out that her new beau (Sam Rockwell) is a... [More]
Directed By: Paco Cabezas

#28

Life After Beth (2014)
45%

#28
Adjusted Score: 48559%
Critics Consensus: In spite of Aubrey Plaza's committed performance, Life After Beth remains a sketch-worthy idea that's been uncomfortably stretched to feature length.
Synopsis: A guy (Dane DeHaan) discovers that his girlfriend (Aubrey Plaza) has returned from the dead, but his joy turns to... [More]
Directed By: Jeff Baena

#27

The Hollars (2016)
47%

#27
Adjusted Score: 51117%
Critics Consensus: The Hollars gathers an impressive assortment of talented stars; unfortunately, it's all in service of a story that's been played out more effectively in countless other indie dramedies.
Synopsis: A man (John Krasinski) returns home to his dysfunctional family after learning that his mother (Margo Martindale) has a brain... [More]
Directed By: John Krasinski

#26

Cake (2014)
49%

#26
Adjusted Score: 53919%
Critics Consensus: Cake finds Jennifer Aniston making the most of an overdue opportunity to test her dramatic chops, but it lacks sufficient depth or warmth to recommend for all but her most ardent fans.
Synopsis: After having visions of a member of her support group who killed herself, a woman (Jennifer Aniston) who also suffers... [More]
Directed By: Daniel Barnz

#25
Adjusted Score: 56824%
Critics Consensus: Stuffed with characters and overly reliant on uninspired dialogue, Eclipse won't win The Twilight Saga many new converts, despite an improved blend of romance and action fantasy.
Synopsis: Danger once again surrounds Bella (Kristen Stewart), as a string of mysterious killings terrorizes Seattle and a malicious vampire continues... [More]
Directed By: David Slade

#24

Twilight (2008)

#24
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: High-school student Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart), always a bit of a misfit, doesn't expect life to change much when she... [More]
Directed By: Catherine Hardwicke

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Christian Wolff (Ben Affleck) is a mathematics savant with more affinity for numbers than people. Using a small-town CPA office... [More]
Directed By: Gavin O'Connor

#22

Noelle (2019)
54%

#22
Adjusted Score: 54691%
Critics Consensus: The always charming Anna Kendrick does her best, but Noelle's progressive take on a timeless tale is unfortunately subdued.
Synopsis: Kris Kringle's daughter is full of Christmas spirit but wishes she could do something important like her brother Nick, who... [More]
Directed By: Marc Lawrence

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 57507%
Critics Consensus: The Company You Keep is a (frustratingly) slow-burning thriller about very contemporary issues.
Synopsis: Decades after an ill-fated robbery, a former member (Susan Sarandon) of the Weather Underground turns herself in to authorities. While... [More]
Directed By: Robert Redford

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 63707%
Critics Consensus: The Last Five Years hits a few awkward notes in its transition from stage to screen, but its freshness and sincere charm -- and well-matched stars -- offer their own rewards.
Synopsis: In New York, a struggling actress (Anna Kendrick) and a successful writer (Jeremy Jordan) sing about their failed marriage from... [More]
Directed By: Richard LaGravenese

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 69039%
Critics Consensus: Absurd yet anchored in knotty real-world themes, The Day Shall Come adds another bleakly funny satire to director/co-writer Christopher Morris' filmography.
Synopsis: An impoverished preacher who brings hope to the Miami projects is offered cash to save his family from eviction. He... [More]
Directed By: Chris Morris

#18

Digging for Fire (2015)
64%

#18
Adjusted Score: 66137%
Critics Consensus: Digging for Fire finds director/co-writer Joe Swanberg working from a familiar palette, but in ways that suggest he's taking new and exciting strides as a filmmaker.
Synopsis: A house sitter (Jake Johnson) becomes an amateur sleuth after finding a bone and a gun on the property.... [More]
Directed By: Joe Swanberg

#17

Camp (2003)

#17
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: At Camp Ovation, kids of all ages spend their summer expressing themselves through dance, music and theater. Vlad (Daniel Letterle)... [More]
Directed By: Todd Graff

#16

Pitch Perfect 2 (2015)
65%

#16
Adjusted Score: 73772%
Critics Consensus: Pitch Perfect 2 sings in sweet comedic harmony, even if it doesn't hit quite as many high notes as its predecessor.
Synopsis: It's been three years since the Barden Bellas (Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson) became the first all-female group to win a... [More]
Directed By: Elizabeth Banks

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 81842%
Critics Consensus: A fun follow-up for fans of the original, Trolls World Tour offers a second helping of colorful animation, infectious energy, and sing-along songs.
Synopsis: Poppy and Branch discover that there are six different troll tribes scattered over six different lands. Each tribe is also... [More]
Directed By: Walt Dohrn

#14

Into the Woods (2014)
71%

#14
Adjusted Score: 80576%
Critics Consensus: On the whole, this Disney adaptation of the Sondheim classic sits comfortably at the corner of Hollywood and Broadway -- even if it darkens to its detriment in the final act.
Synopsis: As the result of the curse of a once-beautiful witch (Meryl Streep), a baker (James Corden) and his wife (Emily... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#13

The Voices (2014)
74%

#13
Adjusted Score: 77393%
Critics Consensus: The Voices gives Ryan Reynolds an opportunity to deliver a highlight-reel performance -- and offers an off-kilter treat for fans of black comedies.
Synopsis: A mentally unhinged factory worker (Ryan Reynolds) must decide whether to listen to his talking cat and become a killer,... [More]
Directed By: Marjane Satrapi

#12

Trolls (2016)
75%

#12
Adjusted Score: 84986%
Critics Consensus: Trolls brings its instantly recognizable characters to the big screen in a colorful adventure that, while geared toward the younger set, isn't without rewards for parents.
Synopsis: After the Bergens invade Troll Village, Poppy (Anna Kendrick), the happiest Troll ever born, and the overly-cautious, curmudgeonly Branch (Justin... [More]
Directed By: Mike Mitchell, Walt Dohrn

#11

Happy Christmas (2014)
75%

#11
Adjusted Score: 77760%
Critics Consensus: Intelligent, well-acted, and satisfyingly low-key, Happy Christmas marks another step in prolific filmmaker Joe Swanberg's creative evolution.
Synopsis: An immature party girl (Anna Kendrick) moves in with her brother's family to get over a breakup and throws their... [More]
Directed By: Joe Swanberg

#10

Stowaway (2021)
77%

#10
Adjusted Score: 81998%
Critics Consensus: Pacing problems prevent Stowaway from fully engaging, but it's distinguished by its thoughtful, well-acted approach to a story built on an excruciating moral dilemma.
Synopsis: A three-person crew on a mission to Mars faces an impossible choice when an unplanned passenger jeopardizes the lives of... [More]
Directed By: Joe Penna

#9

Pitch Perfect (2012)
81%

#9
Adjusted Score: 86241%
Critics Consensus: Pitch Perfect's plot is formulaic, but the performances are excellent and the musical numbers are toe-tapping as well.
Synopsis: College student Beca (Anna Kendrick) knows she does not want to be part of a clique, but that's exactly where... [More]
Directed By: Jason Moore

#8
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: As bass guitarist for a garage-rock band, Scott Pilgrim (Michael Cera) has never had trouble getting a girlfriend; usually, the... [More]
Directed By: Edgar Wright

#7

Rocket Science (2007)
84%

#7
Adjusted Score: 87022%
Critics Consensus: Though Rocket Science appears to be a typically quirky indie, the well-rounded performances and director Jeffrey Blitz's clear affection for his characters gives the film its proper human spark.
Synopsis: High-school student Hal Hefner's (Reece Daniel Thompson) life is falling down around him. His parents have split, his brother picks... [More]
Directed By: Jeffrey Blitz

#6

Drinking Buddies (2013)
84%

#6
Adjusted Score: 87462%
Critics Consensus: Smart, funny, and powered by fine performances from Olivia Wilde and Jake Johnson, Drinking Buddies offers a bittersweet slice of observational comedy.
Synopsis: Although they're both dating other people, two co-workers (Olivia Wilde, Jake Johnson) hang out together in bars and try to... [More]
Directed By: Joe Swanberg

#5

A Simple Favor (2018)
84%

#5
Adjusted Score: 99514%
Critics Consensus: Twisty, twisted, and above all simply fun, A Simple Favor casts a stylish mommy noir spell strengthened by potent performances from Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively.
Synopsis: Stephanie is a widowed, single mother who works as a vlogger in Connecticut. Her best friend, Emily, seems to have... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

#4

End of Watch (2012)

#4
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Longtime LAPD partners and friends, Brian Taylor (Jake Gyllenhaal) and Mike Zavala (Michael Peña) patrol one of the most dangerous... [More]
Directed By: David Ayer

#3

ParaNorman (2012)
89%

#3
Adjusted Score: 95758%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully animated and solidly scripted, ParaNorman will entertain (and frighten) older children while providing surprisingly thoughtful fare for their parents.
Synopsis: Young Norman Babcock (Kodi Smit-McPhee) has the ability to speak with the dead -- and he often prefers their company... [More]
Directed By: Chris Butler, Sam Fell

#2

Up in the Air (2009)
90%

#2
Adjusted Score: 102108%
Critics Consensus: Led by charismatic performances by its three leads, director Jason Reitman delivers a smart blend of humor and emotion with just enough edge for mainstream audiences.
Synopsis: An idea from a young, new co-worker (Anna Kendrick) would put an end to the constant travel of corporate downsizer... [More]
Directed By: Jason Reitman

#1

50/50 (2011)

#1
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Adam Lerner (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) has always tried to take good care of his health, so it comes as a cruel... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Levine

(Photo by Summit Entertainment)

All Kristen Stewart Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Before she became ambassador for vegetarian vampire-and-werewolf relations in the late 2000s, Kristen Stewart had already built a steady career transitioning from child actor roles and into young adulthood. First, she starred in David Fincher’s efficient potboiler Panic Room, then went into space with with Jumanji cinematic universe-adjacent Zathura (directed by pre-Iron Man Jon Faverau), and helped guide a wayward traveler in Into the Wild.

Of course, that all seems like pre-history in the wake of Twilight, the romantic fantasy phenomenon that would make unlikely tabloid stars out of Stewart and Robert Pattinson for years to come. Five Twilight movies released annually for a half-decade, and whatever the benefits of becoming household names through them, there was also the very real threat of a post-career forever in the shadow of the vampire.

Stewart responded, much like Pattinson, by going indie, as she racked up impressive performances in the likes of Still Alice, Personal Shopper, Clouds of Sils Maria, and Certain Women, working with big arthouse names like Olivier Assayas and Kelly Reichardt. She also completed her unofficial “Co-Starring Jesse Eisenberg” trilogy that started with Adventureland, following through with American Ultra and Cafe Society.

Even Stewart’s approach towards mainstream filmmaking come packaged with feminist or revisionist touches, like Charlie’s Angels or Snow White and the Huntsman. She took a dive in Underwater, and ended 2020 on a Happiest Season. And now we’re ranking all her movies by Tomatometer!

#40

Cold Creek Manor (2003)
12%

#40
Adjusted Score: 14358%
Critics Consensus: The plot of Cold Creek Manor is too predictable and contrived to generate suspense.
Synopsis: When filmmaker Cooper Tilson (Dennis Quaid) and his wife, Leah (Sharon Stone), tire of life in New York City, they... [More]
Directed By: Mike Figgis

#39
#39
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When the Solomons trade in the craziness of big-city life for the quiet of a North Dakota farm, little do... [More]

#38
#38
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Athletic 12-year-old Maddy (Kristen Stewart) shares an enthusiasm for mountain climbing with her father, Tom (Sam Robards). Unfortunately, Tom suffers... [More]
Directed By: Bart Freundlich

#37

Jumper (2008)
15%

#37
Adjusted Score: 20622%
Critics Consensus: Featuring uninvolving characters and loose narrative, Jumper is an erratic action pic with little coherence and lackluster special effects.
Synopsis: Aimless David Rice (Hayden Christensen) has the ability to instantly transport himself to any place he can imagine. He uses... [More]
Directed By: Doug Liman

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Finn (Anton Yelchin) is a teenager trying to escape his drug-addicted mother (Diane Lane) by going to study tribal people.... [More]
Directed By: Griffin Dunne

#35

Anesthesia (2015)
25%

#35
Adjusted Score: 26926%
Critics Consensus: Anesthesia's incredible cast is wasted on a sloppily-assembled drama whose grand ambitions are undermined by a flawed screenplay.
Synopsis: The lives of a self-destructive student (Kristen Stewart), a hard-drinking housewife (Gretchen Mol) and an impoverished junkie (K. Todd Freeman)... [More]
Directed By: Tim Blake Nelson

#34
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: At last, Bella (Kristen Stewart) and Edward (Robert Pattinson) are getting married. When Jacob (Taylor Lautner) finds out that Bella... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#33
Adjusted Score: 37559%
Critics Consensus: The Twilight Saga's second installment may satisfy hardcore fans of the series, but outsiders are likely to be turned off by its slow pace, relentlessly downcast tone, and excessive length.
Synopsis: After the abrupt departure of Edward (Robert Pattinson), her vampire love, Bella (Kristen Stewart) finds comfort in her deepening friendship... [More]
Directed By: Chris Weitz

#32

Equals (2015)
36%

#32
Adjusted Score: 40651%
Critics Consensus: Equals is a treat for the eyes, but its futuristic aesthetic isn't enough to make up for its plodding pace and aimlessly derivative story.
Synopsis: Nia (Kristen Stewart) and Silas work together in a futuristic society known as the Collective. A seemingly utopian world, the... [More]
Directed By: Drake Doremus

#31

Seberg (2019)
36%

#31
Adjusted Score: 45020%
Critics Consensus: Seberg's frustratingly superficial treatment of a fascinating true story does a disservice to its subject -- and Kristen Stewart's performance in the central role.
Synopsis: In the late 1960s, French new wave actress and "Breathless" star Jean Seberg becomes the target of the FBI due... [More]
Directed By: Benedict Andrews

#30

American Ultra (2015)
44%

#30
Adjusted Score: 50024%
Critics Consensus: American Ultra has some interesting ideas, but like its stoned protagonist, it's too easily distracted to live up to its true potential.
Synopsis: Small-town stoner Mike Howell (Jesse Eisenberg) spends most of his time getting high and writing a graphic novel. What Mike... [More]
Directed By: Nima Nourizadeh

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 47598%
Critics Consensus: While pleasantly acted, In the Land of Women is a dramatically stilted film with underdeveloped characters.
Synopsis: After a bad breakup with his girlfriend leaves him heartbroken, Carter Webb (Adam Brody) moves to Michigan to take care... [More]
Directed By: Jon Kasdan

#28
Adjusted Score: 52642%
Critics Consensus: Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk has noble goals, but lacks a strong enough screenplay to achieve them -- and its visual innovations are often merely distracting.
Synopsis: Nineteen-year-old private Billy Lynn (Joe Alwyn), along with his fellow soldiers in Bravo Squad, becomes a hero after a harrowing... [More]
Directed By: Ang Lee

#27

On the Road (2012)
45%

#27
Adjusted Score: 50939%
Critics Consensus: Beautiful to look at but a bit too respectfully crafted, On the Road doesn't capture the energy and inspiration of Jack Kerouac's novel.
Synopsis: An aspiring writer (Sam Riley), his new friend (Garrett Hedlund) and his friend's seductive wife (Kristen Stewart) heed the call... [More]
Directed By: Walter Salles

#26
Adjusted Score: 56824%
Critics Consensus: Stuffed with characters and overly reliant on uninspired dialogue, Eclipse won't win The Twilight Saga many new converts, despite an improved blend of romance and action fantasy.
Synopsis: Danger once again surrounds Bella (Kristen Stewart), as a string of mysterious killings terrorizes Seattle and a malicious vampire continues... [More]
Directed By: David Slade

#25

Twilight (2008)

#25
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: High-school student Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart), always a bit of a misfit, doesn't expect life to change much when she... [More]
Directed By: Catherine Hardwicke

#24
Adjusted Score: 57370%
Critics Consensus: It's the most entertaining Twilight, but that's not enough to make Breaking Dawn Part 2 worth watching for filmgoers who don't already count themselves among the franchise converts.
Synopsis: Bella (Kristen Stewart) awakes -- as a vampire -- from her life-threatening labor, and her newborn daughter, Renesmee, proves to... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#23
Adjusted Score: 60076%
Critics Consensus: While it offers an appropriately dark take on the fairy tale that inspired it, Snow White and the Huntsman is undone by uneven acting, problematic pacing, and a confused script.
Synopsis: Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron), who seized control of her kingdom by marrying and killing its rightful ruler, needs the life... [More]
Directed By: Rupert Sanders

#22
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In a suburban landscape, the lives of several families interlace with loss, despair and personal crisis. Esther Gold (Glenn Close)... [More]
Directed By: Rose Troche

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 55367%
Critics Consensus: What Just Happened has some inspired comic moments, but this inside-baseball take on Hollywood lacks satirical bite.
Synopsis: During the course of an ordinary week in Hollywood, movie producer Ben (Robert De Niro) must navigate his way through... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#20

Underwater (2020)
47%

#20
Adjusted Score: 62175%
Critics Consensus: Underwater's strong cast and stylish direction aren't enough to distract from the strong sense of déjà vu provoked by this claustrophobic thriller's derivative story.
Synopsis: Disaster strikes more than six miles below the ocean surface when water crashes through the walls of a drilling station.... [More]
Directed By: William Eubank

#19

Charlie's Angels (2019)
52%

#19
Adjusted Score: 65099%
Critics Consensus: Earnest and energetic, if a bit uneven, Elizabeth Banks's pulpy Charlie's Angels adds new flair to the franchise with fun performances from its three leads.
Synopsis: Elena Houghlin is a scientist, engineer and inventor of Calisto -- a sustainable energy source that will revolutionize the way... [More]
Directed By: Elizabeth Banks

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 56576%
Critics Consensus: Despite earnest performances, Welcome to the Rileys cannot escape its belabored over-sentimentality and sluggish delivery.
Synopsis: Seeking refuge from his grief and crumbling marriage, a salesman (James Gandolfini) becomes a surrogate father to an underage stripper... [More]
Directed By: Jake Scott

#17

Undertow (2004)
55%

#17
Adjusted Score: 58002%
Critics Consensus: Undertow's gently fantastical elements are balanced by fully realized characters and a story with genuine, steadily accumulating emotional weight.
Synopsis: After his wife dies, John Munn (Dermot Mulroney) moves with his sons Chris (Jamie Bell) and Tim (Devon Alan) to... [More]
Directed By: David Gordon Green

#16

J.T. LeRoy (2018)
55%

#16
Adjusted Score: 59712%
Critics Consensus: While it may leave some viewers wishing for a more in-depth exploration of its story and themes, J.T. Leroy offers a diverting dramatization of incredible real-life events.
Synopsis: A young woman named Savannah Knoop spends six years pretending to be the celebrated author JT LeRoy, the made-up literary... [More]
Directed By: Justin Kelly

#15

The Cake Eaters (2007)
64%

#15
Adjusted Score: 64138%
Critics Consensus: Though light on theme and craftsmanship, The Cake Eaters relies on fine performances and brisk direction to provide an affecting tale of small-town life.
Synopsis: The death of the Kimbrough family matriarch affects the three male survivors of the clan. Widower Easy (Bruce Dern) tries... [More]
Directed By: Mary Stuart Masterson

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 67154%
Critics Consensus: Small and intimate -- occasionally to a fault -- The Yellow Handkerchief rises above its overly familiar ingredients thanks to riveting performances from William Hurt and Kristen Stewart.
Synopsis: Former con man Brett Hanson (William Hurt) is imprisoned for six years before finally being released on parole. Now he... [More]
Directed By: Udayan Prasad

#13

Lizzie (2018)
66%

#13
Adjusted Score: 73762%
Critics Consensus: Lizzie forces audiences to take a new look at a widely known true-crime story -- even if the well-acted end result is never quite as gripping as it could be.
Synopsis: In 1892 Lizzie Borden lives a quiet life in Massachusetts under the strict rules established by her father. Lizzie finds... [More]

#12

The Runaways (2010)
69%

#12
Adjusted Score: 75192%
Critics Consensus: Viewers expecting an in-depth biopic will be disappointed, but The Runaways is as electric as the band's music, largely thanks to strong performances from Michael Shannon, Dakota Fanning, and Kristen Stewart.
Synopsis: Joan Jett (Kristen Stewart) and Cherie Currie (Dakota Fanning), two rebellious teenagers from Southern California, become the frontwomen for the... [More]
Directed By: Floria Sigismondi

#11

Café Society (2016)
71%

#11
Adjusted Score: 85948%
Critics Consensus: Café Society's lovely visuals and charming performances round out a lightweight late-period Allen comedy whose genuine pleasures offset its amiable predictability.
Synopsis: Looking for an exciting career, young Bobby Dorfman leaves New York for the glitz and glamour of 1930s Hollywood. After... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#10

Camp X-Ray (2014)
75%

#10
Adjusted Score: 75643%
Critics Consensus: Camp X-Ray's treatment of its subject verges on the shallow, but benefits greatly from a pair of impressive performances from Kristen Stewart and Peyman Moaadi.
Synopsis: A female guard (Kristen Stewart) at Guantanamo Bay forms an unlikely friendship with one of the facility's longtime detainees.... [More]
Directed By: Peter Sattler

#9

Panic Room (2002)
75%

#9
Adjusted Score: 81824%
Critics Consensus: Elevated by David Fincher's directorial talent and Jodie Foster's performance, Panic Room is a well-crafted, above-average thriller.
Synopsis: Trapped in their New York brownstone's panic room, a hidden chamber built as a sanctuary in the event of break-ins,... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#8

Zathura (2005)
76%

#8
Adjusted Score: 81240%
Critics Consensus: Dazzling special effects for the kids + well-crafted storytelling for the 'rents = cinematic satisfaction for the whole family.
Synopsis: After their father (Tim Robbins) is called into work, two young boys, Walter (Josh Hutcherson) and Danny (Jonah Bobo), are... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#7

Personal Shopper (2016)
81%

#7
Adjusted Score: 100433%
Critics Consensus: Personal Shopper attempts a tricky series of potentially jarring tonal shifts with varying results, bolstered by a performance from Kristen Stewart that's impossible to ignore.
Synopsis: A young American in Paris works as a personal shopper for a celebrity. She seems to have the ability to... [More]
Directed By: Olivier Assayas

#6

Into the Wild (2007)
83%

#6
Adjusted Score: 90569%
Critics Consensus: With his sturdy cast and confident direction, Sean Penn has turned a complex work of non-fiction like Into the Wild into an accessible and poignant character study.
Synopsis: Christopher McCandless (Emile Hirsch), son of wealthy parents (Marcia Gay Harden, William Hurt), graduates from Emory University as a top... [More]
Directed By: Sean Penn

#5

Happiest Season (2020)
82%

#5
Adjusted Score: 95288%
Critics Consensus: A jolly good time with heartfelt performances and more than enough holiday cheer, all you'll want for Christmas is Happiest Season.
Synopsis: This romantic comedy is about longtime lesbian couple Abby (Kristen Stewart) and Harper (Mackenzie Davis), who made plans to go... [More]
Directed By: Clea DuVall

#4

Still Alice (2014)
85%

#4
Adjusted Score: 93222%
Critics Consensus: Elevated by a gripping performance from Julianne Moore, Still Alice is a heartfelt drama that honors its delicate themes with bravery and sensitivity.
Synopsis: Dr. Alice Howland (Julianne Moore) is a renowned linguistics professor at Columbia University. When words begin to escape her and... [More]

#3

Adventureland (2009)
89%

#3
Adjusted Score: 98911%
Critics Consensus: Full of humor and nostalgia, Adventureland is a sweet, insightful coming-of-age comedy that will resonate with teens and adults alike.
Synopsis: It's the summer of 1987, and recent college grad James Brennan (Jesse Eisenberg) can't wait to begin his long-anticipated dream... [More]
Directed By: Greg Mottola

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 97026%
Critics Consensus: Bolstered by a trio of powerful performances from its talented leads, Clouds of Sils Maria is an absorbing, richly detailed drama with impressive depth and intelligence.
Synopsis: A veteran actress (Juliette Binoche) comes face-to-face with an uncomfortable reflection of herself when she agrees to take part in... [More]
Directed By: Olivier Assayas

#1

Certain Women (2016)
92%

#1
Adjusted Score: 102968%
Critics Consensus: Certain Women further demonstrates writer-director Kelly Reichardt's gift for telling the stories of ordinary people with uncommon empathy and skill.
Synopsis: Three strong-willed women (Kristen Stewart, Laura Dern, Michelle Williams) strive to forge their own paths amidst the wide-open plains of... [More]
Directed By: Kelly Reichardt

(Photo by Summit/ courtesy Everett Collection)

How to Watch Twilight Movies In Order

If you’re getting ready to experience the seductive, suspenseful love story of Bella and Edward for the first time, here’s how you can watch all Twilight movies in order. 2008’s original Twilight introduces us to teenager Bella (Kristen Stewart) and her attraction to Edward (Robert Pattinson), a vampire-among-us. New Moon makes it a triangle with the arrival of Jacob (Taylor Lautner), he of a rival werewolf pack. The real battle begins in Eclipse, come to a bed-smashing head in the two-part Breaking Dawn. See below for our guide on how to watch all Twilight movies in order.

#5

Twilight (2008)

#5
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: High-school student Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart), always a bit of a misfit, doesn't expect life to change much when she... [More]
Directed By: Catherine Hardwicke

#4
Adjusted Score: 37559%
Critics Consensus: The Twilight Saga's second installment may satisfy hardcore fans of the series, but outsiders are likely to be turned off by its slow pace, relentlessly downcast tone, and excessive length.
Synopsis: After the abrupt departure of Edward (Robert Pattinson), her vampire love, Bella (Kristen Stewart) finds comfort in her deepening friendship... [More]
Directed By: Chris Weitz

#3
Adjusted Score: 56824%
Critics Consensus: Stuffed with characters and overly reliant on uninspired dialogue, Eclipse won't win The Twilight Saga many new converts, despite an improved blend of romance and action fantasy.
Synopsis: Danger once again surrounds Bella (Kristen Stewart), as a string of mysterious killings terrorizes Seattle and a malicious vampire continues... [More]
Directed By: David Slade

#2
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: At last, Bella (Kristen Stewart) and Edward (Robert Pattinson) are getting married. When Jacob (Taylor Lautner) finds out that Bella... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#1
Adjusted Score: 57370%
Critics Consensus: It's the most entertaining Twilight, but that's not enough to make Breaking Dawn Part 2 worth watching for filmgoers who don't already count themselves among the franchise converts.
Synopsis: Bella (Kristen Stewart) awakes -- as a vampire -- from her life-threatening labor, and her newborn daughter, Renesmee, proves to... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

(Photo by Caitlin Cronenberg, © Entertainment One/courtesy Everett Collection)

All Robert Pattinson Movies, Ranked By Tomatometer

Robert Pattinson on the Twilight series press circuits would occasionally mock the movies he was out there supposedly promoting, suggesting two things: (1) maybe this new on the scene IT boy was actually a genuine person, and (2) he had made enough money by New Moon to never work in this town again. Many young actors’ careers have been crushed under the weight of the very things that made them famous. And unemployment post-Twilight was a very real threat for Pattinson: Would he only be remembered as that pasty sparkling vegetarian vampire?

As Twilight wound down, Pattinson threw himself before the arthouse gods, who guided him to challenging directors like David Cronenberg (Cosmopolis, Maps to the Stars), Anton Corbijn (Life), Werner Herzog (Queen of the Desert), and David Michôd (The Rover). And though none of those movies represented their respective director’s best work, and in the case of Herzog it was actually his worst, they showcased Pattinson as a dedicated performer and, especially in dystopian western The Rover, a sometimes unpredictable and savage one.

And then in 2017 he put out Good Time, just to show you sometimes all you need is that one movie to turn your image around. As with the Safdie brothers’ later Uncut Gems, Good Time assaults the senses while building a central emphatic and engaging character defined by constant frantic action. Pattinson came out as the indie hero of that year, and having James Gray’s The Lost City of Z release around the same time didn’t hurt, either. A strong 2019 continued that trend with Claire Denis’ High Life and Robert Eggers’ The Lighthouse.

His latest film was Netflix thriller The Devil All the Time, opposite Tom Holland. And currently a dark night falls upon Pattinson’s career as he takes on the mantle of Bruce Wayne in Matt Reeves’ The Batman, which is scheduled for an October 21, 2021 release. Before that swings into theaters, take a look at all Robert Pattinson movies, ranked by Tomatometer!

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 22203%
Critics Consensus: Queen of the Desert unites some undeniably talented professionals, but it's difficult to discern what drew them together -- or understand how its compelling real-life story became such a muddled mess.
Synopsis: Gertrude Bell's life as an explorer, cartographer, and archaeologist for the British Empire.... [More]
Directed By: Werner Herzog

#21

Little Ashes (2008)
24%

#21
Adjusted Score: 25971%
Critics Consensus: It has a beautiful cast, but Little Ashes suffers from an uneven tone and a surplus of unintentionally silly moments.
Synopsis: The young life and the loves of artist Salvador Dali.... [More]
Directed By: Paul Morrison

#20
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: At last, Bella (Kristen Stewart) and Edward (Robert Pattinson) are getting married. When Jacob (Taylor Lautner) finds out that Bella... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#19

Remember Me (2010)

#19
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Tyler (Robert Pattinson) has had a strained relationship with his father (Pierce Brosnan) since a family tragedy. Rebellious and troubled,... [More]
Directed By: Allen Coulter

#18

Bel Ami (2012)
27%

#18
Adjusted Score: 30820%
Critics Consensus: Bel Ami contains some soapy pleasures but it overall rushes through the narrative and suffers from a vague central performance by Robert Pattinson.
Synopsis: A morally bankrupt schemer (Robert Pattinson) rises to the upper echelons of Parisian society by seducing a series of powerful... [More]

#17
Adjusted Score: 37559%
Critics Consensus: The Twilight Saga's second installment may satisfy hardcore fans of the series, but outsiders are likely to be turned off by its slow pace, relentlessly downcast tone, and excessive length.
Synopsis: After the abrupt departure of Edward (Robert Pattinson), her vampire love, Bella (Kristen Stewart) finds comfort in her deepening friendship... [More]
Directed By: Chris Weitz

#16
Adjusted Score: 56824%
Critics Consensus: Stuffed with characters and overly reliant on uninspired dialogue, Eclipse won't win The Twilight Saga many new converts, despite an improved blend of romance and action fantasy.
Synopsis: Danger once again surrounds Bella (Kristen Stewart), as a string of mysterious killings terrorizes Seattle and a malicious vampire continues... [More]
Directed By: David Slade

#15
Adjusted Score: 57370%
Critics Consensus: It's the most entertaining Twilight, but that's not enough to make Breaking Dawn Part 2 worth watching for filmgoers who don't already count themselves among the franchise converts.
Synopsis: Bella (Kristen Stewart) awakes -- as a vampire -- from her life-threatening labor, and her newborn daughter, Renesmee, proves to... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#14

Twilight (2008)

#14
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: High-school student Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart), always a bit of a misfit, doesn't expect life to change much when she... [More]
Directed By: Catherine Hardwicke

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 67487%
Critics Consensus: It's a tale tastefully told and beautifully filmed, but Water for Elephants suffers from a pronounced lack of chemistry between its leads.
Synopsis: Jacob Jankowski (Robert Pattinson), a veterinary student, is close to graduating when a terrible tragedy forces him to leave school.... [More]
Directed By: Francis Lawrence

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 67126%
Critics Consensus: Narratively unwieldy and tonally jumbled, Maps to the Stars still has enough bite to satisfy David Cronenberg fans in need of a coolly acidic fix.
Synopsis: Driven by an intense need for fame and validation, members of a dysfunctional Hollywood dynasty have lives as dramatic as... [More]
Directed By: David Cronenberg

#11

Life (2015)
64%

#11
Adjusted Score: 66055%
Critics Consensus: Life may frustrate viewers seeking a James Dean biopic with its subject's intensity, but it remains a diverting, well-acted effort assembled with admirable craft and ambition.
Synopsis: In 1955, young photographer Dennis Stock (Robert Pattinson) develops a close bond with actor James Dean (Dane DeHaan) while shooting... [More]
Directed By: Anton Corbijn

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 77661%
Critics Consensus: The Devil All the Time's descent into darkness can be harrowing to the point of punishment, but it's offset by strong work from a stellar cast.
Synopsis: A young man is devoted to protecting his loved ones in a town full of corruption and sinister characters.... [More]
Directed By: Antonio Campos

#9

Cosmopolis (2012)
66%

#9
Adjusted Score: 73378%
Critics Consensus: Though some may find it cold and didactic, Cosmopolis benefits from David Cronenberg's precise direction, resulting in a psychologically complex adaptation of Don DeLillo's novel.
Synopsis: A 28-year-old billionaire (Robert Pattinson) senses his empire collapsing around him as he takes a limo ride across Manhattan to... [More]
Directed By: David Cronenberg

#8

The Rover (2014)
67%

#8
Adjusted Score: 73032%
Critics Consensus: Fueled by engaging performances from Guy Pearce and Robert Pattinson, the tension-filled The Rover overcomes its narrative faults through sheer watchability.
Synopsis: In the near future, mankind's greed and excesses have pushed civilization to the breaking point. Society is in decline, and... [More]
Directed By: David Michôd

#7

Damsel (2018)
67%

#7
Adjusted Score: 73453%
Critics Consensus: The beautifully filmed Damsel injects the western genre with a welcome dose of humor and some unexpected twists, although its stately pace may frustrate impatient viewers.
Synopsis: Samuel Alabaster, an affluent pioneer, ventures across the American frontier to marry the love of his life, Penelope. As his... [More]

#6

High Life (2018)
82%

#6
Adjusted Score: 96494%
Critics Consensus: High Life is as visually arresting as it is challenging, confounding, and ultimately rewarding - which is to say it's everything film fans expect from director Claire Denis.
Synopsis: Monte and his baby daughter are the last survivors of a damned and dangerous mission to the outer reaches of... [More]
Directed By: Claire Denis

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 103391%
Critics Consensus: The Lost City of Z's stately pace and visual grandeur hearken back to classic exploration epics, and Charlie Hunnam turns in a masterful performance as its complex protagonist.
Synopsis: At the dawn of the 20th century, British explorer Percy Fawcett journeys into the Amazon, where he discovers evidence of... [More]
Directed By: James Gray

#4
Adjusted Score: 97486%
Critics Consensus: The main characters are maturing, and the filmmakers are likewise improving on their craft; vibrant special effects and assured performances add up to what is the most complex yet of the Harry Potter films.
Synopsis: The fourth movie in the Harry Potter franchise sees Harry (Daniel Radcliffe) returning for his fourth year at Hogwarts School... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#3
Adjusted Score: 92389%
Critics Consensus: The Childhood of a Leader mirrors the rise of fascism in post-WWI Europe with a well-acted, confidently crafted look at one young man's unsettling coming of age.
Synopsis: The childhood of a post-World War I leader.... [More]
Directed By: Brady Corbet

#2

The Lighthouse (2019)
90%

#2
Adjusted Score: 113061%
Critics Consensus: A gripping story brilliantly filmed and led by a pair of powerhouse performances, The Lighthouse further establishes Robert Eggers as a filmmaker of exceptional talent.
Synopsis: Two lighthouse keepers try to maintain their sanity while living on a remote and mysterious New England island in the... [More]
Directed By: Robert Eggers

#1

Good Time (2017)
92%

#1
Adjusted Score: 108685%
Critics Consensus: A visual treat filled out by consistently stellar work from Robert Pattinson, Good Time is a singularly distinctive crime drama offering far more than the usual genre thrills.
Synopsis: A bank robber stops at nothing to free his brother from prison, launching himself into a nightlong odyssey through New... [More]
Directed By: Josh Safdie, Benny Safdie

Joel Schmacher

(Photo by Summitt Entertainment/courtesy Everett Collection.)

All Twilight Saga Movies, Ranked by Tomatometer

Re-visit the series that launched Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson (not to mention vegetarian vampires) into the international spotlightlight! From 2008 and 2012, The Twilight Saga was a pop culture fixture, with the hype, secrecy, and buzz for each movie on par with the latest comic book blockbuster. The critics may not have been on board for each one, but audiences sure showed up, and now we’re looking back on everything from the original Twilight to Breaking Dawn as we rank all Twilight Saga movies by Tomatometer!

#5
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: At last, Bella (Kristen Stewart) and Edward (Robert Pattinson) are getting married. When Jacob (Taylor Lautner) finds out that Bella... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#4
Adjusted Score: 37559%
Critics Consensus: The Twilight Saga's second installment may satisfy hardcore fans of the series, but outsiders are likely to be turned off by its slow pace, relentlessly downcast tone, and excessive length.
Synopsis: After the abrupt departure of Edward (Robert Pattinson), her vampire love, Bella (Kristen Stewart) finds comfort in her deepening friendship... [More]
Directed By: Chris Weitz

#3
Adjusted Score: 56824%
Critics Consensus: Stuffed with characters and overly reliant on uninspired dialogue, Eclipse won't win The Twilight Saga many new converts, despite an improved blend of romance and action fantasy.
Synopsis: Danger once again surrounds Bella (Kristen Stewart), as a string of mysterious killings terrorizes Seattle and a malicious vampire continues... [More]
Directed By: David Slade

#2
Adjusted Score: 57370%
Critics Consensus: It's the most entertaining Twilight, but that's not enough to make Breaking Dawn Part 2 worth watching for filmgoers who don't already count themselves among the franchise converts.
Synopsis: Bella (Kristen Stewart) awakes -- as a vampire -- from her life-threatening labor, and her newborn daughter, Renesmee, proves to... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#1

Twilight (2008)

#1
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: High-school student Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart), always a bit of a misfit, doesn't expect life to change much when she... [More]
Directed By: Catherine Hardwicke

Kate Beckinsale continues her fight against Lycans and her own faction in Underworld: Blood Wars, prompting this week’s gallery of the hottest vampires from movies and television. And because we couldn’t possibly fit all that undead sexiness in just 24 pictures the same way Beckinsale slips into a leather onesie, let us know in the comments which vampires we missed that get your blood flowing!

“Babies!! They’re babies!!” Yes, Shredder, they are babies, and one day when you’re all grown-up, you too will appreciate the miracle of birth. Just ask Bridget Jones’ Baby — whose mother endured ugly Christmas sweaters and middle-aged manfights and a previous sequel where we assume stuff happened — crowning this Friday after gestating years in development hell. But because Rotten Tomatoes is never one to pass up a cause célèbre, here’s this week’s gallery of 24 most momentous movie babies!

At 48% on the Tomatometer, Snow White and The Huntsman didn’t clear many critical benchmarks in the fantasy genre back in 2012. But The Huntsman: Winter’s War, its Kristen Stewart-less prequel, looks like it’ll fall even shorter, inspiring this week’s 24 Frames gallery: 24 worst fantasy movie sequels (or prequels, or sidequels, or spinoffs, or…) by Tomatometer!

With two more sequels to Fifty Shades of Grey on their way (and Marlon Wayans’ parody Fifty Shades of Black now in theaters), we thought it only proper to shine a light on a whole bevy of films that explored the sensual side of cinema and the actors that went along for the ride.


Cat: I’m indifferent about this film because as I watched, I was fairly engrossed and not nitpicking (as much), as I’ve done in the past. At the same time, I’m bothered by the fact it took so long to get to the point. Because of how the book is written, as well as the need to please the fans, there was the filler of a wedding, a honeymoon, and then the sitting and watching of Bella as she deteriorated from the thing growing inside of her. But that last scene was pretty amazing — when she opened her eyes and we finally got to see not only what she?s been wanting, but what the fans have been looking forward to for near four movies now, I yelled out, YES!

Jeff: I was actually anticipating this one a little — after straining for epic status over the first three movies, Breaking Dawn – Part 1 allows the Twilight saga to finally start getting down to the business of wrapping things up and bringing the story to its conclusion. Of course, as you pointed out, any time these movies get to choose between building narrative momentum and stalling, they pick the latter, so the bulk of Part 1‘s running time is spent literally sitting around waiting for something to happen.



C: How great were the wedding speeches? Kudos to whoever gave these last two films some validation by weaving in funny moments here and there. I enjoyed Bella joking with Edward about him not being a virgin as well as Jessica at the wedding. Again, Kendrick’s comedic timing with her little quips brings me such joy. It’s a shame the appearance of her character has slowly dwindled over the course of these four films.

J: I thought the whole buildup to the wedding was handled pretty well, from the clever last-minute twist in Edward’s backstory to the better-late-than-never touch of sensible jitters from Bella to that sweet little moment between her and Charlie before the ceremony. And the ceremony itself includes some of the nicer touches from the series thus far, like the callback to the prom scene when Bella and Edward are standing at the altar, or the shot of the empty pews that (sort of) subtly signifies how they only have eyes for each other. Heck, we even got a nice tender, relaxed moment between Bella and Jacob after the ceremony — even if it was only used to set up the looming werewolf/vampire war that passes for a subplot in the rest of the film.

C: Frankly, I can’t stand how much Bella still needs Jake in her life to feel complete. This was oversaturated throughout the whole film as if she needs him more now that she’s married. How is Edward OK with his wife’s need for another man? And why are Jacob and Bella talking about the traditional honeymoon she plans to have with Edward — this is so far removed from how anyone with emotions would react, or what they’d put up with. To top it off, she plans to name her child Edward Jacob if she has a boy. Can someone please shake her?

J: All of this would be fine, I think, if the movies hadn’t done such a poor job of filling in the characters. Like any soap opera, Twilight attempts to use melodrama to drive home essential truths about human interaction — but as any soap writer will tell you, all of that heightened reality rings false if it isn’t fueled by believable, identifiable characters, and that’s definitely the case with these films. Bella, Edward, and Jacob constantly do things that don’t make sense; their motivations are poorly explained or simply ignored, and as a result, there’s no context to support the suspension of disbelief that the whole franchise requires. Which is to say that yes, there are a lot of people involved with these movies who deserve a good shaking.



C: A loss of words is all I can say regarding the birthing scene and whatever Edward was doing to get the baby out. How does someone even think of going there? I’m also not sure how I feel about Jake imprinting on an infant. I get that she will grow at an accelerated rate and will probably be 16 by her first birthday, but it’s still inappropriate. At this point, I’ve just learned to go with whatever crazy plot points this franchise throws at me; I almost shouldn’t be shocked.

J: Between Jacob’s imprinting on the CGI baby and centenarian Edward knocking up his teenage bride, it does seem pretty clear that Stephenie Meyer has a thing for May/December romances, but I’ve spent this series strenuously avoiding trying to untangle its troublesome sexual subtext, and I’m not about to change course now. As far as the birthing scene goes — yes, it was revolting. And I know I just promised to avoid the whole sex analysis thing, but let me just point out that it says something very strange about us as a culture when a movie like this goes out of its way to hide the naughty bits but proudly wallows in the kind of stomach-churning stuff Breaking Dawn – Part 1 presents during the birth and its aftermath.

C: As I reach the end of this watching series, I find its conclusion to be bittersweet. I really enjoyed watching these films again, and I’m super pumped to see the last installment. However, it boggles my mind that a female author would write such a manipulative, pushover female lead in this day and age. I’m not sure if it was to show how Bella went from a standoffish teenager to a sort of feisty 18 year old mom; she did become very protective of that fetus. Or was this all a metaphor about coming into one’s true self and being comfortable in your own skin, told by way of supernatural themes?

J: I like your last interpretation; in fact, I think it’s the only way you can look at these movies and make any kind of case for them being semi-effective. It won’t surprise you to hear that I’m not at all pumped to watch Breaking Dawn – Part 2, but I am hoping (probably foolishly, I know) that this is where we’ll finally lose all the dawdling exposition and get down to the business of what happens with the Volturi, how things are settled between the Cullen clan and the Quileute tribe, and where we’ll leave off with our scowly-faced leading trio.

Written by Jeff Giles and Catherine Pricci

When the MTV Movie Awards kicked off in 1992, Terminator 2 swept the top categories. It was a fitting start for an awards show that has since served as the offbeat, fun-loving alternative to the formal redcarpet events of the fall and winter. Not surprisingly, this anything-goes attitude has led to some pretty memorable moments. Check out our picks for the top moments of the 2011 MTV Movie Awards, and get amped for the 2012 Movie Awards, airing live on Sunday, June 3rd at 9/8c on MTV.


Jason Sudeikis Loses Taylor Lautner

Last year’s emcee, Jason Sudeikis, kicked off the awards with a nod to the Hangover series: the panicked host has lost Twilight golden boy Taylor Lautner after a night of partying. With two hours to go until the show, he frantically attempts to locate Lautner, leading him through a montage of the top movie moments of that year — including a compromising scene featuring a scantily clad Mila Kunis and Natalie Portman and, moments later, a very unhappy James Franco, whose arm is pinned underneath a boulder. He finally locates Lautner, and they get ready to hit up the awards — but not before they both stop in on Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis one last time. Hey, priorities.


Host Jason Sudeikis Opens the Show

A tuxedo-clad Sudeikis opens the show, and the famously crude comedian quickly proves his outfit is just about the only thing he’s cleaned up for his hosting gig. From cracking that Schwarzenegger fathered every audience member in the balcony section, to calling out Selena Gomez for sucking face with Justin Bieber (he jokes that her mouth must be full of baby teeth), Sudeikis proves that nothing, and nobody, is off limits.


Jim Carrey Dons a “Cutting-Edge” Green Screen Suit

For once it was Jim Carrey’s suit — not his infamous grin, zany laughs, or quick one-liners — that took center stage. Presenting the Foo Fighters, Carrey wore a cutting-edge chroma-screen suit that projected moving images (including a repeating vignette of two dogs humping each other). But he couldn’t help himself from signing off with one of his signature quips: “Foo can be pretty nasty stuff, so we should all be glad someone’s fighting it.”


Justin Timberlake Gives Mila Kunis A Good Boob Squeeze

Those Friends with Benefits stars sure know how to heat up the rumor mill. After assuring the audience that they’re “totally platonic” friends, Timberlake’s hands head straight for Kunis’s boobs — where they remain for a solid 10 seconds. That is, until Kunis ups the ante, venturing a little, um, further south. Our real question: how does Timberlake’s fiancé Jessica Biel feel about this show of “friendly” affection?


Justin Bieber Wins Best Jaw-Dropping Moment for Never Say Never

Justin Bieber didn’t just win the best jaw-dropping moment last year — he also created the highest decibel one. Funnymen Aziz Ansari, Danny McBride, and Nick Swardson announced Bieber as the winner for Never Say Never, and then proceeded to punk the audience by bemoaning Bieber’s absence. Surprise! Enter a cooler-than-cool Biebs from stage left, decked out with a blue blazer and shades, totally bringing the house down.


Jason Sudeikis Performs Movie Theme Songs He Wrote

Comedian/actor Sudeikis attempted to prove himself as a triple threat by performing some theme songs from the year’s movies that he claimed to have written. These gems include a noise, rather than actual words, to celebrate Brooklyn Decker’s prominently featured assets in Just Go With It; an ode to “skinny Seth Rogen” who “lost weight for the Green Hornet” (rejected, Sudeikis confides, for its too-literal interpretation); and a theme song about the Karate Kid culminating in a gong. Don’t quit your day job!


Robert Pattinson and Taylor Lautner Kiss

The Best Kiss category took an unexpected turn after costars — and real life couple — Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson ascended the stage to accept the award. The notoriously shy Stewart even seemed prepared to enact the kiss, but Pattinson declined, announcing: “There’s someone in the audience who I think will appreciate it more.” This kiss was not to be bestowed on a shrieking Twihard — instead, Pattinson’s onscreen rival Taylor Lautner was the lucky (if unexpecting) recipient.


Reese Witherspoon Accepts 2011 MTV Generation Award

When the accomplished Witherspoon took the stage to accept her Generation Award, the elegant actress proved that she comes with a healthy dose of Southern sass. After thanking the audience, she reminded them: “It’s possible to make it in Hollywood without a reality show. And when I came up in this business, if you made a sex tape you were embarrassed, and you hid it under your bed.” In the event that chastened viewers were still intent on being bad, Witherspoon closed out her acceptance speech with some sage advice: “If you take naked pictures of yourself, you hide your face, people!”


Alexys Nycole Sanchez Wins Best Line From A Movie

The poised, pint-size actress from Grown Ups charmed the crowd by thanking her friends, family, manager, and God — and then made themlaugh by reviving the line that earned her win: “I want to get Chocolate Wasted!” (Hint: it pretty much means what you think it does).


The Twilight Saga: Eclipse Wins Best Movie

There was no good reason that Gary Busey was inside a plastic bubble when he announced the winner in the Best Movie category. But hey, why let a simple thing like logic stand in the way of a good gag? Much less surprising than the announcer’s, err, receptacle, was the category winner: The Twilight Saga: Eclipse. And when much of the huge cast piled onstage to accept the honor, they proved that — under the right circumstances — even vampires and wolves can get along.


EXCLSUSIVE: Behind-the-Scenes Look at the 2012 Stage

And finally, here’s a quick glimpse of this year’s MTV Movie Awards stage.


After her stint on the island of J.J. Abram’s Lost, Maggie Grace has taken to the big screen with roles in a series of high-profile movies — including Faster, Twilight: Breaking Dawn and, most famously, Taken, in which she played Liam Neeson’s kidnapped daughter. It seems movie villains never learn, however. In this week’s Lockout (also from Taken producer Luc Besson), Grace plays the President’s daughter, dispatched as an emissary to a floating space prison where — you guessed it — she’s taken hostage, prompting Guy Pearce’s mercenary mission to rescue her. We’re assuming Neeson was probably too busy fighting space wolves or clones of himself (take note, Besson…), but he and Grace will be reunited for more daddy-daughter carnage in the inevitable Taken 2, due later this year. In the meantime, we spoke with Grace this week for a conversation about her five favorite films.

The English Patient (Anthony Minghella, 1996; 83% Tomatometer)



I think when you ask for favorite films, you’re really asking “favorite films at 15” — you know what I’m saying? Formative favorite films. I don’t think they really change much. You sort of can’t argue with your inner 13-year-old that watched something 25,000 times. Now I’ll see something adult and be affected by it — like A Separation, which I saw and I loved — but it’s gonna be hard to top those 25,000 viewings when you were 13. You get past pubescence and it’s cooked. Put a fork in it, your favorite films is done. [Laughs] Don’t hold me to it. The English Patient: Oh my gosh, it was just so affecting when I saw it. The performances are impeccable. The sense of time and place; everything about it. It’s really one of those kinds of epics — like Lawrence of Arabia is an epic. You rarely see epics any more.

Romeo and Juliet (Franco Zeffirelli, 1968; 97% Tomatometer)



The 1968 version of Romeo and Juliet, the Zeffirelli version. I really fell head over heels in love with that movie when I was 13. I watched it countless times. Just hearing the score makes me feel like I’m 13 again.

It might be the best Romeo and Juliet on film.

I think it certainly is. You know, they cast pretty close to their ages; I think Olivia Hussey was about 16, and it really captures that emotional stuff.

Shouldn’t you have been watching the Leonardo DiCaprio and Claire Danes version when you were 13?

Well, they gave great performances. But I couldn’t forgive them for cutting the Queen Mab speech. [Laughs]

Breaking the Waves (Lars von Trier, 1996; 86% Tomatometer)


Breaking the Waves, I saw that when I was — and this was ill-advised [laughs] — I was in Bucharest, alone with the flu. I don’t know what possessed me to put that in to watch, but I think you could imagine it was pretty devastating. It’s so raw and amazing, and Emily Watson is one of my favorite actresses.

When Harry Met Sally (Rob Reiner, 1989; 91% Tomatometer)



Well I think we just have to have a shout out to the rom-com genre in there and it’s a perfect example of the two, you know, really lovable, flawed characters — perfectly flawed for one another. As my grandmother used to say, “There’s a lid for every pot.” So I think that out of that genre that’s probably my favorite.

When did you first see that one?

Probably as a teenager. But, you know, I rewatch it with girlfriends. [Laughs] I’m pretty sure I know it line for line at this point.

Sophie’s Choice (Alan J. Pakula, 1982; 81% Tomatometer)



I just feel like there’s so much estrogen in this list. [Laughs]

Well you’re in so many action films; that kinda balances your list out.

I really need to do a five favorite action films. I think Die Hard would be up there. No… I’m afraid it’s gonna have to be Sophie’s Choice. [Laughs] Sorry! One of the greatest performances of the 20th century, I think. She’s incredible. I mean, I kinda liked many of her films but that one springs to mind first. I figured I can’t list all five as Meryl Streep films, right? That’d be a little annoying. It’s hard to pick one, but if I had to I’m gonna go with that one.

She did win an Oscar for it.

Yeah. You know, she really should have won many more times than she has. It’s easy to get confused as to which performance of hers was Oscar-nominated and which was Oscar-winning. I think at this point it doesn’t matter. It’s just cumulative. They should just give her a bigger Oscar.

They should remodel the Oscar in her likeness and give that out to other winners.

[Laughs] That’s a fantastic idea.


Lockout is in theaters this week.

Last week was especially robust with new releases, so it’s not surprising that only a few new items of note are hitting shelves this week. Among the rereleases are the George Cukor classic A Star Is Born, the 1967 James Bond parody Casino Royale, the 1963 ensemble screwball comedy It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, and the romance Love Story. The new releases include the latest installment of a certain vampire love saga, the third film starring a lovable stoner duo, and Roland Emmerich’s pseud-historical period thriller. Then, we’ve got the highest rated documentary of 2011, another Disney classic in hi-def, and a couple of films from a French New Wave auteur. See below for the full list!



The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part I

Stephenie Meyer’s vampire-human-werewolf romance has captured the female demographic (from tweens to grandmothers) since the first book was published back in 2005, and the film adaptations have understandably been a huge hit as well. The latest chapter in the saga, which amounts to the first half of the final book, debuted last November to the tune of over $280 million in domestic totals and a worldwide gross exceeding $700 million. By now, it’s well known that the Twilight films haven’t earned the best reviews, but that didn’t stop hordes of fans from watching the marriage of Bella (Kristen Stewart) and Edward (Robert Pattinson), the subsequent consummation of that marriage (finally, right?), and the ensuing complications that arise when a human attempts to birth a vampire. Even within the franchise itself, Breaking Dawn Part I sports the lowest Tomatometer at 25%, with critics calling it slow, joyless, and loaded with unintentionally hilarious moments. But let’s be honest: this film was made exclusively to satisfy its existing fanbase, who are only too eager to eat it up; everyone else will have to be content with the fact that there’s only one more to go.



A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas

If Cheech and Chong taught us anything, it’s that stoner humor can have surprising longevity, given the right ingredients (chemistry between its leads, appropriately outrageous scenarios, and copious amounts of ganja). With that in mind, John Cho and Kal Penn have taken up the mantle of the aforementioned duo and given audiences three movies of varying success, the latest of which hits shelves this week. A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas finds our titular tokers as somewhat estranged friends, Harold (Cho) having stopped smoking marijuana since getting married and Kumar (Penn) having let himself go after his girlfriend dumped him. Harold, however, has promised a perfect Christmas to Mr. Perez (Danny Trejo), his father-in-law, and when Kumar accidentally burns down Mr. Perez?s tree, he and Harold are again caught up in wild hijinks. Not quite hitting the highs of the first installment but certainly besting the second, Christmas offers more raunchy, irreverent laughs, and though it’s still a bit hit-or-miss, critics enjoyed seeing the pair’s sweeter sides.



Anonymous

If you’ve taken any college (or even high school) level course on Shakespeare, you’ve probably been exposed to the centuries-old controversy that asserts the famous bard’s prolific writings are actually the work of another man. While scholars are never able to prove with any solid evidence precisely who this other man was, many believe the most likely candidate was Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford. Anonymous aims to dramatize this angle, dressing the story up in political conspiracy, romantic intrigue, and the power struggles of the Elizabethan elite. And who better to bring you this story than… Roland Emmerich? The guy who did Stargate, Independence Day, and 2012? Yes, that Roland Emmerich. And while the film did manage only a 47% on the Tomatometer, most critics felt it certainly could have been much worse. Anonymous boasts visual flair and emotional bombast, but it too often and too desperately tries to convince the audience of the authenticity of its story, and that’s where it loses steam. Still, if a period potboiler is up your alley, you may get a kick out of it.



Project Nim

97%

Remember that movie last year starring James Franco about the scientist who brings home a baby chimp and attempts to raise it as a member of his own family? Well, Project Nim is basically that same story, except it took place in real life and didn’t end with a massive primate riot. The film documents a fascinating project undertaken during the early 1970s to determine whether or not a chimpanzee raised from birth in a human family could learn enough sign language to indicate some form of syntactic comprehension. Following the chimp subject, Nim Chimpsky, from the time he was taken away from his mother all the way through the end of the project, and several years after, the film intersperses archival footage and contemporary interviews with the various caretakers, handlers, and teachers that passed in and out of Nim’s life. At 98% on the Tomatometer, Project Nim took home the Golden Tomato Award in the Documentary category, with critics calling it equal parts hilarious, poignant, and heartbreaking. It’s a fascinating film, and it’s more than likely worth your while to check out.



La Jetée/Sans Soleil – Criterion Collection Blu-Ray

One of the more eccentric directors to be associated with the French New Wave, Chris Marker’s dazzling films often blur the line between cinema and art, between documentary and essay. Ironically, his best known work is a movie that doesn’t even move: La Jetée, a post-apocalyptic sci-fi short that tells a story using still photographs, was the basis for Terry Gilliam’s 12 Monkeys. The globetrotting experimental essay Sans Soleil reflects on the nature of memory, using images and people from Japan, Africa, Europe, and the U.S.; it served as an influence on Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation. A sparkling new Criterion Blu-ray/DVD will help you to get a feel for this most playful of cerebral filmmakers; in addition to new digital transfers, the disc includes several interviews with Marker and docs about his work.



Lady and the Tramp – Diamond Edition Blu-Ray

93%

As they seem to be doing once or twice a year these days, Disney is releasing yet another of their animated classics in brand spanking new Blu-ray this week. This time, it’s the 1955 canine romance Lady and the Tramp, about a cocker spaniel from a wealthy family who runs away from home and falls in love with a mutt from the wrong side of the tracks. While it may not be as revered in the studio’s canon as, say, any of its princess-themed movies, Lady and the Tramp was, in fact, both Disney’s first feature film — after fourteen before it — based on an entirely original story and its first film in Cinemascope, two pretty significant milestones for the animation giant. Granted, the themes present here are all quite familiar — star-crossed love, notions of class distinction, diamonds in the rough — but in true Disney fashion, the film finds ways to be relatable both to adults and children alike. At 88% on the Tomatometer, it may not be at the top of everyone’s Disney list, but we know there are a lot of you out there who love the movie, so now’s your chance to get the Blu-ray.

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