Lionsgate courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by Lionsgate courtesy Everett Collection)

All Jason Statham Movies, Ranked By Tomatometer

Once, during a long-ago era called The ’80s, Hollywood action heroes roamed the Earth with bulging biceps and names like Sly, Arnold, and Bruce. With a limitless supply of weapons and wisecracks, they saved the world countless times, only to be exiled to the land of Direct-to-Video for their trouble, where they wandered lost throughout the ’90s and much of the aughts. But they’re fighting their way back from extinction, thanks in large part to the tenacious efforts of steely-eyed roughnecks like Jason Statham, the veteran of latter-day genre classics like Crank, The Bank Job, and recent Fast and Furious sequels and spinoffs, who rose to stardom on the strength of his appearances in Guy Ritchie‘s Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch. To celebrate his bravery in the face of indie dramas and romantic comedies, we’ve rounded up all of his major roles to offer a comprehensive look back at all Jason Statham movies, sorted by Tomatometer.

#40
Adjusted Score: 4331%
Critics Consensus: Featuring mostly wooden performances, laughable dialogue, and shoddy production values, In the Name of the King fulfills all expectations of an Uwe Boll film.
Synopsis: As war looms in an idyllic kingdom, a man named Farmer (Jason Statham) begins a heroic quest to find his... [More]
Directed By: Uwe Boll

#39

Turn It Up (2000)
8%

#39
Adjusted Score: 7684%
Critics Consensus: Reviewers say Turn It Up has a derivative feel, running through too many urban movie cliches.
Synopsis: In the ghetto, the only thing more dangerous than a gun is a dream. And gifted Brooklyn hip-hop artist Diamond... [More]
Directed By: Robert Adetuyi

#38

13 (2010)
8%

#38
Adjusted Score: 3920%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A desperate man (Sam Riley) takes part in an underworld game of Russian roulette in which gamblers place bets on... [More]
Directed By: Gela Babluani

#37

War (2007)
13%

#37
Adjusted Score: 14871%
Critics Consensus: Jet Li and Jason Statham find themselves on opposing sides in the immensely boring War, which is full of clichés but short on action.
Synopsis: After his partner and family are killed, FBI agent Jack Crawford (Jason Statham) becomes obsessed with revenge on an assassin... [More]
Directed By: Philip G. Atwell

#36

London (2005)
14%

#36
Adjusted Score: 13715%
Critics Consensus: Hampered by pretension and undermined by unlikable characters, London proves that the novelty of seeing actors play against type isn't enough to rescue a deeply flawed film.
Synopsis: Upon learning that his ex-lover (Jessica Biel) is leaving New York, a man (Chris Evans) named Syd crashes her going-away... [More]
Directed By: Hunter Richards

#35

The One (2001)
13%

#35
Adjusted Score: 15993%
Critics Consensus: The One plays more like a video game than a movie and borrows freely from other, better sci-fi actioners, burying Jet Li's spectacular talents under heaps of editing and special effects.
Synopsis: In a stunning dual role, international star Jet Li portrays Gabriel Yulaw, a police officer confronted with a sinister form... [More]
Directed By: James Wong

#34

Revolver (2005)
15%

#34
Adjusted Score: 16004%
Critics Consensus: In attempting to meld his successful previous formulas with philosophical musings, Guy Ritchie has produced an incoherent misfire.
Synopsis: Jake Green is a hotshot gambler, long on audacity and short on common sense. Jake served seven years in jail... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#33
Adjusted Score: 25890%
Critics Consensus: John Carpenter's Ghosts of Mars is not one of Carpenter's better movies, filled as it is with bad dialogue, bad acting, confusing flashbacks, and scenes that are more campy than scary.
Synopsis: Long inhabited by human settlers, the Red Planet has become the manifest destiny of an over-populated Earth. Nearly 640,000 people... [More]
Directed By: John Carpenter

#32

Killer Elite (2011)
28%

#32
Adjusted Score: 31471%
Critics Consensus: A rote, utterly disposable Jason Statham vehicle that just happens to have Clive Owen and Robert De Niro in it.
Synopsis: Danny Bryce (Jason Statham), one of the world's deadliest special-ops agents, returns from self-imposed exile after his mentor, Hunter (Robert... [More]
Directed By: Gary McKendry

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 32988%
Critics Consensus: With little to recommend beyond a handful of entertaining set pieces, Mechanic: Resurrection suggests this franchise should have remained in its tomb.
Synopsis: Living under cover in Brazil, master assassin Arthur Bishop (Jason Statham) springs back into action after an old enemy (Sam... [More]
Directed By: Dennis Gansel

#30

Wild Card (2015)
31%

#30
Adjusted Score: 32599%
Critics Consensus: Hardcore Jason Statham fans may enjoy parts of Wild Card, but all other action aficionados need not apply.
Synopsis: A bodyguard (Jason Statham) goes after the sadistic thug who beat his friend, only to find that the object of... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 39224%
Critics Consensus: Like its predecessors, Expendables 3 offers a modicum of all-star thrills for old-school action thriller aficionados -- but given all the talent assembled, it should have been a lot more fun.
Synopsis: Years ago, Barney Ross (Sylvester Stallone) co-founded the Expendables with Conrad Stonebanks (Mel Gibson). After Stonebanks became an arms dealer,... [More]
Directed By: Patrick Hughes

#28

Mean Machine (2001)
34%

#28
Adjusted Score: 34123%
Critics Consensus: Despite some genuine wit, this crowd pleaser is filled with too many cliches.
Synopsis: In a rough-and-tumble British prison, where murderers, thieves and assorted madmen are locked away, inmate Danny Meehan (Vinnie Jones) is... [More]
Directed By: Barry Skolnick

#27

Transporter 3 (2008)
40%

#27
Adjusted Score: 44156%
Critics Consensus: This middling installment in the Transporter franchise is a few steps down from its predecessors, featuring generic stunts and a lack of energy.
Synopsis: Mob courier Frank Martin's (Jason Statham) latest assignment pairs him with Valentina (Natalya Rudakova), the cynical daughter of a Ukrainian... [More]
Directed By: Olivier Megaton

#26

Parker (2013)
40%

#26
Adjusted Score: 43881%
Critics Consensus: Jason Statham is game as usual, but Parker is a thoroughly generic and convoluted heist movie.
Synopsis: Daring, ruthless and meticulous, Parker (Jason Statham) is one of the most successful thieves in the business. But when his... [More]
Directed By: Taylor Hackford

#25

Death Race (2008)
42%

#25
Adjusted Score: 47174%
Critics Consensus: Mindless, violent, and lightning-paced, Death Race is little more than an empty action romp.
Synopsis: Framed for a murder he did not commit, three-time speedway champ Jensen Ames (Jason Statham) finds himself at Terminal Island,... [More]
Directed By: Paul W.S. Anderson

#24

The Expendables (2010)
42%

#24
Adjusted Score: 49883%
Critics Consensus: It makes good on the old-school action it promises, but given all the talent on display, The Expendables should hit harder.
Synopsis: Mercenary leader Barney Ross (Sylvester Stallone) and his loyal men take on what they think is a routine assignment: a... [More]
Directed By: Sylvester Stallone

#23

Homefront (2013)
42%

#23
Adjusted Score: 46284%
Critics Consensus: While it boasts a capable cast, the disappointingly dull Homefront hearkens back to classic action thrillers without adding anything to the genre.
Synopsis: Hoping to escape from his troubled past, former DEA agent Phil Broker (Jason Statham) moves to a seemingly quiet backwater... [More]
Directed By: Gary Fleder

#22

The Meg (2018)
46%

#22
Adjusted Score: 63725%
Critics Consensus: The Meg sets audiences up for a good old-fashioned B-movie creature feature, but lacks the genre thrills -- or the cheesy bite -- to make it worth diving in.
Synopsis: Previously thought to be extinct, a massive creature attacks a deep-sea submersible, leaving it disabled and trapping the crew at... [More]
Directed By: Jon Turteltaub

#21

Blitz (2011)
48%

#21
Adjusted Score: 48077%
Critics Consensus: A middling crime thriller largely assembled from wearyingly familiar parts, Blitz sacks a game Jason Statham's performance behind the line of genre scrimmage.
Synopsis: A tough cop (Jason Statham) goes after a serial killer who targets police officers.... [More]
Directed By: Elliott Lester

#20

Redemption (2013)
49%

#20
Adjusted Score: 50284%
Critics Consensus: While it certainly has more on its mind than the average Jason Statham action thriller, Redemption doesn't quite capitalize on its premise -- or on its star's strong, committed performance.
Synopsis: A troubled war veteran (Jason Statham) assumes a new identity and becomes a vigilante in a bid to atone for... [More]
Directed By: Steven Knight

#19

Transporter 2 (2005)
52%

#19
Adjusted Score: 56453%
Critics Consensus: A stylish and more focused sequel to The Transporter, the movie is over-the-top fun for fans of the first movie.
Synopsis: Mercenary Frank Martin (Jason Statham) has accepted a job that seems easy enough, as chauffeur and bodyguard to young Jack... [More]
Directed By: Louis Leterrier

#18

The Mechanic (2011)
53%

#18
Adjusted Score: 59186%
Critics Consensus: Jason Statham and Ben Foster turn in enjoyable performances, but this superficial remake betrays them with mind-numbing violence and action thriller cliches.
Synopsis: One of an elite group of assassins, Arthur Bishop (Jason Statham) may be the best in the business. Bishop carries... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#17

The Transporter (2002)
54%

#17
Adjusted Score: 56853%
Critics Consensus: The Transporter delivers the action at the expense of coherent storytelling.
Synopsis: Ex-Special Forces operator Frank Martin (Jason Statham) lives what seems to be a quiet life along the French Mediterranean, hiring... [More]
Directed By: Corey Yuen

#16

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011)
55%

#16
Adjusted Score: 59557%
Critics Consensus: While it has moments of inspiration, Gnomeo and Juliet is often too self-referential for its own good.
Synopsis: In Stratford-Upon-Avon, birthplace of William Shakespeare, Miss Capulet and Mr. Montague feud over whose garden is the better. Garden gnomes... [More]
Directed By: Kelly Asbury

#15

Cellular (2004)
55%

#15
Adjusted Score: 60201%
Critics Consensus: Though it's gimmicky and occasionally feels like a high-end cell phone ad, Cellular is also an energetic and twisty thriller.
Synopsis: Schoolteacher Jessica Martin (Kim Basinger) is abducted by ruthless crook Ethan (Jason Statham) and brought to a remote hideout, where... [More]
Directed By: David R. Ellis

#14

Safe (2012)
59%

#14
Adjusted Score: 62270%
Critics Consensus: While hard-hitting and violently inventive, Safe ultimately proves too formulaic to set itself apart from the action thriller pack -- including some of its star's better films.
Synopsis: Luke Wright (Jason Statham) is a two-bit cage fighter, until the day he throws a fixed match. In retaliation, the... [More]
Directed By: Boaz Yakin

#13

Crank (2006)
61%

#13
Adjusted Score: 64573%
Critics Consensus: Crank's assaultive style and gleeful depravity may turn off casual action fans, but audiences seeking a strong dose of adrenaline will be thrilled by Jason Statham's raucous race against mortality.
Synopsis: Chev Chelios (Jason Statham), a hit man wanting to go straight, lets his latest target slip away, then he awakes... [More]

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 66181%
Critics Consensus: Crank: High Voltage delivers on its promises: a fast-paced, exciting thrill ride that doesn't take itself too seriously.
Synopsis: After surviving an incredible plunge to near-certain death, Chev Chelios (Jason Statham) is abducted by Chinese mobsters. Waking up three... [More]

#11

Wrath of Man (2021)
66%

#11
Adjusted Score: 79703%
Critics Consensus: Wrestling just enough stakes out of its thin plot, Wrath of Man sees Guy Ritchie and Jason Statham reunite for a fun, action-packed ride.
Synopsis: Mysterious and wild-eyed, a new security guard for a cash truck surprises his co-workers when he unleashes precision skills during... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 72212%
Critics Consensus: Taut, violent, and suitably self-deprecating, The Expendables 2 gives classic action fans everything they can reasonably expect from a star-studded shoot-'em-up -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Mercenary leader Barney Ross (Sylvester Stallone), Lee Christmas (Jason Statham) and the rest of the Expendables team reunite when Mr.... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 90575%
Critics Consensus: The Fate of the Furious opens a new chapter in the franchise, fueled by the same infectious cast chemistry and over-the-top action fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: With Dom and Letty married, Brian and Mia retired and the rest of the crew exonerated, the globe-trotting team has... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#8
Adjusted Score: 88518%
Critics Consensus: Hobbs & Shaw doesn't rev as high as the franchise's best installments, but gets decent mileage out of its well-matched stars and over-the-top action sequences.
Synopsis: Brixton Lorr is a cybernetically enhanced soldier who possesses superhuman strength, a brilliant mind and a lethal pathogen that could... [More]
Directed By: David Leitch

#7

Fast & Furious 6 (2013)
71%

#7
Adjusted Score: 78448%
Critics Consensus: With high-octane humor and terrific action scenes, Fast & Furious 6 builds upon the winning blockbuster formula that made Fast 5 a critical and commercial success.
Synopsis: Since Dom (Vin Diesel) and Brian's (Paul Walker) heist in Rio left them and their crew very rich people, they've... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#6

The Italian Job (2003)
73%

#6
Adjusted Score: 78186%
Critics Consensus: Despite some iffy plot elements, The Italian Job succeeds in delivering an entertaining modern take on the original 1969 heist film, thanks to a charismatic cast.
Synopsis: After a heist in Venice, Steve (Edward Norton) turns on his partners in crime, killing safecracker John Bridger (Donald Sutherland)... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#5

Snatch (2000)
74%

#5
Adjusted Score: 78292%
Critics Consensus: Though perhaps a case of style over substance, Guy Ritchie's second crime caper is full of snappy dialogue, dark comedy, and interesting characters.
Synopsis: Illegal boxing promoter Turkish (Jason Statham) convinces gangster Brick Top (Alan Ford) to offer bets on bare-knuckle boxer Mickey (Brad... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#4
Adjusted Score: 77268%
Critics Consensus: Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels is a grimy, twisted, and funny twist on the Tarantino hip gangster formula.
Synopsis: Eddy (Nick Moran) convinces three friends to pool funds for a high-stakes poker game against local crime boss Hatchet Harry... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#3

The Bank Job (2008)
80%

#3
Adjusted Score: 84681%
Critics Consensus: Well cast and crisply directed, The Bank Job is a thoroughly entertaining British heist thriller.
Synopsis: Self-reformed petty criminal Terry Leather (Jason Statham) has become a financially struggling car dealer and settled into a pedestrian London... [More]
Directed By: Roger Donaldson

#2

Furious 7 (2015)
82%

#2
Adjusted Score: 92414%
Critics Consensus: Serving up a fresh round of over-the-top thrills while adding unexpected dramatic heft, Furious 7 keeps the franchise moving in more ways than one.
Synopsis: After defeating international terrorist Owen Shaw, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel), Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and the rest of the crew... [More]
Directed By: James Wan

#1

Spy (2015)
95%

#1
Adjusted Score: 104595%
Critics Consensus: Simultaneously broad and progressive, Spy offers further proof that Melissa McCarthy and writer-director Paul Feig bring out the best in one another -- and delivers scores of belly laughs along the way.
Synopsis: Despite having solid field training, CIA analyst Susan Cooper (Melissa McCarthy) has spent her entire career as a desk jockey,... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

(Photo by Jonny Cournoyer / © Paramount Pictures /Courtesy Everett Collection)

All Emily Blunt Movies Ranked

Emily Blunt‘s first two Rotten Tomatoes-rated movies were Certified Fresh: My Summer of Love, which you’ve never heard of, and The Devil Wears Prada, which you definitely have. The $124-million grossing and decidedly unromantic comedy paved a path for more female-led films and served as a launching vector for actresses like Anne Hathaway and Blunt. Her appearances in high-profile Charlie Wilson’s War, The Wolfman and The Muppets kept the momentum going, but it wasn’t until releasing Looper that Blunt got that most coveted of validations: internet fan cred. Following that up with Edge of Tomorrow and A Quiet Place has cemented her image of poise and natural radiant strength. She was Mary Poppins, y’all.She was even Tempest Shadow in My Little Pony: The Movie. That’s cross-generational.

In 2021, she set course with A Quiet Place Part II and Jungle Cruise. Wee where those two land as we rank Emily Blunt movies by Tomatometer!

#32
Adjusted Score: 32631%
Critics Consensus: The Huntsman: Winter's War is visually arresting and boasts a stellar cast, but neither are enough to recommend this entirely unnecessary sequel.
Synopsis: Betrayed by her evil sister Ravenna (Charlize Theron), heartbroken Freya (Emily Blunt) retreats to a northern kingdom to raise an... [More]
Directed By: Cedric Nicolas-Troyan

#31

Arthur Newman (2012)
20%

#31
Adjusted Score: 20284%
Critics Consensus: Despite the natural charisma of its leads, Arthur Newman does little with its intriguing setup, and the result is bland and unconvincing.
Synopsis: Frustrated with his boring life, Wallace Avery (Colin Firth) fakes his own death and sets out to make a new... [More]
Directed By: Dante Ariola

#30
#30
Adjusted Score: 23143%
Critics Consensus: Though Jack Black is back doing what he does best, Gulliver's Travels largely fails to do any justice to its source material, relying instead on juvenile humor and special effects.
Synopsis: Lemuel Gulliver (Jack Black) works in a mailroom at a city newspaper. While he is on an assignment in the... [More]
Directed By: Rob Letterman

#29

Sherlock Gnomes (2018)
27%

#29
Adjusted Score: 29305%
Critics Consensus: Sherlock Gnomes is sadly, utterly stumped by the mystery of the reason for its own existence.
Synopsis: When Gnomeo and Juliet first arrive in London with their friends and family, their biggest concern is getting a new... [More]
Directed By: John Stevenson

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 33726%
Critics Consensus: Fatally undermined by dodgy accents and a questionable story, Wild Mountain Thyme is a baffling misfire for a talented filmmaker and impressive cast.
Synopsis: John Patrick Shanley, who created the classic MOONSTRUCK, brings his sweeping romantic vision to Ireland with Wild Mountain Thyme. The... [More]
Directed By: John Patrick Shanley

#27

Wild Target (2010)
33%

#27
Adjusted Score: 33338%
Critics Consensus: An ineptly staged farce that dishonors the original film and squanders the comedic potential of its fine actors.
Synopsis: Longing to get out of the assassination business, a hit man (Bill Nighy) decides not to follow through with his... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Lynn

#26

The Wolfman (2010)
34%

#26
Adjusted Score: 41436%
Critics Consensus: Suitably grand and special effects-laden, The Wolfman suffers from a suspense-deficient script and a surprising lack of genuine chills.
Synopsis: Though absent from his ancestral home of Blackmoor for many years, aristocrat Lawrence Talbot (Benicio Del Toro) returns to find... [More]
Directed By: Joe Johnston

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 63683%
Critics Consensus: Emily Blunt's outstanding performance isn't enough to keep The Girl on the Train from sliding sluggishly into exploitative melodrama.
Synopsis: Commuter Rachel Watson (Emily Blunt) catches daily glimpses of a seemingly perfect couple, Scott and Megan, from the window of... [More]
Directed By: Tate Taylor

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 50182%
Critics Consensus: Charming and sweet, My Little Pony: The Movie will please its dedicated fanbase, even if it's unlikely to encourage non-devotees to gallop along for the ride.
Synopsis: Twilight Sparkle, Applejack, Rainbow Dash, Pinkie Pie, Fluttershy and Rarity embark on an epic journey to save Ponyville from a... [More]
Directed By: Jayson Thiessen

#23

Wind Chill (2007)
46%

#23
Adjusted Score: 45148%
Critics Consensus: Wind Chill is a ghost story with a clunky and unpolished script that fails to keep viewers in suspense.
Synopsis: Just before their university campus goes quiet for the winter break, a young woman (Emily Blunt) asks a classmate (Ashton... [More]
Directed By: Gregory Jacobs

#22

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011)
55%

#22
Adjusted Score: 59557%
Critics Consensus: While it has moments of inspiration, Gnomeo and Juliet is often too self-referential for its own good.
Synopsis: In Stratford-Upon-Avon, birthplace of William Shakespeare, Miss Capulet and Mr. Montague feud over whose garden is the better. Garden gnomes... [More]
Directed By: Kelly Asbury

#21

Jungle Cruise (2021)
62%

#21
Adjusted Score: 79534%
Critics Consensus: Its craft isn't quite as sturdy as some of the classic adventures it's indebted to, but Jungle Cruise remains a fun, family-friendly voyage.
Synopsis: Join fan favorites Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt for the adventure of a lifetime on Disney's JUNGLE CRUISE, a rollicking... [More]
Directed By: Jaume Collet-Serra

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 70421%
Critics Consensus: While certainly overlong, The Five-Year Engagement benefits from the easy chemistry of its leads and a funny, romantic script with surprising depth and intelligence.
Synopsis: On their one-year anniversary, sous chef Tom Solomon (Jason Segel) plans to surprise his girlfriend, Violet Barnes (Emily Blunt), with... [More]
Directed By: Nicholas Stoller

#19

Dan in Real Life (2007)
65%

#19
Adjusted Score: 71139%
Critics Consensus: The fine performances elevate Dan in Real Life beyond its sentimental plot.
Synopsis: Dan Burns (Steve Carell), a widower and advice columnist, meets a beautiful stranger (Juliette Binoche) in a bookstore and is... [More]
Directed By: Peter Hedges

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 70201%
Critics Consensus: Though at times formulaic and sentimental, Jane Austen Book Club succeeds on the strength of its likable ensemble cast. Even those not familiar with Jane Austen's work may find much to enjoy this lighthearted romance.
Synopsis: Six Californians (Maria Bello, Amy Brenneman, Emily Blunt) form a book club devoted to studying the works of the 19th-century... [More]
Directed By: Robin Swicord

#17
Adjusted Score: 72104%
Critics Consensus: Quirky and a little reserved, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is nonetheless a charming little romantic drama sold by some strong central performances.
Synopsis: Dr. Alfred Jones (Ewan McGregor) is a fisheries scientist who one day receives an unusual request: A businesswoman named Harriet... [More]
Directed By: Lasse Hallström

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 74278%
Critics Consensus: By turns fluffy and biting, this show biz comedy is given girth by comic heavyweight John Malkovich and made all the more charming by Emily Blunt.
Synopsis: Defying his father and dropping out of law school, aspiring writer Troy Gable (Colin Hanks) looks for a way to... [More]
Directed By: Sean McGinly

#15

Into the Woods (2014)
71%

#15
Adjusted Score: 80573%
Critics Consensus: On the whole, this Disney adaptation of the Sondheim classic sits comfortably at the corner of Hollywood and Broadway -- even if it darkens to its detriment in the final act.
Synopsis: As the result of the curse of a once-beautiful witch (Meryl Streep), a baker (James Corden) and his wife (Emily... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 81231%
Critics Consensus: First-time writer/director George Nolfi struggles to maintain a consistent tone, but The Adjustment Bureau rises on the strong, believable chemistry of its stars.
Synopsis: Just as he is on the brink of winning a Senate seat, politician David Norris (Matt Damon) meets a ballerina... [More]
Directed By: George Nolfi

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 81144%
Critics Consensus: Despite a sometimes overly familiar plot, Sunshine Cleaning benefits from the lively performances of its two stars.
Synopsis: Though they once seemed to have a bright future, life seems to be passing by the Norkowski sisters. Rose (Amy... [More]
Directed By: Christine Jeffs

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 83337%
Critics Consensus: A rare film that surpasses the quality of its source novel, this Devil is a witty expose of New York's fashion scene, with Meryl Streep in top form and Anne Hathaway more than holding her own.
Synopsis: Andy (Anne Hathaway) is a recent college graduate with big dreams. Upon landing a job at prestigious Runway magazine, she... [More]
Directed By: David Frankel

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 82089%
Critics Consensus: Emily Blunt shines as Victoria in this romantic but plodding royal portrait.
Synopsis: As the only legitimate heir of England's King William, teenage Victoria (Emily Blunt) gets caught up in the political machinations... [More]
Directed By: Jean-Marc Vallée

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 102222%
Critics Consensus: Mary Poppins Returns relies on the magic of its classic forebear to cast a familiar -- but still solidly effective -- family-friendly spell.
Synopsis: Now an adult with three children, bank teller Michael Banks learns that his house will be repossessed in five days... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 89762%
Critics Consensus: Charlie Wilson's War manages to entertain and inform audiences, thanks to its witty script and talented cast of power players.
Synopsis: In the 1980s U.S.Rep. Charlie Wilson (Tom Hanks), Texas socialite Joanne Herring (Julia Roberts) and CIA agent Gust Avrakotos (Philip... [More]
Directed By: Mike Nichols

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 88822%
Critics Consensus: Superbly acted and satisfyingly engaging, Your Sister's Sister subverts rom-com conventions with sensitive direction, an unconventional screenplay, and a big heart.
Synopsis: A man (Mark Duplass) falls into bed with his best friend's (Emily Blunt) sister (Rosemarie DeWitt), leading to an unexpected... [More]
Directed By: Lynn Shelton

#7

The Wind Rises (2013)
88%

#7
Adjusted Score: 95365%
Critics Consensus: The Wind Rises is a fittingly bittersweet swan song for director Hayao Miyazaki.
Synopsis: A lifelong love of flight inspires Japanese aviation engineer Jiro Horikoshi, whose storied career includes the creation of the A-6M... [More]

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 93156%
Critics Consensus: My Summer of Love is a moody, bittersweet love story featuring outstanding performances from the leads.
Synopsis: When upper-class Tamsin (Emily Blunt) meets working-class Mona (Natalie Press) they are immediately drawn to each other. Although coming from... [More]
Directed By: Paul Pavlikovsky

#5

Edge of Tomorrow (2014)
91%

#5
Adjusted Score: 104366%
Critics Consensus: Gripping, well-acted, funny, and clever, Edge of Tomorrow offers entertaining proof that Tom Cruise is still more than capable of shouldering the weight of a blockbuster action thriller.
Synopsis: When Earth falls under attack from invincible aliens, no military unit in the world is able to beat them. Maj.... [More]
Directed By: Doug Liman

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 110594%
Critics Consensus: A nerve-wracking continuation of its predecessor, A Quiet Place Part II expands the terrifying world of the franchise without losing track of its heart.
Synopsis: Following the deadly events at home, the Abbott family must now face the terrors of the outside world as they... [More]
Directed By: John Krasinski

#3

Sicario (2015)
92%

#3
Adjusted Score: 102548%
Critics Consensus: Led by outstanding work from Emily Blunt and Benicio del Toro, Sicario is a taut, tightly wound thriller with much more on its mind than attention-getting set pieces.
Synopsis: After rising through the ranks of her male-dominated profession, idealistic FBI agent Kate Macer (Emily Blunt) receives a top assignment.... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#2

Looper (2012)
93%

#2
Adjusted Score: 103706%
Critics Consensus: As thought-provoking as it is thrilling, Looper delivers an uncommonly smart, bravely original blend of futuristic sci-fi and good old-fashioned action.
Synopsis: In a future society, time-travel exists, but it's only available to those with the means to pay for it on... [More]
Directed By: Rian Johnson

#1

A Quiet Place (2018)
96%

#1
Adjusted Score: 118865%
Critics Consensus: A Quiet Place artfully plays on elemental fears with a ruthlessly intelligent creature feature that's as original as it is scary -- and establishes director John Krasinski as a rising talent.
Synopsis: If they hear you, they hunt you. A family must live in silence to avoid mysterious creatures that hunt by... [More]
Directed By: John Krasinski

(Photo by Murray Close/TM and Copyright ©20th Century Fox Film Corp. All rights reserved./courtesy Everett Collection)

All James McAvoy Movies Ranked

James McAvoy got his start in British comedies and dramas, working in ensembles like Bright Young Things and TV’s Shameless, while taking the lead early in Starter for 10. His role as hirsute satyr Mr. Tumnus in The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe got him major exposure, and an in with the young crowd. McAvoy started to pick up awards attention while on the peripheral in the Forrest Whitaker-starring The Last King of Scotland, a fitting fate considering the observer character he played in that Idi Amin biopic. The Best Picture-nominated Atonement quickly followed.

But it was his role in the raucous Wanted that proved his breakthrough, and that maybe McAvoy could hack it in action blockbuster world. This led to his most iconic role yet, that of Professor X as the X-Men sidewined into the past with First Class. His matchup against Michael Fassbender’s Magneto remains among the most engaging hero/villain feuds in superhero cinema.

2019 was one of his busier years, appearing in three movies, all sequels wrapping up their franchises: Dark Phoenix, IT Chapter Two, and Glass. With that, we’re ranked all James McAvoy movies by Tomatometer!

#32

Submergence (2017)
22%

#32
Adjusted Score: 23534%
Critics Consensus: A slow-moving misfire, Submergence isn't as deep as it thinks it is -- but still manages to drown its stars in a drama whose admirable ambitions remain almost entirely unfulfilled.
Synopsis: Clinging to life in a cell in Africa, James is brutally interrogated by jihadis. Worlds away, Danielle prepares to descend... [More]
Directed By: Wim Wenders

#31

Dark Phoenix (2019)
22%

#31
Adjusted Score: 45015%
Critics Consensus: Dark Phoenix ends an era of the X-Men franchise by taking a second stab at adapting a classic comics arc -- with deeply disappointing results.
Synopsis: The X-Men face their most formidable and powerful foe when one of their own, Jean Grey, starts to spiral out... [More]
Directed By: Simon Kinberg

#30
#30
Adjusted Score: 31410%
Critics Consensus: A re-imagining without the imagining, Victor Frankenstein plays at providing a fresh perspective on an oft-told tale, but ultimately offers little of interest that viewers haven't already seen in superior Frankenstein films.
Synopsis: While searching for animal body parts at a London circus, radical scientist Victor Frankenstein (James McAvoy) meets gifted surgeon Igor... [More]
Directed By: Paul McGuigan

#29

Sherlock Gnomes (2018)
27%

#29
Adjusted Score: 29305%
Critics Consensus: Sherlock Gnomes is sadly, utterly stumped by the mystery of the reason for its own existence.
Synopsis: When Gnomeo and Juliet first arrive in London with their friends and family, their biggest concern is getting a new... [More]
Directed By: John Stevenson

#28

The Pool (2002)
36%

#28
Adjusted Score: 17764%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A masked killer slaughters young people having a party at a fancy gymnasium.... [More]
Directed By: Boris von Sychowski

#27

Glass (2019)
36%

#27
Adjusted Score: 61525%
Critics Consensus: Glass displays a few glimmers of M. Night Shyamalan at his twisty world-building best, but ultimately disappoints as the conclusion to the writer-director's long-gestating trilogy.
Synopsis: David Dunn tries to stay one step ahead of the law while delivering vigilante justice on the streets of Philadelphia.... [More]
Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 49507%
Critics Consensus: Welcome to the Punch is a little deeper and more thoughtful than most police dramas -- but not quite enough to surmount its thinly written characters and numbing violence.
Synopsis: When a notorious criminal is forced to return to London, it gives a veteran detective one final chance to bring... [More]
Directed By: Eran Creevy

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 67945%
Critics Consensus: Overloaded action and a cliched villain take the focus away from otherwise strong performers and resonant themes, making X-Men: Apocalypse a middling chapter of the venerable superhero franchise.
Synopsis: Worshiped as a god since the dawn of civilization, the immortal Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac) becomes the first and most powerful... [More]
Directed By: Bryan Singer

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 50127%
Critics Consensus: The dramatic aspects of Rory O'Shea Was Here veer into mawkish, formulaic sentiment, which undercuts the characters' individuality.
Synopsis: In a Dublin home for the disabled, Michael Connolly (Steven Robertson) leads a glum, introverted existence; his cerebral palsy makes... [More]
Directed By: Damien O'Donnell

#23

Penelope (2006)
53%

#23
Adjusted Score: 57739%
Critics Consensus: Though Penelope has a charming cast and an appealing message, it ultimately suffers from faulty narrative and sloppy direction.
Synopsis: Born with the snout of a pig, young Penelope Wilhern (Christina Ricci) spends life a virtual prisoner in her home.... [More]
Directed By: Mark Palansky

#22

The Conspirator (2010)
56%

#22
Adjusted Score: 61367%
Critics Consensus: The Conspirator is well cast and tells a worthy story, but many viewers will lack the patience for Redford's deliberate, stagebound approach.
Synopsis: Following the assassination of President Lincoln, seven men and one woman are arrested and charged with conspiring to kill Lincoln,... [More]
Directed By: Robert Redford

#21

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011)
55%

#21
Adjusted Score: 59557%
Critics Consensus: While it has moments of inspiration, Gnomeo and Juliet is often too self-referential for its own good.
Synopsis: In Stratford-Upon-Avon, birthplace of William Shakespeare, Miss Capulet and Mr. Montague feud over whose garden is the better. Garden gnomes... [More]
Directed By: Kelly Asbury

#20

Becoming Jane (2007)
58%

#20
Adjusted Score: 62277%
Critics Consensus: Although Becoming Jane is a well-crafted period piece, it lacks fresh insight into the life and works of Jane Austen. The film focuses too much on wardrobe and not enough on Austen's achievements.
Synopsis: Though Jane Austen's (Anne Hathaway) financially strapped parents (James Cromwell, Julie Walters) expect her to marry the nephew of wealthy... [More]
Directed By: Julian Jarrold

#19

Wimbledon (2004)
61%

#19
Adjusted Score: 65036%
Critics Consensus: A predictable, bland rom-com, but Bettany proves to be an appealing lead.
Synopsis: Frustrated at his own failures and disillusioned with professional sports, tennis player Peter Colt (Paul Bettany) resolves to retire from... [More]
Directed By: Richard Loncraine

#18

It: Chapter Two (2019)
62%

#18
Adjusted Score: 85818%
Critics Consensus: It: Chapter Two proves bigger doesn't always mean scarier for horror sequels, but a fine cast and faithful approach to the source material keep this follow-up afloat.
Synopsis: Defeated by members of the Losers' Club, the evil clown Pennywise returns 27 years later to terrorize the town of... [More]
Directed By: Andy Muschietti

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 68398%
Critics Consensus: Colored with witty performances and a camp sense of satire, Stephen Fry's version of Evelyn Waugh's novel may only be fitfully successful but it does mark a promising debut for the British comic.
Synopsis: During the 1930s in England, a group of young socialites dominate the national gossip with extravagant and outlandish antics. Among... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Fry

#16
Adjusted Score: 68370%
Critics Consensus: Led by strong performances from Jessica Chastain and James McAvoy, The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby is a hauntingly original rumination on love and loss.
Synopsis: Following the death of their child, a woman (Jessica Chastain) leaves her husband (James McAvoy) and flees to the suburban... [More]
Directed By: Ned Benson

#15

Filth (2013)
66%

#15
Adjusted Score: 68558%
Critics Consensus: Warped, grimy, and enthusiastically unpleasant, Filth lives up to its title splendidly.
Synopsis: A drug-addled, manipulative misanthrope (James McAvoy) begins to experience increasingly severe hallucinations as he tries to solve the murder of... [More]
Directed By: Jon S. Baird

#14

Trance (2013)
68%

#14
Adjusted Score: 75373%
Critics Consensus: As stylish as ever, director Danny Boyle seems to be treading water with the surprisingly thinly written Trance -- but for fans of Boyle's work, it should still prove a trippily entertaining distraction.
Synopsis: Simon (James McAvoy), a fine-art auctioneer, joins a gang of thieves led by Franck (Vincent Cassel) to steal a priceless... [More]
Directed By: Danny Boyle

#13

Bollywood Queen (2002)
71%

#13
Adjusted Score: 19525%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Family interference and culture clash threaten the romance between the offspring (Preeya Kalidas, James McAvoy) of rival clothiers in London.... [More]
Directed By: Jeremy Wooding

#12

The Last Station (2009)
71%

#12
Adjusted Score: 76325%
Critics Consensus: Michael Hoffman's script doesn't quite live up to its famous subject, but this Tolstoy biopic benefits from a spellbinding tour de force performance by Helen Mirren.
Synopsis: In 1910, famed novelist Leo Tolstoy (Christopher Plummer) and his wife Sofya (Helen Mirren) vehemently disagree over the rights to... [More]
Directed By: Michael Hoffman

#11

Wanted (2008)
71%

#11
Adjusted Score: 79371%
Critics Consensus: Wanted is stylish, energetic popcorn fare with witty performances from Angelina Jolie (playing an expert assassin), James McAvoy, and Morgan Freeman that help to distract from its absurdly over-the-top plot.
Synopsis: Wesley Gibson (James McAvoy) is an office worker whose life is going nowhere. After his estranged father is murdered, he... [More]
Directed By: Timur Bekmambetov

#10
Adjusted Score: 83788%
Critics Consensus: With first-rate special effects and compelling storytelling, this adaptation stays faithful to its source material and will please moviegoers of all ages.
Synopsis: During the World War II bombings of London, four English siblings are sent to a country house where they will... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Adamson

#9

Split (2016)
77%

#9
Adjusted Score: 100205%
Critics Consensus: Split serves as a dramatic tour de force for James McAvoy in multiple roles -- and finds writer-director M. Night Shyamalan returning resoundingly to thrilling form.
Synopsis: Though Kevin (James McAvoy) has evidenced 23 personalities to his trusted psychiatrist, Dr. Fletcher (Betty Buckley), there remains one still... [More]
Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan

#8

Atomic Blonde (2017)
79%

#8
Adjusted Score: 105736%
Critics Consensus: Atomic Blonde gets enough mileage out of its stylish action sequences -- and ever-magnetic star -- to make up for a narrative that's somewhat less hard-hitting than its protagonist.
Synopsis: Sensual and savage, Lorraine Broughton is the most elite spy in MI6, an agent who's willing to use all of... [More]
Directed By: David Leitch

#7

Strings (2004)
80%

#7
Adjusted Score: 17870%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In an alternate puppet world, all marionettes are connected to a higher power by their strings. When one is severed,... [More]

#6

Atonement (2007)
83%

#6
Adjusted Score: 91819%
Critics Consensus: Atonement features strong performances, brilliant cinematography, and a unique score. Featuring deft performances from James MacAvoy and Keira Knightley, it's a successful adaptation of Ian McEwan's novel.
Synopsis: This sweeping English drama, based on the book by Ian McEwan, follows the lives of young lovers Cecilia Tallis (Keira... [More]
Directed By: Joe Wright

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 96823%
Critics Consensus: With a strong script, stylish direction, and powerful performances from its well-rounded cast, X-Men: First Class is a welcome return to form for the franchise.
Synopsis: In the early 1960s, during the height of the Cold War, a mutant named Charles Xavier (James McAvoy) meets a... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Vaughn

#4
Adjusted Score: 93809%
Critics Consensus: Forest Whitaker's performance as real-life megalomaniac dictator Idi Amin powers this fictionalized political thriller, a blunt and brutal tale about power and corruption.
Synopsis: While in Uganda on a medical mission, Scottish doctor Nicholas Garrigan (James McAvoy) becomes the personal physician and close confidante... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Macdonald

#3

Starter for 10 (2006)
90%

#3
Adjusted Score: 92878%
Critics Consensus: Starter For 10 is a spirited coming-of-age tale that remains charming and witty even as it veers into darker teritory. The unique setting of a quiz show makes the film wittier than your average romantic comedy.
Synopsis: Brian Jackson (James McAvoy), a working-class youth from Essex, gets a chance to prove himself when he is accepted to... [More]
Directed By: Tom Vaughan

#2
Adjusted Score: 104507%
Critics Consensus: X-Men: Days of Future Past combines the best elements of the series to produce a satisfyingly fast-paced outing that ranks among the franchise's finest installments.
Synopsis: Convinced that mutants pose a threat to humanity, Dr. Bolivar Trask (Peter Dinklage) develops the Sentinels, enormous robotic weapons that... [More]
Directed By: Bryan Singer

#1

Arthur Christmas (2011)
92%

#1
Adjusted Score: 98272%
Critics Consensus: Aardman Animations broadens their humor a bit for Arthur Christmas, a clever and earnest holiday film with surprising emotional strength.
Synopsis: Everyone knows that, each Christmas, Santa Claus delivers presents to every last child on Earth. What everyone doesn't know is... [More]
Directed By: Sarah Smith

This week on home video, there isn’t a whole lot to choose from in the New Releases department; most of the notable stuff includes collections and re-releases. This latter category is comprised of stuff like Platoon, two Ronald F. Maxwell Civil War films (Gettysburg, Gods and Generals), the Steve McQueen prison break film Papillon, and a couple of classic racing flicks (1966’s Grand Prix and 1971’s Le Mans), all on Blu-Ray. The brand new releases, however, consist of a teen-with-powers-on-the-run movie and an animated ode to Shakespeare… with garden gnomes. Check out the new releases below!



Gnomeo and Juliet

55%

Romeo and Juliet is probably Shakespeare’s most famous love story, if not the most famous of all time, and its underlying premise of starcrossed lovers is such a universal theme that storytellers have reinterpreted the tragic play in countless ways. Case in point: Kelly Asbury’s (Shrek 2) Gnomeo and Juliet, which opened earlier this year, relocates the setting to the world of, yes, garden gnomes. Not real ones, mind you, but ones akin to the little fellow you see in those Travelocity ads. But with Asbury’s track record (Shrek 2 was nominated for a Best Animated Feature Oscar), a voice cast that includes, among others, James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Michael Caine, Maggie Smith, Patrick Stewart, and Hulk Hogan, and a soundtrack that boasts both new and classic songs by Elton John, it wouldn’t have been a stretch to assume this would be a winner. Unfortunately, critics found the film to be a little too aware of its own silliness, which detracted from its charm enough to earn it a 55% on the Tomatometer. Still, most say it’s not a bad movie altogether, and if you don’t mind a bit of fudging on the part of the writers, it might not be too terrible an introduction to Shakespeare for the little ones.



I Am Number Four

33%

With its combination of teen romance and super-empowerment, it’s no wonder the young adult novel I Am Number Four spent nineteen weeks on the NY Times Best Seller List (seven of them at #1); the setup is, after all, vaguely something like Harry Potter meets Twilight. With that in mind, it’s also not surprising that a proposed film franchise was hot on its heels, and we got the first big screen installment, I Am Number Four, back in February. Directed by DJ Caruso (Disturbia), the film stars Alex Pettyfer as John Smith, a human-like alien refugee with nascent superpowers who is on the run from another predatory alien race who call themselves Mogadorians. John, along with his guardian Henri (Timothy Olyphant), set up shop in Paradise, Ohio, where John begins attending the local high school and falls in love with a normal human girl named Sarah (Glee‘s Dianna Agron). As John’s powers begin to mature, the Mogadorians discover his location and a confrontation ensues. The film is set up as the first in a franchise, and the second book in the series is set to debut later this year, but critics were harsh on the film, calling it noisy, derivative, and ultimately forgettable. Still, if you’re a fan of the book, you may enjoy this.



Solaris (1976) – Criterion Collection

92%

Andrei Tarkovsky’s Solaris can be seen as a Soviet response to Kubrick’s 2001 — it’s a sci-fi odyssey that uses the darkest recesses of space as a setting to explore the essence of what it is to be human. And like 2001, it’s a heady head-trip (those looking for pulse pounding tension will be disappointed) that weaves an intoxicating, sometimes heartbreaking spell if you surrender to its spare, hypnotic tone. Cosmonaut Kris Kelvin (Donatas Banionis) is dispatched to a space station orbiting the planet Solaris, where crew members have reported strange visions; when he arrives, Kelvin discovers that his memories have become reality. A swanky new Criterion set features deleted scenes, audio commentary from Tarkovsky scholars, interviews with cast and crew members, and a doc on Stanislaw Lem, who wrote the source novel. Even if you’ve seen Steven Soderbergh’s underrated remake, you should check out the original, which remains a haunting, singular cinematic masterpiece.



Lemonade Mouth

In the grand tradition of High School Musical comes the next made-for-tv Disney original film, Lemonade Mouth, starring Adam Hicks, Bridgit Mendler, Hayley Kiyoko, Naomi Scott, and Blake Michael. In Breakfast Club style, five very different high school freshmen meet during detention, part of which entails cleaning up the music room. As the kids tidy up the place, they each grab an instrument and begin jamming, only to realize they make a pretty decent band. Next thing you know, they’ve formed an honest-to-goodness band, they’ll be performing at their school’s Halloween Bash, and they learn to put aside their differences and stand up for a common cause. It’s all pretty typical Disney Channel stuff, but it’s hard to argue against making wholesome messages more appealing to kids through pop songs. Whether or not this will spawn another franchise like the aforementioned Zac Efron/Vanessa Hudgens vehicle is anyone’s guess, but if you’re looking for something peppy and harmless to keep your pre-tween occupied for a couple hours, this will do the trick.



The Great Dictator – Criterion Collection

93%

In an era when hundreds of Downfall parodies are available on YouTube, it’s hard to imagine a time when it was risky to make Hitler look like a spastic buffoon. But such was the case when Charlie Chaplin made The Great Dictator, an incendiary satire of der Führer that made some folks in Hollywood nervous, as the United States had yet to enter World War II. Chaplin played both an amnesiac Jewish barber and Adenoid Hynkel, the dictator of Tomainia and a persecutor of Jews (although his Little Tramp persona and unmatched physical comedy are ever present as well). For Chaplin, The Great Dictator was personal — he was disgusted by Hitler’s systematic anti-Semitism and saber-rattling — and he made the German leader look as foolish as possible, mimicking his hyperventilating style of speech with pidgin German and mocking his boot-licking lackeys. The new Criterion disc presents the film with a new transfer, plus oodles of bonus material, include outtakes, scenes from other films that influenced Chaplin, audio commentary from Chaplin experts, and the 2001 documentary The Tramp and the Dictator, which takes an in-depth look at the lives of both Chaplin and Hitler.



Transformers: The Complete Series

If you, like a few of the RT editors here, grew up watching the old animated Transformers cartoons (not Beast Wars or any of the newfangled reboots) from the early to mid-80s, and you haven’t rewatched any of the episodes since those glory days, give it a shot. We’re going to be honest with you here: they’re not very good. But you know, when you’ve got giant robots shapeshifting into fighter jets and sports cars, who cares? Right? Seemingly timed to generate (or benefit from) some interest leading up to the release of the third live-action Transformers film, the entire series of the classic show arrives on home video this week in the form of a 15-disc DVD set. The set contains all four seasons of the show, plus all the special features found on the previously released 25th Anniversary Editions. That’s 98 remastered episodes, as well as several featurettes, PSAs, concept art, toy commercials, and more. Now, if you already have the 25th Anniversary Matrix of Leadership Edition, you won’t need this, but if you don’t own any of it already, and you’re feeling extra nostalgic, you can pick this up; the special features will be interesting to watch, and you can wax sentimental every time Optimus Prime says, “Autobots! Transform and roll out!”

This weekend, distracted by Oscar hoopla, Hollywood studios tossed unimpressive new films into North American multiplexes which failed to excite moviegoers who instead drove the three-week old animated hit Gnomeo & Juliet into first place. The Owen Wilson comedy Hall Pass stumbled into second place during its opening weekend while Nicolas Cage’s latest action effort Drive Angry crashed and burned with an embarrassing ninth place debut for the actor who won an Oscar 15 years ago this spring.

Thanks to strong legs and weak results from new releases, Disney’s 3D hit Gnomeo & Juliet climbed into the top spot with an estimated $14.2M in its third weekend. Off just 26%, the G-rated tale has pulled in a stellar $75.1M and is headed for $110M or more. Solid word-of-mouth from kids and parents plus a lack of other family options has helped. This Friday, a new animated competitor arrives in the form of Johnny Depp’s Rango which is being backed by a massive marketing and distribution assault. However, that PG-rated pic may play a little older since its rating is due to “rude humor” and “smoking” so it may not hurt Gnomeo‘s hold on younger children.

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The Farrelly brothers, the ex-kings of raunchy comedies, hoped for their first number one hit in over a decade but were beaten down by a three-week old garden gnome. Their vacation-from-marriage pic Hall Pass debuted in second with an estimated $13.4M from 2,950 theaters for a mild $4,549 average. Falling below industry expectations, the R-rated film starring Owen Wilson and Jason Sudeikis failed to excite its target adult audience and its story about two husbands granted a no-questions-asked week away from their marriages turned off many women. Reviews were mostly bad and starpower wasn’t ample with Wilson just seen in two December comedies and Sudeikis never anchoring a feature film before.

Falling from first to third was Liam Neeson’s action thriller Unknown which dropped a moderate 43% to an estimated $12.4M for a ten-day total of $42.8M. Warner Bros. should end its domestic run with about $70M. Adam Sandler’s Just Go With It followed with an estimated $11.1M, down 40%, for a $79.4M cume for Sony.

Sophomore I Am Number Four grossed an estimated $11M thanks to a 43% decline, a good hold for a sci-fi flick with a built-in audience. With $37.7M in ten days, Disney should end up with around $60M. Paramount added more 3D footage to its tween sensation Justin Bieber: Never Say Never and fans responded with a weekend dip of only 31% to an estimated $9.2M. A film like this would normally fall by more than 50% at this point in its run. Total stands at an impressive $62.8M.

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Leading all films with 12 Oscar nominations, The King’s Speech added 300 more runs over Oscar weekend and rose 17% to an estimated $7.6M. That put The Weinstein Co. at a robust $114.5M with more to come in the weeks ahead. Close behind with an estimated $7.6M as well was a film likely to receive less Oscar attention next awards season, Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son. Fox’s Martin Lawrence threequel fell 54% in its second frame and has banked $28.6M in ten days. Look for a $40M final and possible Razzie nods.

In one of the worst showings ever for both Nicolas Cage and the 3D format, the action film Drive Angry bombed in its opening grossing a puny $5.1M, according to estimates. The Summit release averaged a lousy $2,241 from 2,290 theaters and failed to excite paying moviegoers. The marketing emphsized that the R-rated film was actually shot in 3D and wasn’t a conversion, but action fans still found no need in spending top dollar on Cage’s second film in as many months. His Season of the Witch also struck out with its $10.6M debut in January.

Rounding out the weak top ten was the college thriller The Roommate which fell 48% to an estimated $2.1M in its fourth frame raising Sony’s total to a solid $35.9M.

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Below the top ten, top Oscar contenders enjoyed good holds as the awards drew near. Among Best Picture nominees, True Grit dipped just 20% to an estimated $1.9M, The Fighter rose 2% to an estimated $1.6M, and Spirit Award champ Black Swan inched up 2% as well to an estimated $1.4M. Totals stand at $167.1M, $90.4M, and $103.6M respectively. Seven of the ten Best Picture nominees have now grossed over $90M.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $93.8M which was down 10% from last year when Shutter Island stayed in the top spot with $22.7M; but up 17% from 2009 when Madea Goes to Jail remained at number one with $16.2M. The Academy Awards did not fall on either of those frames.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, Box Office Guru!

This week at the movies, we’ve got Bieber fever (the concert documentary Justin Bieber: Never Say Never); romantic deception (Just Go With It, starring Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston); Shakespearean lawn ornaments (Gnomeo and Juliet, with voice work by James McAvoy and Emily Blunt); and an epic journey (The Eagle, starring Channing Tatum and Jamie Bell). What do the critics have to say?



Justin Bieber: Never Say Never

65%

If you’re a 12-year-old girl with a severe case of Bieber fever, you’ll probably love Justin Bieber: Never Say Never. If you’re a parent, or if you’re merely curious about the Bieber phenomenon, critics say you’ll probably have a better-than-average time with this concert/behind-the-scenes doc, which makes a solid case for Bieber’s talent and likeability without going too far beneath the surface. Never Say Never chronicles Bieber’s rise to stardom, culminating in a blowout show in Madison Square Garden with such pop luminaries as Usher, Miley Cyrus, and Ludacris; along the way, we learn about the star’s prodigious talent and hard work. The pundits say the film sometimes has the feel of an infomercial, and is a little overlong, but it’s also an occasionally fascinating peek into the star-making process, and Bieber comes off as a likeable, remarkably polished performer throughout.



Just Go with It

19%

One often needs to suspend disbelief with the unlikely plot mechanics of romantic comedies. However, critics say that’s a tall order with Just Go With It, which requires its talented cast to act foolishly at nearly every turn. Adam Sandler stars as a plastic surgeon who lures women by pretending he’s married; when he meets the girl of his dreams, he asks his long-suffering assistant (Jennifer Aniston) to pretend to be his ex in order to keep up the façade. The pundits say Just Go with It is an implausible, largely laugh-free affair that lacks the energy and comic rhythm required to pull off this kind of farce.



Gnomeo and Juliet

55%

Shakespeare’s works are so universal that they’ve survived innumerable offbeat adaptations. Still, the idea of Gnomeo and Juliet — the Bard’s greatest romantic tragedy set in a world of anthropomorphic garden gnomes – is more idiosyncratic than most, and critics say this animated musical comedy has moments of inspiration but is a little thin over the long haul. Gnomeo (James McAvoy) and Juliet (Emily Blunt) are gnomes that find love despite being from opposite sides of a fence. Can these crazy kids make it work — and keep their fellow lawn ornaments from all-out war? Some pundits are charmed by Gnomeo‘s wit and imagination, but others find it a little too self-referential for its own good (Check out Five Favorite Films with executive producer/composer Sir Elton John.)



The Eagle

39%

An old-school sword-and-sandal epic that gets by without overdosing on CGI is a tasty proposition. Unfortunately, critics say The Eagle doesn’t quite soar — it looks terrific, but its sluggish pacing and so-so central performance from Channing Tatum keep it from standing alongside antiquity flicks of yore. Tatum stars as a Roman centurion on a quest to restore his family’s honor; along with a slave (Jamie Bell), his dangerous journey takes him beyond the borders of the Roman Empire. The pundits say The Eagle has a nice eye for period detail and scenic vistas, but Tatum lacks the authority to pull off the central role, and the battle sequences are hard to follow.(Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we present a list of memorable Romans in the movies.)

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • Poetry, about a sixtysomething woman who enrolls in a poetry class to stave off personal demons, is at 100 percent.
  • The Sky Turns, a documentary chronicling a young woman’s return to her isolated, sparsely populated village, is at 100 percent.
  • Orgasm, Inc., a doc about the development of pharmaceuticals to treat female sexual dysfunction, is at 88 percent.
  • Cedar Rapids, starring Ed Helms and John C. Reilly in a comedy about a naive guy representing his company at an insurance convention, is at 85 percent.
  • Carancho, a noir-ish romance set amidst an Argentine underworld that profits from traffic fatalities, is at 73 percent.
  • Carbon Nation, a doc about individuals addressing the climate change crisis, is at 57 percent.
  • Certifiably Jonathan, a mock/doc hybrid featuring legendary comic Jonathan Winters, is at 20 percent.

In the pantheon of popular music, few artists have been as celebrated and enduring as Sir Elton John. The Grammy/Oscar/Tony winner is also a Kennedy Center honoree, a Rock and Roll Hall-of-Famer, and a Commander of the Order of the British Empire. And, with lyricist Bernie Taupin, John has crafted some of pop’s most iconic – and best-selling – music. However, John is hardly one to rest on his laurels; he still plays scores of concerts each year, and a long-gestating passion project, the animated comedy Gnomeo and Juliet, finally hits theaters Friday.

Executive-produced by John, Gnomeo is a retelling of Shakespeare’s classic tale with garden gnomes, and features some of his biggest singles (“Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting,” “Don’t Go Breaking My Heart,” “Rocket Man,” among others) along with “Hello, Hello,” a duet with Lady Gaga. In an interview with Rotten Tomatoes, Sir Elton shared his favorite films, and discussed the making of Gnomeo and why it’s still a thrill for him to hear his old songs.

 



The Godfather, Part II
(1974, 98% Tomatometer)



Godfather II. Just riveting. It’s just incredible. At that time, there weren’t usually sequels to films, and when they did Godfather II, when they said they were going to do Godfather II, I groaned. And, of course, it was better, I think, than Godfather I. I think it’s an amazing, amazing piece of filmmaking. He was an amazing director, Coppola.

All About Eve (1950, 100% Tomatometer)



All About Eve, because I just think the dialogue in that film is incredible and so brilliant, and I never get fed up with watching it. It’s just brilliantly acted; it’s b—-iness at its best.

The Exorcist (1973,
85% Tomatometer)



The Exorcist, because it frightened the s— out of me. I remember going to see it in London – I went with a friend – and I said, “Well, that wasn’t too bad after all, was it?” And we both said, “Well, I don’t want to go home quite yet.” So we went out for a meal. That is an incredible movie.


Blazing Saddles
(1974,
89% Tomatometer)



Let me choose a comedy. Let me choose Blazing Saddles, because I just thought, at the time when that came out, it was just so ahead of its time. I mean, you couldn’t get away with that now. There’s no f—ing way you could get away with it.


The Lives of Others
(2006, 93% Tomatometer)



The Lives of Others would go in there. It’s just an amazing movie. And then he went and did The Tourist, which, I think, got a 20 percent rating on your site. We look at your website quite a lot. But, [The Lives of Others] was just a beautiful film.

So many great movies coming out of Germany, like… Well, The Reader was a Stephen Daldry film, but it was all about coming to terms with their past. And also, Downfall was as well. God, I could continue forever because I love movies.

RT: I wanted to ask you about that. You have songs like “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road,” “All Quiet on the Western Front,” and the album titled “Don’t Shoot Me I’m Only the Piano Player.” How much has cinema informed your songwriting?

I think you’d have to ask Bernie [Taupin] that, because I don’t write lyrics. But I think it’s obviously quite a lot. I mean, he’s written songs like “Roy Rogers.” I mean, we grew up in Britain, and the only good music to listen to was American; the only good films really, mostly – not all of them, but most of the films that we loved – were American. And so you become very romantic about America, and I think it has to influence what you write if you’re a lyric writer. And Bernie’s obsessed with Americana. Listen, I can sit here and probably name a hundred movies that I like, but you asked me off the top of my head. You a——! [laughs] But I think those five… It’s always nice to put a comedy in the mix because they never get nominated, do they?

Next, John talks about working on Gnomeo and Juliet, and what it’s like to hear his music everywhere.

RT: You must be happy that Gnomeo and Juliet is finally coming to the big screen.

Elton John: It’s only taken 11 years, yes. It’s like giving birth to a whale [laughs]. It’s been quite an amazing journey; maybe one day we’ll write about it. But you know what? We’re just concentrating on the positive, and [former Chairman of Walt Disney Studios] Dick Cook was the person who actually really, really said, “Go ahead and make this movie your way, and not the Disney studio’s way,” which was Americanizing the whole thing and giving the gnomes American accents. We always wanted to do this in a British way, and it’s set in Stratford-upon-Avon, so you have to have British actors. We put in a couple of… We put in Flamingo as an American import, just for the American market. We had to do that; we were told we needed to do that, so that was the only way around that. But yes, I’m thrilled with the film.

It’s weird doing animation, because you never really get a glimpse of what it’s going to be like until about maybe four months before it’s finished. You’re just waiting for the animation to be finished. It’s really hard to know what’s going on when you’ve got black-and-white drawings being animated. When you see the actual animation and the visual things it brings to the whole project, then you can actually know where you really stand.

[rtimage]siteImageId=10240540[/rtimage]

And obviously the music was kind of vital to what was going on in this. It wasn’t my idea to use… It was Dick Cook’s idea to use all the Elton backtrack stuff – or catalog stuff – along with the new songs we’d written. And I think James Newton Howard really did a good job with that, because there’s the danger that it’s going to be a little overboard, but things like “Saturday Night’s Alright for Fighting” for the lawnmower race, and “Bennie and the Jets” where he’s on the computer, and “Your Song” was very funny where Stephen Merchant is playing that really drippy character, and it’s a little bit runny. I love things like that. So it gave us a chance to poke fun at ourselves, as well.

But it’s tough doing animation, because again, you’re really hoping that what you’ve got in your mind is going to come through visually. And it’s all very well seeing it on paper, but it’s not the same thing.

When you’re doing an animated film, do you ever say to yourself, “Okay, this is for the kids”? Does it change the audience you’re hoping to reach?

Well, I think adults are kids, too. The first [animated film] I ever did was The Lion King, which was a homerun because it was a really great animated movie. And even though it was for children, there’s so many adult things in it. For example, the hyenas, and all the dialogue that goes on there. And The Road to El Dorado, it’s the same thing. I think now, because adults take their kids to see movies like this, I think you can get away with far more. The proof in the pudding is in the Shrek franchise. I mean, I took my godchildren to see Kung Fu Panda, and I was surprised to see how adult the content was, and how advanced kids are with adult content as well. Much more than we were [when we were kids]. They get the jokes. They probably wouldn’t get the “Bennie and the Jets” jokes on the computer, but that’s a little adult thing going on there.

When I write, I try and write the songs as how they fit the scene. “Love Builds a Garden” is when the poor garden the flamingo’s in… The couple breaks up and it goes to wreck and ruin. You know, that’s the song that had to go there. And “Hello, Hello,” when Gnomeo and Juliet first meet, is the same thing. The kids are the ones buying the Britney Spears singles, so, I mean, come on. Much more advanced than we were; we were listening to “The Three Billy Goats Gruff” [laughs]. Kids have come a long way.

[rtimage]siteImageId=10240541[/rtimage]
Do you hope that Gnomeo introduces you to a whole new audience?

Well, I have that, in a way, anyway. The Lion King gave me that; for that I’m forever grateful. But yes, at my age, lots of people who don’t know my music out there are younger. That would be nice. But I do have that with The Lion King, and Billy Elliot to a certain extent. I’m very fortunate like that. But yeah, the more people appreciate your music, hey, the better it is for me. It’s great. I mean, I write music to be enjoyed, and it’s not just for one kind of age group.

Speaking of people who appreciate your music, when someone uses one of your songs in a movie – I’m thinking of Martin Scorsese with Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore, or Cameron Crowe using “Tiny Dancer” in Almost Famous, or Lars von Trier with “Goodbye Yellow Brick Road” in Breaking the Waves – do you ever say to yourself, “That’s an interesting take on my song; I hadn’t looked at it that way.” Are you generally pleased with how people use your music?

Yeah, I am. I’m a songwriter, and I never understand people saying, “They shouldn’t record one of my songs,” or “People shouldn’t use this,” or whatever. I think Kings of Leon just said they didn’t want their songs on Glee, and Slash [of Guns N’ Roses]. You know what? Get a f—ing life. You know, your songs, once you’ve written them, you should be pleased and honored that anyone does a version of them. I get excited if I’m in a f—ing elevator and I hear it on muzak. I think, “Oh, I wrote that.” It’s just a thrill. And you never get over that as a songwriter. The choice of “Amoreena” in Dog Day Afternoon floored me, because it wasn’t one of my most… It’s nice when people pick out songs that aren’t so well known. And, in fact, “Tiny Dancer,” I owe Cameron Crowe a lot for that, because he really resurrected that song.

So you still get a thrill hearing your music in an elevator?

Yeah, because that’s the only time I ever hear it — I don’t listen to it at home. [laughs]

But you do play a lot of shows. Is it one of those things where you have some deep cut from Madman Across the Water that you would like to play, but you feel a certain obligation to your fans to play the hits?

No, we play “Madman” on stage; we play “Holiday Inn,” I play “Indian Sunset.” I do different sorts of shows. I do band shows, I do solo shows, I do shows with my percussion player Ray Cooper, I do Billy Joel shows, I do orchestral shows. Last year I played over 80 different songs. So I can do more obscure songs; “Indian Sunset” I do with Ray Cooper, and it’s brilliant. Nobody knows that song at all, and every night it gets a standing ovation, because it’s an unusual, beautiful lyric by Taupin. So no, I’m lucky. That’s why I do different sorts of shows, because if you just played the hits, you’d go stark raving f—ing mad.


Gnomeo and Juliet opens this weekend in the US.

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