Disney/courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by Disney/courtesy Everett Collection)

All Oscar Isaac Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Before he became Llewyn Davis, actor Oscar Isaac was the guy you saw constantly bringing it in secondary roles in high-profile projects, each career move taking him that much closer to the one perfect role that would make him a star. He worked twice with Ridley Scott with Body of Lies and Robin Hood, got to show off his sweet dance moves in Sucker Punch, shot a few guns in The Bourne Legacy, and brought uncommon empathy to his doomed ex-con character in Drive.

And as great as the Llewyn Davis character is on paper, being written by the Coen brothers after all, it was Isaac’s wry, sad, funny, and even mysterious performance that brought the folk singer to cinematic life. 2015 was A Most Violent Year for Isaac, but also a very good one, as that movie released, along with The Two Faces of January, word-of-mouth sci-fi smash Ex Machina, and the juggernaut that was Star Wars: Episode VII – The Force Awakens.

Recently, he was in The Card Counter and two Addams Family movies. Now, we’re taking a walk back now with ranking all of Oscar Isaac’s movies by Tomatometer!

#33

W.E. (2011)
12%

#33
Adjusted Score: 16316%
Critics Consensus: W.E. exhibits director Madonna's keen eye for striking style, but this shallow biopic is too enamored with aesthetics to offer any insight into its subject.
Synopsis: Dissatisfied with the way her own life is playing out, New York-based Wally Winthrop (Abbie Cornish) becomes obsessed with the... [More]
Directed By: Madonna

#32

Life Itself (2018)
13%

#32
Adjusted Score: 21830%
Critics Consensus: A mawkish melodrama that means less the more it tries to say, Life Itself suggests writer-director Dan Fogelman's talents are best suited to television.
Synopsis: College sweethearts Will and Abby fall in love, get married and prepare to bring their first child into the world.... [More]
Directed By: Dan Fogelman

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 21305%
Critics Consensus: It has laudable aspirations, but For Greater Glory ultimately fails to fulfill its goals due to an overstuffed script, thinly written characters, and an overly simplified dramatization of historical events.
Synopsis: In late 1920s Mexico, retired Gen. Gorostieta (Andy Garcia) and his wife (Eva Longoria) watch their country degenerate into violent... [More]
Directed By: Dean Wright

#30

Sucker Punch (2011)
22%

#30
Adjusted Score: 30467%
Critics Consensus: It's technically impressive and loaded with eye-catching images, but without characters or a plot to support them, all of Sucker Punch's visual thrills are for naught.
Synopsis: Locked away, a young woman named Babydoll (Emily Browning) retreats to a fantasy world where she is free to go... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 33374%
Critics Consensus: Altogether ooky, and not in a good way.
Synopsis: Everyone's favorite spooky family is back in the animated comedy sequel, The Addams Family 2. In this all new movie... [More]

#28

Suburbicon (2017)
28%

#28
Adjusted Score: 46492%
Critics Consensus: A disappointing misfire for director George Clooney, Suburbicon attempts to juggle social satire, racial commentary, and murder mystery -- and ends up making a mess of all three.
Synopsis: Suburbicon is a peaceful, idyllic, suburban community with affordable homes and manicured lawns -- the perfect place to raise a... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#27

Mojave (2015)
31%

#27
Adjusted Score: 33722%
Critics Consensus: Mojave has no shortage of talent on either side of the camera; unfortunately, it amounts to little more than a frustrating missed opportunity.
Synopsis: A down-and-out artist (Garrett Hedlund) has a dangerous and shocking encounter with an evil drifter (Oscar Isaac) in the desert,... [More]
Directed By: William Monahan

#26

Won't Back Down (2012)
35%

#26
Adjusted Score: 37987%
Critics Consensus: Despite the best efforts of its talented leads, Won't Back Down fails to lend sufficient dramatic heft or sophistication to the hot-button issue of education reform.
Synopsis: Jamie Fitzpatrick (Maggie Gyllenhaal) and Nona Alberts (Viola Davis) are two women from opposites sides of the social and economic... [More]
Directed By: Daniel Barnz

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 42240%
Critics Consensus: The Nativity Story is a dull retelling of a well-worn tale with the look and feel of a high-school production.
Synopsis: Betrothed to much-older Joseph (Oscar Isaac), Mary (Keisha Castle-Hughes) must remain a maiden for one year, but she subsequently receives... [More]
Directed By: Catherine Hardwicke

#24

Therese (2013)
41%

#24
Adjusted Score: 43135%
Critics Consensus: Although it benefits from a strong cast, In Secret's stars can't totally compensate for the movie's sodden pacing and overly familiar story.
Synopsis: A woman (Elizabeth Olsen) and her lover (Oscar Isaac) conspire to murder her mild-mannered husband (Tom Felton), but overwhelming guilt... [More]
Directed By: Charlie Stratton

#23

Robin Hood (2010)
43%

#23
Adjusted Score: 51697%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott's revisionist take on this oft-told tale offers some fine acting and a few gripping action sequences, but it's missing the thrill of adventure that made Robin Hood a legend in the first place.
Synopsis: After the death of Richard the Lion-Hearted, a skilled archer named Robin Longstride (Russell Crowe) travels to Nottingham, where villagers... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 53374%
Critics Consensus: The Addams Family's starry voice cast and eye-catching animation aren't enough to outweigh its saccharine handling of the delightfully dark source material.
Synopsis: Members of the mysterious and spooky Addams family -- Gomez, Morticia, Pugsley, Wednesday, Uncle Fester and Grandma -- are readily... [More]

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 67945%
Critics Consensus: Overloaded action and a cliched villain take the focus away from otherwise strong performers and resonant themes, making X-Men: Apocalypse a middling chapter of the venerable superhero franchise.
Synopsis: Worshiped as a god since the dawn of civilization, the immortal Apocalypse (Oscar Isaac) becomes the first and most powerful... [More]
Directed By: Bryan Singer

#20

The Promise (2016)
51%

#20
Adjusted Score: 61641%
Critics Consensus: The Promise wastes an outstanding cast and powerful real-life story on a love triangle that frustratingly fails to engage.
Synopsis: Brilliant medical student Michael (Oscar Isaac) meets beautiful dance instructor Ana (Charlotte Le Bon) in late 1914. Their shared Armenian... [More]
Directed By: Terry George

#19
Adjusted Score: 83579%
Critics Consensus: Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker suffers from a frustrating lack of imagination, but concludes this beloved saga with fan-focused devotion.
Synopsis: When it's discovered that the evil Emperor Palpatine did not die at the hands of Darth Vader, the rebels must... [More]
Directed By: J.J. Abrams

#18

Agora (2009)
54%

#18
Adjusted Score: 55953%
Critics Consensus: Noble goals and a gripping performance from Rachel Weisz can't save Agora from its muddled script, uneven acting, and choppy editing.
Synopsis: In the 4th century A.D., astronomer and philosopher Hypatia (Rachel Weisz) teaches her scientific beliefs to a class of male... [More]
Directed By: Alejandro Amenábar

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 64918%
Critics Consensus: It isn't quite as compelling as the earlier trilogy, but The Bourne Legacy proves the franchise has stories left to tell -- and benefits from Jeremy Renner's magnetic work in the starring role.
Synopsis: When the actions of Jason Bourne spark a fire that threatens to burn down decades of research across a number... [More]
Directed By: Tony Gilroy

#16
Adjusted Score: 17889%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Dying from radiation poisoning, a man (Paddy Considine) gets mixed up in a plutonium scheme with a small-time criminal (Oscar... [More]
Directed By: Scott Z. Burns

#15

10 Years (2011)
60%

#15
Adjusted Score: 61729%
Critics Consensus: A sweet ensemble comedy about a high school reunion, 10 Years is well cast but unfortunately predictable and short on three dimensional characters.
Synopsis: Former high-school friends (Channing Tatum, Rosario Dawson, Justin Long) meet again after a decade and discover that the passage of... [More]
Directed By: Jamie Linden

#14

Operation Finale (2018)
61%

#14
Adjusted Score: 67674%
Critics Consensus: Operation Finale is well-intentioned, well-acted, and overall entertaining, even if the depth and complexity of the real-life events depicted can get a little lost in their dramatization.
Synopsis: Fifteen years after the end of World War II, a team of top-secret Israeli agents travels to Argentina to track... [More]
Directed By: Chris Weitz

#13

Triple Frontier (2019)
71%

#13
Adjusted Score: 77995%
Critics Consensus: An outstanding cast and ambitious story help Triple Frontier overcome an uneven narrative -- and elevate the end result above a crowded field of grim and gritty heist thrillers.
Synopsis: Former Special Forces operatives reunite to plan a heist in a sparsely populated multi-border zone of South America. For the... [More]
Directed By: J.C. Chandor

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 89208%
Critics Consensus: Led by mesmerizing work from Willem Dafoe in the central role, At Eternity's Gate intriguingly imagines Vincent Van Gogh's troubled final days.
Synopsis: Famed but tormented artist Vincent van Gogh spends his final years in Arles, France, painting masterworks of the natural world... [More]
Directed By: Julian Schnabel

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 83596%
Critics Consensus: With striking visuals, complex characters, and Hitchcockian plot twists, The Two Faces of January offers a pleasantly pungent treat for fans of romantic thrillers.
Synopsis: After he kills a detective, a con artist (Viggo Mortensen) and his wife (Kirsten Dunst) must trust a potentially dangerous... [More]
Directed By: Hossein Amini

#10

The Card Counter (2020)
86%

#10
Adjusted Score: 96922%
Critics Consensus: Led by Oscar Isaac's gripping performance, The Card Counter adds another weighty chapter to Paul Schrader's long inquiry into man's moral responsibility.
Synopsis: Redemption is the long game in Paul Schrader's THE CARD COUNTER. Told with Schrader's trademark cinematic intensity, the revenge thriller... [More]
Directed By: Paul Schrader

#9

Annihilation (2018)
88%

#9
Adjusted Score: 108010%
Critics Consensus: Annihilation backs up its sci-fi visual wonders and visceral genre thrills with an impressively ambitious -- and surprisingly strange -- exploration of challenging themes that should leave audiences pondering long after the end credits roll.
Synopsis: Lena, a biologist and former soldier, joins a mission to uncover what happened to her husband inside Area X --... [More]
Directed By: Alex Garland

#8

Dune (2021)
83%

#8
Adjusted Score: 107705%
Critics Consensus: Dune occasionally struggles with its unwieldy source material, but those issues are largely overshadowed by the scope and ambition of this visually thrilling adaptation.
Synopsis: Paul Atreides, a brilliant and gifted young man born into a great destiny beyond his understanding, must travel to the... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 98397%
Critics Consensus: Gritty, gripping, and weighted with thought-provoking heft, A Most Violent Year represents another strong entry in writer-director J.C. Chandor's impressive filmography.
Synopsis: In 1981 New York, a fuel supplier (Oscar Isaac) tries to adhere to his own moral compass amid the rampant... [More]
Directed By: J.C. Chandor

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 126927%
Critics Consensus: Star Wars: The Last Jedi honors the saga's rich legacy while adding some surprising twists -- and delivering all the emotion-rich action fans could hope for.
Synopsis: Luke Skywalker's peaceful and solitary existence gets upended when he encounters Rey, a young woman who shows strong signs of... [More]
Directed By: Rian Johnson

#5

Ex Machina (2014)
92%

#5
Adjusted Score: 103683%
Critics Consensus: Ex Machina leans heavier on ideas than effects, but it's still a visually polished piece of work -- and an uncommonly engaging sci-fi feature.
Synopsis: Caleb Smith (Domhnall Gleeson) a programmer at a huge Internet company, wins a contest that enables him to spend a... [More]
Directed By: Alex Garland

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 102851%
Critics Consensus: Smart, funny, and profoundly melancholy, Inside Llewyn Davis finds the Coen brothers in fine form.
Synopsis: In 1961 New York City, folk singer Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) is at a crossroads. Guitar in hand, he struggles... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#3

Drive (2011)
93%

#3
Adjusted Score: 102675%
Critics Consensus: With its hyper-stylized blend of violence, music, and striking imagery, Drive represents a fully realized vision of arthouse action.
Synopsis: Driver is a skilled Hollywood stuntman who moonlights as a getaway driver for criminals. Though he projects an icy exterior,... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

#2
Adjusted Score: 110988%
Critics Consensus: Packed with action and populated by both familiar faces and fresh blood, The Force Awakens successfully recalls the series' former glory while injecting it with renewed energy.
Synopsis: Thirty years after the defeat of the Galactic Empire, the galaxy faces a new threat from the evil Kylo Ren... [More]
Directed By: J.J. Abrams

#1

Balibo (2009)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 89014%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Roger East and Jose Ramos-Horta travel to East Timor to investigate the Balibo Five murders.... [More]
Directed By: Robert Connolly

(Photo by Warner Bros./ courtesy Everett Collection)

All 8 Zack Snyder Movies, Ranked by Tomatometer

Director Zack Snyder was among the frontlines in the battle to bring back the zombie, his 2004 Certified Fresh remake of Dawn of the Dead nestling in snugly with the likes of Shaun of the Dead and Land of the Dead. But it was with his second feature that he developed a signature style: 300, combining a comic-book palette with unflinching machismo and fetishistic style. The adaptation of the Frank Miller comic was a pop-culture phenomenon, and helped establish the gritty Warner Bros. look on comic-book movies that started with V for Vendetta and was furthered by The Dark Knight.

There was no stopping Snyder now, as he next tackled Watchmen, once thought a graphic novel too dense and troubling for film. Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole and Sucker Punch were stepping stones into the world most know Snyder for: As the creative guide behind Superman movies, and the DC Extended Universe beyond. Man of Steel was a big enough box office hit for the studio, and if audiences had some qualms about the direction of the character, their curiosity was nonetheless piqued for the next movie.

That would, of course, end up being the biggest title bout of comicdom: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice. Ben Affleck put on the suit, the first to do so after Christian Bale in his Dark Knight trilogy run, and went mano-a-mano with Henry Cavill. A single word may have put this quarrel between two mama’s boys to bed, which opened the path to the next movie referred to in BvS‘s subtitle. Justice League arrived, pulling in Gal Gadot, who would go on to make the Certified Fresh Wonder Woman, and introducing the new movie versions of The Flash (Ezra Miller), Aquaman (Jason Momoa), and Cyborg (Ray Fisher). Justice League‘s disappointing Tomatometer and box office have made “Release the Snyder cut!” a clarion call for the online hordes, referring to the supposed three-hour version of the movie that existed  before studio executives and meddling forced it down to its current 120-minute runtime.

Snyder has since lessened his presence within the DCEU (he’s still a producer on Wonder Woman 1984), and is returning to where it all began with Army of the Dead, an upcoming Netflix movie starring Dave Bautista about mercenaries who pull off a heist in Vegas during a zombie outbreak. And now, we’re pulling a heist ourselves as we sneak into the past and bringing up every Zack Snyder movie ranked by Tomatometer!

#8

Sucker Punch (2011)
22%

#8
Adjusted Score: 30467%
Critics Consensus: It's technically impressive and loaded with eye-catching images, but without characters or a plot to support them, all of Sucker Punch's visual thrills are for naught.
Synopsis: Locked away, a young woman named Babydoll (Emily Browning) retreats to a fantasy world where she is free to go... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#7
Adjusted Score: 56047%
Critics Consensus: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice smothers a potentially powerful story -- and some of America's most iconic superheroes -- in a grim whirlwind of effects-driven action.
Synopsis: It's been nearly two years since Superman's (Henry Cavill) colossal battle with Zod (Michael Shannon) devastated the city of Metropolis.... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#6

Justice League (2017)
40%

#6
Adjusted Score: 69877%
Critics Consensus: Justice League leaps over a number of DC movies, but its single bound isn't enough to shed the murky aesthetic, thin characters, and chaotic action that continue to dog the franchise.
Synopsis: Fueled by his restored faith in humanity and inspired by Superman's selfless act, Bruce Wayne enlists newfound ally Diana Prince... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#5
Adjusted Score: 55646%
Critics Consensus: Legend of the Guardians' dark tone and dazzling visuals are to be admired, even if they're ultimately let down by a story that never lives up to its full potential.
Synopsis: A father owl's tales of the Guardians of Ga'Hoole enthrall his son Soren, but an older son scoffs at the... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#4

Man of Steel (2013)
56%

#4
Adjusted Score: 70179%
Critics Consensus: Man of Steel's exhilarating action and spectacle can't fully overcome its detours into generic blockbuster territory.
Synopsis: With the imminent destruction of Krypton, their home planet, Jor-El (Russell Crowe) and his wife seek to preserve their race... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#3

300 (2006)
61%

#3
Adjusted Score: 71299%
Critics Consensus: A simple-minded but visually exciting experience, full of blood, violence, and ready-made movie quotes.
Synopsis: In 480 B.C. a state of war exists between Persia, led by King Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro), and Greece. At the... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#2

Watchmen (2009)
65%

#2
Adjusted Score: 77195%
Critics Consensus: Gritty and visually striking, Watchmen is a faithful adaptation of Alan Moore's graphic novel, but its complex narrative structure may make it difficult for it to appeal to viewers not already familiar with the source material.
Synopsis: In an alternate 1985 America, costumed superheroes are part of everyday life. When one of his former comrades is murdered,... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#1

Dawn of the Dead (2004)
76%

#1
Adjusted Score: 82020%
Critics Consensus: A kinetic, violent and surprisingly worthy remake of George Romero's horror classic that pays homage to the original while working on its own terms.
Synopsis: When her husband is attacked by a zombified neighbor, Ana (Sarah Polley) manages to escape, only to realize her entire... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

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If ever there was a week that we could be accused of toying with your home video expectations, this would be that week. We kick things off with a handful of the most recent releases, including Zack Snyder’s steampunk girl power (sort of) film, Nicolas Cage’s foray into medieval sorcery, a modern interpretation of Beauty and the Beast, and an ill-conceived action genre mashup. But after that, we present one Certified Fresh drama, a couple of classics on Criterion, and — wait for it — the definitive LOTR boxset everyone’s been waiting for.



Sucker Punch

22%

Though it’s debatable whether or not Zack Snyder actually deserves the “visionary” title that seems to get plastered on all the trailers for his films, there’s no question that Sucker Punch was all his doing. Both written and directed by Snyder (300, Watchmen), Sucker Punch is a swirly dreamscape filled with young prostitutes, demon samurai, dragons, robot soldiers, and more. And, unfortunately, most critics just weren’t buying it. Despite the film’s visual dazzle, the critics found both the character development and storytelling severely inadequate, slapping it with a meager 22% Tomatometer. If you’re just looking to see some scantily-clad girls dish out heavy violence in slow motion, then yes, this is for you. If you require some semblance of a coherent storyline or characters you care about, you’re probably better off leaving this one alone.



Season of the Witch

11%

On first announcement, Season of the Witch had some goofy potential. Nicolas Cage playing a soldier in the age of the Crusades, directed by competent action director Dominic Sena? Sure, why not? But things looked worse and worse as time went on, and the supernatural flick suffered countless delays and Cage’s shriveling critical reputation, and at one point looked destined to go direct to DVD. But Relativity Media saved it from the discount bin… for a while, at least. After all, when Season of the Witch finally hit theaters this last January, it couldn’t gross even $25 million and got hit with some of the worst reviews of Cage’s career. It even brazenly carried a 00% Tomatometer, until some late-game reviews came in and saved it from goose egg infamy. Still, with a Tomatometer still well away from double digits, Season of the Witch just might be the ticket for your next bad movie night with friends and strong drinks.



Beastly

21%

With all the “modern” interpretations on classic literature being brought to the screen, one almost has to wonder: “Do kids just not read the original books any more?” For every decent 10 Things I Hate About You (a modern interpretation of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew), there’s a dismal Red Riding Hood, and unfortunately, Beastly falls into the latter camp. Based on a novel that is itself based on the classic tale of Beauty and the Beast, Beastly centers on… Well, there’s no need to go into the plot here, because it is, at the end of the day, simply a retelling of the classic story, set in modern-day New York. Suffice it to say the film earned a 16% on the Tomatometer, so unless you’re just dying for some teen angst, probably a good idea to skip this one.



The Warrior’s Way

31%

There have been a handful of films recently that have served as vehicles to introduce mainstream American audiences to South Korean stars, but none of them have been very successful. One possible explanation for this is that these actors, otherwise quite capable in their homeland, have been relegated to roles in silly and poorly reviewed action shlock, like G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra and Ninja Assassin. Don’t expect any of that to change with The Warrior’s Way, a fantasy action film about an Asian assassin (Jang Dong-gun) of unspecified origin who flees his country during the 19th Century, only to be tracked to the Old West town where he’s hiding out. Co-starring Geoffrey Rush (nice post-King’s Speech choice there, Geoff) and Kate Bosworth, The Warrior’s Way divided critics to the tune of 32% on the Tomatometer, with a small number of them championing the over-the-top action and smashing together of Eastern and Western cliches. If that sounds like your thing, have at it!



Barney’s Version

78%

Three marriages across 30 years. That’s a lot of drama, heartache, details and fights, and we only get one version of the events: Bradley’s. Wait, we mean: Barney. It’s from his (Paul Giamatti) perspective that we see his love life unfold, from his first marriage to an unfaithful wife (Rachelle Lefevre), his second with a wealthy Jewish princess (Minnie Driver), and the third marriage to the great love of his life (Rosamund Pike), who he just incidentally happened to meet during his second marriage. All throughout the decades there is also Barney’s father and right hand man (Dustin Hoffman). Giamatti gives another powerful performance, guiding this Certified Fresh seriocomedy through the ups and downs of modern romance.



Zazie dans le métro – Criterion Collection

76%

There have been plenty of cinematic tributes to Paris, but few are as delightfully bonkers as Louis Malle’s Zazie dans le Métro, one of the most stylistically bold and outright wacky films to emerge from the French New Wave. Amélie fans will smile with recognition throughout — Audrey Tautou’s whimsical breakout role is heavily indebted to little Zazie (Catherine Demongeot), a gap-toothed little hellion who travels throughout the City Of Lights with her cross-dressing uncle while her mother is off having an affair. Zazie is a whirl of bright colors, silent-movie slapstick, and wanton property destruction, and it stands as one of the most original and gleefully wild movies of an era famous for cinematic audacity. A spiffy new Criterion disc features a fresh transfer of the film, archival interviews with Malle, Demongeot, and other crew members, a short documentary about Zazie, and more. For those interested, Malle’s apocalyptic fantasy film Black Moon is also available in a Criterion edition this week.



People on Sunday – Criterion Collection

Too many cooks spoil the broth, right? Not in the case of People on Sunday, a 1930 collaboration between a group of German directors who would go on to have success in the U.S.: Robert Siodmak (The Killers), his brother Curt (who wrote the screenplay for The Wolf Man), Edgar G. Ulmer (Detour), and Fred
Zinnemann (High Noon, From Here to Eternity). (Oh, and one of the writers was some guy named Billy Wilder.) The result was a silent feature-length avant-garde mix of documentary and drama, featuring non-actors going about their daily lives in pre-Nazi Berlin.
People on Sunday isn’t just an early glimpse at a group of filmmakers who would go on to big things, it’s also visually rapturous, looking particularly clean in a new transfer. The Criterion disc features two scores for the film, plus a 2000 documentary about the making of the movie, and a 1931 short by the film’s cinematographer Eugen Schüfftan, who later worked on such classics as Eyes Without a Face and The Hustler.



The Lord of the Rings Trilogy: Extended Edition Blu-Ray

Here it is, folks. You’ve been waiting for the Lord of the Rings trilogy’s Extended Editions to hit Blu-Ray, and they finally have, in the form of an immense 15-disc boxset that will probably keep you in front of your TV for weeks. For the few of you who aren’t familiar with the fantasy trilogy, it follows the adventures and tribulations of a young hobbit named Frodo as he joins with various humans, elves, dwarfs, and wizards to transport a powerful ring to the only place where it can be destroyed (that’s the super-abridged version). For the rest of you who have been anticipating this home video release, you’ll be excited to know it has pretty much the most definitive collection of LOTR bonus materials ever assembled, so you’ll be able to dive as deep as you want into director Peter Jackson’s vision for the material. Have fun, and we’ll see you in a couple of weeks when you emerge from your living room with a beard Gimli would be proud of.

A group of nerdy middle school boys defeated a commando team of machine gun-toting women at the North American box office as the kid comedy Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules opened at number one while the effects-heavy action fantasy Sucker Punch debuted in second place. Adult-skewing thrillers Limitless and The Lincoln Lawyer both displayed remarkable staying power in the top five as the lackluster first quarter of 2011 ended.

Improving on its predecessor, the kidpic sequel Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Rodrick Rules seized the top spot with an impressive opening of $24.4M, according to estimates. Fox enjoyed an impressive $7,704 average from 3,167 locations as the PG-rated comedy beat out the debut of the first Wimpy Kid by 10%. That film bowed to $22.1M on its way to a $64M domestic run.

With a reported cost of only $20M, Rodrick Rules is well on its way to becoming another profitable film adaptation from the popular book series. Audiences are liking what they see as the CinemaScore grade was an encouraging A-. Competition for school children was low so the studio entered the marketplace with very few alternatives stealing away its target crowd. Plus good will from the well-reviewed first Wimpy pic carried over to the sequel which did not fare as well with critics. Given the low cost, continued interest from fans, and existing books to still adapt, the franchise could easily continue.

The stylish action vehicle Sucker Punch, which led the box office on opening day Friday, settled for second place over the weekend with an estimated $19M. The PG-13 tale about a band of young women that must escape the mental asylum they are locked in averaged $6,269 from 3,033 theaters. Director Zack Snyder, whose effects-heavy action pics 300 and Watchmen both opened at number one with their March debuts, took a beating from critics this time with Punch. The girlpower film was expected to be tops this weekend but with a 17% Saturday slump from the $8.1M opening Friday, it soon became apparent that even reaching $20M in three days would be difficult. Action films led by women have struggled at the box office with the exception of many Angelina Jolie offerings.

Sucker Punch is the latest in a string of stylish action films aimed at teens and young adults that underperformed on opening weekend following I Am Number Four, Red Riding Hood, Scott Pilgrim vs. The World, and Kick-Ass. None broke $20M on opening weekend. With a reported production cost of at least $75M and a troubling B- CinemaScore, Sucker Punch will need strength from overseas and home video to break even. Snyder is still working with Warner Bros. and is directing its Superman reboot film scheduled to hit theaters in December 2012.

With the final March weekend now concluded, Hollywood studios will be eager to put the first quarter behind them. Only four films opened north of $30M during this time period compared to eight last year.

Last weekend’s two new adult thrillers enjoyed amazingly low declines and followed in the next two spots. Bradley Cooper’s miracle drug flick Limitless slipped only 20% in its sophomore session thanks to terrific word-of-mouth with mature audiences and grossed an estimated $15.2M which was about what the industry expected from its opening frame. Relativity Media has taken in a solid $41.3M in ten days and should be headed for $75-85M or even more if these strong legs continue. Lionsgate’s legal drama The Lincoln Lawyer dipped by an even smaller amount, 17%, and grossed an estimated $11M for a $29M ten-day cume. The Matthew McConaughey pic may be able to end up in the neighborhood of $60M.

Johnny Depp scored his sixth $100M+ grosser of the past eight years with the animated comedy Rango which dropped 35% to an estimated $9.8M. With $106.4M in 24 days, the Paramount release has delivered both the biggest opening and largest overall gross of any 2011 release. The lizard toon could be headed for the vicinity of $130M.

Dropping 48% to an estimated $7.6M was Sony’s alien invasion thriller Battle: Los Angeles which upped its cume to $72.6M. Close behind was another extra terrestrial flick, the comedy Paul with an estimated $7.5M. The Universal pic dropped a moderate 43% and has taken in $24.6M in ten days.

Red Riding Hood ranked eighth with an estimated $4.3M, off 40%, for a $32.5M cume in 17 days. Matt Damon’s fate-based drama The Adjustment Bureau enjoyed a good hold sliding just 27% to an estimated $4.2M for a $54.9M sum to date.

Two films claimed tenth place, not wanting to be excluded from all the press given to the top ten, and had distributor estimates that were a mere $1,000 apart with $2.2M a piece. The 3D animated flop Mars Needs Moms tumbled 59% thanks to another kidpic in the marketplace while the teen drama Beastly slipped only 32%. Totals stand at $19.2M for Disney and $25.3M for CBS Films.

Joining Rango in the century club this weekend was Adam Sandler whose latest comedy Just Go With It fell 33% to an estimated $1.5M upping its total to $100.2M. It was the bankable funnyman’s 12th starring vehicle to surpass $100M domestically over the last 13 years proving again that audiences still come out for his brand of humor despite what critics have to say.

In platform release, The Weinstein Co. premiered its Palestinian drama Miral in two theaters each in New York and Los Angeles and collected an estimated $65,000 for a $16,250 average. The Julian Schnabel-directed pic expands to more cities on Friday. The French film Potiche starring Catherine Deneuve and Gérard Depardieu debuted in seven locations and bowed to an estimated $85,000 for a $12,143 average.

Expanding indie titles did well too. The period drama Jane Eyre grossed an estimated $983,000 from 90 sites in its third frame for a solid $10,922 average for Focus. Fox Searchlight’s Paul Giamatti comedy Win Win averaged a sturdy $20,478 from 23 locations with its estimated $471,000 take in its second session. Totals are $1.9M and $679,000, respectively.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $105.3M which was down 7% from last year when How to Train Your Dragon opened in the top spot with $43.7M; and off 23% from 2009 when Monsters vs. Aliens debuted at number one with $59.3M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, Box Office Guru!

This week at the movies, we’ve got a violent fantasyland (Sucker Punch, starring Emily Browning and Abbie Cornish) and some brotherly love (Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2: Rodrick Rules, starring Zachary Gordon and Devon Bostick). What do the critics have to say?


Sucker Punch

22%

Smoking-hot babes with swords! A daring escape from a creepy asylum! Samurais and dragons! Is there any way Sucker Punch could possibly go wrong? Well, yes, say critics, who find Zack Snyder’s latest to be a compendium of geeky obsessions in search of a story (or indeed, general coherence). Emily Browning stars as Babydoll, a young woman whose mother has recently died, leaving her in the care of her evil stepfather, who ships her off to a mental hospital. Babydoll retreats into a dreamworld, teaming up with a bevy of gals who plan a treacherous escape from the facility. The pundits say Sucker Punch is admirably ambitious, but it fails to add up to much; it’s an assault on the senses that suffers from jarring tonal shifts and a shortage of narrative logic. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we present a rundown of memorable prison break movies.)


Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2: Rodrick Rules

47%

The first Diary of a Wimpy Kid, which hit theaters last year, got decidedly mixed reviews; a number of scribes found it sweet and perceptive, while others called it clichéd and over reliant on gross-out jokes. It appears Diary of a Wimpy Kid 2: Rodrick Rules won’t set the critical world on fire either — some critics say its life lessons and good humor are more pronounced this time out, but others feel it’s a little shopworn and occasionally cynical. Our hero Greg (Zachary Gordon) is starting seventh grade, and optimistically hopes that he will get in with the cool crowd. Unfortunately, his older brother Rodrick continues to torment him. Will these two ever get along? The pundits say Diary benefits from strong performances from its young actors and a couple of insightful laughs, but it also gets bogged down in scenes of public humiliation and bullying that don’t add much to the equation.

Also opening this week in limited release:

  • Honey, a drama about a boy’s spiritual awakening in a remote town in Turkey, is at 100 percent.
  • My Perestroika, a documentary about the lives of young people growing up in the waning days of communism, is at 83 percent.
  • Potiche, starring Catherine Deneuve and Gérard Depardieu in a comedy about a romance between an umbrella factory owner’s wife and a labor leader, is at 77 percent.
  • White Irish Drinkers, a coming-of-age drama about a group of petty crooks in 1970s Brooklyn, is at 46 percent.
  • Peep World, starring Michael C. Hall and Sarah Silverman in an ensemble comedy about a family reunion that’s been sabotaged by a scandalous tell-all book, is at 29 percent.
  • Miral, a drama about the lives of several generations of Palestinian women, is at 15 percent (check out director Julian Schnabel‘s Five Favorite Films here).

Finally, want to win a Rotten Tomatoes shirt? First, watch Sucker Punch. Then, on Sunday, tweet your review and tag it #fresh or #rotten. We’ll choose five winners! Check us out on Twitter!

Prison Breaks

Zack Snyder’s Sucker Punch, opening this weekend, is a state-of-the-art action thriller featuring the latest advancements in special effects and cleavage-baring underthings — but underneath all that 21st-century gimcrackery, it’s also a throwback to one of the most time-honored tales in film: the prison break movie. We decided to celebrate this nod to tradition by compiling a list of some other noteworthy examples from the genre, from 75-year-old classics to more recent (and more big-budget) blockbusters. Sharpen that nail file, keep an eye out for the warden, and get ready to bust out of the slammer Total Recall style!

Brute Force

94%

If you only know Hume Cronyn from his late-period “kindly old man” roles in movies like *batteries not included or the Cocoon series, it’ll come as something of a shock to see him in 1947’s Brute Force, where he plays a manipulative, sadistic warden whose pressure-cooker tactics produce violence so hellacious it served as an inspiration for Oliver Stone’s prison break sequence in Natural Born Killers. Noteworthy at the time for its progressive stance on prisoner treatment, it survives today as the movie MSN’s Sean Axmaker called “one of the most brutal films about caged men ever made.”

Chicken Run

97%

Blending the distinctive Aardman Animations style with a smart, funny, and exciting jailbreak story about anthropomorphic stop-motion chickens whose only hope for avoiding slaughter rests on a cocky rooster (voiced by Mel Gibson), 2000’s Chicken Run affectionately parodied the conventions of the genre while demonstrating why they’ve proven so durable. No matter the context, any filmgoer can understand the basic human need for freedom — even if it’s being expressed by cartoon fowl. “What really makes it special,” argued Kevin N. Laforest of the Montreal Film Journal, “more than the impressive animation, is the endearing characters and involving plot.”

Cool Hand Luke

100%

This 1967 classic has it all: Paul Newman in his early prime, toplining a stellar cast that included George Kennedy and Jo Van Fleet, as well as Dennis Hopper, Joe Don Baker, and Harry Dean Stanton in supporting roles; one of the most quotable lines in movie history; and not one, not two, but three prison breaks. All of them were unsuccessful, of course, but that was never the point — Cool Hand Luke is about refusing to lay down and quit, no matter how painful the consequences, and whether you take it as a cautionary tale or an ode to the nonconformist, nobody ever looked cooler than Newman in a prison uniform. This is, as Empire’s Kim Newman wrote, “One of those movies you remember Great Moments from.”

Con Air

56%

Okay, so it isn’t the highest-rated movie on the list. But even if it didn’t win the Palme d’Or, Con Air combined a popcorn-gobbling premise and a top-shelf cast with almost irresistible exuberance, adding up to a loud, action-packed, marvelously over-the-top $224 million smash hit. Who needs high art when you have Nicolas Cage as a drawling ex-Army Ranger whose path to freedom is blocked by a maniacal villain played by John Malkovich? Certainly not the Arizona Daily Star’s Phil Villarreal, who said that Con Air “pulls off the impossible task of having the film make constant fun of itself and its viewers while keeping the storyline grounded enough for emotional payoffs.”

Escape from Alcatraz

96%

See that guy in the poster? He’s so flinty, he could probably chip his way out of prison with his bare hands — but Alcatraz was no ordinary hoosegow, and this isn’t your average prison break movie. A swan song for Clint Eastwood’s prolific five-film partnership with director Don Siegel, Escape from Alcatraz dramatizes the unknown fates of the three men who, in 1962, freed themselves from the island prison, never to be seen or heard from again. It’s an undeniably irresistible setup for a film, and Siegel does right by it, capturing the action in typically terse, economical fashion, aided by a cast that included Fred Ward and Patrick McGoohan. “What Mr. Siegel has made is fiction,” explained Vincent Canby of the New York Times, hastening to praise it as “a first-rate action movie that is about the need and the decision to take action, as well as the action itself.”

Escape from New York

86%

Breaking out of your average maximum security prison is hard enough. But what if it took up an entire city — that just happened to be surrounded by a 50-foot wall and dozens of explosives? Obviously, no ordinary man could free himself — but then, Snake Plissken (Kurt Russell) is far from ordinary, and that’s why he’s the one the government turns to when the President (Donald Pleasence) is kidnapped by a flock of finger-stealing inmates. Of course, Plissken is an inmate himself, and a bit of a bastard in the bargain, but in the post-Watergate era, a good anti-hero was about the best we could hope for — as well as what the Q Network’s James Kendrick called “an intriguing window into the fears and anxieties of the early Reagan years, and a film-lover’s cavalcade of genre mash-up.”

The Grand Illusion

97%

It was the first foreign language film ever nominated for a Best Picture Academy Award, and for good reason: this 1937 classic is arguably Jean Renoir’s finest effort, a tenderly humanistic plea for peace and tolerance in an era when both of those things were in perilously short supply. Even then, Illusion‘s surface plot — about French POWs plotting their escape from a World War I German prison camp — wasn’t exactly new; what’s remarkable about the film is how deftly Renoir ties that backdrop into his startlingly forward-thinking messages about race and class. “Its story is so perfectly (and economically) told, its characters are so rich, human and civilized, and its dialogue so intelligent and revealing,” observed William Arnold of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, “that the film wraps a spell around you that’s hard to describe but impossible to forget.”

The Great Escape

94%

This might be the definitive prison break movie, despite the fact that it takes the accomplishments and dogged determination of a largely British group of World War II POWs and replaces them with American soldiers. But it’s only fair, really — even if the Brits were the driving force in the real-life Great Escape, we were the ones who had Steve McQueen, James Garner, Charles Bronson, and James Coburn, and if combining their prodigious cool into one classic escape film meant a little historical fudging, well, the ends justify the means. And when it’s all said and done, The Great Escape is, as Marjorie Baumgarten wrote for the Austin Chronicle, “One of the all-time great action movies.”

Midnight Express

93%

Unlike most of the movies on this list, Alan Parker’s Midnight Express doesn’t try to find a lot of entertainment value in its story — its screenplay, adapted by Oliver Stone from Billy Hayes’ memoir, plunges the viewer into the hellish nightmare of an American tourist (Brad Davis) who is sentenced to 30 years in a Turkish prison after being caught with hashish. Grim, violent, and frequently hard to watch, Express provoked the ire of those who felt it painted Turkish people in an unfair light, but it won three Academy Awards and earned praise from most critics — and if nothing else, it serves as a painful warning. As Shannon J. Harvey wrote for the Sunday Times, “Anyone thinking of smuggling drugs into a foreign country should watch this first.”

Papillon

79%

A decade after helping set the standard for movies about busting out of the slammer with The Great Escape, Steve McQueen teamed up with Dustin Hoffman for another classic: Papillon, adapted from the novel by real-life ex-con Henri Charrière. McQueen starred as the Hollywood version of Charrière, sent to the infamous Devil’s Island prison for murdering a pimp, where he teams up with fellow inmate Louis Dega (Hoffman) and spends a decade trying to reclaim his freedom. Ultimately, the version of events presented in Charrière’s book may not jibe with the true story of his years in confinement, but they sure did make for exciting cinema — 150 full minutes of what the Denver Post’s Michael Booth called “A rousing drama of endurance, opportunism and friendship under fire.”

Rescue Dawn

90%

The prison break story so nice that Werner Herzog had to tell it twice, Rescue Dawn finds the director dramatizing the tale of Vietnam War POW Dieter Dengler, whose real-life (and truly horrific) ordeal he first recounted in Herzog’s 1997 documentary Little Dieter Needs to Fly. What brought about this rare backward glance from one of our most restless filmmakers? Dengler’s inspiring refusal to give up no matter how incredible the odds — whether facing a plane crash, imprisonment and torture by Laotian communists, or the weeks he spent staggering through the jungle after his final escape. It’s an incredible story done justice by Herzog’s ever-inimitable lens, not to mention gripping performances from Christian Bale (who played Dengler) and Steve Zahn. Wrote Stephen Whitty for the Newark Star-Ledger, “In its study of an American pilot, surviving only because of his single-minded obsession with staying alive, Rescue Dawn is compelling and dramatic and emotional.”

The Shawshank Redemption

91%

An artful blend of gut-clenching tragedy, horrific violence, and heartwarming drama, The Shawshank Redemption is arguably the greatest modern prison break movie — which is a little ironic, considering that it didn’t do much at the box office when it was originally released. And it’s true that the movie is a bit of a tough sell, classic status notwithstanding; unlike a lot of prison break films, it isn’t about busting out of the joint so much as it is about learning to cope with life’s injustices, refusing to give up on hope, and — at long last — taking redemption even when it isn’t offered. Is Shawshank overlong and shamelessly sentimental? Perhaps. But it’s also, in the words of Variety’s Leonard Klady, “A testament to the human spirit.”

Stalag 17

97%

William Holden famously turned down his role in Stalag 17, believing the character was too unlikable to play — but the studio wouldn’t let him say no, and it’s a good thing they didn’t, because he eventually won a Best Actor Oscar for his work as Sefton, the cynical World War II POW whose chummy relationships with the camp’s guards make him the target of vicious rumors from the other inmates. Directed by Billy Wilder with his customary dark humor, Stalag 17 blended bleak laughs with high-stakes drama, prompting the Chicago Reader’s Don Druker to reflect, “The resulting letdown is terrific, but along the way there is some of the funniest men-at-loose-ends interplay that Wilder has ever put on film.?


Take a look through the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for Sucker Punch.

Finally, here’s Thin Lizzy with a musical tribute to busting out of the joint:

Happy Friday Harvest, a weekly round-up of the
best pictures, posters, and videos that have become available for
viewing/download on Rotten Tomatoes. Each section features the favorite or most
interesting item we’ve
added for the week, along with several other new highlights. Enjoy!


Pictures


Picture Gallery of the Week:

Battle: Los
Angeles

Aaron Eckhart and Michelle Rodriguez in a realistic(ish?) look at what
war would be like with aliens.
Browse the gallery.

More New Pictures












Priest


Please Priest me


L’Armee Du Crime


He’s holding a gun


Salt of this Sea


Pictures


Horse Apocalypse


Beardy
The
Green Hornet


New pics


Posters


Posters of the Week:

The Green
Lantern

Looking a bit like the poster for The Phantom. Slam evil!!
View the poster.

More New Posters












Never
Let Me Go


Based on the sci-fi/sad sack novel

Hiding Divya

New poster


Salt of this Sea


Not the other sea


L’Armee Du Crime


Translation: Crimes
of the Creamy Army
Red

Character posters


Videos


Video of the Week:


Sucker Punch trailer

Hot chicks. Guns. Slo-mo. What more does an action trailer need?.
Watch the video.

More New Videos












Tron Legacy


New trailer


It’s Kind of a Funny Story


Coming of age with Zach Galifiankis



Faster


The Rock is back

Saw 3D

The end of torture porn


Want to keep up to date on ALL the pictures, posters, and videos that are added to Rotten Tomatoes throughout the week? Then check out the
Trailers & Pictures page,
which is automatically updated as material is uploaded.

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