Crazy Heart

(Photo by Fox Searchlight/courtesy Everett Collection. Thumbnail: Gramercy Pictures.)

All Jeff Bridges Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Jeff Bridges, son of Lloyd, struck it big with his first major role in 1971’s The Last Picture Show, where he was Oscar-nominated for his role as a graduating high school student in a prospectless Texas town. Afterwards, Bridges became a steady, comforting fixture in American cinema, appearing across action-thrillers (Thunderbolt & Lightfoot, Cutter’s Way), big-budget remakes (1975’s King Kong, The Vanishing), magnificent bombs (Heaven’s Gate), science-fiction (TRON, Starman), theater adaptations (The Iceman Cometh), and additional fine-tuned dramas (The Fisher King).

Bridges’ eclectic career choices primed him to become a beloved Hollywood statesman, all but confirmed with 1998’s The Big Lebowski. Wearing his personal wardrobe on-screen (including the jelly sandals) and directed by the Coen brothers, Bridges as Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski in a state of perpetual befuddled zen has rooted himself into pop culture with his generation-defining comedy performance. And Lebowski has only paved the way for later milestones and hits, including True Grit, Hell or High Water, and a take-home Best Actor Oscar for Crazy Heart, his big win out of seven nominations overall.

And now we do believe you shall abide as we take a trip through all Jeff Bridges movies, ranked by Tomatometer.

#62
#62
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Matt Scudder (Jeff Bridges) is a depressed and hard-drinking Los Angeles cop troubled by a shooting that occurred in the... [More]
Directed By: Hal Ashby

#61

R.I.P.D. (2013)
12%

#61
Adjusted Score: 15701%
Critics Consensus: It has its moments -- most of them courtesy of Jeff Bridges' rootin' tootin' performance as an undead Wild West sheriff -- but R.I.P.D. is ultimately too dim-witted and formulaic to satisfy.
Synopsis: Veteran lawman Roy Pulsifer (Jeff Bridges) works for the R.I.P.D., a legendary police force charged with finding monstrous spirits who... [More]
Directed By: Robert Schwentke

#60

Seventh Son (2014)
12%

#60
Adjusted Score: 16424%
Critics Consensus: Seventh Son squanders an excellent cast and some strange storyline ingredients, leaving audiences with one disappointingly dull fantasy adventure.
Synopsis: Centuries ago, a supernatural champion named Master Gregory (Jeff Bridges) defeated Mother Malkin (Julianne Moore), a malevolent witch. Now, she... [More]
Directed By: Sergei Bodrov

#59
#59
Adjusted Score: 26220%
Critics Consensus: Unintelligible and self-indulgent Bob Dylan vehicle.
Synopsis: A nation wracked with civil war and social unrest is looking forward to a giant charity concert, organized by deceptive... [More]
Directed By: Larry Charles

#58

Simpatico (1999)

#58
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Carter receives a collect call from Vinnie, and a dark event from the past threatens to destroy his current success.... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Warchus

#57

The Open Road (2009)
29%

#57
Adjusted Score: 8920%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: While playing minor league baseball in Texas, Carlton Garrett (Justin Timberlake) receives word from his grandfather (Harry Dean Stanton) that... [More]
Directed By: Michael Meredith

#56

Tideland (2005)
30%

#56
Adjusted Score: 31684%
Critics Consensus: Tideland is a disturbing, and mostly unwatchable effort from Terry Gilliam.
Synopsis: Little Jeliza-Rose (Jodelle Ferland) has a very warped childhood. Her parents (Jeff Bridges, Jennifer Tilly) are both drug addicts, and... [More]
Directed By: Terry Gilliam

#55

Stick It (2006)
31%

#55
Adjusted Score: 34718%
Critics Consensus: Director Jessica Bendinger is unable to transfer her winning Bring It On formula to the world of gymnastics, despite Missy Peregrym's strong lead performance.
Synopsis: Haley (Missy Peregrym) is a naturally gifted athlete but, with her social behavior, the teen seems intent on squandering her... [More]
Directed By: Jessica Bendinger

#54
Adjusted Score: 38144%
Critics Consensus: Narratively messy and cloying, The Only Living Boy in New York is a romantic trifle that audiences won't want to give a second date.
Synopsis: After graduating from college and moving into an apartment, young Thomas Webb befriends an alcoholic neighbor who dispenses worldly wisdom... [More]
Directed By: Marc Webb

#53

The Giver (2014)
35%

#53
Adjusted Score: 40988%
Critics Consensus: Phillip Noyce directs The Giver with visual grace, but the movie doesn't dig deep enough into the classic source material's thought-provoking ideas.
Synopsis: Jonas (Brenton Thwaites) lives in a seemingly idyllic world of conformity and contentment. When he begins to spend time with... [More]
Directed By: Phillip Noyce

#52
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Sidney Young is a down-on-his-luck journalist. Thanks to a stint involving a pig and a glitzy awards ceremony, Sidney turns... [More]
Directed By: Robert Weide

#51

Blown Away (1994)

#51
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After staging a particularly gory jailbreak, Irish Republican Army agent Ryan Gaerity (Tommy Lee Jones) makes his way to Boston... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Hopkins

#50

Wild Bill (1995)
42%

#50
Adjusted Score: 43019%
Critics Consensus: Crowded with talent on either side of the camera, Wild Bill shoots itself in the foot with a surprisingly muddled take on the story of the titular folk hero.
Synopsis: Gunfighter Wild Bill Hickok (Jeff Bridges) travels the frontier, gaining fame and enemies in roughly equal measure. He sometimes meets... [More]
Directed By: Walter Hill

#49

K-PAX (2001)

#49
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Tells the story of a mysterious patient (Kevin Spacey) at a mental hospital who claims to be from a distant... [More]
Directed By: Iain Softley

#48

Nadine (1987)
45%

#48
Adjusted Score: 45056%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Hairdresser Nadine Hightower (Kim Basinger) wants to retrieve the risqué photos she once posed for, but when she visits the... [More]
Directed By: Robert Benton

#47
#47
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Barney (Jeff Bridges) is a disturbed man intent on abducting a woman. After numerous failed attempts, he manages to kidnap... [More]
Directed By: George Sluizer

#46
#46
Adjusted Score: 11784%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In need of money for his upcoming wedding, Lenny (Jon Abrahams) agrees to help Rick (Peter Greene) with some work.... [More]
Directed By: Dominique Forma

#45
Adjusted Score: 58922%
Critics Consensus: Though The Men Who Stare at Goats is a mostly entertaining, farcical glimpse of men at war, some may find its satire and dark humor less than edgy.
Synopsis: Struggling reporter Bob Wilton (Ewan McGregor) gets the scoop of a lifetime when he meets Lyn Cassady (George Clooney), who... [More]
Directed By: Grant Heslov

#44

Tron: Legacy (2010)

#44
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Sam (Garrett Hedlund), the son of famous video-game developer Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges), has been haunted for a long time... [More]
Directed By: Joseph Kosinski

#43
Adjusted Score: 73256%
Critics Consensus: Kingsman: The Golden Circle offers more of everything that made its predecessor so much fun, but lacks the original's wild creative spark.
Synopsis: With their headquarters destroyed and the world held hostage, members of Kingsman find new allies when they discover a spy... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Vaughn

#42

The Muse (1999)
53%

#42
Adjusted Score: 55011%
Critics Consensus: Despite quirky and original writing, the subject matter feels too removed to produce laughs.
Synopsis: Screenwriter Steven Phillips (Albert Brooks) seemingly has it all, including an Academy Award for his latest script. But he's hit... [More]
Directed By: Albert Brooks

#41
#41
Adjusted Score: 27034%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A Manhattan psychiatrist (Jeff Bridges) shuttles from his second wife (Alice Krige) to his ex-wife (Farrah Fawcett), with children in... [More]
Directed By: Alan J. Pakula

#40

Texasville (1990)

#40
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: 1950s lovers (Jeff Bridges, Cybill Shepherd) meet in the 1980s in this sequel to "The Last Picture Show."... [More]
Directed By: Peter Bogdanovich

#39
#39
Adjusted Score: 55362%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Comic tale about the relationship between a frumpy college lecturer specializing in romantic literature and a fellow professor who wants... [More]
Directed By: Barbra Streisand

#38

King Kong (1976)
55%

#38
Adjusted Score: 57930%
Critics Consensus: King Kong represents a significant visual upgrade over the original, but falls short of its classic predecessor in virtually every other respect.
Synopsis: When a research ship is sent to explore an island thought to be rich in oil, paleontologist Jack Prescott (Jeff... [More]
Directed By: John Guillermin

#37

White Squall (1996)
58%

#37
Adjusted Score: 59566%
Critics Consensus: Though it gets occasionally bogged down by touchy-feely sentiment, White Squall benefits greatly from Jeff Bridges' assured lead performance and Ridley Scott's visceral, exciting direction.
Synopsis: In 1960, a hardy group of prep school students boards an old-fashioned sailing ship. With Capt. Christopher Sheldon (Jeff Bridges)... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#36

Heaven's Gate (1980)
59%

#36
Adjusted Score: 61920%
Critics Consensus: Heaven's Gate contains too many ideas and striking spectacle to be a disaster, but this western buckles under the weight of its own sprawl.
Synopsis: Harvard graduate James Averill (Kris Kristofferson) is the sheriff of prosperous Jackson County, Wyo., when a battle erupts between the... [More]
Directed By: Michael Cimino

#35
#35
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Failed actress Alex Sternbergen (Jane Fonda) wakes up hungover one morning in an apartment she does not recognize, unable to... [More]
Directed By: Sidney Lumet

#34
#34
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Widowed when his FBI agent wife is killed by an extremist group, college professor Michael Faraday (Jeff Bridges) becomes obsessed... [More]
Directed By: Mark Pellington

#33

Against All Odds (1984)
64%

#33
Adjusted Score: 64331%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Having been cut from his professional football team, down-and-out athlete Terry Brogan (Jeff Bridges) is in desperate need of money.... [More]
Directed By: Taylor Hackford

#32

Stay Hungry (1976)
67%

#32
Adjusted Score: 66681%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A dishonest businessman asks rich layabout Craig Blake (Jeff Bridges) to help him buy a gym, which will be demolished... [More]
Directed By: Bob Rafelson

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 70951%
Critics Consensus: Though uneven in tone, this is one of the better adaptations of John Irving's novels, with Jeff Bridges giving one of his best performances.
Synopsis: The lives of Ted (Jeff Bridges) and Marion Cole (Kim Basinger) are thrown into disarray when their two adolescent sons... [More]
Directed By: Tod Williams

#30

Rancho Deluxe (1975)
70%

#30
Adjusted Score: 71169%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Cattle rustlers Jack McKee (Jeff Bridges) and Cecil Colson (Sam Waterston) steadily steal cows from wealthy rancher John Brown (Clifton... [More]
Directed By: Frank Perry

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 23674%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Junior Jackson (Jeff Bridges) is a Southern boy with a penchant for driving too fast along his native North Carolina... [More]
Directed By: Lamont Johnson

#28

Tron (1982)
71%

#28
Adjusted Score: 76692%
Critics Consensus: Though perhaps not as strong dramatically as it is technologically, TRON is an original and visually stunning piece of science fiction that represents a landmark work in the history of computer animation.
Synopsis: When talented computer engineer Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges) finds out that Ed Dillinger (David Warner), an executive at his company,... [More]
Directed By: Steven Lisberger

#27

The Last Unicorn (1982)
73%

#27
Adjusted Score: 73232%
Critics Consensus: The Last Unicorn lacks the fluid animation to truly sparkle as an animated epic, but offbeat characters and an affecting story make it one of a kind for the true believers.
Synopsis: In this animated musical, the villainous King Haggard (Christopher Lee) plots to destroy all the world's unicorns. When a young... [More]

#26
Adjusted Score: 89448%
Critics Consensus: Smart, stylish, and packed with solid performances, Bad Times at the El Royale delivers pure popcorn fun with the salty tang of social subtext.
Synopsis: The El Royale is run-down hotel that sits on the border between California and Nevada. It soon becomes a seedy... [More]
Directed By: Drew Goddard

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When the sitting Vice President dies, Senator Laine Hanson is chosen by the President to be the first woman to... [More]
Directed By: Rod Lurie

#24

Seabiscuit (2003)
77%

#24
Adjusted Score: 84131%
Critics Consensus: A life-affirming, if saccharine, epic treatment of a spirit-lifting figure in sports history.
Synopsis: In the midst of the Great Depression, a businessman (Jeff Bridges) coping with the tragic death of his son, a... [More]
Directed By: Gary Ross

#23

Surf's Up (2007)
79%

#23
Adjusted Score: 84034%
Critics Consensus: Surf's Up is a laid back, visually stunning animated movie that brings a fresh twist to some familiar conventions. Its witty mockumentary format is fun and inventive, and the CGI is breathtakingly realistic.
Synopsis: Surfing means everything to teenage penguin Cody Maverick (Shia LaBeouf). Followed by a documentary film crew, he leaves his home... [More]
Directed By: Ash Brannon, Chris Buck

#22

American Heart (1992)
80%

#22
Adjusted Score: 80453%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: This unflinching drama tells the story of recently released ex-convict Jack Kelson (Jeff Bridges) as he struggles to begin a... [More]
Directed By: Martin Bell

#21

Jagged Edge (1985)
81%

#21
Adjusted Score: 82021%
Critics Consensus: Coolly performed and suspenseful, Jagged Edge is a satisfying enough potboiler that most audiences won't mind if the twists don't quite add up.
Synopsis: Lawyer Teddy Barnes reluctantly takes up the case of publisher Jack Forrester, who is accused of murdering his wife for... [More]
Directed By: Richard Marquand

#20
Adjusted Score: 85026%
Critics Consensus: Though it may not be as comprehensive as some would like, Francis Ford Coppola's cheerful biopic of the failed automotive designer features sparkling direction and a strong central performance from Jeff Bridges.
Synopsis: Obsessed with cars since childhood, inventor Preston Tucker (Jeff Bridges) has his first successful auto design partnership in the 1930s... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#19

The Big Lebowski (1998)
83%

#19
Adjusted Score: 89049%
Critics Consensus: Typically stunning visuals and sharp dialogue from the Coen Brothers, brought to life with strong performances from Goodman and Bridges.
Synopsis: Jeff Bridges plays Jeff Lebowski who insists on being called "the Dude," a laid-back, easygoing burnout who happens to have... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#18

The Fisher King (1991)
84%

#18
Adjusted Score: 87551%
Critics Consensus: An odd but affecting mixture of drama, comedy and fantasy, The Fisher King manages to balance moving performances from Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges with director Terry Gilliam's typically askew universe.
Synopsis: After shock jock Jack Lucas (Jeff Bridges) inadvertently provokes a caller into murdering a group of innocent people in a... [More]
Directed By: Terry Gilliam

#17

Starman (1984)
85%

#17
Adjusted Score: 86137%
Critics Consensus: What initially begins as sci-fi transforms into a surprisingly sweet, offbeat drama, courtesy of John Carpenter's careful direction.
Synopsis: Answering a NASA message intended for aliens, a space being tries to contact mankind, but an American missile grounds his... [More]
Directed By: John Carpenter

#16

Fearless (1993)

#16
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When Max Klein (Jeff Bridges) survives a plane crash that kills many others, his last-minute epiphanies bring him a sense... [More]
Directed By: Peter Weir

#15

Bad Company (1972)
86%

#15
Adjusted Score: 86612%
Critics Consensus: Well-acted and pleasantly gritty, Bad Company is one of the more authentic Westerns of its era -- and an auspicious debut for director Robert Benton.
Synopsis: Out of the frying pan and into the fire: Civil War draft dodger Drew Dixon (Barry Brown) avoids the horrors... [More]
Directed By: Robert Benton

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 89613%
Critics Consensus: This likable buddy/road picture deftly mixes action and comedy, and features excellent work from stars Clint Eastwood and Jeff Bridges and first-time director Michael Cimino.
Synopsis: While stealing a car, free-spirited drifter Lightfoot (Jeff Bridges) crosses paths with legendary thief Thunderbolt (Clint Eastwood) in the midst... [More]
Directed By: Michael Cimino

#13

Only the Brave (2017)
87%

#13
Adjusted Score: 98875%
Critics Consensus: Only the Brave's impressive veteran cast and affecting fact-based story add up to a no-frills drama that's just as stolidly powerful as the real-life heroes it honors.
Synopsis: Through hope, determination, sacrifice and the drive to protect families and communities, the Granite Mountain Hotshots become one of the... [More]
Directed By: Joseph Kosinski

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 31677%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: During the 1930s, endearingly naïve Lewis Tater (Jeff Bridges) aspires to be the next great American Western writer. But when... [More]
Directed By: Howard Zieff

#11

Winter Kills (1979)
88%

#11
Adjusted Score: 88730%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Inspired by the conspiracy theories surrounding John F. Kennedy's assassination, this comic thriller follows Nick Kegan (Jeff Bridges), the younger... [More]
Directed By: William Richert

#10

Crazy Heart (2009)
90%

#10
Adjusted Score: 96999%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a captivating performance from Jeff Bridges, Crazy Heart transcends its overly familiar origins and finds new meaning in an old story.
Synopsis: With too many years of hazy days and boozy nights,former country-music legend Bad Blake (Jeff Bridges) is reduced to playing... [More]
Directed By: Scott Cooper

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Based on the play by Eugene O'Neill, this drama begins as the sad-sack patrons of a New York City bar... [More]
Directed By: John Frankenheimer

#8

Cutter's Way (1981)
91%

#8
Adjusted Score: 92199%
Critics Consensus: A suitably cynical neo-noir that echoes the disillusionment of its era, Cutter's Way relies on character-driven drama further elevated by the work of an outstanding cast.
Synopsis: Best friends Richard Bone (Jeff Bridges) and Alex Cutter (John Heard) are two middle-class guys living in an upper-class town.... [More]
Directed By: Ivan Passer

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 97522%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully animated and faithful to the spirit of its classic source material, The Little Prince is a family-friendly treat that anchors thrilling visuals with a satisfying story.
Synopsis: The Aviator introduces a girl to a world where she rediscovers her childhood and learns that it's human connections that... [More]
Directed By: Mark Osborne

#6

Iron Man (2008)
94%

#6
Adjusted Score: 104599%
Critics Consensus: Powered by Robert Downey Jr.'s vibrant charm, Iron Man turbo-charges the superhero genre with a deft intelligence and infectious sense of fun.
Synopsis: A billionaire industrialist and genius inventor, Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.), is conducting weapons tests overseas, but terrorists kidnap him... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#5

True Grit (2010)
95%

#5
Adjusted Score: 105673%
Critics Consensus: Girded by strong performances from Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, and newcomer Hailee Steinfeld, and lifted by some of the Coens' most finely tuned, unaffected work, True Grit is a worthy companion to the Charles Portis book.
Synopsis: After an outlaw named Tom Chaney (Josh Brolin) murders her father, feisty 14-year-old farm girl Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld) hires... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 97715%
Critics Consensus: Its story is nothing special, but The Fabulous Baker Boys glows beneath luminous performances from its perfectly cast stars.
Synopsis: Frank (Beau Bridges) and Jack Baker (Jeff Bridges) are brothers who have performed together in a small but successful piano... [More]
Directed By: Steve Kloves

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 114020%
Critics Consensus: Hell or High Water offers a solidly crafted, well-acted Western heist thriller that eschews mindless gunplay in favor of confident pacing and full-bodied characters.
Synopsis: Toby is a divorced father who's trying to make a better life for his son. His brother Tanner is an... [More]
Directed By: David Mackenzie

#2

Fat City (1972)
100%

#2
Adjusted Score: 102110%
Critics Consensus: Fat City is a bleak, mordant, slice of life boxing drama that doesn't pull its punches.
Synopsis: Washed-up boxer Tully (Stacy Keach) is inspired to restart his career after seeing potential in a teenager, Ernie (Jeff Bridges),... [More]
Directed By: John Huston

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 106118%
Critics Consensus: Making excellent use of its period and setting, Peter Bogdanovich's small town coming-of-age story is a sad but moving classic filled with impressive performances.
Synopsis: High school seniors and best friends, Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and Duane (Jeff Bridges), live in a dying Texas town. The... [More]
Directed By: Peter Bogdanovich

Waking Life

(Photo by Warner Bros./Fox/Rogue/courtesy Everett Collection)

20 Best Movies To Watch High

If you want to watch something funny, mind-blowing or mind-bending to pair with the altered state you find yourself in, look no further than our 20 best movies to watch while high. Consider comedies that commit to their insane internal zaniness, like Step Brothers, Airplane!, and Monty Python. There are movies that dazzle with their visuals (The Fall, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Spirited Away), with others also kicking the audio component into overdrive (Pink Floyd – The Wall, Tron Legacy).

Let science-fiction become the theater of the mind, as Inception, 2001: A Space Odyssey, and The Matrix knock your perspectives around. And some movies — like Pulp Fiction, Fight Club, and Shaun of the Dead — will lock you to your couch based on pure elan and style. After that, we sorted the movies by Tomatometer, from lowest to highest.

Get ready for some unforgettable experiences with the 20 best movies to watch while high! (And don’t forget to check out the 25 essential stoner movies.)

#20

Tron: Legacy (2010)

#20
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Sam (Garrett Hedlund), the son of famous video-game developer Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges), has been haunted for a long time... [More]
Directed By: Joseph Kosinski

#19

Step Brothers (2008)
55%

#19
Adjusted Score: 63191%
Critics Consensus: Step Brothers indulges in a cheerfully relentless immaturity that will quickly turn off viewers unamused by Ferrell and Reilly -- and delight those who find their antics hilarious.
Synopsis: Brennan Huff (Will Ferrell) and Dale Doback (John C. Reilly) have one thing in common: they are both lazy, unemployed... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#18

The Fall (2006)
62%

#18
Adjusted Score: 65022%
Critics Consensus: More visually elaborate than the fragmented story can sometimes support, The Fall walks the line between labor of love and filmmaker self-indulgence.
Synopsis: A bedridden patient (Lee Pace) captivates a hospitalized girl (Catinca Untaru) with a fantastic tale involving heroes, mystics and villains... [More]
Directed By: Tarsem

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 71740%
Critics Consensus: Pink Floyd's expression of generational angst is given striking visual form The Wall, although this ambitious feature's narrative struggles to marry its provocative images and psychedelic soundtrack into a compelling whole.
Synopsis: In this visual riff on Pink Floyd's album "The Wall," successful but drugged-out musician Pink (Bob Geldof) is looking back... [More]
Directed By: Alan Parker

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 74084%
Critics Consensus: Visually inventive and gleefully over the top, Luc Besson's The Fifth Element is a fantastic piece of pop sci-fi that never takes itself too seriously.
Synopsis: In the 23rd century, a New York City cabbie, Korben Dallas (Bruce Willis), finds the fate of the world in... [More]
Directed By: Luc Besson

#15

Fight Club (1999)
79%

#15
Adjusted Score: 86255%
Critics Consensus: Solid acting, amazing direction, and elaborate production design make Fight Club a wild ride.
Synopsis: A depressed man (Edward Norton) suffering from insomnia meets a strange soap salesman named Tyler Durden (Brad Pitt) and soon... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#14

Waking Life (2001)
81%

#14
Adjusted Score: 85505%
Critics Consensus: Waking Life's inventive animated aesthetic adds a distinctive visual component to a film that could easily have rested on its smart screenplay and talented ensemble cast.
Synopsis: Transcending the boundaries of technology and imagination, "Waking Life" is a revolutionary breakthrough in film animation. In "Waking Life," Wiley... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#13

Tropic Thunder (2008)
82%

#13
Adjusted Score: 91388%
Critics Consensus: With biting satire, plenty of subversive humor, and an unforgettable turn by Robert Downey, Jr., Tropic Thunder is a triumphant late Summer comedy.
Synopsis: Tugg Speedman (Ben Stiller), pampered action superstar, sets out for Southeast Asia to take part in the biggest, most-expensive war... [More]
Directed By: Ben Stiller

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 84660%
Critics Consensus: A visual treat rich in symbolism, The Holy Mountain adds another defiantly idiosyncratic chapter to Jodorowsky's thoroughly unique filmography.
Synopsis: A Mexican master (Alexandro Jodorowsky) leads a Christ figure (Horacio Salinas) and other disciples to a mountain of immortal wise... [More]
Directed By: Alexandro Jodorowsky

#11

21 Jump Street (2012)
85%

#11
Adjusted Score: 93642%
Critics Consensus: A smart, affectionate satire of '80s nostalgia and teen movie tropes, 21 Jump Street offers rowdy mainstream comedy with a surprisingly satisfying bite.
Synopsis: When cops Schmidt (Jonah Hill) and Jenko (Channing Tatum) join the secret Jump Street unit, they use their youthful appearances... [More]

#10

Inception (2010)

#10
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Dom Cobb (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a thief with the rare ability to enter people's dreams and steal their secrets from... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Nolan

#9

The Matrix (1999)
88%

#9
Adjusted Score: 95175%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to the Wachowskis' imaginative vision, The Matrix is a smartly crafted combination of spectacular action and groundbreaking special effects.
Synopsis: Neo (Keanu Reeves) believes that Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne), an elusive figure considered to be the most dangerous man alive, can... [More]

#8

Fantastic Planet (1973)
91%

#8
Adjusted Score: 90532%
Critics Consensus: Fantastic Planet is an animated epic that is by turns surreal and lovely, fantastic and graceful.
Synopsis: This animated tale follows the relationship between the small human-like Oms and their much larger blue-skinned oppressors, the Draags, who... [More]
Directed By: René Laloux

#7

Pulp Fiction (1994)
92%

#7
Adjusted Score: 98550%
Critics Consensus: One of the most influential films of the 1990s, Pulp Fiction is a delirious post-modern mix of neo-noir thrills, pitch-black humor, and pop-culture touchstones.
Synopsis: Vincent Vega (John Travolta) and Jules Winnfield (Samuel L. Jackson) are hitmen with a penchant for philosophical discussions. In this... [More]
Directed By: Quentin Tarantino

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 106035%
Critics Consensus: One of the most influential of all sci-fi films -- and one of the most controversial -- Stanley Kubrick's 2001 is a delicate, poetic meditation on the ingenuity -- and folly -- of mankind.
Synopsis: An imposing black structure provides a connection between the past and the future in this enigmatic adaptation of a short... [More]
Directed By: Stanley Kubrick

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 98888%
Critics Consensus: Shaun of the Dead cleverly balances scares and witty satire, making for a bloody good zombie movie with loads of wit.
Synopsis: Shaun (Simon Pegg) is a 30-something loser with a dull, easy existence. When he's not working at the electronics store,... [More]
Directed By: Edgar Wright

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 104608%
Critics Consensus: Typically stylish but deceptively thoughtful, The Grand Budapest Hotel finds Wes Anderson once again using ornate visual environments to explore deeply emotional ideas.
Synopsis: In the 1930s, the Grand Budapest Hotel is a popular European ski resort, presided over by concierge Gustave H. (Ralph... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#3

Airplane! (1980)
97%

#3
Adjusted Score: 103487%
Critics Consensus: Though unabashedly juvenile and silly, Airplane! is nevertheless an uproarious spoof comedy full of quotable lines and slapstick gags that endure to this day.
Synopsis: This spoof comedy takes shots at the slew of disaster movies that were released in the 70s. When the passengers... [More]

#2
Adjusted Score: 104447%
Critics Consensus: A cult classic as gut-bustingly hilarious as it is blithely ridiculous, Monty Python and the Holy Grail has lost none of its exceedingly silly charm.
Synopsis: A comedic send-up of the grim circumstances of the Middle Ages as told through the story of King Arthur and... [More]
Directed By: Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones

#1

Spirited Away (2001)
97%

#1
Adjusted Score: 103390%
Critics Consensus: Spirited Away is a dazzling, enchanting, and gorgeously drawn fairy tale that will leave viewers a little more curious and fascinated by the world around them.
Synopsis: 10-year-old Chihiro (Daveigh Chase) moves with her parents to a new home in the Japanese countryside. After taking a wrong... [More]
Directed By: Hayao Miyazaki, Kirk Wise

In the past decade, we’ve seen follow-ups to a number of films and TV shows decades after the originals. From Star Wars and Jurassic World to The Karate Kid, Bill & Ted, and Indiana Jones. These films faced the difficult task of living up to the legacies of their predecessors, reminding audiences why they were special in the first place, and offering stories fresh enough to entice audiences old and new.

So when Disney decided to greenlight a sequel to the modest 1982 cult hit TRON nearly 30 years later and with a budget 10 times that of the original, it was a risky endeavor. Thankfully, the result was as much a visual marvel as the original, but with a deeper story about playing god that also commented on the nature of movie sequels, all while delivering one of the best movie soundtracks in decades. Grab your identity disk and hop on your light cycle, because TRON: Legacy turns 10 today, and we’re heading back to the Grid to explore why it’s a worthy successor to its cult classic predecessor.


It’s Darker than the Original, but Just as Hopeful

Olivia Wilde in Tron: Legacy

(Photo by ©Walt Disney Pictures)

The original Tron arrived at the dawn of widespread home computing, at a time when one could wonder what it would be like to live inside the machine and marvel at the possibilities the future could bring. For the sequel, director Joseph Kosinski and writers Edward Kitsis and Adam Horowitz take a far more pessimistic approach to the “legacy” of the film’s title. Jeff Bridges reprises his role as programming wizard Kevin Flynn, who went on to become a successful CEO of a huge tech conglomerate and build a digital world he calls the Grid, only for his most sophisticated creation to run amok and turn the Grid into a dystopian nightmare. The Grid is not a technicolor wonder, but a perpetually dark and rainy hell where programs are forced to compete in brutal gladiatorial fights to the death for the amusement of the ruling class.

And yet, there is still a lot of optimism in Tron: Legacy, and it comes in the form of Quorra (Olivia Wilde), a digital lifeform born inside the Grid who marvels at her world — and especially the world outside the Grid — with child-like wonder. If the original Tron looked at technology with awe at a time when the prospect of a digital world connecting everyone was a nice thought, the sequel recognizes that we now look at the Internet differently. It is a dark, pessimistic place easily abused by those in power, yes, but there is still spectacle and beauty to be found. The film’s narrative may be driven by a young man hoping to reconnect with his father, but it works just as hard to make the audience sympathize with a digital creation who longs to witness a real sunrise.


The Soundtrack Is an Absolute Banger

We’re just going to say it: The TRON: Legacy soundtrack is one of the best pieces of movie music to grace theaters in decades. Scored entirely by legendary French electronic duo Daft Punk, it seamlessly combines more typical orchestral fanfare with the their signature synthwavey staccatos, and the result is both modern and sophisticated. There are moody synths and percussion moments like the theme of the movie’s villain, and much of the score sounds like it was recorded using sounds from an actual computer.

But Daft Punk don’t let their reputation and background define their work on the film. Sure, they pull from their signature repertoire for the banger of a dance track that plays during their big cameo scene, but they also demonstrate a knack for big, emotional pieces that feel fully operatic, like an even moodier version of John Carpenter if he worked with an 85-piece orchestra. The whole album is a fantastic listen from beginning to end, and it likely saw heavy rotation in the collections of more than just film score nerds.


The Film Is a Giant Allegory for Movie Sequels

Jeff Bridges and Garrett Hedlund in Tron: Legacy

(Photo by ©Walt Disney Pictures)

Though the plot of both Tron and Tron: Legacy are simple at their cores, they both keep their big allegories just barely hidden beneath the surface. The original film was about a world of anthropomorphic computer programs waiting for the day a human user would arrive and save them from the evil program ruling over them; when Flynn enters the Grid and does exactly that, he’s regarded as a god. Legacy centers on Flynn’s reunion with his son Sam (Garrett Hedlund), but the film utilizes that reunion to tell a story about Flynn the god and his creation, and likewise about a movie sequel and its predecessor.

When Legacy reintroduces the audience to Flynn, he’s living in exile in the Grid, cast out from its society by Clu — a program created in young Flynn’s own image. Clu’s entire purpose was to realize Flynn’s vision of a perfect system; he’s a reflection of a young Flynn’s hubris and pride. So it makes sense that Clu would then try to purge everything he saw as imperfect — including his creator. In turn, Clu tries to be the creator of his own world by tearing everything down and building it back up to his liking, by eradicating the programs known as “isomorphic algorithms” — or just ISOs — and brainwashing everyone else into following him. Clu may be severely misguided, but his entire reason for existence was to carry out his creator’s very specific bidding.

In many ways, this creator/creation relationship is a mirror of the father/son one between Flynn and Sam. In the first act, we see Sam refuse to take his rightful place at his father’s company’s board, pranking them instead by stealing new products and releasing them for free before pulling a Batman-like escape from the building complex. Like Sam, Tron: Legacy also had to make its own name in the shadow of its predecessor’s legend. Trying to please fans of the original while offering something to new audiences is a near impossible standard to meet, and the film itself seems to anticipate any blowback in the form of Clu — a creation that did everything its creator wanted and yet failed to please him.


The Scenery-Chewing Is Delicious

Michael Sheen in Tron: Legacy

(Photo by ©Walt Disney Pictures)

One of the biggest changes made in Tron: Legacy was Jeff Bridges’ portrayal of Flynn. In the original, he wasn’t a hero. He went into the Grid to find evidence of a colleague stealing his code, but he didn’t care for the programs. The fact that, mathematically, Sam should have already been born by the time of the first film but never appeared in it is a clever bit of retconning to make Flynn even more of an absentee jerk. But when we see him again in Tron: Legacy, he’s part Steve Jobs, part The Dude from The Big Lebowski. And who doesn’t love The Dude?

Kevin Flynn turned from an ambitious programmer to a wise sage who won’t abide people “messing with my Zen thing,” who reminisces about “jamming” and appreciates the miracle of “bio-digital jazz.” Bridges is clearly having fun with the character and the legacy the audience has in their head.

Meanwhile, Michael Sheen shows up for a short but very memorable role as the shadowy nightclub owner Zuse, a digital love child of Ziggy Stardust and Frank-N-Furter from The Rocky Horror Picture Show. who swings his cane traipses through the End of the Line club fight scene like a cackling vaudevillian. It’s as if he dropped in from the set of another film entirely, but somehow, it just works.


It Manages to Recapture the Visual Marvel of the Original

Garrett Hedlund in Tron: Legacy

(Photo by Douglas Curran/©Walt Disney Pictures)

The original Tron was praised for its groundbreaking use of computer-generated visuals, paving the way for everything from Pixar movies to Avengers: Endgame. Though Tron: Legacy suffers a bit from the uncanny valley effect when it comes to Clu, the film still manages to present a massive, vibrant world of its own.

Remember the disc fights from the original Tron? The sequel reimagines them by amping everything up to 11 with high-flying acrobatics and pristine “derezzing” effects. Remember the then-revolutionary light cycle races? Legacy takes the concept three-dimensional with a huge set piece that twists and turns on a multi-level racetrack and even finds time to work in a dogfighting sequence that feels straight out of Star Wars.

But the film also ventures beyond the Grid and depicts a sprawling, apocalyptic world with busy, shadowy streets and alleyways, vast deserts, and otherworldly mountains. Watching the light cycles for the first time may not be as groundbreaking as it was in 1982, but Tron: Legacy takes full advantage of the technological advancements of the past few decades to present a cutting-edge world you would want to live in. The film is glossy and designed to the teeth, and a decade after its release, it’s still one of the slickest, most visually spectacular films to look at.


Tron: Legacy was released in theaters on December 17, 2010.


Thumbnail image by ©Walt Disney Pictures

On an Apple device? Follow Rotten Tomatoes on Apple News.

We have been busy at Rotten Tomatoes these last two months recommending tons of movies and TV series to watch during quarantine (you can find a ton of lists here). But sometimes you’re not in a position, or mood, to plonk yourself down in front of a screen. Perhaps you’re working, or gardening, or cooking, or exercising, or hiding in a closet for a few minutes of peace and quiet away from your kids/pupils/audience. Either way: tough to follow the twists and turns of Ozark as you do that. To help in these moments – and to generally keep you sane and healthy as we endure our collective cabin fever – the RT staff curated a list of 15 scores to pair with different parts of your quarantine life. Looking for something to push you through that last set of burpees? We have an orchestral doozy for you. Got a swoony Zoom date? Try something with French flavors. Want a new soundtrack to your Animal Crossing hours? Daft Punk is here to help.

What movie music are you listening to at home? Let us know in the comments. 


Gattaca (1997) 83%

Gattaca

(Photo by © Columbia/courtesy Everett Collection)

Composer: Michael Nyman

There are moments in Gattaca where nothing much is happening on-screen, but the rich Michael Nyman score is going in hard. In my early Gattaca-watching career (I’ve seen the movie eight or nine times now), I thought this was faulty, like the music was overcompensating. Plainly, this was a bad take. The music is devastatingly romantic. And not just how it informs the relationship between Jerome and Irene (Ethan Hawke, Uma Thurman), but also Jerome’s love for himself, to believe he is capable of something far beyond his cursed birthright. These times ask us to search for this kind of inner strength, to navigate daily life’s new chaos, and carry a torch of hope for the not-too-distant-future. Gattaca‘s soundtrack, culminating in the impossible beauty of “The Arrival,” is the music of that guiding light.

Listen when: Working from home – this s–t is motivating! – but only if you like your job, and you’re not on a call. – Alex Vo, Editor


Romeo and Juliet (1968) 95%

Romeo and Juliet

(Photo by Courtesy Everett Collection)

Composer: Nino Rota

Italian composer Nino Rota has quite the résumé: La Dolce Vita, 8 1/2, and, of course, the first two Godfather films, both of which earned him Oscar nominations, and the second of which got him a win. My personal favorite, though, is his score for Franco Zeffirelli’s 1968 version of Romeo and Juliet, starring Leonard Whiting and Olivia Hussey. Maybe it takes me back to the high school English class in which I first saw the film, but there’s something about Rota’s love theme – a little trepidatious at first before a rousing strings-led swell, all laced with a certain feeling it’s not going to turn out well – that helps me focus when editing or reading. Be warned though: The score’s final tracks, which accompany the tragic finale on screen, are intense. Skip those, re-start from the beginning, and pretend the young lovers had a dagger-less ending.

Listen when: You’ve carved out some time in your day to read (and have got your “looking interested” photo programmed to your Zoom feed). – Joel Meares, Editor-in-Chief


Anatomy of a Murder (1959) 100%

Anatomy of a Murder

(Photo by Courtesy the Everett Collection)

Composers: Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn

There are several reasons why Otto Preminger’s Anatomy of a Murder is one of the greatest courtroom dramas ever, but it’s arguably best remembered for its striking opening title sequence by Saul Bass and its incredible soundtrack, composed by none other than jazz legend Duke Ellington and his longtime collaborator Billy Strayhorn. Together, Ellington and Strayhorn put together a complete musical package that was alternately sultry (“Flirtibird”), playful (“Happy Anatomy”), melancholic (“Almost Cried”), and mysterious (“Midnight Indigo”), and it all still feels fresh and alive today. Of course, the most memorable song is probably the “Main Title” theme that accompanies Bass’ opening credits, but the whole score just drips with style. It’s also worth noting that it was not only one of the first soundtracks entirely scored by jazz musicians, but also the first one for a major Hollywood film that was created by an African-American composer. Movie soundtrack or not, it’s a masterpiece.

Listen when: You’re feeling fancy and having a glass of wine in a bubble bath. – Ryan Fujitani, Snr. Editor


The Handmaiden (2016) 95%

The Handmaiden

(Photo by © Amazon Studios /Courtesy Everett Collection)

Composer: Jo Yeong-wook

The Handmaiden, like so many others, is the type of film that Bong Joon-ho spoke of when he urged English-speaking audiences to hurdle over the “one-inch barrier of subtitles” during one of his acceptance speeches last year for Parasite. The Korean- and Japanese-language film, which was not selected for Best International Film in 2016, sadly never reached a wide audience and was instead relegated to join other underrated/unknown non-English gems (most of which are available to stream – so get busy). Due to its under-the-radar status, many not only missed the seductive romance-thriller director Park Chan-wook weaved, but also the humorous and erotic score that plays throughout most of the film. The music, like the film it plays beneath, is surprising and genre-defying, mixing dark themes employing strings, clarinets, and harps with romantic melodies.

Listen when: You’re scrolling through exotic locales, dreaming of the day you can travel to distant lands once again. – Jacqueline Coley, Editor


Drive (2011) 93%

Drive

(Photo by Richard Foreman Jr/©FilmDistric/Courtesy Everett Collection)

Composer: Cliff Martinez

You can split Drive‘s original Cliff Martinez soundtrack into three categories: Pensive, ethereal, and fittingly, driving. “Kick Your Teeth” and “Skull Crushing” are among the pensive songs, and they suggest a shadow looming high over your shoulders, like a clockwork beast wound up to strike. The ethereal songs make you feel like you’re drifting through a hazy dream, and have incongruous names like “They Broke His Pelvis” and “Wrong Floor.” These two moods converge in the driving songs (“Rubber Head,” “Where’s the Deluxe Version?,” “Hammer”) that speak to those luxuriating in their delusional power fantasies and modern fairy tales. And, in this world, who can blame them?

Listen when: You’re out for a sanctioned late-night drive, on the route with the most lights. – Vo


Toy Story (1995) 100% and Toy Story 2 (1999) 100%

Toy Story 2

(Photo by © Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, © Pixar)

Composer: Randy Newman

Over four films, the themes and movements of Randy Newman’s Toy Story scores have become as familiar to many ’90s kids as “The Imperial March” – though the effect of Newman’s sometimes jazzy, sometimes rousing music is far less hair-raising. In fact, the music of Toy Story is total comfort food during these trying times, particularly the first Toy Story’s opening flourish, “Andy’s Birthday,” which will shoot you straight back to a buttery-smelling movie theater circa 1995, to the first time you saw this computer-animated marvel. (“Sid” on the other hand may give you those Darth Vader vibes; skip it.) The sung songs on these soundtracks are a treat – “You’ve Got a Friend In Me” will keep you smiling, while you can turn to Toy Story 2’s “When She Loved Me,” performed by Sarah McLachlan, if you just feel like having a good cry. You know, the kind you have when you’re watching a Pixar movie.

Listen when: It’s 3pm, you have a few hours of work left, and you need a solo pick-me-up. – Meares



Tron: Legacy (2010)

Tron: Legacy

(Photo by ©Walt Disney Pictures/Courtesy Everett Collection)

Composers: Daft Punk

Director Joseph Kosinski already had a daunting task before him when he agreed to helm a sequel to a beloved cult classic, but he made things just a bit easier on himself by recruiting possibly the most fitting composers for the film: Daft Punk. The legendary French electronic duo – who, unsurprisingly, admitted the original Tron was a big influence on them – relied on a mix of traditional orchestral compositions and some that blended strings and horns with synthesized elements and their trademark arpeggios to create a propulsive, otherworldly sound. Their work goes a long way toward establishing the mood and tone of the film, and considering they started working on the score even before the film entered production, it’s incredible how well it fits the dark cyberpunk aesthetic. Daft Punk being who they are, the Tron Legacy soundtrack got a lot of attention, and while audiences may argue about the quality of the film itself, the music remains one of its undisputed high points.

Listen when: You need some epic music while you fish in Animal Crossing. – Fujitani


Amélie (2001)

Amelie

(Photo by Courtesy the Everett Collection)

Composer: Yann Teirsen

The accordion-heavy music that playfully scored Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s Oscar-nominated film Amélie has, in the almost 20 years since the movie’s release, become synonymous with Paris and particularly Montmartre, the cobblestoned neighborhood where most of the story takes place. French musician Yann Tiersen earned wide international acclaim for his work – and a César Award, and a BAFTA nomination – but would go on to later say that the fame Amelie gave him was something he resented; he would be forever linked to the quirky French hit. His score, despite his feelings, is iconic for a reason, providing a sonic fantasy land that, back in 2001, allowed a pixie-like waitress to find her happy ending, but today can take the listener anywhere they want to go. Perhaps you will take a moment in these times to fantasize about slow walks on the Seine with your one true love.

Listen when: Noshing on something French – crepes and Nutella are easy enough – on a Zoom date with your boo. – Coley


Oldboy (2003) 81%

Oldboy

(Photo by Tartan Films/courtesy Everett Collection)

Composers: Choi Seung-hyun, Lee Ji-soo, Shim Hyeon-jeong

South Korean director Park Chan-wook’s twisty and twisted revenge thriller is rightly revered as a genre standout that helped put the country’s contemporary cinema on the world map. Its pulpy narrative, stylish direction, and one-take hallway fight sequence get all the attention, but the film wouldn’t have had the same impact if it weren’t for the score, composed by Choi Seung-hyun, Lee Ji-soo, and Shim Hyeon-jeong. While the more propulsive, electronic pieces may sound a little dated, the moody orchestral numbers feel like they’ve been ripped from some elegant, forgotten film noir; listen to “Kiss Me Deadly,” “It’s Alive!”, “The Big Sleep,” or any of the score’s melancholy waltzes for starters. Oh, and in case those titles didn’t clue you in, most of the original compositions are named after other movies, many of them film noirs themselves, which is a nice extra detail for movie buffs.

Listen when: You need to blow off some steam after a long day working from home – or you’re trying to solve the mystery of those undelivered Amazon packages you ordered. – Fujitani


The Farewell (2019) 97%

The Farewell

(Photo by Casi Moss, courtesy of A24)

Composer: Alex Weston

The score for Lulu Wang’s incredibly moving The Farewell is an aspect of the movie that I think gets too often overlooked; recall some of the film’s most memorable moments – the family slo-mo walk, the driving away in the cab at the end – and you’ll see how important the musical choices were for making them stand out. Alex Weston’s compositions feel unapologetically classical, even operatic – the wordless vocals throughout come courtesy of tenor Mykal Kilgore – and yet they also feel inherently Eastern, an apt sonic effect given the themes of the film. A departure from most of the music, and a standout track, is soul singer Elayna Boynton’s cover of Leonard Cohen’s “Come Healing.”

Listen when: The crushing anxiety of all that is happening starts seriously stressing you out. Or when rearranging the bookshelf. – Meares


Columbus (2017) 97%

(Photo by ©Superlative Films/courtesy Everett Collection)

Composer: Hammock

Hammock is a Nashville post-rock band that composes long, unhurried ambient songs without vocals or drums. Columbus is a quiet movie about two lost strangers (John Cho, Haley Lu Richardson) who meet in the Ohio town and bond over its surprising modernist architecture. By any measure, the band and movie are far from mainstream in their respective mediums, but the two coming together for the original soundtrack is a thing of niche beauty. Across Columbus director Kogonada’s pristine, meticulous shots and the building intimacy between the characters, Hammock’s music is used very sparingly, so listening to the 16-song soundtrack is a true act of discovery for Hammock fans. The songs, per usual, are compact galaxies of swelling sound. They suggest stillness, composure, and reflection – the kinds of moods one might feel when studying architecture. Or observing the world around you. As long as you’re looking up.

Listen when: Dusk starts to settle in in and your work for the day is all done, or you’re doing a spot of gardening. – Vo


Carol (2015) 94%

Carol

(Photo by Wilson Webb/©Weinstein Company/Courtesy Everett Collection)

Composer: Carter Burwell

The Oscar-nominated score for Todd Haynes’ haunting love story, Carol, is considered by many to be one of the best film compositions from the 21st century. The ’40s-inspired score also provides the perfect soundtrack for quiet meditation in the age of COVID-19. For Carol, Carter Burwell composed delicate and teasing melodies with woodwinds, strings, and xylophones that will instantly help you get Zen-y. Like the fated lovers at the center of the drama (masterfully brought to life by Rooney Mara and Cate Blanchett), Burwell’s chord progressions delay their resolution but find their home triumphantly in the end.

Listen when: You need a moment of relief from your “Baby Shark”-induced headache (and the kids that instigated it). – Coley


If Beale Street Could Talk (2018) 95%

If Beale Street Could Talk

(Photo by Annapurna Pictures)

Composer: Nicholas Britell

Two-time Oscar nominee Nicholas Britell’s most recognizable music might be his theme for HBO’s Succession, and while we certainly pay our respects to that antsy ditty – and the memes it inspired – it’s a little anxiety-inducing for our current moment. For something more soothing and just knock-your-socks-off gorgeous, Britell’s score for Barry Jenkins’ If Beale Street Could Talk is a wonderful blend of euphoria and melancholy that feels perfectly of its place and setting (Harlem, 1970s). It’s a lush strings-heavy score that follows the beats of the doomed love story the movie tells; listen to bonus track “Harlem Aria” to see what the score might have sounded like had Britell stuck with horns as the dominant instrument.

Listen when: You’re out on a socially distanced walk and really soaking in your surrounds. – Meares


The Last of the Mohicans (1992) 93%

The Last of the Mohicans

(Photo by 20th Century Fox Film Corp.)

Composers: Trevor Jones, Randy Edelman, Dougie MacLean

The story behind the score of Michael Mann’s epic rendition of James Fenimore Cooper’s 1826 novel is fraught with strife, which makes it all the more impressive that it turned out as incredible as it did. Mann initially asked composer Trevor Jones for an electronic score, but switched things up quite far into the production when they realized orchestral music would be more appropriate. Jones had to scramble not only to deliver an entirely new score, but also to keep up with the film’s last-minute editing, and Randy Edelman was brought on board to help finish it on time. The end result, of course, is a dramatic, sweeping array of compositions that evoke the film’s most emotional scenes. The film’s main theme, “Promontory,” a reworking of Scottish singer-songwriter Dougie MacLean’s “The Gael,” is instantly recognizable, but the star of it all is arguably the main title score. It’s an ominous procession of drums, strings, and horns that erupts into an iconic refrain that’s somehow heartbreaking and triumphant at the same time, and if it doesn’t inspire you to fight for something – anything – then you might need to get your pulse checked.

Listen when: You need extra motivation during your stay-at-home workout. –Fujitani

(Photo by Walt Disney Motion Pictures)

Earlier this year it was reported that Jared Leto was among the names circling the third Tron movie, a project that’s been hot and cold at different times following the somewhat lukewarm reception of 2010’s Tron: Legacy (51% at Rotten Tomatoes; $400 million in worldwide grosses). While we still don’t have a firm release date or cast, Leto — out promoting Blade Runner 2049 — says he’s definitely excited about jumping into the Tron universe and expanding upon it, much like he’s done with Blade Runner.

“For me, when I was a kid, it was Blade Runner, it was Tron, it was The Shining,” Leto told Rotten Tomatoes. “It was these kind of elevated genre movies really blew my mind, as well as films like Clockwork Orange and Scorsese [movies] and the early work of Brian De Palma. But Tron is another one that I feel like is a world that we’re not done with yet. There’s so much more to explore and to see there. I would absolutely love to expand upon the world of Tron and see what we could do to bring that to life.”

So What Would That Third Tron Movie Look Like?

According to Legacy director Joseph Kosinski, the current idea revolves around an all-out invasion film, with parts of it taking place in the real world and other parts inside the Tron world.

“What I’m excited about is the concept, which is an invasion movie from inside the machine coming out as opposed to one we’ve usually seen,” Kosinski told Collider earlier this year. “So we hinted at that at the end of Legacy with Quorra coming out, but the idea for Ascension was a movie that was, the first act was in the real world, the second act was in the world of Tron, or multiple worlds of Tron, and the third act was totally in the real world.”

As for Leto’s role (assuming he remains onboard and the film becomes a reality), all we know is he’d be playing a character named Ares, according to the original report. In Greek mythology, Ares is the god of war, and so it would seem like Leto might be playing a villain — or, like he does in Blade Runner 2049, a character whose presence is both good and bad, depending on the situation.

Do you want to see a third Tron movie?

Tag Cloud

kaiju Hollywood Foreign Press Association Disney Channel hispanic venice Freeform comic book movies Masterpiece movies VICE indiana jones TLC Avengers Christmas Turner Classic Movies Teen japan toronto Kids & Family deadpool cancelled TV series 21st Century Fox festival IMDb TV 2015 new zealand hist Wes Anderson 79th Golden Globes Awards Polls and Games Britbox rt labs boxoffice Binge Guide Black History Month basketball hollywood Apple Sundance Now jurassic park The Walt Disney Company 90s nature Bravo FOX Character Guide based on movie dragons RT21 Starz comic FX posters natural history Emmy Nominations Hallmark Christmas movies Spring TV zombies BBC One TIFF criterion streaming See It Skip It worst Spectrum Originals political drama nbcuniversal Rom-Com reboot Premiere Dates high school Mary Poppins Returns action-comedy animated Set visit Brie Larson FX on Hulu Arrowverse HBO Discovery Channel justice league dark cancelled TV shows directors 2019 classics Mary Tyler Moore Warner Bros. scary crime drama independent zero dark thirty women Black Mirror popular NBC vs. Netflix Christmas movies New York Comic Con trailers science fiction screen actors guild Rocky blockbuster cults vampires technology unscripted revenge award winner YouTube Red PlayStation Image Comics what to watch Tubi Year in Review 2021 docuseries President Stephen King Cosplay National Geographic japanese Fargo adenture dc Shondaland AMC Plus space blockbusters screenings Opinion dreamworks heist movie suspense 2020 Mudbound DirecTV Captain marvel ABC Family spain DC Universe 2018 99% TCA Winter 2020 Paramount sag awards Lionsgate casting ITV Star Trek monster movies Action LGBTQ batman GLAAD Walt Disney Pictures james bond Marathons TCM south america Box Office Summer 2017 71st Emmy Awards psycho stand-up comedy mob TCA Awards GoT American Society of Cinematographers Amazon Holiday Television Critics Association Tokyo Olympics mcc Comedy Musical TCA 2017 pirates of the caribbean thriller comic books sequels Creative Arts Emmys spy thriller Crunchyroll chucky superman Video Games Chernobyl Comic-Con@Home 2021 007 Adult Swim Song of Ice and Fire green book anime news dceu international Trophy Talk Toys Apple TV+ OWN cooking sports Paramount Network cancelled Logo LGBT Reality Competition free movies 45 politics sopranos latino adaptation Writers Guild of America video Reality blaxploitation BET Marvel Television The Academy Sci-Fi Musicals Paramount Plus game of thrones Exclusive Video live action true crime History game show dexter Lifetime Mystery rt labs critics edition Apple TV Plus aapi stoner Epix television strong female leads crime Comics on TV Winter TV scary movies Winners Grammys Ovation die hard cars 24 frames Mindy Kaling halloween Hulu CNN DC Comics ABC Peacock TruTV Tags: Comedy A24 live event transformers robots RT History new star wars movies canceled TV shows ghosts Universal Pictures best quibi documentary royal family golden globes elevated horror satire Fall TV superhero Film Festival Ghostbusters Amazon Studios Marvel Studios slasher spider-verse travel aliens telelvision werewolf miniseries TNT E! Baby Yoda Comedy Central rom-coms TV renewals cops saw X-Men ViacomCBS HBO Go TV comiccon target Amazon Prime Video Animation rotten breaking bad Tumblr emmy awards fast and furious debate spider-man Ellie Kemper facebook godzilla joker FXX versus indie Turner Mary poppins docudrama renewed TV shows australia critic resources foreign SDCC festivals Syfy prank Disney streaming service archives name the review composers laika a nightmare on elm street USA Network social media Rock black YouTube harry potter Tarantino football WGN leaderboard USA ID trophy witnail stop motion Red Carpet Photos First Look series Fox Searchlight Superheroes comedies CMT Sundance TV Rocketman Funimation PBS Chilling Adventures of Sabrina canceled dogs Infographic Instagram Live tv talk golden globe awards Superheroe Nat Geo Emmys Best and Worst TV Land feel good slashers SundanceTV YA BAFTA Anna Paquin Country VH1 marvel comics dramedy young adult 4/20 zombie Lucasfilm MSNBC comics CBS mockumentary Universal IFC Films Star Wars hidden camera sequel Drama films children's TV 1990s TCA 73rd Emmy Awards Podcast ABC Signature crime thriller Schedule Vudu Thanksgiving marvel cinematic universe BET Awards worst movies Pop NBA Biopics Pacific Islander Watching Series kids Pet Sematary Women's History Month twilight Esquire psychological thriller anthology genre Comic Book rotten movies we love fresh book adaptation razzies Film mission: impossible DGA biography NYCC A&E Western toy story wonder woman sitcom Academy Awards GIFs know your critic 93rd Oscars Pixar Horror Marvel SXSW E3 child's play concert Alien Dark Horse Comics jamie lee curtis DC streaming service TV movies police drama Awards Holidays universal monsters gangster comic book movie biopic MTV AMC spinoff rt archives Broadway Neflix CW Seed Certified Fresh HBO Max art house black comedy scorecard Quiz cats nfl HFPA reviews cartoon christmas movies Amazon Prime Countdown MCU documentaries Music singing competition binge serial killer Hallmark Family italian discovery diversity Prime Video The Walking Dead all-time Crackle cinemax Classic Film legend olympics 20th Century Fox halloween tv doctor who Netflix Pride Month french Showtime VOD theme song TV One Disney Plus romance ESPN war The Arrangement Shudder hispanic heritage month CBS All Access obituary Tomatazos disaster Cannes Interview mutant Super Bowl Valentine's Day teaser Oscars kong 2016 new york Sony Pictures Sneak Peek Awards Tour lord of the rings Sundance APB Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt ratings Television Academy Disney book romantic comedy Legendary Food Network Lifetime Christmas movies Nickelodeon asian-american Endgame El Rey scene in color Cartoon Network supernatural BBC America streaming movies spanish language 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards Elton John Spike The Purge Columbia Pictures spanish boxing First Reviews BBC Pirates crossover San Diego Comic-Con Heroines PaleyFest video on demand Fox News king kong IFC adventure Travel Channel franchise talk show 72 Emmy Awards critics The Witch remakes Extras Calendar Trivia Election Hear Us Out WarnerMedia period drama Martial Arts Nominations Pop TV Acorn TV movie richard e. Grant TBS Fantasy YouTube Premium parents Disney+ Disney Plus cancelled television finale OneApp king arthur Trailer historical drama medical drama The CW