(Photo by Searchlight/courtesy Everett Collection)

All 95 Best Picture Winners, Ranked

Every year, after the fracas of awards season and studio campaigning, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences hands out the ultimate prize in cinema, the explicit recommendation that if you’re only going to watch one movie, make it the one we picked. We’re talking the Oscar for Best Picture. Less than 100 of these have been handed out through the centuries. But ever wonder how the movies of this exclusive golden club would fare against each other?

Welcome to our countdown of every Best Picture winner ever, from the Certified Fresh (Casablanca, Schindler’s List, Argo, Lawrence of Arabia, The Godfather, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King…most of them, fortunately), the kinda Fresh (Out of Africa, Forrest Gump), to the ‘HUH? HOW?’ Rottens (The Broadway Melody, Cimarron).

And now we’ve added Coda as the 95th Best Picture Oscar winner. See where all the films place in our guide to Best Picture Winners, Ranked by Tomatometer!

#1

Parasite (2019)
99%

#1
Adjusted Score: 128013%
Critics Consensus: An urgent, brilliantly layered look at timely social themes, Parasite finds writer-director Bong Joon Ho in near-total command of his craft.
Synopsis: Greed and class discrimination threaten the newly formed symbiotic relationship between the wealthy Park family and the destitute Kim clan.... [More]
Directed By: Bong Joon-ho

#2

Casablanca (1942)
99%

#2
Adjusted Score: 115286%
Critics Consensus: An undisputed masterpiece and perhaps Hollywood's quintessential statement on love and romance, Casablanca has only improved with age, boasting career-defining performances from Humphrey Bogart and Ingrid Bergman.
Synopsis: Rick Blaine (Humphrey Bogart), who owns a nightclub in Casablanca, discovers his old flame Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman) is in town... [More]
Directed By: Michael Curtiz

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 110453%
Critics Consensus: With his electrifying performance in Elia Kazan's thought-provoking, expertly constructed melodrama, Marlon Brando redefined the possibilities of acting for film and helped permanently alter the cinematic landscape.
Synopsis: Dockworker Terry Malloy (Marlon Brando) had been an up-and-coming boxer until powerful local mob boss Johnny Friendly (Lee J. Cobb)... [More]
Directed By: Elia Kazan

#4

All About Eve (1950)
99%

#4
Adjusted Score: 110332%
Critics Consensus: Smart, sophisticated, and devastatingly funny, All About Eve is a Hollywood classic that only improves with age.
Synopsis: Backstage story revolving around aspiring actress Eve Harrington. Tattered and forlorn, Eve shows up in the dressing room of Broadway... [More]
Directed By: Joseph L. Mankiewicz

#5

Rebecca (1940)
98%

#5
Adjusted Score: 110806%
Critics Consensus: Hitchcock's first American film (and his only Best Picture winner), Rebecca is a masterpiece of haunting atmosphere, Gothic thrills, and gripping suspense.
Synopsis: Story of a young woman who marries a fascinating widower only to find out that she must live in the... [More]
Directed By: Alfred Hitchcock

#6

Moonlight (2016)
98%

#6
Adjusted Score: 124055%
Critics Consensus: Moonlight uses one man's story to offer a remarkable and brilliantly crafted look at lives too rarely seen in cinema.
Synopsis: A look at three defining chapters in the life of Chiron, a young black man growing up in Miami. His... [More]
Directed By: Barry Jenkins

#7

Schindler's List (1993)
98%

#7
Adjusted Score: 108194%
Critics Consensus: Schindler's List blends the abject horror of the Holocaust with Steven Spielberg's signature tender humanism to create the director's dramatic masterpiece.
Synopsis: Businessman Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson) arrives in Krakow in 1939, ready to make his fortune from World War II, which... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 117965%
Critics Consensus: Capturing its stars and director at their finest, It Happened One Night remains unsurpassed by the countless romantic comedies it has inspired.
Synopsis: In Frank Capra's acclaimed romantic comedy, spoiled heiress Ellie Andrews (Claudette Colbert) impetuously marries the scheming King Westley, leading her... [More]
Directed By: Frank Capra

#9
Adjusted Score: 106836%
Critics Consensus: An engrossing look at the triumphs and travails of war veterans, The Best Years of Our Lives is concerned specifically with the aftermath of World War II, but its messages speak to the overall American experience.
Synopsis: Fred, Al and Homer are three World War II veterans facing difficulties as they re-enter civilian life. Fred (Dana Andrews)... [More]
Directed By: William Wyler

#10
Adjusted Score: 109484%
Critics Consensus: Director Lewis Milestone's brilliant anti-war polemic, headlined by an unforgettable performance from Lew Ayres, lays bare the tragic foolishness at the heart of war.
Synopsis: The film follows a group of German schoolboys, talked into enlisting at the beginning of World War I by their... [More]
Directed By: Lewis Milestone

#11

Sunrise (1927)
98%

#11
Adjusted Score: 103839%
Critics Consensus: Boasting masterful cinematography to match its well-acted, wonderfully romantic storyline, Sunrise is perhaps the final -- and arguably definitive -- statement of the silent era.
Synopsis: Bored with his wife (Janet Gaynor), their baby and the dull routine of farm life, a farmer (George O'Brien) falls... [More]
Directed By: F.W. Murnau

#12

Spotlight (2015)
97%

#12
Adjusted Score: 112287%
Critics Consensus: Spotlight gracefully handles the lurid details of its fact-based story while resisting the temptation to lionize its heroes, resulting in a drama that honors the audience as well as its real-life subjects.
Synopsis: In 2001, editor Marty Baron of The Boston Globe assigns a team of journalists to investigate allegations against John Geoghan,... [More]
Directed By: Tom McCarthy

#13

The Hurt Locker (2008)
97%

#13
Adjusted Score: 108708%
Critics Consensus: A well-acted, intensely shot, action filled war epic, Kathryn Bigelow's The Hurt Locker is thus far the best of the recent dramatizations of the Iraq War.
Synopsis: Staff Sgt. William James (Jeremy Renner), Sgt. J.T. Sanborn (Anthony Mackie) and Specialist Owen Eldridge (Brian Geraghty) are members of... [More]
Directed By: Kathryn Bigelow

#14

The Godfather (1972)
97%

#14
Adjusted Score: 113786%
Critics Consensus: One of Hollywood's greatest critical and commercial successes, The Godfather gets everything right; not only did the movie transcend expectations, it established new benchmarks for American cinema.
Synopsis: Widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time, this mob drama, based on Mario Puzo's novel of... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#15

Annie Hall (1977)
97%

#15
Adjusted Score: 105110%
Critics Consensus: Filled with poignant performances and devastating humor, Annie Hall represents a quantum leap for Woody Allen and remains an American classic.
Synopsis: Comedian Alvy Singer (Woody Allen) examines the rise and fall of his relationship with struggling nightclub singer Annie Hall (Diane... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 108776%
Critics Consensus: Broderick Crawford is spellbinding as politician Willie Stark in director Robert Rossen's adaptation of the Robert Penn Warren novel about the corrosive effects of power on the human soul.
Synopsis: Drama about the rise and fall of a corrupt southern governor who promises his way to power. Broderick Crawford portrays... [More]
Directed By: Robert Rossen

#17

The Lost Weekend (1945)
97%

#17
Adjusted Score: 105267%
Critics Consensus: Director Billy Wilder's unflinchingly honest look at the effects of alcoholism may have had some of its impact blunted by time, but it remains a powerful and remarkably prescient film.
Synopsis: Writer Don Birnam (Ray Milland) is on the wagon. Sober for only a few days, Don is supposed to be... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#18

Argo (2012)
96%

#18
Adjusted Score: 111593%
Critics Consensus: Tense, exciting, and often darkly comic, Argo recreates a historical event with vivid attention to detail and finely wrought characters.
Synopsis: On Nov. 4, 1979, militants storm the U.S. embassy in Tehran, Iran, taking 66 American hostages. Amid the chaos, six... [More]
Directed By: Ben Affleck

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 107949%
Critics Consensus: Drawing on strong performances by Al Pacino and Robert De Niro, Francis Ford Coppola's continuation of Mario Puzo's Mafia saga set new standards for sequels that have yet to be matched or broken.
Synopsis: The compelling sequel to "The Godfather," contrasting the life of Corleone father and son. Traces the problems of Michael Corleone... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#20

Unforgiven (1992)
96%

#20
Adjusted Score: 105493%
Critics Consensus: As both director and star, Clint Eastwood strips away decades of Hollywood varnish applied to the Wild West, and emerges with a series of harshly eloquent statements about the nature of violence.
Synopsis: When prostitute Delilah Fitzgerald (Anna Thomson) is disfigured by a pair of cowboys in Big Whiskey, Wyoming, her fellow brothel... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#21
Adjusted Score: 108698%
Critics Consensus: This complex war epic asks hard questions, resists easy answers, and boasts career-defining work from star Alec Guinness and director David Lean.
Synopsis: Adaptation of the Pierre Bouelle novel about POWs in Burma forced to build a bridge to aid the war effort... [More]
Directed By: David Lean

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 110021%
Critics Consensus: The plot may be problematic, but such concerns are rendered superfluous by Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron's star power, the Gershwins' classic songs, and Vincente Minnelli's colorful, sympathetic direction.
Synopsis: Jerry Mulligan (Gene Kelly) is an American ex-GI who stays in post-war Paris to become a painter, and falls for... [More]
Directed By: Vincente Minnelli

#23

Marty (1955)
96%

#23
Adjusted Score: 104355%
Critics Consensus: Scriptwriter Paddy Chayefsky's solid dialogue is bolstered by strong performances from Ernest Borgnine and Betsy Blair in this appealingly low-key character study.
Synopsis: This acclaimed romantic drama follows the life of Marty Piletti (Ernest Borgnine), a stout bachelor butcher who lives with his... [More]
Directed By: Delbert Mann

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 108940%
Critics Consensus: The historical inaccuracies in this high-seas adventure are more than offset by its timeless themes, larger-than-life performances from Clark Gable and Charles Laughton, and Frank Lloyd's superb direction.
Synopsis: As the cruel captain of the HMS Bounty, a ship bound for Tahiti, William Bligh (Charles Laughton) wins few friends.... [More]
Directed By: Frank Lloyd

#25

12 Years a Slave (2013)
95%

#25
Adjusted Score: 111091%
Critics Consensus: It's far from comfortable viewing, but 12 Years a Slave's unflinchingly brutal look at American slavery is also brilliant -- and quite possibly essential -- cinema.
Synopsis: In the years before the Civil War, Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free black man from upstate New York, is... [More]
Directed By: Steve McQueen

#26

The Artist (2011)
95%

#26
Adjusted Score: 109790%
Critics Consensus: A crowd-pleasing tribute to the magic of silent cinema, The Artist is a clever, joyous film with delightful performances and visual style to spare.
Synopsis: In the 1920s, actor George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is a bona fide matinee idol with many adoring fans. While working... [More]
Directed By: Michel Hazanavicius

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: 106523%
Critics Consensus: Director Jonathan Demme's smart, taut thriller teeters on the edge between psychological study and all-out horror, and benefits greatly from stellar performances by Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster.
Synopsis: Jodie Foster stars as Clarice Starling, a top student at the FBI's training academy. Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn) wants Clarice... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Demme

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 104329%
Critics Consensus: Realistic, fast-paced and uncommonly smart, The French Connection is bolstered by stellar performances by Gene Hackman and Roy Scheider, not to mention William Friedkin's thrilling production.
Synopsis: New York Detective "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) and his partner (Roy Scheider) chase a French heroin smuggler.... [More]
Directed By: William Friedkin

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 102687%
Critics Consensus: Tense, funny, and thought-provoking all at once, and lifted by strong performances from Sydney Poitier and Rod Steiger, director Norman Jewison's look at murder and racism in small-town America continues to resonate today.
Synopsis: African-American Philadelphia police detective Virgil Tibbs (Sidney Poitier) is arrested on suspicion of murder by Bill Gillespie (Rod Steiger), the... [More]
Directed By: Norman Jewison

#30
Adjusted Score: 108136%
Critics Consensus: It's predictably uplifting fare from Frank Capra, perhaps the most consciously uplifting of all great American directors -- but thanks to immensely appealing performances and a nimble script, You Can't Take It With You is hard not to love.
Synopsis: Sweet-natured Alice Sycamore (Jean Arthur) falls for banker's son Tony Kirby (James Stewart). But when she invites her snooty prospective... [More]
Directed By: Frank Capra

#31

Hamlet (1948)
95%

#31
Adjusted Score: 99904%
Critics Consensus: A well-executed labor of love from star and director Laurence Olivier, Hamlet not only proved that Shakespeare could be successfully adapted to the big screen, it paved the way for further cinematic interpretations.
Synopsis: Winner of four Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actor, Sir Laurence Olivier's "Hamlet" continues to be the most... [More]
Directed By: Laurence Olivier

#32
#32
Adjusted Score: 106691%
Critics Consensus: Colin Firth gives a masterful performance in The King's Speech, a predictable but stylishly produced and rousing period drama.
Synopsis: England's Prince Albert (Colin Firth) must ascend the throne as King George VI, but he has a speech impediment. Knowing... [More]
Directed By: Tom Hooper

#33

CODA (2021)
94%

#33
Adjusted Score: 109441%
Critics Consensus: CODA's story offers few surprises, but strong representation and a terrific cast -- led by Emilia Jones' brilliant performance -- bring this coming-of-age story vividly to life.
Synopsis: Seventeen-year-old Ruby (Emilia Jones) is the sole hearing member of a deaf family -- a CODA, child of deaf adults.... [More]
Directed By: Siân Heder

#34
#34
Adjusted Score: 105800%
Critics Consensus: The epic of all epics, Lawrence of Arabia cements director David Lean's status in the filmmaking pantheon with nearly four hours of grand scope, brilliant performances, and beautiful cinematography.
Synopsis: Due to his knowledge of the native Bedouin tribes, British Lieutenant T.E. Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) is sent to Arabia to... [More]
Directed By: David Lean

#35

The Apartment (1960)
94%

#35
Adjusted Score: 105736%
Critics Consensus: Director Billy Wilder's customary cynicism is leavened here by tender humor, romance, and genuine pathos.
Synopsis: Insurance worker C.C. Baxter (Jack Lemmon) lends his Upper West Side apartment to company bosses to use for extramarital affairs.... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#36

My Fair Lady (1964)
94%

#36
Adjusted Score: 96782%
Critics Consensus: George Cukor's elegant, colorful adaptation of the beloved stage play is elevated to new heights thanks to winning performances by Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison.
Synopsis: In this beloved musical, pompous phonetics professor Henry Higgins (Rex Harrison) is so sure of his abilities that he takes... [More]
Directed By: George Cukor

#37

The Sting (1973)
92%

#37
Adjusted Score: 101575%
Critics Consensus: Paul Newman, Robert Redford, and director George Roy Hill prove that charm, humor, and a few slick twists can add up to a great film.
Synopsis: Following the murder of a mutual friend, aspiring con man Johnny Hooker (Robert Redford) teams up with old pro Henry... [More]
Directed By: George Roy Hill

#38

Mrs. Miniver (1942)
94%

#38
Adjusted Score: 100530%
Critics Consensus: An excessively sentimental piece of propaganda, Mrs. Miniver nonetheless succeeds, due largely to Greer Garson's powerful performance.
Synopsis: A moving drama about a middle-class English family learning to cope with war, told in a series of dramatic vignettes.... [More]
Directed By: William Wyler

#39

Nomadland (2020)
93%

#39
Adjusted Score: 116349%
Critics Consensus: A poetic character study on the forgotten and downtrodden, Nomadland beautifully captures the restlessness left in the wake of the Great Recession.
Synopsis: A woman embarks on a journey through the American West after losing everything during the recession.... [More]
Directed By: Chloé Zhao

#40
#40
Adjusted Score: 106329%
Critics Consensus: Bolstered by powerful lead performances from Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, and Tommy Lee Jones, No Country for Old Men finds the Coen brothers spinning cinematic gold out of Cormac McCarthy's grim, darkly funny novel.
Synopsis: While out hunting, Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin) finds the grisly aftermath of a drug deal. Though he knows better, he... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#41
Adjusted Score: 103517%
Critics Consensus: Visually breathtaking and emotionally powerful, The Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King is a moving and satisfying conclusion to a great trilogy.
Synopsis: The culmination of nearly 10 years' work and conclusion to Peter Jackson's epic trilogy based on the timeless J.R.R. Tolkien... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#42
Adjusted Score: 103923%
Critics Consensus: Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher are worthy adversaries in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, with Miloš Forman's more grounded and morally ambiguous approach to Ken Kesey's surrealistic novel yielding a film of outsized power.
Synopsis: When Randle Patrick McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) gets transferred for evaluation from a prison farm to a mental institution, he assumes... [More]
Directed By: Milos Forman

#43
#43
Adjusted Score: 103815%
Critics Consensus: Nostalgic without becoming maudlin, this working-class drama is enlivened by a terrific cast and John Ford's ineffable directorial eye.
Synopsis: Huw Morgan (Roddy McDowall), the academically inclined youngest son in a proud family of Welsh coal miners, witnesses the tumultuous... [More]
Directed By: John Ford

#44

Wings (1927)
93%

#44
Adjusted Score: 98411%
Critics Consensus: Subsequent war epics may have borrowed heavily from the original Best Picture winner, but they've all lacked Clara Bow's luminous screen presence and William Wellman's deft direction.
Synopsis: With World War I afoot, David Armstrong (Richard Arlen) and Jack Powell (Charles "Buddy" Rogers) join the military with an... [More]
Directed By: William A. Wellman

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 128042%
Critics Consensus: The Shape of Water finds Guillermo del Toro at his visually distinctive best -- and matched by an emotionally absorbing story brought to life by a stellar Sally Hawkins performance.
Synopsis: Elisa is a mute, isolated woman who works as a cleaning lady in a hidden, high-security government laboratory in 1962... [More]
Directed By: Guillermo del Toro

#46
#46
Adjusted Score: 99594%
Critics Consensus: Endlessly witty, visually rapturous, and sweetly romantic, Shakespeare in Love is a delightful romantic comedy that succeeds on nearly every level.
Synopsis: "Shakespeare in Love" is a romantic comedy for the 1990s set in the 1590s. It imaginatively unfolds the witty, sexy... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#47

West Side Story (1961)
92%

#47
Adjusted Score: 104370%
Critics Consensus: Buoyed by Robert Wise's dazzling direction, Leonard Bernstein's score, and Stephen Sondheim's lyrics, West Side Story remains perhaps the most iconic of all the Shakespeare adaptations to visit the big screen.
Synopsis: A musical in which a modern day Romeo and Juliet are involved in New York street gangs. On the harsh... [More]

#48
Adjusted Score: 106372%
Critics Consensus: A thrilling leap forward for director Alejandro González Iñárritu, Birdman is an ambitious technical showcase powered by a layered story and outstanding performances from Michael Keaton and Edward Norton.
Synopsis: Former cinema superhero Riggan Thomson (Michael Keaton) is mounting an ambitious Broadway production that he hopes will breathe new life... [More]

#49
#49
Adjusted Score: 103606%
Critics Consensus: Visually dazzling and emotionally resonant, Slumdog Millionaire is a film that's both entertaining and powerful.
Synopsis: As 18-year-old Jamal Malik (Dev Patel) answers questions on the Indian version of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," flashbacks... [More]
Directed By: Danny Boyle

#50

Rocky (1976)
91%

#50
Adjusted Score: 97502%
Critics Consensus: This story of a down-on-his-luck boxer is thoroughly predictable, but Sylvester Stallone's script and stunning performance in the title role brush aside complaints.
Synopsis: Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone), a small-time boxer from working-class Philadelphia, is arbitrarily chosen to take on the reigning world heavyweight... [More]
Directed By: John G. Avildsen

#51
#51
Adjusted Score: 105179%
Critics Consensus: Urgently relevant in an era of escalating bigotry and fascism, The Life of Emile Zola is a respectful and staid tribute to the French novelist, enlivened by Paul Muni's chameleonic prowess.
Synopsis: After struggling to establish himself, author Emile Zola (Paul Muni) wins success writing about the unsavory side of Paris and... [More]
Directed By: William Dieterle

#52

The Departed (2006)
90%

#52
Adjusted Score: 102869%
Critics Consensus: Featuring outstanding work from an excellent cast, The Departed is a thoroughly engrossing gangster drama with the gritty authenticity and soupy morality we come to expect from Martin Scorsese.
Synopsis: South Boston cop Billy Costigan (Leonardo DiCaprio) goes under cover to infiltrate the organization of gangland chief Frank Costello (Jack... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#53
#53
Adjusted Score: 101358%
Critics Consensus: Clint Eastwood's assured direction - combined with knockout performances from Hilary Swank and Morgan Freeman - help Million Dollar Baby to transcend its clichés, and the result is deeply heartfelt and moving.
Synopsis: Frankie Dunn (Clint Eastwood) is a veteran Los Angeles boxing trainer who keeps almost everyone at arm's length, except his... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#54
#54
Adjusted Score: 100240%
Critics Consensus: Gone with the Wind's epic grandeur and romantic allure encapsulate an era of Hollywood filmmaking -- but that can't excuse a blinkered perspective that stands on the wrong side of history.
Synopsis: Presented as originally released in 1939. Includes themes and character depictions which may be offensive and problematic to contemporary audiences.... [More]
Directed By: Victor Fleming

#55

Ordinary People (1980)
89%

#55
Adjusted Score: 97834%
Critics Consensus: Robert Redford proves himself a filmmaker of uncommon emotional intelligence with Ordinary People, an auspicious debut that deftly observes the fractioning of a family unit through a quartet of superb performances.
Synopsis: Tormented by guilt following the death of his older brother, Buck, in a sailing accident, alienated teenager Conrad Jarrett (Timothy... [More]
Directed By: Robert Redford

#56

Patton (1970)
90%

#56
Adjusted Score: 95019%
Critics Consensus: George C. Scott's sympathetic, unflinching portrayal of the titular general in this sprawling epic is as definitive as any performance in the history of American biopics.
Synopsis: Biography of controversial World War II hero General George S. Patton. The film covers his wartime activities and accomplishments, beginning... [More]
Directed By: Franklin J. Schaffner

#57

Amadeus (1984)
89%

#57
Adjusted Score: 99769%
Critics Consensus: Amadeus' liberties with history may rankle some, but the creative marriage of Miloš Forman and Peter Shaffer yields a divinely diabolical myth of genius and mediocrity, buoyed by inspired casting and Mozart's rapturous music.
Synopsis: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce) is a remarkably talented young Viennese composer who unwittingly finds a fierce rival in the... [More]
Directed By: Milos Forman

#58

Rain Man (1988)
89%

#58
Adjusted Score: 97445%
Critics Consensus: This road-trip movie about an autistic savant and his callow brother is far from seamless, but Barry Levinson's direction is impressive, and strong performances from Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman add to its appeal.
Synopsis: When car dealer Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise) learns that his estranged father has died, he returns home to Cincinnati, where... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#59

Midnight Cowboy (1969)
89%

#59
Adjusted Score: 102400%
Critics Consensus: John Schlesinger's gritty, unrelentingly bleak look at the seedy underbelly of urban American life is undeniably disturbing, but Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight's performances make it difficult to turn away.
Synopsis: Convinced of his irresistible appeal to women, Texas dishwasher Joe Buck (Jon Voight) quits his job and heads for New... [More]
Directed By: John Schlesinger

#60

Gandhi (1982)
89%

#60
Adjusted Score: 97141%
Critics Consensus: Director Richard Attenborough is typically sympathetic and sure-handed, but it's Ben Kingsley's magnetic performance that acts as the linchpin for this sprawling, lengthy biopic.
Synopsis: This acclaimed biographical drama presents major events in the life of Mohandas Gandhi (Ben Kingsley), the beloved Indian leader who... [More]
Directed By: Richard Attenborough

#61

The Deer Hunter (1978)
89%

#61
Adjusted Score: 97784%
Critics Consensus: Its greatness is blunted by its length and one-sided point of view, but the film's weaknesses are overpowered by Michael Cimino's sympathetic direction and a series of heartbreaking performances from Robert De Niro, Meryl Streep, and Christopher Walken.
Synopsis: In 1968, Michael (Robert De Niro), Nick (Christopher Walken) and Steven (John Savage), lifelong friends from a working-class Pennsylvania steel... [More]
Directed By: Michael Cimino

#62

Oliver! (1968)
89%

#62
Adjusted Score: 97638%
Critics Consensus: Oliver! transforms Charles Dickens' muckraking novel into a jaunty musical Victorian fairytale, buoyed by Ron Moody's charming star turn and Onna White's rapturous choreography.
Synopsis: In this award-winning adaptation of the Broadway musical based on the Charles Dickens novel, 9-year-old orphan Oliver Twist (Mark Lester)... [More]
Directed By: Carol Reed

#63
#63
Adjusted Score: 97782%
Critics Consensus: It has perhaps aged poorly, but this languidly paced WWII romance remains an iconic, well-acted film, featuring particularly strong performances from Burt Lancaster and Montgomery Clift.
Synopsis: At an Army barracks in Hawaii in the days preceding the attack on Pearl Harbor, lone-wolf soldier and boxing champion... [More]
Directed By: Fred Zinnemann

#64
#64
Adjusted Score: 96417%
Critics Consensus: The divorce subject isn't as shocking, but the film is still a thoughtful, well-acted drama that resists the urge to take sides or give easy answers.
Synopsis: On the same day Manhattan advertising executive Ted Kramer (Dustin Hoffman) lands the biggest account of his career, he learns... [More]
Directed By: Robert Benton

#65

Titanic (1997)
87%

#65
Adjusted Score: 102629%
Critics Consensus: A mostly unqualified triumph for James Cameron, who offers a dizzying blend of spectacular visuals and old-fashioned melodrama.
Synopsis: James Cameron's "Titanic" is an epic, action-packed romance set against the ill-fated maiden voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic; the pride... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#66

American Beauty (1999)
87%

#66
Adjusted Score: 94576%
Critics Consensus: Flawlessly cast and brimming with dark, acid wit, American Beauty is a smart, provocative high point of late '90s mainstream Hollywood film.
Synopsis: Lester Burnham (Kevin Spacey) is a gainfully employed suburban husband and father. Fed up with his boring, stagnant existence, he... [More]
Directed By: Sam Mendes

#67

Gigi (1958)
88%

#67
Adjusted Score: 95931%
Critics Consensus: It may not be one of Vincente Minnelli's best, but the charming and flawlessly acted Gigi still offers enough visual and musical treats to satisfy.
Synopsis: Gaston (Louis Jourdan) is a restless Parisian playboy who moves from one mistress to another, while also spending time with... [More]
Directed By: Vincente Minnelli

#68

Platoon (1986)
87%

#68
Adjusted Score: 93612%
Critics Consensus: Informed by director Oliver Stone's personal experiences in Vietnam, Platoon forgoes easy sermonizing in favor of a harrowing, ground-level view of war, bolstered by no-holds-barred performances from Charlie Sheen and Willem Dafoe.
Synopsis: Chris Taylor (Charlie Sheen) leaves his university studies to enlist in combat duty in Vietnam in 1967. Once he's on... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Stone

#69

Chicago (2002)
86%

#69
Adjusted Score: 95261%
Critics Consensus: A rousing and energetic adaptation of the Broadway musical, Chicago succeeds on the level of pure spectacle, but provides a surprising level of depth and humor as well.
Synopsis: Nightclub sensation Velma (Catherine Zeta-Jones) murders her philandering husband, and Chicago's slickest lawyer, Billy Flynn (Richard Gere), is set to... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#70

The Last Emperor (1987)
87%

#70
Adjusted Score: 95313%
Critics Consensus: While Bernardo Bertolucci's decadent epic never quite identifies the dramatic pulse of its protagonist, stupendous visuals and John Lone's ability to make passivity riveting give The Last Emperor a rarified grandeur.
Synopsis: This sweeping account of the life of Pu Yi (John Lone), the last emperor of China, follows the leader's tumultuous... [More]
Directed By: Bernardo Bertolucci

#71
#71
Adjusted Score: 90527%
Critics Consensus: Though it suffers from excessive length and ambition, director Minghella's adaptation of the Michael Ondaatje novel is complex, powerful, and moving.
Synopsis: The sweeping expanses of the Sahara are the setting for a passionate love affair in this adaptation of Michael Ondaatje's... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Minghella

#72

Grand Hotel (1932)
86%

#72
Adjusted Score: 91500%
Critics Consensus: Perhaps less a true film than a series of star-studded vignettes, Grand Hotel still remains an entertaining look back at a bygone Hollywood era.
Synopsis: At a luxurious Berlin hotel between the wars, the once-wealthy Baron Felix von Gaigern (John Barrymore) supports himself as a... [More]
Directed By: Edmund Goulding

#73

Ben-Hur (1959)
85%

#73
Adjusted Score: 88744%
Critics Consensus: Uneven, but in terms of epic scope and grand spectacle, Ben-Hur still ranks among Hollywood's finest examples of pure entertainment.
Synopsis: Charlton Heston plays a Palestinian Jew who is battling the Roman empire at the time of Christ. His actions send... [More]
Directed By: William Wyler

#74
#74
Adjusted Score: 92320%
Critics Consensus: While it's fueled in part by outdated stereotypes, Driving Miss Daisy takes audiences on a heartwarming journey with a pair of outstanding actors.
Synopsis: Daisy Werthan (Jessica Tandy), an elderly Jewish widow living in Atlanta, is determined to maintain her independence. However, when she... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#75
#75
Adjusted Score: 89157%
Critics Consensus: Solid cinematography and enjoyable performances from Paul Scofield and Robert Shaw add a spark to this deliberately paced adaptation of the Robert Bolt play.
Synopsis: When the highly respected British statesman Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield) refuses to pressure the Pope into annulling the marriage... [More]
Directed By: Fred Zinnemann

#76

Chariots of Fire (1981)
83%

#76
Adjusted Score: 91766%
Critics Consensus: Decidedly slower and less limber than the Olympic runners at the center of its story, Chariots of Fire nevertheless makes effectively stirring use of its spiritual and patriotic themes.
Synopsis: In the class-obsessed and religiously divided United Kingdom of the early 1920s, two determined young runners train for the 1924... [More]
Directed By: Hugh Hudson

#77
#77
Adjusted Score: 87263%
Critics Consensus: Dances with Wolves suffers from a simplistic view of the culture it attempts to honor, but the end result remains a stirring western whose noble intentions are often matched by its epic grandeur.
Synopsis: A Civil War soldier develops a relationship with a band of Lakota Indians. Attracted by the simplicity of their lifestyle,... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Costner

#78
#78
Adjusted Score: 93231%
Critics Consensus: Unapologetically sweet and maybe even a little corny, The Sound of Music will win over all but the most cynical filmgoers with its classic songs and irresistible warmth.
Synopsis: A tuneful, heartwarming story, it is based on the real life story of the Von Trapp Family singers, one of... [More]
Directed By: Robert Wise

#79
#79
Adjusted Score: 90249%
Critics Consensus: A classic tearjerker, Terms of Endearment isn't shy about reaching for the heartstrings -- but is so well-acted and smartly scripted that it's almost impossible to resist.
Synopsis: Widow Aurora Greenway (Shirley MacLaine) and her daughter, Emma (Debra Winger), have a strong bond, but Emma marries teacher Flap... [More]
Directed By: James L. Brooks

#80

Tom Jones (1963)
80%

#80
Adjusted Score: 83672%
Critics Consensus: A frantic, irreverent adaptation of the novel, bolstered by Albert Finney's courageous performance and arresting visuals.
Synopsis: Tom Jones (Albert Finney), a bastard foundling raised by the kindly Squire Allworthy (George Devine), loves the beautiful Sophie Western... [More]
Directed By: Tony Richardson

#81

Gladiator (2000)
78%

#81
Adjusted Score: 84827%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott and an excellent cast successfully convey the intensity of Roman gladitorial combat as well as the political intrigue brewing beneath.
Synopsis: Commodus (Joaquin Phoenix) takes power and strips rank from Maximus (Russell Crowe), one of the favored generals of his predecessor... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#82

Green Book (2018)
77%

#82
Adjusted Score: 99469%
Critics Consensus: Green Book takes audiences on an excessively smooth ride through bumpy subject matter, although Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen's performances add necessary depth.
Synopsis: Dr. Don Shirley is a world-class African-American pianist who's about to embark on a concert tour in the Deep South... [More]
Directed By: Peter Farrelly

#83

Braveheart (1995)
76%

#83
Adjusted Score: 81538%
Critics Consensus: Distractingly violent and historically dodgy, Mel Gibson's Braveheart justifies its epic length by delivering enough sweeping action, drama, and romance to match its ambition.
Synopsis: Tells the story of the legendary thirteenth century Scottish hero named William Wallace (Mel Gibson). Wallace rallies the Scottish against... [More]
Directed By: Mel Gibson

#84
#84
Adjusted Score: 81540%
Critics Consensus: It occasionally fails to live up to its subject matter -- and is perhaps an 'important' film more than a 'great' one -- but the performances from Gregory Peck and Dorothy McGuire are superb.
Synopsis: When journalist Phil Green (Gregory Peck) moves to New York City, he takes on a high-profile magazine assignment about anti-Semitism.... [More]
Directed By: Elia Kazan

#85

Crash (2004)
74%

#85
Adjusted Score: 83700%
Critics Consensus: A raw and unsettling morality piece on modern angst and urban disconnect, Crash examines the dangers of bigotry and xenophobia in the lives of interconnected Angelenos.
Synopsis: Writer-director Paul Haggis interweaves several connected stories about race, class, family and gender in Los Angeles in the aftermath of... [More]
Directed By: Paul Haggis

#86

A Beautiful Mind (2001)
74%

#86
Adjusted Score: 82782%
Critics Consensus: The well-acted A Beautiful Mind is both a moving love story and a revealing look at mental illness.
Synopsis: A human drama inspired by events in the life of John Forbes Nash Jr., and in part based on the... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#87

Going My Way (1944)
82%

#87
Adjusted Score: 85065%
Critics Consensus: Bing Crosby and Barry Fitzgerald are eminently likable, and film is pleasantly sentimental, but Going My Way suffers from a surplus of sweetness.
Synopsis: Father Charles O'Malley (Bing Crosby) is an easy-going, golf-playing young priest whose entry into a tough neighborhood parish in midtown... [More]
Directed By: Leo McCarey

#88

Forrest Gump (1994)
71%

#88
Adjusted Score: 76897%
Critics Consensus: Forrest Gump may be an overly sentimental film with a somewhat problematic message, but its sweetness and charm are usually enough to approximate true depth and grace.
Synopsis: Slow-witted Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks) has never thought of himself as disadvantaged, and thanks to his supportive mother (Sally Field),... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#89
#89
Adjusted Score: 81966%
Critics Consensus: This biopic is undeniably stylish, but loses points for excessive length, an overreliance on clichés, and historical inaccuracies.
Synopsis: This lively biopic depicts the rise of Florenz Ziegfeld (William Powell), a theater producer who became renowned during the 1920s... [More]
Directed By: Robert Z. Leonard

#90
Adjusted Score: 74102%
Critics Consensus: It's undeniably shallow, but its cheerful lack of pretense -- as well as its grand scale and star-stuffed cast -- help make Around the World in 80 Days charmingly light-hearted entertainment.
Synopsis: Victorian-era Englishman Phileas Fogg (David Niven) proclaims before his fellow members of a London gentleman's club that he can circumnavigate... [More]
Directed By: Michael Anderson

#91

Cavalcade (1933)
66%

#91
Adjusted Score: 70079%
Critics Consensus: Though solidly acted and pleasant to look at, Cavalcade lacks cohesion, and sacrifices true emotion for mawkishness.
Synopsis: Upper-crust Londoners Robert and Jane Marryot (Clive Brook, Diana Wynyard) and their working-class counterparts, Alfred and Ellen Bridges, experience life's... [More]
Directed By: Frank Lloyd

#92

Out of Africa (1985)
61%

#92
Adjusted Score: 67956%
Critics Consensus: Though lensed with stunning cinematography and featuring a pair of winning performances from Meryl Streep and Robert Redford, Out of Africa suffers from excessive length and glacial pacing.
Synopsis: Initially set on being a dairy farmer, the aristocratic Karen Blixen (Meryl Streep) travels to Africa to join her husband,... [More]
Directed By: Sydney Pollack

#93

Cimarron (1931)
50%

#93
Adjusted Score: 53391%
Critics Consensus: Cimarron is supported by a strong performance from Irene Dunne, but uneven in basically every other regard, and riddled with potentially offensive stereotypes.
Synopsis: In 1889, adventurous lawyer and newspaper editor Yancey Cravat (Richard Dix) convinces his genteel wife, Sabra (Irene Dunne), to join... [More]
Directed By: Wesley Ruggles

#94
Adjusted Score: 53802%
Critics Consensus: The Greatest Show on Earth is melodramatic, short on plot, excessively lengthy and bogged down with clichés, but not without a certain innocent charm.
Synopsis: "The Greatest Show on Earth" is a dazzling spectacle of life behind the scenes with Ringling Bros.-Barnum and Bailey Circus,... [More]
Directed By: Cecil B. DeMille

#95
#95
Adjusted Score: 43272%
Critics Consensus: The Broadway Melody is interesting as an example of an early Hollywood musical, but otherwise, it's essentially bereft of appeal for modern audiences.
Synopsis: Vaudeville sisters "Hank" (Bessie Love) and Queenie Mahoney (Anita Page) take their act to the Broadway stage in New York... [More]
Directed By: Harry Beaumont

All Dev Patel Movies, Ranked by Tomatometer

After being alerted to Dev Patel’s existence by his Skins-watching daughter, director Danny Boyle cast the then 17-year-old actor in 2008’s Slumdog Millionaire. The film, which was originally dropped by Warner Independent after the studio doubted its commercial prospects, would go on to gross over $350 million worldwide, win Best Picture at the Academy Awards, and make international stars out of leads Patel and Freida Pinto.

It would be hard to match that kind of explosive feature debut, and for the next several years, only the Best Exotic Marigold Hotel cinematic universe films would come close to that early critical and box office success. But Patel came roaring back with Lion, the true-story drama that would earn him a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nom, with the film itself ultimately in the running for Best Picture. The Certified Fresh Hotel Mumbai and Personal History of David Copperfield followed, and now Patel is getting career-best review write-ups for A24’s Arthurian jam, The Green Knight.

Read on to see all Dev Patel movies, ranked by Tomatometer!

#1

Only Yesterday (1991)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 102962%
Critics Consensus: Only Yesterday's long-delayed U.S. debut fills a frustrating gap for American Ghibli fans while offering further proof of the studio's incredibly consistent commitment to quality.
Synopsis: A put-upon 27-year-old Japanese office worker travels to the countryside and reminisces about her childhood in Tokyo and what life... [More]
Directed By: Isao Takahata

#2
Adjusted Score: 108754%
Critics Consensus: The Personal History of David Copperfield puts a fresh, funny, and utterly charming spin on Dickens' classic, proving some stories truly are timeless.
Synopsis: The life of David Copperfield is chronicled from his youth into adulthood.... [More]
Directed By: Armando Iannucci

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 103606%
Critics Consensus: Visually dazzling and emotionally resonant, Slumdog Millionaire is a film that's both entertaining and powerful.
Synopsis: As 18-year-old Jamal Malik (Dev Patel) answers questions on the Indian version of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," flashbacks... [More]
Directed By: Danny Boyle

#4

The Green Knight (2021)
89%

#4
Adjusted Score: 106386%
Critics Consensus: The Green Knight honors and deconstructs its source material in equal measure, producing an absorbing adventure that casts a fantastical spell.
Synopsis: An epic fantasy adventure based on the timeless Arthurian legend, THE GREEN KNIGHT tells the story of Sir Gawain (Dev... [More]
Directed By: David Lowery

#5

Lion (2016)
84%

#5
Adjusted Score: 101380%
Critics Consensus: Lion's undeniably uplifting story and talented cast make it a moving journey that transcends the typical cliches of its genre.
Synopsis: Five year old Saroo gets lost on a train which takes him thousands of miles across India, away from home... [More]
Directed By: Garth Davis

#6
Adjusted Score: 84217%
Critics Consensus: The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel isn't groundbreaking storytelling, but it's a sweet story about the senior set featuring a top-notch cast of veteran actors.
Synopsis: Some British retirees (Judi Dench, Maggie Smith, Bill Nighy) decide to outsource their retirement to exotic -- and less expensive... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#7

Hotel Mumbai (2018)
76%

#7
Adjusted Score: 89311%
Critics Consensus: Its depiction of real-life horror will strike some as exploitative, but Hotel Mumbai remains a well-made dramatization of tragic events.
Synopsis: November 26, 2008 ... terror struck the heart of India. From the producer of Sicario and Wind River.... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Maras

#8
Adjusted Score: 72552%
Critics Consensus: The Second Best Exotic Marigold Hotel is about as original as its title -- but with a cast this talented and effortlessly charming, that hardly matters.
Synopsis: As his marriage to Sunaina draws near, Sonny sets his eye on opening a second residence for the elderly, but... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#9
Adjusted Score: 69949%
Critics Consensus: The Man Who Knew Infinity might be a tad too conventional to truly do its subject justice, but Dev Patel and Jeremy Irons elevate the end result beyond mere biopic formula.
Synopsis: In 1913, brilliant East Indian mathematician Srinivasa Ramanujan (Dev Patel) travels to Trinity College in England to work with professor... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Brown

#10

The Road Within (2014)
45%

#10
Adjusted Score: 41169%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A man with (Robert Sheehan) Tourette's syndrome brings his OCD roommate (Dev Patel) and an anorexic woman (Zoë Kravitz) along... [More]
Directed By: Gren Wells

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 46837%
Critics Consensus: The Wedding Guest makes a compelling argument for Dev Patel as an actor worthy of diverse leading roles, even if the movie's less than the sum of its action thriller parts.
Synopsis: Jay is a man with a secret who travels from Britain to Pakistan to attend a wedding - armed with... [More]
Directed By: Michael Winterbottom

#12

Chappie (2015)
32%

#12
Adjusted Score: 41431%
Critics Consensus: Chappie boasts more of the big ideas and visual panache that director Neill Blomkamp has become known for -- and, sadly, more of the narrative shortcomings.
Synopsis: In the near future, a mechanized police force patrols the streets and deals with lawbreakers -- but now, the people... [More]
Directed By: Neill Blomkamp

#13

Cherry (2012)
14%

#13
Adjusted Score: 13632%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A teenager (Ashley Hinshaw) takes the money she earned for a photo shoot and runs away to San Francisco, where... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Elliott

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 11567%
Critics Consensus: The Last Airbender squanders its popular source material with incomprehensible plotting, horrible acting, and detached joyless direction.
Synopsis: The four nations of Air, Water, Earth and Fire lived in harmony until the Fire Nation declared war. A century... [More]
Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan

Golden Globes Best Picture Winners by Tomatometer

Since 1943, the Golden Globes have been celebrating the biggest, brightest, and starriest movies of the year. Now, we’re taking every Golden Globe Best Motion Picture winner — including the categories for Drama, Comedy/Musical, and that brief period of unadulterated hedonism during the 1950s/1960s when Musical and Comedy were separated — and ranking them using our weighted formula, which factors each movie’s number of collected critics reviews and its original year of release. We’ve caught up with Nomadland and Borat Subsequent Moviefilm taking home the big two in 2021, and making space for 2022’s eventual winners. For now, see all Golden Globes Best Picture winners by Tomatometer!

#153

The Robe (1953)
38%

#153
Adjusted Score: 39525%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In this biblical epic, a drunk and disillusioned Roman, Marcellus Gallio (Richard Burton), wins Jesus' robe in a dice game... [More]
Directed By: Henry Koster

#152
#152
Adjusted Score: 34879%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Since her beloved son was killed in World War II, Bertha Jacoby (Rosalind Russell) has nursed a grudge against the... [More]
Directed By: Mervyn LeRoy

#151
#151
Adjusted Score: 38725%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: This film adaption of a Broadway play is based on the historical events surrounding the founding of the Church of... [More]
Directed By: Charles Jarrott

#150

A Star Is Born (1976)
35%

#150
Adjusted Score: 38361%
Critics Consensus: A lack of memorable music, chemistry between its leads, and an overlong runtime prompts this modish iteration of A Star is Born to fizzle out quickly.
Synopsis: A rock star on the decline, John Norman Howard has given in to drugs and excessive drinking, and his music... [More]
Directed By: Frank Pierson

#149
#149
Adjusted Score: 53802%
Critics Consensus: The Greatest Show on Earth is melodramatic, short on plot, excessively lengthy and bogged down with clichés, but not without a certain innocent charm.
Synopsis: "The Greatest Show on Earth" is a dazzling spectacle of life behind the scenes with Ringling Bros.-Barnum and Bailey Circus,... [More]
Directed By: Cecil B. DeMille

#148

The Cardinal (1963)
50%

#148
Adjusted Score: 50603%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: On his path to the College of Cardinals, Stephen Fermoyle (Tom Tryon), a newly ordained Catholic priest, is confronted with... [More]
Directed By: Otto Preminger

#147
Adjusted Score: 66194%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In Santa Vittoria, an Italian town renowned for its vineyards, the residents discover that the occupying Nazi troops plan to... [More]
Directed By: Stanley Kramer

#146

Green Card (1990)
61%

#146
Adjusted Score: 62566%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Urban horticulturalist Brontë Mitchell (Andie MacDowell) has her eye on a gorgeous apartment, but the building's board will rent it... [More]
Directed By: Peter Weir

#145

Evita (1996)
64%

#145
Adjusted Score: 65767%
Critics Consensus: Evita sometimes strains to convince on a narrative level, but the soundtrack helps this fact-based musical achieve a measure of the epic grandeur to which it aspires.
Synopsis: Eva Duarte Peron rises from poverty to become an Argentinian actress and the wife of powerful President Juan Peron. Through... [More]
Directed By: Alan Parker

#144

Yentl (1983)
65%

#144
Adjusted Score: 64659%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Rebbe Mendel is a single father who teaches the Talmud, a sacred text of Judaism, to the boys of his... [More]
Directed By: Barbra Streisand

#143
#143
Adjusted Score: 64101%
Critics Consensus: The Turning Point is a handsomely-made resuscitation of Old Hollywood melodramas with a compelling duo at its center, but the formulaic script keeps this story from realizing its symphonic potential.
Synopsis: Forced to give up ballet after becoming pregnant, Deedee (Shirley MacLaine) moved from New York to Oklahoma to raise a... [More]
Directed By: Herbert Ross

#142

Porgy and Bess (1959)
73%

#142
Adjusted Score: 76868%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: This musical drama focuses on the poverty-stricken residents struggling to survive in the Charleston tenement of Catfish Row. The sultry... [More]

#141
#141
Adjusted Score: 62919%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After landing a job singing on the radio, Jane Froman (Susan Hayward) marries musical accompanist Don Ross (David Wayne). Under... [More]
Directed By: Walter Lang

#140

Out of Africa (1985)
61%

#140
Adjusted Score: 67956%
Critics Consensus: Though lensed with stunning cinematography and featuring a pair of winning performances from Meryl Streep and Robert Redford, Out of Africa suffers from excessive length and glacial pacing.
Synopsis: Initially set on being a dairy farmer, the aristocratic Karen Blixen (Meryl Streep) travels to Africa to join her husband,... [More]
Directed By: Sydney Pollack

#139

Love Story (1970)
68%

#139
Adjusted Score: 69238%
Critics Consensus: Earnest and determined to make audiences swoon, Love Story is an unabashed tearjerker that will capture hearts when it isn't inducing eye rolls.
Synopsis: When wealthy Harvard University law student Oliver Barrett IV (Ryan O'Neal) meets Jenny Cavilleri (Ali MacGraw), a middle-class girl who... [More]
Directed By: Arthur Hiller

#138

Song Without End (1960)
83%

#138
Adjusted Score: 62111%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Famous pianist Franz Liszt (Dirk Bogarde) is unhappily married to Countess Marie D'Agoult (Genevieve Page) and considers quitting performing in... [More]

#137
#137
Adjusted Score: 74686%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to the sparkling chemistry between its stars and Herbert Ross' gentle direction, this sweetly ambling comedy ranks among Neil Simon's finest screen adaptations.
Synopsis: Al Lewis (George Burns) and Willy Clark (Walter Matthau) are a pair of feuding vaudeville comedians (Lewis and Clark, naturally)... [More]
Directed By: Herbert Ross

#136
#136
Adjusted Score: 74102%
Critics Consensus: It's undeniably shallow, but its cheerful lack of pretense -- as well as its grand scale and star-stuffed cast -- help make Around the World in 80 Days charmingly light-hearted entertainment.
Synopsis: Victorian-era Englishman Phileas Fogg (David Niven) proclaims before his fellow members of a London gentleman's club that he can circumnavigate... [More]
Directed By: Michael Anderson

#135

Mrs. Doubtfire (1993)
72%

#135
Adjusted Score: 75009%
Critics Consensus: On paper, Mrs. Doubtfire might seem excessively broad or sentimental, but Robin Williams shines so brightly in the title role that the end result is difficult to resist.
Synopsis: Troubled that he has little access to his children, divorced Daniel Hillard (Robin Williams) hatches an elaborate plan. With help... [More]
Directed By: Chris Columbus

#134

Babel (2006)
69%

#134
Adjusted Score: 78010%
Critics Consensus: In Babel, there are no villains, only victims of fate and circumstance. Director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu weaves four of their woeful stories into this mature and multidimensional film.
Synopsis: An accident connects four groups of people on three different continents: two young Moroccan goatherds, a vacationing American couple (Brad... [More]

#133

Becket (1964)
76%

#133
Adjusted Score: 77613%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Debauched King Henry II (Peter O'Toole) installs his longtime court facilitator Thomas Becket (Richard Burton) as the Archbishop of Canterbury,... [More]
Directed By: Peter Glenville

#132

Forrest Gump (1994)
71%

#132
Adjusted Score: 76897%
Critics Consensus: Forrest Gump may be an overly sentimental film with a somewhat problematic message, but its sweetness and charm are usually enough to approximate true depth and grace.
Synopsis: Slow-witted Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks) has never thought of himself as disadvantaged, and thanks to his supportive mother (Sally Field),... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#131
#131
Adjusted Score: 72966%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Cathy Timberlake (Doris Day) is en route to a job interview when a car transporting businessman Philip Shayne (Cary Grant)... [More]
Directed By: Delbert Mann

#130
#130
Adjusted Score: 86119%
Critics Consensus: Bohemian Rhapsody hits a handful of high notes, but as an in-depth look at a beloved band, it offers more of a medley than a true greatest hits collection.
Synopsis: Freddie Mercury -- the lead singer of Queen -- defies stereotypes and convention to become one of history's most beloved... [More]
Directed By: Bryan Singer

#129

Carmen Jones (1954)
78%

#129
Adjusted Score: 79601%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Screen version of the musical "Carmen Jones," which adapted Bizet's opera Carmen for an African-American cast. A soldier falls for... [More]
Directed By: Otto Preminger

#128

Les Misérables (2012)
70%

#128
Adjusted Score: 80617%
Critics Consensus: Impeccably mounted but occasionally bombastic, Les Misérables largely succeeds thanks to bravura performances from its distinguished cast.
Synopsis: After 19 years as a prisoner, Jean Valjean (Hugh Jackman) is freed by Javert (Russell Crowe), the officer in charge... [More]
Directed By: Tom Hooper

#127

A Beautiful Mind (2001)
74%

#127
Adjusted Score: 82782%
Critics Consensus: The well-acted A Beautiful Mind is both a moving love story and a revealing look at mental illness.
Synopsis: A human drama inspired by events in the life of John Forbes Nash Jr., and in part based on the... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#126

The Longest Yard (1974)
79%

#126
Adjusted Score: 81827%
Critics Consensus: Equal parts tough and funny, and led by a perfectly cast Burt Reynolds, The Longest Yard has an interesting political subtext and an excellent climax -- even if it takes too long to get there.
Synopsis: An ex-football star doing time is forced by the warden to organize a team of inmates to play against his... [More]
Directed By: Robert Aldrich

#125
#125
Adjusted Score: 90249%
Critics Consensus: A classic tearjerker, Terms of Endearment isn't shy about reaching for the heartstrings -- but is so well-acted and smartly scripted that it's almost impossible to resist.
Synopsis: Widow Aurora Greenway (Shirley MacLaine) and her daughter, Emma (Debra Winger), have a strong bond, but Emma marries teacher Flap... [More]
Directed By: James L. Brooks

#124
#124
Adjusted Score: 86111%
Critics Consensus: Director George Stevens' stately treatment of A Place in the Sun buffs out some of the novel's nuance with blunt moralizing, but riveting performances by Montgomery Clift and company give the drama a bruising punch.
Synopsis: In this classic version of Theodore Dreiser's novel "An American Tragedy," George Eastman (Montgomery Clift), the nephew of a wealthy... [More]
Directed By: George Stevens

#123

Moulin Rouge (2001)
76%

#123
Adjusted Score: 84183%
Critics Consensus: A love-it-or-hate-it experience, Moulin Rouge is all style, all giddy, over-the-top spectacle. But it's also daring in its vision and wildly original.
Synopsis: A celebration of love and creative inspiration takes place in the infamous, gaudy and glamorous Parisian nightclub, at the cusp... [More]
Directed By: Baz Luhrmann

#122
#122
Adjusted Score: 81540%
Critics Consensus: It occasionally fails to live up to its subject matter -- and is perhaps an 'important' film more than a 'great' one -- but the performances from Gregory Peck and Dorothy McGuire are superb.
Synopsis: When journalist Phil Green (Gregory Peck) moves to New York City, he takes on a high-profile magazine assignment about anti-Semitism.... [More]
Directed By: Elia Kazan

#121

Gladiator (2000)
78%

#121
Adjusted Score: 84827%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott and an excellent cast successfully convey the intensity of Roman gladitorial combat as well as the political intrigue brewing beneath.
Synopsis: Commodus (Joaquin Phoenix) takes power and strips rank from Maximus (Russell Crowe), one of the favored generals of his predecessor... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#120

The Hours (2002)
79%

#120
Adjusted Score: 85679%
Critics Consensus: The movie may be a downer, but it packs an emotional wallop. Some fine acting on display here.
Synopsis: "The Hours" is the story of three women searching for more potent, meaningful lives. Each is alive at a different... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Daldry

#119

Oliver! (1968)
89%

#119
Adjusted Score: 97638%
Critics Consensus: Oliver! transforms Charles Dickens' muckraking novel into a jaunty musical Victorian fairytale, buoyed by Ron Moody's charming star turn and Onna White's rapturous choreography.
Synopsis: In this award-winning adaptation of the Broadway musical based on the Charles Dickens novel, 9-year-old orphan Oliver Twist (Mark Lester)... [More]
Directed By: Carol Reed

#118

Going My Way (1944)
82%

#118
Adjusted Score: 85065%
Critics Consensus: Bing Crosby and Barry Fitzgerald are eminently likable, and film is pleasantly sentimental, but Going My Way suffers from a surplus of sweetness.
Synopsis: Father Charles O'Malley (Bing Crosby) is an easy-going, golf-playing young priest whose entry into a tough neighborhood parish in midtown... [More]
Directed By: Leo McCarey

#117

Dreamgirls (2006)
79%

#117
Adjusted Score: 87115%
Critics Consensus: Dreamgirls' simple characters and plot hardly detract from the movie's real feats: the electrifying performances and the dazzling musical numbers.
Synopsis: Deena (Beyoncé Knowles),Effie (Jennifer Hudson) and Lorrell (Anika Noni Rose) form a music trio called the Dreamettes. When ambitious manager... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#116

The Goodbye Girl (1977)
79%

#116
Adjusted Score: 80757%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Former Broadway hoofer Paula McFadden (Marsha Mason) and her young daughter, Lucy (Quinn Cummings), are outraged to find that Paula's... [More]
Directed By: Herbert Ross

#115

The Hangover (2009)
79%

#115
Adjusted Score: 88383%
Critics Consensus: With a clever script and hilarious interplay among the cast, The Hangover nails just the right tone of raunchy humor, and the non-stop laughs overshadow any flaw.
Synopsis: Two days before his wedding, Doug (Justin Bartha) and three friends (Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Zach Galifianakis) drive to Las... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#114

Gigi (1958)
88%

#114
Adjusted Score: 95931%
Critics Consensus: It may not be one of Vincente Minnelli's best, but the charming and flawlessly acted Gigi still offers enough visual and musical treats to satisfy.
Synopsis: Gaston (Louis Jourdan) is a restless Parisian playboy who moves from one mistress to another, while also spending time with... [More]
Directed By: Vincente Minnelli

#113

Tom Jones (1963)
80%

#113
Adjusted Score: 83672%
Critics Consensus: A frantic, irreverent adaptation of the novel, bolstered by Albert Finney's courageous performance and arresting visuals.
Synopsis: Tom Jones (Albert Finney), a bastard foundling raised by the kindly Squire Allworthy (George Devine), loves the beautiful Sophie Western... [More]
Directed By: Tony Richardson

#112

Working Girl (1988)
85%

#112
Adjusted Score: 86645%
Critics Consensus: A buoyant corporate Cinderella story, Working Girl has the right cast, right story, and right director to make it all come together.
Synopsis: Savvy New York City receptionist Tess McGill (Melanie Griffith) gives her conniving boss, Katharine Parker (Sigourney Weaver), an excellent business... [More]
Directed By: Mike Nichols

#111
#111
Adjusted Score: 92320%
Critics Consensus: While it's fueled in part by outdated stereotypes, Driving Miss Daisy takes audiences on a heartwarming journey with a pair of outstanding actors.
Synopsis: Daisy Werthan (Jessica Tandy), an elderly Jewish widow living in Atlanta, is determined to maintain her independence. However, when she... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#110
#110
Adjusted Score: 85758%
Critics Consensus: A bird may love a fish -- and musical fans will love this adaptation of Fiddler on the Roof, even if it isn't quite as transcendent as the long-running stage version.
Synopsis: A lavishly produced and critically acclaimed screen adaptation of the international stage sensation tells the life-affirming story of Tevye (Topol),... [More]
Directed By: Norman Jewison

#109
#109
Adjusted Score: 90781%
Critics Consensus: Like a classic traditional country song, Coal Miner's Daughter draws on time-tested formula -- and undeniable talent -- to tell a solidly affecting story.
Synopsis: Raised in rural Kentucky poverty and married at the age of 13, Loretta Lynn (Sissy Spacek) begins writing and singing... [More]
Directed By: Michael Apted

#108
#108
Adjusted Score: 89157%
Critics Consensus: Solid cinematography and enjoyable performances from Paul Scofield and Robert Shaw add a spark to this deliberately paced adaptation of the Robert Bolt play.
Synopsis: When the highly respected British statesman Sir Thomas More (Paul Scofield) refuses to pressure the Pope into annulling the marriage... [More]
Directed By: Fred Zinnemann

#107
Adjusted Score: 88079%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When a Soviet submarine gets stuck on a sandbar off the coast of a New England island, its commander (Theodore... [More]
Directed By: Norman Jewison

#106

Prizzi's Honor (1985)
85%

#106
Adjusted Score: 87614%
Critics Consensus: Disturbing and sardonic, Prizzi's Honor excels at black comedy because director John Huston and his game ensemble take the farce deadly seriously.
Synopsis: For Charley Partanna (Jack Nicholson), life in the Prizzi family is good as long as he honors the wishes of... [More]
Directed By: John Huston

#105
#105
Adjusted Score: 87263%
Critics Consensus: Dances with Wolves suffers from a simplistic view of the culture it attempts to honor, but the end result remains a stirring western whose noble intentions are often matched by its epic grandeur.
Synopsis: A Civil War soldier develops a relationship with a band of Lakota Indians. Attracted by the simplicity of their lifestyle,... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Costner

#104
#104
Adjusted Score: 88481%
Critics Consensus: Led by an unforgettable performance from Tom Cruise, Born on the Fourth of July finds director Oliver Stone tackling thought-provoking subject matter with ambitious élan.
Synopsis: In the mid 1960s, suburban New York teenager Ron Kovic (Tom Cruise) enlists in the Marines, fulfilling what he sees... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Stone

#103
#103
Adjusted Score: 88676%
Critics Consensus: Romancing the Stone reaches back to the classic Saturday morning serials of old with an action-filled adventure enlivened by the sparkling chemistry between its well-matched leads.
Synopsis: A dowdy romantic-adventure writer is hurled into a real-life adventure in the Colombian jungle in order to save her sister,... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#102
#102
Adjusted Score: 88981%
Critics Consensus: A beguiling tragicomedy, Vicky Cristina Barcelona charms with beautiful views of the Spanish city and a marvelously well-matched cast.
Synopsis: Americans Vicky (Rebecca Hall) and Cristina (Scarlett Johansson) arrive in Spain for a summer vacation at a friend's (Patricia Clarkson)... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#101

Walk the Line (2005)
82%

#101
Adjusted Score: 91103%
Critics Consensus: Superior acting and authentic crooning capture the emotional subtleties of the legend of Johnny Cash with a freshness that is a pleasure to watch.
Synopsis: The rise of country music legend Johnny Cash (Joaquin Phoenix) begins with his days as a boy growing up on... [More]
Directed By: James Mangold

#100

Bugsy (1991)
84%

#100
Adjusted Score: 87321%
Critics Consensus: Stylishly scattered, Bugsy offers cinematic homage to the infamous underworld legend, chiefly through a magnetic performance from Warren Beatty in the title role.
Synopsis: New York mobster Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel (Warren Beatty) leaves New York City to dip into the glamour of Hollywood, Calif.,... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#99
#99
Adjusted Score: 88561%
Critics Consensus: James L. Brooks and Jack Nicholson, doing what they do best, combine smart dialogue and flawless acting to squeeze fresh entertainment value out of the romantic-comedy genre.
Synopsis: Melvin Udall (Jack Nicholson) is an obsessive-compulsive writer of romantic fiction who's rude to everyone he meets, including his gay... [More]
Directed By: James L. Brooks

#98

East of Eden (1955)
85%

#98
Adjusted Score: 88981%
Critics Consensus: East of Eden strains to swell its story to epic dimensions, but James Dean's riveting performance gives this CinemaScope drama much of its raging heart.
Synopsis: In this film based on John Steinbeck's epic novel, Cal Trask (James Dean), the son of a California farmer (Raymond... [More]
Directed By: Elia Kazan

#97
#97
Adjusted Score: 90527%
Critics Consensus: Though it suffers from excessive length and ambition, director Minghella's adaptation of the Michael Ondaatje novel is complex, powerful, and moving.
Synopsis: The sweeping expanses of the Sahara are the setting for a passionate love affair in this adaptation of Michael Ondaatje's... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Minghella

#96

Arthur (1981)
89%

#96
Adjusted Score: 88692%
Critics Consensus: Dudley Moore brings a boozy charm to Arthur, a coming of age tale for a wayward millionaire that deploys energetic cast chemistry and spiffy humor to jovial effect.
Synopsis: Wealthy New York City playboy Arthur Bach (Dudley Moore) is perpetually drunk and completely rudderless. Dutifully supported by his sharp-tongued... [More]
Directed By: Steve Gordon

#95

Doctor Zhivago (1965)
84%

#95
Adjusted Score: 89626%
Critics Consensus: It may not be the best of David Lean's epics, but Dr. Zhivago is still brilliantly photographed and sweepingly romantic.
Synopsis: During the Russian Revolution, Yuri Zhivago (Omar Sharif), is a young doctor who has been raised by his aunt and... [More]
Directed By: David Lean

#94

Atonement (2007)
83%

#94
Adjusted Score: 92307%
Critics Consensus: Atonement features strong performances, brilliant cinematography, and a unique score. Featuring deft performances from James MacAvoy and Keira Knightley, it's a successful adaptation of Ian McEwan's novel.
Synopsis: This sweeping English drama, based on the book by Ian McEwan, follows the lives of young lovers Cecilia Tallis (Keira... [More]
Directed By: Joe Wright

#93
#93
Adjusted Score: 89951%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Based on the popular novel by Franz Werfel, this drama focuses on Bernadette Soubirous (Jennifer Jones), a young French woman... [More]
Directed By: Henry King

#92

Johnny Belinda (1948)
91%

#92
Adjusted Score: 90547%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In this acclaimed drama, Belinda McDonald (Jane Wyman), a young deaf-mute woman living off the coast of Canada on Cape... [More]
Directed By: Jean Negulesco

#91

The Exorcist (1973)
84%

#91
Adjusted Score: 91002%
Critics Consensus: The Exorcist rides its supernatural theme to magical effect, with remarkable special effects and an eerie atmosphere, resulting in one of the scariest films of all time.
Synopsis: One of the most profitable horror movies ever made, this tale of an exorcism is based loosely on actual events.... [More]
Directed By: William Friedkin

#90

M*A*S*H (1970)
84%

#90
Adjusted Score: 88476%
Critics Consensus: Bold, timely, subversive, and above all funny, M*A*S*H remains a high point in Robert Altman's distinguished filmography.
Synopsis: Based on the novel by Richard Hooker, "M*A*S*H" follows a group of Mobile Army Surgical Hospital officers at they perform... [More]
Directed By: Robert Altman

#89

Ben-Hur (1959)
85%

#89
Adjusted Score: 88744%
Critics Consensus: Uneven, but in terms of epic scope and grand spectacle, Ben-Hur still ranks among Hollywood's finest examples of pure entertainment.
Synopsis: Charlton Heston plays a Palestinian Jew who is battling the Roman empire at the time of Christ. His actions send... [More]
Directed By: William Wyler

#88

Scent of a Woman (1992)
89%

#88
Adjusted Score: 92469%
Critics Consensus: It might soar on Al Pacino's performance more than the drama itself, but what a performance it is -- big, bold, occasionally over-the-top, and finally giving the Academy pause to award the star his first Oscar.
Synopsis: Frank is a retired Lt. Col. in the US army. He's blind and impossible to get along with. Charlie is... [More]
Directed By: Martin Brest

#87

Heaven Can Wait (1978)
87%

#87
Adjusted Score: 91552%
Critics Consensus: A throwback to the high-gloss screwball comedies of the 1940s, Heaven Can Wait beguiles with seamless production values and great comic relief from Charles Grodin and Dianne Cannon.
Synopsis: Joe Pendleton (Warren Beatty), quarterback for the Los Angeles Rams, is killed in an auto accident. In the afterlife, Joe... [More]
Directed By: Warren Beatty, Buck Henry

#86
#86
Adjusted Score: 96417%
Critics Consensus: The divorce subject isn't as shocking, but the film is still a thoughtful, well-acted drama that resists the urge to take sides or give easy answers.
Synopsis: On the same day Manhattan advertising executive Ted Kramer (Dustin Hoffman) lands the biggest account of his career, he learns... [More]
Directed By: Robert Benton

#85
#85
Adjusted Score: 93231%
Critics Consensus: Unapologetically sweet and maybe even a little corny, The Sound of Music will win over all but the most cynical filmgoers with its classic songs and irresistible warmth.
Synopsis: A tuneful, heartwarming story, it is based on the real life story of the Von Trapp Family singers, one of... [More]
Directed By: Robert Wise

#84

The Aviator (2004)
86%

#84
Adjusted Score: 95385%
Critics Consensus: With a rich sense of period detail, The Aviator succeeds thanks to typically assured direction from Martin Scorsese and a strong performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, who charts Howard Hughes' descent from eccentric billionaire to reclusive madman.
Synopsis: Billionaire and aviation tycoon Howard Hughes (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a successful public figure: a director of big-budget Hollywood films such... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#83

Avatar (2009)
82%

#83
Adjusted Score: 95177%
Critics Consensus: It might be more impressive on a technical level than as a piece of storytelling, but Avatar reaffirms James Cameron's singular gift for imaginative, absorbing filmmaking.
Synopsis: On the lush alien world of Pandora live the Na'vi, beings who appear primitive but are highly evolved. Because the... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#82

Green Book (2018)
77%

#82
Adjusted Score: 99469%
Critics Consensus: Green Book takes audiences on an excessively smooth ride through bumpy subject matter, although Mahershala Ali and Viggo Mortensen's performances add necessary depth.
Synopsis: Dr. Don Shirley is a world-class African-American pianist who's about to embark on a concert tour in the Deep South... [More]
Directed By: Peter Farrelly

#81

Chicago (2002)
86%

#81
Adjusted Score: 95261%
Critics Consensus: A rousing and energetic adaptation of the Broadway musical, Chicago succeeds on the level of pure spectacle, but provides a surprising level of depth and humor as well.
Synopsis: Nightclub sensation Velma (Catherine Zeta-Jones) murders her philandering husband, and Chicago's slickest lawyer, Billy Flynn (Richard Gere), is set to... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#80

Ordinary People (1980)
89%

#80
Adjusted Score: 97834%
Critics Consensus: Robert Redford proves himself a filmmaker of uncommon emotional intelligence with Ordinary People, an auspicious debut that deftly observes the fractioning of a family unit through a quartet of superb performances.
Synopsis: Tormented by guilt following the death of his older brother, Buck, in a sailing accident, alienated teenager Conrad Jarrett (Timothy... [More]
Directed By: Robert Redford

#79
Adjusted Score: 95533%
Critics Consensus: Full of pith and Grand Guignol grossness, this macabre musical is perfectly helmed and highly entertaining. Tim Burton masterfully stages the musical in a way that will make you think he has done this many times before.
Synopsis: Evil Judge Turpin (Alan Rickman) lusts for the beautiful wife of a London barber (Johnny Depp) and transports him to... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#78
#78
Adjusted Score: 94324%
Critics Consensus: Sharper and wittier than your average period piece, The Lion in Winter is a tale of palace intrigue bolstered by fantastic performances from Peter O'Toole, Katharine Hepburn, and Anthony Hopkins in his big-screen debut.
Synopsis: It's Christmas 1183, and King Henry II (Peter O'Toole) is planning to announce his successor to the throne. The jockeying... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Harvey

#77

The Revenant (2015)
78%

#77
Adjusted Score: 103531%
Critics Consensus: As starkly beautiful as it is harshly uncompromising, The Revenant uses Leonardo DiCaprio's committed performance as fuel for an absorbing drama that offers punishing challenges -- and rich rewards.
Synopsis: While exploring the uncharted wilderness in 1823, frontiersman Hugh Glass (Leonardo DiCaprio) sustains life-threatening injuries from a brutal bear attack.... [More]
Directed By:

#76
#76
Adjusted Score: 93907%
Critics Consensus: Bolstered by a cast of memorable stars and an impressive sense of scale, The Guns of the Navarone fires with vivid characterization and entertaining spectacle.
Synopsis: In 1943, a small commando team is sent to destroy huge German guns on the Greek Island of Navarone in... [More]
Directed By: J. Lee Thompson

#75

Platoon (1986)
87%

#75
Adjusted Score: 93612%
Critics Consensus: Informed by director Oliver Stone's personal experiences in Vietnam, Platoon forgoes easy sermonizing in favor of a harrowing, ground-level view of war, bolstered by no-holds-barred performances from Charlie Sheen and Willem Dafoe.
Synopsis: Chris Taylor (Charlie Sheen) leaves his university studies to enlist in combat duty in Vietnam in 1967. Once he's on... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Stone

#74

Tootsie (1982)
90%

#74
Adjusted Score: 93740%
Critics Consensus: Tootsie doesn't squander its high-concept comedy premise with fine dialogue and sympathetic treatment of the characters.
Synopsis: New York actor Michael Dorsey (Dustin Hoffman) is a talented perfectionist who is so hard on himself and others that... [More]
Directed By: Sydney Pollack

#73

Auntie Mame (1958)
93%

#73
Adjusted Score: 94068%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Mame Dennis (Rosalind Russell), a progressive and independent woman of the 1920s, is left to care for her nephew Patrick... [More]
Directed By: Morton DaCosta

#72

The Last Emperor (1987)
87%

#72
Adjusted Score: 95313%
Critics Consensus: While Bernardo Bertolucci's decadent epic never quite identifies the dramatic pulse of its protagonist, stupendous visuals and John Lone's ability to make passivity riveting give The Last Emperor a rarified grandeur.
Synopsis: This sweeping account of the life of Pu Yi (John Lone), the last emperor of China, follows the leader's tumultuous... [More]
Directed By: Bernardo Bertolucci

#71

On Golden Pond (1981)
93%

#71
Adjusted Score: 95729%
Critics Consensus: Henry Fonda and Katherine Hepburn are a wondrous duo in On Golden Pond, a wistful drama that movingly explores the twilight years of a loving marriage.
Synopsis: Cantankerous retiree Norman Thayer (Henry Fonda) and his conciliatory wife, Ethel (Katharine Hepburn), spend summers at their New England vacation... [More]
Directed By: Mark Rydell

#70

Guys and Dolls (1955)
91%

#70
Adjusted Score: 93017%
Critics Consensus: An escapist and inventive cinemascope delight, Guys and Dolls glistens thanks to the charm of its ensemble.
Synopsis: Gambler Nathan Detroit (Frank Sinatra) has few options for the location of his big craps game. Needing $1,000 to pay... [More]
Directed By: Joseph L. Mankiewicz

#69

Rain Man (1988)
89%

#69
Adjusted Score: 97445%
Critics Consensus: This road-trip movie about an autistic savant and his callow brother is far from seamless, but Barry Levinson's direction is impressive, and strong performances from Tom Cruise and Dustin Hoffman add to its appeal.
Synopsis: When car dealer Charlie Babbitt (Tom Cruise) learns that his estranged father has died, he returns home to Cincinnati, where... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#68

The Music Man (1962)
94%

#68
Adjusted Score: 94895%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When Harold Hill, a traveling con man, arrives in River City, he convinces the locals to start a band by... [More]
Directed By: Morton DaCosta

#67

Almost Famous (2000)
89%

#67
Adjusted Score: 94542%
Critics Consensus: Almost Famous, with its great ensemble performances and story, is a well-crafted, warm-hearted movie that successfully draws you into its era.
Synopsis: Set in 1973, it chronicles the funny and often poignant coming of age of 15-year-old William, an unabashed music fan... [More]
Directed By: Cameron Crowe

#66
#66
Adjusted Score: 97903%
Critics Consensus: A beautiful, epic Western, Brokeback Mountain's love story is imbued with heartbreaking universality thanks to moving performances by Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal.
Synopsis: In 1963, rodeo cowboy Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhaal) and ranch hand Ennis Del Mar (Heath Ledger) are hired by rancher... [More]
Directed By: Ang Lee

#65

The Descendants (2011)
87%

#65
Adjusted Score: 97233%
Critics Consensus: Funny, moving, and beautifully acted, The Descendants captures the unpredictable messiness of life with eloquence and uncommon grace.
Synopsis: Native islander Matt King (George Clooney) lives with his family in Hawaii. Their world shatters when a tragic accident leaves... [More]
Directed By: Alexander Payne

#64

American Beauty (1999)
87%

#64
Adjusted Score: 94576%
Critics Consensus: Flawlessly cast and brimming with dark, acid wit, American Beauty is a smart, provocative high point of late '90s mainstream Hollywood film.
Synopsis: Lester Burnham (Kevin Spacey) is a gainfully employed suburban husband and father. Fed up with his boring, stagnant existence, he... [More]
Directed By: Sam Mendes

#63

Hope and Glory (1987)
96%

#63
Adjusted Score: 97178%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Director John Boorman drew from his own childhood experiences for this touching coming-of-age tale about a boy growing up in... [More]
Directed By: John Boorman

#62
#62
Adjusted Score: 96086%
Critics Consensus: Smart, tender, and funny in equal measure, Hannah and Her Sisters is one of Woody Allen's finest films.
Synopsis: Three successive family Thanksgiving dinners mark time for Hannah (Mia Farrow), her younger sisters Lee (Barbara Hershey) and Holly (Dianne... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#61

The Graduate (1967)
87%

#61
Adjusted Score: 94691%
Critics Consensus: The music, the performances, the precision in capturing the post-college malaise -- The Graduate's coming-of-age story is indeed one for the ages.
Synopsis: Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman) has just finished college and, back at his parents' house, he's trying to avoid the one... [More]
Directed By: Mike Nichols

#60

Breaking Away (1979)
95%

#60
Adjusted Score: 97905%
Critics Consensus: At once a touching, funny coming-of-age story and a compelling sports film, Breaking Away is a delightful treat.
Synopsis: Dave (Dennis Christopher) and his working-class friends Cyril (Daniel Stern), Moocher (Jackie Earle Haley) and Mike (Dennis Quaid) spend their... [More]
Directed By: Peter Yates

#59
Adjusted Score: 107077%
Critics Consensus: Borat Subsequent Moviefilm proves Sacha Baron Cohen's comedic creation remains a sharp tool for exposing the most misguided -- or utterly repugnant -- corners of American culture.
Synopsis: Released from prison for bringing shame to his country, Kazakh funnyman Borat risks life and limb when he returns to... [More]
Directed By: Jason Woliner

#58

Midnight Express (1978)
93%

#58
Adjusted Score: 94296%
Critics Consensus: Raw and unrelenting, Midnight Express is riveting in its realistic depiction of incarceration -- mining pathos from the simple act of enduring hardship.
Synopsis: Billy Hayes (Brad Davis) is a young American caught by Turkish police while attempting to smuggle hash out of Istanbul.... [More]
Directed By: Alan Parker

#57

Cabaret (1972)
94%

#57
Adjusted Score: 97613%
Critics Consensus: Great performances and evocative musical numbers help Cabaret secure its status as a stylish, socially conscious classic.
Synopsis: In Berlin in 1931, American cabaret singer Sally Bowles (Liza Minnelli) meets British academic Brian Roberts (Michael York), who is... [More]
Directed By: Bob Fosse

#56
#56
Adjusted Score: 101139%
Critics Consensus: Worthwhile as both a well-acted ensemble piece and as a smart, warm statement on family values, The Kids Are All Right is remarkable.
Synopsis: Lesbian couple Jules (Julianne Moore) and Nic (Annette Bening) have been together for almost 20 years and have two teenage... [More]
Directed By: Lisa Cholodenko

#55

The King and I (1956)
93%

#55
Adjusted Score: 94125%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In this film adaptation of the Rodgers & Hammerstein musical, widowed Welsh mother Anna Loenowens (Deborah Kerr) becomes a governess... [More]
Directed By: Walter Lang

#54

The Defiant Ones (1958)
91%

#54
Adjusted Score: 96443%
Critics Consensus: An advocacy drama that makes its points without belaboring them, The Defiant Ones relies on its clever concept and brilliant performances to repudiate racial prejudice.
Synopsis: In 1950s America, members of a chain gang are being transported through the South when their truck crashes. Two of... [More]
Directed By: Stanley Kramer

#53
#53
Adjusted Score: 99594%
Critics Consensus: Endlessly witty, visually rapturous, and sweetly romantic, Shakespeare in Love is a delightful romantic comedy that succeeds on nearly every level.
Synopsis: "Shakespeare in Love" is a romantic comedy for the 1990s set in the 1590s. It imaginatively unfolds the witty, sexy... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#52

Les Girls (1957)
89%

#52
Adjusted Score: 88221%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When dancer Sybil Wren (Kay Kendall) pens a memoir about her time in a troupe with two other women, she... [More]
Directed By: George Cukor

#51

My Fair Lady (1964)
94%

#51
Adjusted Score: 96782%
Critics Consensus: George Cukor's elegant, colorful adaptation of the beloved stage play is elevated to new heights thanks to winning performances by Audrey Hepburn and Rex Harrison.
Synopsis: In this beloved musical, pompous phonetics professor Henry Higgins (Rex Harrison) is so sure of his abilities that he takes... [More]
Directed By: George Cukor

#50

West Side Story (1961)
92%

#50
Adjusted Score: 104370%
Critics Consensus: Buoyed by Robert Wise's dazzling direction, Leonard Bernstein's score, and Stephen Sondheim's lyrics, West Side Story remains perhaps the most iconic of all the Shakespeare adaptations to visit the big screen.
Synopsis: A musical in which a modern day Romeo and Juliet are involved in New York street gangs. On the harsh... [More]

#49

Spartacus (1960)
94%

#49
Adjusted Score: 99733%
Critics Consensus: Featuring terrific performances and epic action, Kubrick's restored swords-and-sandals epic is a true classic.
Synopsis: The rebellious Thracian Spartacus, born and raised a slave, is sold to Gladiator trainer Batiatus. After weeks of being trained... [More]
Directed By: Stanley Kubrick

#48
#48
Adjusted Score: 102687%
Critics Consensus: Tense, funny, and thought-provoking all at once, and lifted by strong performances from Sydney Poitier and Rod Steiger, director Norman Jewison's look at murder and racism in small-town America continues to resonate today.
Synopsis: African-American Philadelphia police detective Virgil Tibbs (Sidney Poitier) is arrested on suspicion of murder by Bill Gillespie (Rod Steiger), the... [More]
Directed By: Norman Jewison

#47
#47
Adjusted Score: 108776%
Critics Consensus: Broderick Crawford is spellbinding as politician Willie Stark in director Robert Rossen's adaptation of the Robert Penn Warren novel about the corrosive effects of power on the human soul.
Synopsis: Drama about the rise and fall of a corrupt southern governor who promises his way to power. Broderick Crawford portrays... [More]
Directed By: Robert Rossen

#46
#46
Adjusted Score: 101153%
Critics Consensus: Sense and Sensibility is an uncommonly deft, very funny Jane Austen adaptation, marked by Emma Thompson's finely tuned performance.
Synopsis: When Elinor Dashwood's (Emma Thompson) father dies, her family's finances are crippled. After the Dashwoods move to a cottage in... [More]
Directed By: Ang Lee

#45

Rocky (1976)
91%

#45
Adjusted Score: 97502%
Critics Consensus: This story of a down-on-his-luck boxer is thoroughly predictable, but Sylvester Stallone's script and stunning performance in the title role brush aside complaints.
Synopsis: Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone), a small-time boxer from working-class Philadelphia, is arbitrarily chosen to take on the reigning world heavyweight... [More]
Directed By: John G. Avildsen

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: 100899%
Critics Consensus: Anchored by another winning performance from Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg's unflinchingly realistic war film virtually redefines the genre.
Synopsis: Captain John Miller (Tom Hanks) takes his men behind enemy lines to find Private James Ryan, whose three brothers have... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#43
#43
Adjusted Score: 100548%
Critics Consensus: One of the most influential of all teen films, American Graffiti is a funny, nostalgic, and bittersweet look at a group of recent high school grads' last days of innocence.
Synopsis: On the last day of summer vacation in 1962, friends Curt (Richard Dreyfuss), Steve (Ronny Howard), Terry (Charles Martin Smith)... [More]
Directed By: George Lucas

#42
Adjusted Score: 103517%
Critics Consensus: Visually breathtaking and emotionally powerful, The Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King is a moving and satisfying conclusion to a great trilogy.
Synopsis: The culmination of nearly 10 years' work and conclusion to Peter Jackson's epic trilogy based on the timeless J.R.R. Tolkien... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#41

Amadeus (1984)
89%

#41
Adjusted Score: 99769%
Critics Consensus: Amadeus' liberties with history may rankle some, but the creative marriage of Miloš Forman and Peter Shaffer yields a divinely diabolical myth of genius and mediocrity, buoyed by inspired casting and Mozart's rapturous music.
Synopsis: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (Tom Hulce) is a remarkably talented young Viennese composer who unwittingly finds a fierce rival in the... [More]
Directed By: Milos Forman

#40

Babe (1995)
97%

#40
Adjusted Score: 101380%
Critics Consensus: The rare family-friendly feature with a heart as big as its special effects budget, Babe offers timeless entertainment for viewers of all ages.
Synopsis: Gentle farmer Arthur Hoggett (James Cromwell) wins a piglet named Babe (Christine Cavanaugh) at a county fair. Narrowly escaping his... [More]
Directed By: Chris Noonan

#39
#39
Adjusted Score: 103835%
Critics Consensus: Effectively balancing humor and subtle pathos, Sofia Coppola crafts a moving, melancholy story that serves as a showcase for both Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson.
Synopsis: A lonely, aging movie star named Bob Harris (Bill Murray) and a conflicted newlywed, Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson), meet in Tokyo.... [More]
Directed By: Sofia Coppola

#38

Titanic (1997)
87%

#38
Adjusted Score: 102629%
Critics Consensus: A mostly unqualified triumph for James Cameron, who offers a dizzying blend of spectacular visuals and old-fashioned melodrama.
Synopsis: James Cameron's "Titanic" is an epic, action-packed romance set against the ill-fated maiden voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic; the pride... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#37

The Lion King (1994)
93%

#37
Adjusted Score: 101062%
Critics Consensus: Emotionally stirring, richly drawn, and beautifully animated, The Lion King is a pride within Disney's pantheon of classic family films.
Synopsis: This Disney animated feature follows the adventures of the young lion Simba (Jonathan Taylor Thomas), the heir of his father,... [More]
Directed By: Roger Allers, Rob Minkoff

#36

The Apartment (1960)
94%

#36
Adjusted Score: 105736%
Critics Consensus: Director Billy Wilder's customary cynicism is leavened here by tender humor, romance, and genuine pathos.
Synopsis: Insurance worker C.C. Baxter (Jack Lemmon) lends his Upper West Side apartment to company bosses to use for extramarital affairs.... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#35
#35
Adjusted Score: 103606%
Critics Consensus: Visually dazzling and emotionally resonant, Slumdog Millionaire is a film that's both entertaining and powerful.
Synopsis: As 18-year-old Jamal Malik (Dev Patel) answers questions on the Indian version of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire," flashbacks... [More]
Directed By: Danny Boyle

#34

The Player (1992)
98%

#34
Adjusted Score: 103315%
Critics Consensus: Bitingly cynical without succumbing to bitterness, The Player is one of the all-time great Hollywood satires -- and an ensemble-driven highlight of the Altman oeuvre.
Synopsis: Certain that the anonymous threats he's been receiving are the work of David Kahane (Vincent D'Onofrio), producer Griffin Mill (Tim... [More]
Directed By: Robert Altman

#33

Some Like It Hot (1959)
94%

#33
Adjusted Score: 100591%
Critics Consensus: Some Like It Hot: A spry, quick-witted farce that never drags.
Synopsis: After witnessing a Mafia murder, slick saxophone player Joe (Tony Curtis) and his long-suffering buddy, Jerry (Jack Lemmon), improvise a... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#32
Adjusted Score: 103923%
Critics Consensus: Jack Nicholson and Louise Fletcher are worthy adversaries in One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, with Miloš Forman's more grounded and morally ambiguous approach to Ken Kesey's surrealistic novel yielding a film of outsized power.
Synopsis: When Randle Patrick McMurphy (Jack Nicholson) gets transferred for evaluation from a prison farm to a mental institution, he assumes... [More]
Directed By: Milos Forman

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 103119%
Critics Consensus: Enchanting, sweepingly romantic, and featuring plenty of wonderful musical numbers, Beauty and the Beast is one of Disney's most elegant animated offerings.
Synopsis: An arrogant young prince (Robby Benson) and his castle's servants fall under the spell of a wicked enchantress, who turns... [More]
Directed By: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

#30
Adjusted Score: 108698%
Critics Consensus: This complex war epic asks hard questions, resists easy answers, and boasts career-defining work from star Alec Guinness and director David Lean.
Synopsis: Adaptation of the Pierre Bouelle novel about POWs in Burma forced to build a bridge to aid the war effort... [More]
Directed By: David Lean

#29

American Hustle (2013)
92%

#29
Adjusted Score: 103781%
Critics Consensus: Riotously funny and impeccably cast, American Hustle compensates for its flaws with unbridled energy and some of David O. Russell's most irrepressibly vibrant direction.
Synopsis: Irving Rosenfeld (Christian Bale) dabbles in forgery and loan-sharking, but when he falls for fellow grifter Sydney Prosser (Amy Adams),... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#28

Sideways (2004)
97%

#28
Adjusted Score: 105613%
Critics Consensus: Charming, thoughtful, and often funny, Sideways is a decidedly mature road trip comedy full of excellent performances.
Synopsis: Struggling writer and wine enthusiast Miles (Paul Giamatti) takes his engaged friend, Jack (Thomas Haden Church), on a trip to... [More]
Directed By: Alexander Payne

#27

The Lost Weekend (1945)
97%

#27
Adjusted Score: 105267%
Critics Consensus: Director Billy Wilder's unflinchingly honest look at the effects of alcoholism may have had some of its impact blunted by time, but it remains a powerful and remarkably prescient film.
Synopsis: Writer Don Birnam (Ray Milland) is on the wagon. Sober for only a few days, Don is supposed to be... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 104329%
Critics Consensus: Realistic, fast-paced and uncommonly smart, The French Connection is bolstered by stellar performances by Gene Hackman and Roy Scheider, not to mention William Friedkin's thrilling production.
Synopsis: New York Detective "Popeye" Doyle (Gene Hackman) and his partner (Roy Scheider) chase a French heroin smuggler.... [More]
Directed By: William Friedkin

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 105073%
Critics Consensus: Typically stylish but deceptively thoughtful, The Grand Budapest Hotel finds Wes Anderson once again using ornate visual environments to explore deeply emotional ideas.
Synopsis: In the 1930s, the Grand Budapest Hotel is a popular European ski resort, presided over by concierge Gustave H. (Ralph... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#24

Schindler's List (1993)
98%

#24
Adjusted Score: 108194%
Critics Consensus: Schindler's List blends the abject horror of the Holocaust with Steven Spielberg's signature tender humanism to create the director's dramatic masterpiece.
Synopsis: Businessman Oskar Schindler (Liam Neeson) arrives in Krakow in 1939, ready to make his fortune from World War II, which... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#23
Adjusted Score: 106836%
Critics Consensus: An engrossing look at the triumphs and travails of war veterans, The Best Years of Our Lives is concerned specifically with the aftermath of World War II, but its messages speak to the overall American experience.
Synopsis: Fred, Al and Homer are three World War II veterans facing difficulties as they re-enter civilian life. Fred (Dana Andrews)... [More]
Directed By: William Wyler

#22

The Artist (2011)
95%

#22
Adjusted Score: 109790%
Critics Consensus: A crowd-pleasing tribute to the magic of silent cinema, The Artist is a clever, joyous film with delightful performances and visual style to spare.
Synopsis: In the 1920s, actor George Valentin (Jean Dujardin) is a bona fide matinee idol with many adoring fans. While working... [More]
Directed By: Michel Hazanavicius

#21

The Martian (2015)
91%

#21
Adjusted Score: 107562%
Critics Consensus: Smart, thrilling, and surprisingly funny, The Martian offers a faithful adaptation of the bestselling book that brings out the best in leading man Matt Damon and director Ridley Scott.
Synopsis: When astronauts blast off from the planet Mars, they leave behind Mark Watney (Matt Damon), presumed dead after a fierce... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 108757%
Critics Consensus: Impeccably scripted, beautifully directed, and filled with fine performances, The Social Network is a riveting, ambitious example of modern filmmaking at its finest.
Synopsis: In 2003, Harvard undergrad and computer genius Mark Zuckerberg (Jesse Eisenberg) begins work on a new concept that eventually turns... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#19

Nomadland (2020)
93%

#19
Adjusted Score: 116349%
Critics Consensus: A poetic character study on the forgotten and downtrodden, Nomadland beautifully captures the restlessness left in the wake of the Great Recession.
Synopsis: A woman embarks on a journey through the American West after losing everything during the recession.... [More]
Directed By: Chloé Zhao

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 105800%
Critics Consensus: The epic of all epics, Lawrence of Arabia cements director David Lean's status in the filmmaking pantheon with nearly four hours of grand scope, brilliant performances, and beautiful cinematography.
Synopsis: Due to his knowledge of the native Bedouin tribes, British Lieutenant T.E. Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) is sent to Arabia to... [More]
Directed By: David Lean

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 110021%
Critics Consensus: The plot may be problematic, but such concerns are rendered superfluous by Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron's star power, the Gershwins' classic songs, and Vincente Minnelli's colorful, sympathetic direction.
Synopsis: Jerry Mulligan (Gene Kelly) is an American ex-GI who stays in post-war Paris to become a painter, and falls for... [More]
Directed By: Vincente Minnelli

#16
Adjusted Score: 106451%
Critics Consensus: Remade but never duplicated, this darkly humorous morality tale represents John Huston at his finest.
Synopsis: In this classic adventure film, two rough-and-tumble wanderers, Dobbs (Humphrey Bogart) and Curtin (Tim Holt), meet up with a veteran... [More]
Directed By: John Huston

#15

Chinatown (1974)
99%

#15
Adjusted Score: 105779%
Critics Consensus: As bruised and cynical as the decade that produced it, this noir classic benefits from Robert Towne's brilliant screenplay, director Roman Polanski's steady hand, and wonderful performances from Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway.
Synopsis: When Los Angeles private eye J.J. "Jake" Gittes (Jack Nicholson) is hired by Evelyn Mulwray to investigate her husband's activities,... [More]
Directed By: Roman Polanski

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 110453%
Critics Consensus: With his electrifying performance in Elia Kazan's thought-provoking, expertly constructed melodrama, Marlon Brando redefined the possibilities of acting for film and helped permanently alter the cinematic landscape.
Synopsis: Dockworker Terry Malloy (Marlon Brando) had been an up-and-coming boxer until powerful local mob boss Johnny Friendly (Lee J. Cobb)... [More]
Directed By: Elia Kazan

#13
Adjusted Score: 122114%
Critics Consensus: Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri deftly balances black comedy against searing drama -- and draws unforgettable performances from its veteran cast along the way.
Synopsis: After months have passed without a culprit in her daughter's murder case, Mildred Hayes makes a bold move, painting three... [More]
Directed By: Martin McDonagh

#12

Toy Story 2 (1999)
100%

#12
Adjusted Score: 107570%
Critics Consensus: The rare sequel that arguably improves on its predecessor, Toy Story 2 uses inventive storytelling, gorgeous animation, and a talented cast to deliver another rich moviegoing experience for all ages.
Synopsis: Woody (Tom Hanks) is stolen from his home by toy dealer Al McWhiggin (Wayne Knight), leaving Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen)... [More]

#11

Sunset Blvd. (1950)
98%

#11
Adjusted Score: 109437%
Critics Consensus: Arguably the greatest movie about Hollywood, Billy Wilder's masterpiece Sunset Boulevard is a tremendously entertaining combination of noir, black comedy, and character study.
Synopsis: An aging silent film queen refuses to accept that her stardom has ended. She hires a young screenwriter to help... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#10

La La Land (2016)
91%

#10
Adjusted Score: 121033%
Critics Consensus: La La Land breathes new life into a bygone genre with thrillingly assured direction, powerful performances, and an irresistible excess of heart.
Synopsis: Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) are drawn together by their common desire to do what they love. But... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#9

1917 (2019)
88%

#9
Adjusted Score: 117880%
Critics Consensus: Hard-hitting, immersive, and an impressive technical achievement, 1917 captures the trench warfare of World War I with raw, startling immediacy.
Synopsis: During World War I, two British soldiers -- Lance Cpl. Schofield and Lance Cpl. Blake -- receive seemingly impossible orders.... [More]
Directed By: Sam Mendes

#8

Argo (2012)
96%

#8
Adjusted Score: 111593%
Critics Consensus: Tense, exciting, and often darkly comic, Argo recreates a historical event with vivid attention to detail and finely wrought characters.
Synopsis: On Nov. 4, 1979, militants storm the U.S. embassy in Tehran, Iran, taking 66 American hostages. Amid the chaos, six... [More]
Directed By: Ben Affleck

#7

12 Years a Slave (2013)
95%

#7
Adjusted Score: 111091%
Critics Consensus: It's far from comfortable viewing, but 12 Years a Slave's unflinchingly brutal look at American slavery is also brilliant -- and quite possibly essential -- cinema.
Synopsis: In the years before the Civil War, Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor), a free black man from upstate New York, is... [More]
Directed By: Steve McQueen

#6
Adjusted Score: 122164%
Critics Consensus: Thrillingly unrestrained yet solidly crafted, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood tempers Tarantino's provocative impulses with the clarity of a mature filmmaker's vision.
Synopsis: Actor Rick Dalton gained fame and fortune by starring in a 1950s television Western, but is now struggling to find... [More]
Directed By: Quentin Tarantino

#5

Boyhood (2014)
97%

#5
Adjusted Score: 110937%
Critics Consensus: Epic in technical scale but breathlessly intimate in narrative scope, Boyhood is a sprawling investigation of the human condition.
Synopsis: The joys and pitfalls of growing up are seen through the eyes of a child named Mason (Ellar Coltrane), his... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#4
Adjusted Score: 109527%
Critics Consensus: Playing as both an exciting sci-fi adventure and a remarkable portrait of childhood, Steven Spielberg's touching tale of a homesick alien remains a piece of movie magic for young and old.
Synopsis: After a gentle alien becomes stranded on Earth, the being is discovered and befriended by a young boy named Elliott... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#3

The Godfather (1972)
97%

#3
Adjusted Score: 113786%
Critics Consensus: One of Hollywood's greatest critical and commercial successes, The Godfather gets everything right; not only did the movie transcend expectations, it established new benchmarks for American cinema.
Synopsis: Widely regarded as one of the greatest films of all time, this mob drama, based on Mario Puzo's novel of... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#2

Moonlight (2016)
98%

#2
Adjusted Score: 124055%
Critics Consensus: Moonlight uses one man's story to offer a remarkable and brilliantly crafted look at lives too rarely seen in cinema.
Synopsis: A look at three defining chapters in the life of Chiron, a young black man growing up in Miami. His... [More]
Directed By: Barry Jenkins

#1

Lady Bird (2017)
99%

#1
Adjusted Score: 128978%
Critics Consensus: Lady Bird delivers fresh insights about the turmoil of adolescence -- and reveals writer-director Greta Gerwig as a fully formed filmmaking talent.
Synopsis: A teenager (Saoirse Ronan) navigates a loving but turbulent relationship with her strong-willed mother (Laurie Metcalf) over the course of... [More]
Directed By: Greta Gerwig



Anil Kapoor

Slumdog Millionaire‘s American audiences were enticed to watch by the
name of director Danny Boyle or the movie’s kinetic exploration of an exotic,
far-away underbelly. In India, the selling point very well may have been
Anil Kapoor. Kapoor, who portrays the movie’s shifty host of India’s version of Who
Wants to Be a Millionaire?, is the movie’s biggest Bollywood name, something
fashioned over three decades of work, which includes Mr. India (an early work by
Elizabeth director Shekhar Kapur for which Kapoor received great critical
acclaim). The story of Kapoor’s  first international movie is a story we
know well now — the plot, the controversies, the international box office
success, and the endless trophies (including an ultimate Oscar Best Picture and
Kapoor’s own share of a SAG Oustanding Cast award). As he pursues new projects
in America (and on the release of Slumdog on DVD), RT sat down with Kapoor to get his Five Favorite Films.

Gold Rush (1925, 100% Tomatometer)



The Gold Rush
The films that really changed my life were all the films made by Charlie Chaplin. Films like
The Gold Rush
. They were silent films, they were black and white. As a kid,
I would just completely get mesmerized with every aspect of cinema. That kind of magic I’d never yet seen, the magic Charlie Chaplin created on screen — in terms of performances, in terms of technique, in terms of innocence, in terms of purity. I would wonder, “Is there anyone in the world who can match this?” I would see other films, and I’d think, “No, this guy is a real genius.” He makes me smile.
And sometimes he moves me.


City Lights (1931, 100% Tomatometer)



City Lights
Ah, City Lights.
[It] doesn’t [really] make an effort to do comedy or [try] to make me cry. It just flows so naturally.
A true artist. And you don’t have to be sensible [to watch  Chaplin’s
films]. You [can be] a kid but you still can understand his films.  [One] doesn’t need education, academic education, to understand or enjoy his films. And I would see in the theater, in the audience, all kinds of people: children, parents, grandparents, poor, rich, very rich people, everybody in the theater enjoying his films.

Chaplin really influenced me on being an actor. And I remember, back in India, Raj Kapoor, was greatly influenced by Charlie Chaplin.
[Kapoor] became one of the biggest filmmakers of our country. You know, [Kapoor] is one of the few filmmakers who are very very known in that part of the world, especially Russia and the Middle East, the Far East. All the countries, one of the most famous filmmakers, Raj Kapoor. And he was influenced by Charlie Chaplin.
Everybody says, “Are you influenced by Raj Kapoor?” and I say, “No, I’m not inspired by Raj Kapoor, I’m inspired by Charlie Chaplin.” It all goes back to that. And if you see my films, films like Woh 7 Din, Mr. India, and all those kinds of films, there is a bit of Chaplin. In every role which I do to this day, there is that flavor, because I’ve been influenced by all this. I will always think, if there is a scene, I will always have him in mind. Even in Slumdog Millionaire

[My performance in Slumdog Millionaire] is very animated, it’s very flamboyant.
That influence always works when I’m doing those kinds of roles. There are certain times when I’m slightly larger than life and animated, still in control and still looking natural, and not looking like a buffoon, and not looking caricaturish. Still looking real. I think some way it is the influence of Charlie Chaplin. And even if I can achieve one percent or two percent of what he has achieved in this life in terms of art, in terms of what he has done, I’ll feel pretty fulfilled. When I try to do stuff which he has done, a little bit here and there, then I realize what a great man he was, and what a great character he was, and what he accomplished. Very, very difficult. I heard that he would rehearse for hours and days for every punch. For every
punch. And there are times when I’m doing my films, I say, “Let’s copy this
punch on this film.” And we could never get it. We just couldn’t get it.


The Great Dictator (1940, 100% Tomatometer)



The Great Dictator
You can go into the depth and go inside into his mind, and it’s like miles and miles of depth. Which you can’t really get in the actor’s realm, but Charlie Chaplin could get. And his speech in The Great Dictator, the way he spoke when he played Hitler in The Great Dictator. It is one of the greatest monologues to come out of cinema. Nobody has ever been able to achieve that.

Every movie by Laurel & Hardy (1921 – 1951)

Laurel & HardyI feel performance cannot be done in isolation. So when I talk about teamwork, when I talk about timing between two actors, timing between two actors, I think about Laurel & Hardy. It’s like two sides of a coin. It’s the quickest examples of two people creating magic, two actors creating magic. I look up to these people [and] I get influenced by [them], because I try to create these things. I see others trying to create that thing, but nobody has succeeded yet.

Laurel & Hardy [are] completely timeless. And anything in art which is timeless — it might be architecture, it might be paintings, whatever you do — [if] it’s great art, it will entertain the people all over the world for centuries and centuries.


The Godfather (1972, 100% Tomatometer)



The Godfather
Everything just fell in place. The right people, the right director, the right script, the right timing, what the world was going through. Everything just fell right. So
Godfather, Slumdog Millionaire, Laurel & Hardy, and Chaplin. Well, it’s too early to talk about
Slumdog, but I’m sure after 50 or 100 years people are going to say that everything just fell in the right [place] for
Slumdog.

The Godfather is not [just] an American hit, it’s really a worldwide film. Anywhere [you go]: China, Japan, Mexico. Everywhere students of cinema, ordinary people, everybody just loved the film. It’s got that cinematic magic, The Godfather. And, you know, it’s the lighting, the camerawork, the editing, the performances, the casting, the colors, the costumes. It was cinema at its best, and I’m sure it is something which, as you say, was written. Just everything fell in place. It doesn’t happen with everybody, it’s [when] people are [from] a certain kind of work culture [that] these things happen normally.

What I like about The Godfather [is that] it’s very classical. [Coppola] just leaves the camera. You never see the camera moving. It’s very static and it’s the actors [who are moving]. [But] still you create the magic. You don’t have to juggle the camera to attract attention.

The music also is very subtle. Everything is subtle. Your mind is throbbing, your [hairs are] rising, you’re on the edge of your seat, but still everything is so calm and relaxed. It’s cinema at its best. Slumdog? That’s also cinema at its best but everything [is] movement. There’s so much movement, there’s so much energy, the script is moving, the screenplay, the camera is moving, the actors are moving, everything is moving. But still, you understand the story. It is in control. Still, it moves you.


Catch Anil Kapoor in Slumdog Millionaire on DVD this week. For more Five Favorite Films, visit our archive.

Jai Ho it up with the DVD debut of Danny Boyle’s multiple Oscar-winning film, Slumdog Millionaire! It’s also your week to catch films you might have missed in theaters, from Jennifer Aniston’s tale of puppy love (Marley & Me) to the latest heart-wrencher from Will Smith (Seven Pounds). Those who dare to go foreign will be justly rewarded with two well-reviewed imports (the French thriller Tell No One and the Spanish sci-fi Timecrimes), while art-house devotees have two remastered Wong Kar-Wai films to choose from (Happy Together and Fallen Angels). Horror fans have an octet of new flicks to check out (After Dark Horror Fest 8 Films to Die For)…and did we mention the sweet new Blu-ray that should be on the top of any philosophical cyberpunk’s wishlist (The Matrix 10th Anniversary Blu-ray Digibook)?

Slumdog Millionaire — 94%

Jai Ho it up this week with the multiple Oscar-winning feel-good hit, Slumdog Millionaire! Danny Boyle‘s Dickensian Best Picture-winner, about an Indian working-class hero who competes on the Hindi version of Who Wants to Be A Millionaire, won over audiences and critics last year thanks to energetic filmmaking, a sweetly romantic story, and its exotic, catchy soundtrack. (That end-sequence Bollywood number, set to composer A.R. Rahman’s Oscar-winning song, “Jai Ho,” didn’t hurt either; even Ellen DeGeneres couldn’t resist recreating the dance on her daytime talk show.) If you missed the Little Film That Could in theaters (it narrowly avoided the ignominy of a direct-to-video release), you can bring it home today and relive all the feel-goodness of our most recent Oscar season.

Slumdog Millionaire comes to DVD in single-disc and Blu-ray releases. I know, single-disc; these days getting just one disc in a new release seems a bit skimpy, but Fox Home Entertainment has actually packed a decent host of extras here, including a commentary track by Best Director Boyle and star Dev Patel and a second commentary with writer Simon Beaufoy and producer Christian Colson (both of whom won Oscars for their work). The DVD also includes a dozen deleted scenes. On Blu-ray you’ll get the above, plus additional behind-the-scenes featurettes, a music video, and a short film by newbie Rahi Anil Bharve (Manjha) which was hand-picked by Boyle.

Want more of the Bollywood-meets-Hollywood genre? Check out Desperate Housewives hottie Jesse Metcalfe in the cross-global romance The Other End of the Line (27%), in which he romances Bollywood star Shriya Saran.

Below, watch an exclusive deleted scene from Slumdog Millionaire.

Next: Aniston, Wilson, and Marley & Me

Marley & Me — 60%

Everyone knows there’s nothing cuter than a puppy, a fact well-exploited by the filmmakers behind Marley & Me. (If you haven’t seen it yet, we recommend you do your best to avoid spoilers.) Based on the non-fiction bestseller by John Grogan, Marley & Me follows a couple (Jennifer Aniston and Owen Wilson) and their adventures with their beloved-but-rambunctious yellow Labrador, Marley. Though critics called it only sporadically funny, this sentimental flick is a must-see for pet owners and animal-lovers — especially the kind that lets their dogs kiss them on the mouth. (It’s really unsanitary, people.) Pick up the 2-Disc Bad Dog Edition for a ton of extended/deleted scenes, a director commentary, making-of featurettes, a PSA for animal adoption, a gag reel, and more.

Next: Will Smith in Seven Pounds

Seven Pounds — 28%

Superstar Will Smith has got range to rival any working actor in Hollywood (Six Degrees of Separation — drama! Independence Day — action! Ali — boxing!) and part of what’s impressive about him is his ever-varying career path. Unfortunately for Smith, he decided to follow up his blockbuster flicks I Am Legend and Hancock with Seven Pounds, a gimmicky thriller about an auditor on a secret mission involving seven strangers — a twisty, complicated schmaltz fest that critics tore to pieces. Deleted scenes, behind-the-scenes featurettes (including one on a particularly deadly species of jellyfish) and a commentary by director Gabriele Muccino (who directed Smith in the superior Pursuit of Happyness) accompany the film.

Next: French thrills in Tell No One

You may not have heard of this French import thriller, but the fact that it made numerous critics’ Top Ten lists last year should be reason to check it out this week on DVD. Eight years after his wife’s murder, a doctor (Francoise Cluzet) is pulled into a web of intrigue when his dead wife resurfaces, alive and well. Actor-director Guillaume Canet helms this twisty thriller, with a supporting cast led by Kristin Scott Thomas, Francois Berleand (the Transporter trilogy), and Marie-Josée Croze (Munich‘s Dutch assassin).

Next: A time-travel movie that actually makes sense!

Timecrimes — 86%

First time director Nacho Vigalondo (who earned an Oscar nomination for his 2003 short film, 7:35 de la Mañana) makes an impressive feature-length debut with Timecrimes, a Spanish-language science-fiction black comedy about one ordinary man who, thanks to a fateful encounter with a time travel machine, must contend with and battle alternate versions of himself. Critics loved the lo-fi thriller, noting that — against all odds — its sci-fi logic just might make the most sense of any time travel movie ever made. Hollywood liked Timecrimes, too — an English-language remake is already in the works. See the original this week and get a jump on your fellow movie geeks.

Next: Don’t even try to pronounce it – Cthulhu

Cthulhu — 58%

Based on the H.P. Lovecraft novella The Shadow Over Innsmouth, this indie horror pic follows a history professor (Jason Cottle) to his Pacific Northwest home town, where he becomes embroiled in a local New Age cult who he believes plans a mass human sacrifice. The townsfolk are a weird bunch — Tori Spelling plays one, for example (and sexually assaults our hero to boot, blech) — who worship a fabled sea creature. While more gay panic allegory than straight up science fiction, Cthulhu will find its own cult audience among Lovecraft geeks, who incidentally are the only ones with any clue as to how you pronounce “Cthulhu.”

Next: Two classic Vincente Minnelli musicals come to Blu-ray

An American in Paris Blu-ray — 98%, Gigi Blu-ray — 73%

It’s hard to say what portion of the Blu-ray audience will overlap with the demographic for these classic musicals, but if you’re a Playstation 3-owning grandma, have we got the new releases for you! Golden Age auteur Vincente Minnelli directed actress Leslie Caron in both films (both also written by the writing team of Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe), which have been given the Blu-ray treatment in honor of Warner Bros.’ 85th Anniversary. In An American in Paris (1951), Caron gets wooed by American expatriate Gene Kelly to Gershwin tunes like “I Got Rhythm,” “S’Wonderful,” and “Our Love is Here To Stay.” In Gigi (1958), Caron is a turn-of-the-century Parisian girl being groomed as a courtesan who falls for Louis Jordan (AKA Kamal Khan from Octopussy). Both Blu-ray releases include extras ported over from their previous 2-Disc Special Editions, which are great for fans of Old Hollywood.

Next: A Wong Kar-Wai double bill — Happy Together and Fallen Angels

Lyrical filmmaker Wong-Kar Wai made his international breakthrough with this tragic romance about an on-and-off gay Chinese couple living as expatriates in Argentina. Working with the late Hong Kong pop star Leslie Cheung (who had previously starred in Wong’s Days of Being Wild and Ashes of Time) as the promiscuous Po-Wing, and fellow Wong collaborator Tony Leung Chiu-Wai (Ashes of Time, In the Mood For Love, 2046) as his lover, Lai Yiu-Fai, Wong won the Best Director prize at the Cannes Film Festival. The new Kino Special Edition offers a remastered cut of the film, a previously-released making-of documentary, trailers and stills, and a 2008 feature from Wong Kar-Wai’s career retrospective at the Museum of the Moving Image.
The director’s 1995 film about a Hong Kong hitman and his agent, Fallen Angels (95%), is also available on a new Special Edition this week.

Next: The After Dark HorrorFest III collection

Horror fans have eight new titles to look forward to, as the third annual After Dark HorrorFest slate comes to DVD. Horrors range from cannibals (Slaughter) to cults (Perkins’ 14), to unnecessary sequels (The Butterfly Effect 3: Revelations), and include Korean horror (Voices) and pics with familiar faces (Autopsy, starring Robert Patrick , Michael Bowen, and 90210’s Jessica Lowndes). Rounding out the octet are an Australian outback flick (Dying Breed, starring Saw scribe Leigh Whannell), a suicide thriller (From Within, featuring Rumer Willis and The Sarah Connor Chronicles’ Thomas Dekker), and the Lena Headey vehicle The Broken, which is surprisingly helmed by Brit newcomer Sean Ellis (Cashback).

Next: Celebrate the 10th Anniversary of The Matrix!

There may be no spoon, but this week, there is a must-have Blu-ray: The Matrix 10th Anniversary Blu-ray Book, which brings the essential existential sci-fi adventure to Blu-ray for the first time as a single-film release. Of course, if you already own either the Matrix Trilogy or Ultimate Matrix Collections on Blu-ray, this will be an unnecessary addition to your library — but if not, take advantage of this title, which comes in digibook packaging that includes a 47-page booklet crammed with Matrix trivia. Special features on the Blu-ray are plentiful and include a digital copy of the film, four expert commentary tracks, a feature-length documentary and much more.

Until next week, happy renting!

Bill Pullman

Few will forget Bill Pullman‘s rousing speech as the US president in Independence Day, but it’s only one of a long string of vast and diverse roles that have seen him cast as romantic lead, action hero, comedy star and dark villain. In more than twenty years of screen acting he’s defined himself as a hard-working, engaging talent.

His latest film, Surveillance, opens in UK cinemas this week. Directed by Jennifer Lynch, it casts Pullman as one of a pair of FBI agents (with Julia Ormond) tracking down the culprit of a grisly collection of seemingly unpremeditated murders. With a fine ensemble cast it’s an original crime thriller; only Lynch’s second film since her 1993 debut Boxing Helena. It will open in the US on 26th June.

Of his five favourite films, Pullman says his choices depend on mood and context. “I always feel like there are a lot of different types of favourites,” he tells RT. “there are some that I look to for interesting things, some that I look to for acting things, others that I watch again and again. I don’t know if this is in any sort of order!”

Lawrence of Arabia

Lawrence of Arabia

“This is always the first choice when people say they have a new television set or home cinema system and they want to watch a great visual movie. I always choose this because I feel it has an incredible presence.”

Click on a thumbnail below.

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia

The Searchers
The Searchers

Zabriskie Point
Zabriskie Point

America, America
America, America

Scenes from a Marriage
Scenes from a Marriage


Bill Pullman

The Searchers

The Searchers

“I like The Searchers for the same reason. I like to see those performances again and just the way that without special effects or tweaked shots or CGI or whatever you get this expansive feeling of being in the outdoors.”


Bill Pullman

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point

“When I was in college, first year, I saw it and I really hadn’t been exposed to a lot of European filmmakers. It’s such a ‘film’ film. It wasn’t required viewing, it was just a film playing on campus and I hadn’t been interested in film before then. Nowadays people are deciding to get into film at age five when they’re sitting, watching the Oscars. I really didn’t come out of that culture — I was pretty much a John Wayne fan and that was it. Zabriskie Point was a time when I was in a lot of change and flux and these incredible visuals hit me like they had rearranged the organs in my body. The ending and the free-floating debris and everything is an image that burned itself in my consciousness.”


Bill Pullman

America, America

America, America

“It’s a little bit of a Slumdog movie in a way of somebody coming from incredibly unlikely beginnings and climbing through a lot of incredibly hard challenges to get somewhere. As an actor you’re continually riding the waves of whether you’re in or out, getting work or not getting work, and Kazan was really a guy who was condemned into not working and looking to go deep into someplace and just live inside his art.”


Bill Pullman

Scenes from a Marriage

Scenes from a Marriage

“This is one I’ve watched a couple of different times in a couple of different forms. I’ve watched the film version and I’ve also seen the mini-series. I think when I first saw that it changed my idea of acting. I go back to it sometimes just to put myself back in that place where my discoveries about what was possible on a film and the level of immersion between people — this incredible dance that they do — really formed.”

Click on a thumbnail below.

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia

The Searchers
The Searchers

Zabriskie Point
Zabriskie Point

America, America
America, America

Scenes from a Marriage
Scenes from a Marriage


Surveillance opens in UK cinemas this week. It will open in the US on 26th June.

In the movie world there is no event greater, no red carpet glitzier, no awards show more meaningful, than that of the Academy Awards. While millions watch the biggest night in Hollywood via television and thousands post show commentaries on their blogs (or, in the case of this year, on Twitter), Rotten Tomatoes was on the ground, right smack dab in the middle of it all. Read on as RT’s Jen Yamato recounts this year’s Oscars show, from the best parts of the musical-laden telecast to the quiet moments backstage with the night’s triumphant winners.

Jen here! After weeks of anticipation and months of populating Rotten Tomatoes’ Awards Tour with major awards show news, galleries, trivia, and interviews with this year’s Oscar nominees and winners, the day finally came to cover the Superbowl of movies: The 81st Annual Academy Awards! So on Sunday afternoon, I gussied myself up (left) — formal wear mandatory, even for the backstage press room — and headed to the Hollywood Renaissance Hotel to camp out for the next eight hours. It was just like my Senior Prom, only instead of a tuxedoed date (he’d worn white a la Mickey Rourke this year, incidentally) I’d be cozied up with my laptop, watching glamorous A-listers traipse up and down the red carpet practicing their best “It was an honor just to be nominated” faces.

Would Kate Winslet break the Susan Lucci curse and wrestle the Best Actress trophy from Meryl Streep‘s greedy paws? Could any film other than Slumdog Millionaire really contend for the Best Picture prize? Would Hugh Jackman usher in a new era of song-and-dance hosting, or make us long for the days of a Billy Crystal wisecrack? And would Beyonce please change out of that black and gold mermaid dress, which someone apparently made from her grandma’s drapery??

“This Slumdog Millionaire just needs some Milk!”

— Oscar host Hugh Jackman, before launching into the opening musical sequence

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Oscar watchers had known for a while that this year’s show would be different; ratings in recent years had dipped so low that some wondered if the Academy could ever get America watching again. (ABC’s early numbers show that ratings were up six percent from last year’s all time low of 32 million viewers.) But who knew it would be this different?

Filmmakers Bill Condon and Laurence Mark (the writer/director and producer of 2006’s Oscar-winning Dreamgirls, respectively) were tapped to produce the show, no doubt in hopes that they would jazz up the proceedings. As they’d done to the film musical genre (with Dreamgirls and Chicago, which Condon wrote), the duo injected the Oscar show with a healthy smattering of shuffle-ball-changes and jazz hands, employing Aussie stage star-turned-Wolverine Hugh Jackman to lead two huge musical numbers; the first one, lampooning the Best Picture nominees, worked (thanks in large part to singing starlet Anne Hathaway, plucked from the crowd to duet with Jackman in the spirit of Frost/Nixon).

The second number, featuring guest stars Beyonce, Amanda Seyfried, Dominic Cooper, Zac Efron, and Vanessa Hudgens…not so much. Even with help from Baz Luhrmann — the king of the overdone, sentimental spectacle — the ode to music in movies from Jackman and Co. had many viewers wondering when the Oscars had become the Tony Awards. That is, those viewers who knew what the Tonys are to begin with. Others (read: the under-40 crowd) just squirmed in their seats until the singing and dancing were over.

Fun fact: The Oscars provide an “Academy Librarian” in the press room to answer your nerdiest, most obscure Oscar-related questions. When did Oscar last feature an all-star musical number?

It was back in 1990, two years after the infamous Alan Carr-produced spectacle-debacle featuring Snow White and Rob Lowe. My personal favorite is the sequence from the year before, with “stars of the future” like Ricki Lake, Patrick Dempsey, and Corey Feldman.

Next: Backstage with Kate Winslet, Best Actress winner

“My mum won a pickled onion competition in the local pub just before Christmas, and you know, that was a big deal. And the Reading Evening Post sent me a picture of her holding up her jar. Well, Reading Evening Post, there’s your next Winslet picture.”

Kate Winslet, after winning the Oscar for Best Actress

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Being backstage in the press room amounts to a lot of waiting around. You can tune in to the telecast on a headset when the winners, ushered to us after receiving their Oscars, are not at the podium taking questions. Even then, it becomes tedious; I hate to say it, but even journalists don’t much care what a production designer or technical Oscar-winner has to say. So you look forward to the big stars coming through, for the moments of true giddiness and jubilance that can only be delivered by an actor or actress who’s been waiting years for their moment to shine.

Kate Winslet gave us one of those big emotional moments. At the end of a three hour plus telecast, her speech onstage revealed a bundle of nerves — a seasoned actress who, despite numerous accolades this year alone, was obviously still blown away by her first Academy Award win.

Backstage minutes later, she was still visibly overwhelmed. Clutching her Oscar with both hands, shock still on her face, Winslet still had tears of joy in her eyes. After answering a few minutes of questions, she paused. “It’s sort of dawning on me now that I just won an Oscar,” she mumbled, looking down at the statuette. “It’s only starting to sink in right now actually. Oh, my God.”

When a familiar voice took the microphone to ask the next question, she ran off the stage to greet him. “Baz, where are you?” After greeting Daily Mail columnist Baz Bamigboye with a hug — he’s been interviewing her for almost two decades — she returned.

On the controversy surrounding her film The Reader, for which she won Best Actress: “I don’t have any concerns, you know. I mean, I can’t be responsible for the emotional response that an audience has to any film,” she said. “I don’t think any actor really can, and I think going into it, I was very aware that if an audience did feel any level of sympathy for Hanna, and they felt morally compromised as a consequence, that would be an interesting emotion for them to then deal with. It certainly wasn’t my intention to make people sympathize with an SS guard.”

Next: Best Actor Sean Penn gets political in the press room

“To anybody who believes in equal rights for human beings, it’s pretty simple. And, certainly, what I mentioned from the stage earlier tonight, to see this culture of ignorance, that breeds this kind of hateful expression, that these people have their signs outside essentially telling you that you’re less than human…There’s nothing more important than the themes of [Milk]. There’s nothing more important, and so being part of something like that is a privilege. And when you see something like what you saw outside today, it enhances that.”

Sean Penn, after winning the Best Actor Oscar for his portrayal of Harvey Milk

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In stark contrast to the highly emotional Winslet, Best Actor winner Sean Penn strode into the press room as if entering a post office; there to run an errand, to do a job required of him: to talk to the press. His Oscar was nowhere to be seen. He stood, hands in pockets, and answered a line of questioning prompted by his politically-charged acceptance speech.

“I think that it is a good time for those who voted for the ban against gay marriage to sit and reflect,” Penn had said during the telecast, “and anticipate their great shame and the shame in their grandchildren’s eyes if they continue that way of support.” It was poetic justice of sorts for the man who’d portrayed slain gay activist Harvey Milk to receive the night’s top acting honor while outside, anti-gay demonstrators surrounded the Oscar perimeter with signs. In the press room, Penn continued to shame those detractors. What would he say if he should come face to face with them?

“I’d tell them to turn in their hate card and find their better self,” he answered. “I think that these are largely taught limitations and ignorances…it’s very sad in a way, because it’s a demonstration of such emotional cowardice to be so afraid to be extending the same rights to a fellow man as you would want for yourself.”

After a string of politically-themed questioning (What does Penn think of Barack Obama’s stance on gay marriage? He hopes it’s not a “future one or a felt one”), Penn was ready for lighter talk. Could he describe his friendship with fellow nominee Mickey Rourke, who many felt might steal the Oscar from underneath Penn’s nose?

“I’ve been making movies for over 25 years and I can’t speak for his consistent sense of me. He’s an excellent bridge burner at times, but we’ve had for the most part a very close friendship,” Penn shared. “And he’s somebody that I alternatively looked up to and advised and directed, I’ve wanted to work with and admired and quite literally had me, almost throughout The Wrestler, weeping.”

“He’s one of our most talented actors; he always was. Comebacks are funny, and we talk about it with him, but everyone in this room has to make a comeback every day. Life is tough. And I think what’s sensational about him is always what’s been sensational about him; he’s one of the great poetic talents in acting that we have.”

Next: Montages, skits, and everything in between — did the telecast work?

“Suck on that, Anthony Dod Mantle!”

— Oscar-winning cinematographer Janusz Kaminski

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Of course, while winners are addressing the press backstage, there’s still a show going on. This year’s production introduced new concepts and experiments; what would hold audiences’ attention, or help the Academy get past its popular reputation as an elitist night of self congratulation?

The answer: montages and skits, and lots of them. The Academy worked closely with Hollywood’s major studios to trade on-air exposure for content that could engage the minds of American viewers. Space Chimps, for example, would never have been mentioned in a previous year’s show, but it made an appearance in the night’s Animation reel. Step Brothers, a Will Ferrell comic flop, showed up briefly in the Comedy tribute. Even the show’s closing credits featured a montage highlighting upcoming films, most of which (Sherlock Holmes, Old Dogs, Terminator Salvation) aren’t exactly Oscar material and in all honesty won’t be nominated at the 82nd Annual Academy Awards.

In one skit, Pineapple Express stars Seth Rogen and James Franco watched the “Oscars” in character as their stoner counterparts, a funny bit (for a bit) that included the random appearance of Oscar-winning DP Janusz Kaminski: “Suck on that, Anthony Dod Mantle!” Mantle did, in fact, suck on that, later winning the Academy Award for Cinematography for Slumdog Millionaire.

Zeitgeist-capturing catch phrases were as plentiful as if in any Shrek film, from Ben Stiller‘s post-postmodern Joaquin Phoenix shtick to Will Smith‘s ad-lib following a teleprompter flub: “Boom goes the dynamite!” Even the old fogies on ABC’s pre-show red carpet coverage had learned to reference Twitter, which was the new media forum du jour for the night.

Next: Heath Ledger’s family remembers their son backstage

“When he came home for Christmas a year ago, he had been sending me shots and bits and pieces from the film. And he hadn’t seen it, I hadn’t seen it. No one had really seen it, but he knew. And I said to him, I have a feeling this is it for you. You’re going to get a nomination for this. And he just looked at me and smiled. So he knew.”

— Kate Ledger on her late brother and Best Supporting Actor winner, Heath Ledger

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When asked if we had questions for the Ledger family, the entire room answered together in one shout: “YES!” And so the family of the late Heath Ledger — father Kim, mother Sally, and sister Kate — came in to discuss his posthumous Oscar win for portraying The Joker in Chris Nolan’s The Dark Knight.

Gingerly but with quiet strength, the trio answered inquiries on a range of topics.

Would they take the Oscar home to Australia? (By Academy rule, it belongs to Heath’s daughter Matilda, who can claim it when she turns 18.)

How would Heath have reacted to his win? (“I think he would be really quietly pleased,” said mother Sally Bell.)

How close is the family to Matilda’s mother, actress Michelle Williams? (“Very close,” answered Kate Ledger. “She’s doing an amazing job with Matilda, and we speak all the time so we’re in constant contact and always will be.”)

Lastly, Ledger’s sister shared what she’d seen of Heath’s unfinished film, Terry Gilliam‘s The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus. “We have seen a little bit of footage,” she said. “He only completed about a third of the film. And we’ve had some incredible actors — Johnny Depp and Jude Law and Colin Farrell — step in to complete it. And I think it’s going to be…amazing.”

“Terry is amazing and Heath always had such enthusiasm and interest in whatever Terry was doing,” she concluded.

Next: Best Supporting Actress Penelope Cruz thanks Woody Allen

“I’m going to go call Woody right now. He sent me flowers last week when I went to BAFTA, and we’ve been speaking sometimes during the week. But I call Woody sometimes to just say hello and I adore him. I think he’s so funny and charming and so peculiar and unique. And of course, today I have to talk to Woody to thank him.”

Penelope Cruz, after winning Best Supporting Actress for Vicky Cristina Barcelona

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Spanish actress Penelope Cruz kicked off the night with one of the first major awards — Best Supporting Actress, for her fiery performance in Vicky Cristina Barcelona — which marked her first Oscar win. (I personally think she was robbed in 2006 in the Best Actress race, which she lost to Helen Mirren.) After threatening to faint onstage in her acceptance speech, she made her way to the press room, where she stood serenely, cradling her Academy Award in the crook of one arm as if it were a bouquet of roses and she’d just been crowned Miss Universe.

Cruz explained that while filming Vicky Cristina Barcelona she was quite insecure in her performance, and only learned that the film was a comedy at its Cannes premiere.

“When you’re working with Woody Allen you know that you can trust the person that you’re working with and if he doesn’t like something he will tell you,” she explained. “If he likes it, he will tell you. He’s not a man of too many words, but he’s honest and that’s what counts for me. We just trusted him. We did the whole movie in four weeks — four and a half weeks, so I had no idea what it was to be.

With the Oscars this year and last going largely to foreign winners (including Cruz’s real-life boyfriend and Vicky Cristina Barcelona co-star, Javier Bardem), is Hollywood opening itself up to honor international filmmakers? Cruz thought so.

“Could you work in America if you have an accent? Yes, you can. And that has been changing in the last 10 or 15 years. It was much harder before, but movies represent life, movies represent what happens in the streets. Then we are all in this together.”

After doing her duty, Cruz left the room to return to her seat and watch the Oscars, as she’d said she’d done as a child growing up in the Spanish town of Alcobendas.

Next: Slumdog Millionaire’s Danny Boyle shouts out to Rotten Tomatoes

“Rotten Tom-ah-toes? We love Rotten Tom-ah-toes! It’s got a 95!”

Slumdog Millionaire producer Christian Colson, backstage after his Best Picture win

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In the Oscars press room, you sit in an assigned seat amongst a sea of journalists from around the globe, every one of them decked out in tuxes and gowns, for formality’s sake; the official, scan-able press badge must also be worn at all times, no matter how it clashes with your outfit. Lucky ones get to park their laptops and recording devices at a table, from which they write and file reports throughout the night. Food and non-alcoholic beverages are kindly catered in the hallway (try the shrimp!), and you’re free to roam, headset in ear tuned to ABC’s official telecast, around a guarded 50-foot perimeter. It’s a strange combination of traditional etiquette and voluntary imprisonment, and the tightest-run ship in movie journalism.

At every seat there is an assigned number card, which you must hold up to be called on during each press conference. If your number is called, you’ll get the microphone to ask a winner one of ten or so questions before they’re shuffled offstage, to escape back into the safety of the Kodak Theater and rejoin the show. Rotten Tomatoes’ number was 141, and it was called once — at the end of the night, while the night’s biggest winner, Slumdog director Danny Boyle, was taking questions.

“Rotten Tom-ah-toes? We love Rotten Tom-ah-toes!” shouted Slumdog producer Christian Colson, who along with Boyle received an Oscar for the film. “It’s got a 95!”

(Slumdog Millionaire actually has a 94 percent Tomatometer rating. For a second I thought about it, then politely declined to correct Colson; he was only off by one point.)

Boyle, whose naturally jubilant demeanor was especially cheerful after eight Slumdog wins on the night, stood with his Oscar in his left hand and a glass of champagne in his right. “My other film, Millions, also did really well on Rotten Tom-ah-toes!” (He was right — Millions scored an 88 percent Tomatometer and won the Golden Tomato Award for best-reviewed family film.)

After the shout out, Boyle answered my question: even with all of its Oscars and accolades, does he still think Slumdog is and should be an imperfect film? He used the opportunity to reiterate his onstage mention of choreographer Longinus, who directed Slumdog‘s end-credits dance sequence. At his side, Colson jumped in to praise Boyle for having the humility to note his error while onstage accepting his Academy Award. “I don’t want to embarrass Danny, and this would embarrass him,” Colson began, “but it’s a measure of the man that in his Oscar acceptance speech, the last thing he addresses is forgetting someone off the credits, and I think that is awesome.”

Boyle and Colson also juxtaposed their tiny Slumdog — which nearly didn’t get a theatrical release — to the big studio flick The Dark Knight. “It was wonderful to see Heath Ledger’s work acknowledged in The Dark Knight,” Boyle said. “And it is extraordinary work. But like virtually, I am sure, everybody, Heath started small as well. He started [in] small films, you know. Everybody does and we’ve got to protect them.”

“And the studios have got to protect them as well,” he continued. “Because that’s where everybody starts, and they go on. Some people go on to some things and some don’t. But that’s where everybody begins, in those small independent movies. And you learn the business, you learn your craft, you learn what you are doing, you know. So, it’s very, very, very important. The first film I made [cost] a million pounds. The whole film cost a million pounds. That’s where you learn your craft.”

In the end, Boyle himself summed up his entire Slumdog experience. “This amazing British poet called WJ Jordan talks about Americans putting jukeboxes on the moon. Soon you will be putting jukeboxes on the moon. I love that expression, and that’s what tonight feels like. Just amazing like that. The bringing together of things that are just so unlikely and yet wonderful and about entertainment and pleasure and exploring things and changing things.”

Next: More of our favorite backstage snippets from Oscar’s big winners

More of our favorite backstage moments with this year’s Oscar winners:

“I’ve said this before, but WALL-E really was the most unique personal film I could have made, and I really expected it to speak to a minority, not a majority, because I felt I had gotten away with that with Finding Nemo. So, to get this kind of response — it just really gives you a lot of confidence to listen to that little voice inside you again the next time.”

Wall-E director Andrew Stanton, Best Animated Film

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“For me, the whole thing was always just sort of, you know, pay it forward. Harvey gave me his story. [Pause] Harvey gave me his story and it saved my life. I just thought it’s time to pass it on. So the only thing I really knew I wanted to say is to tell those kids out there they are going to be all right.”

Milk screenwriter Dustin Lance Black, winner for Best Adapted Screenplay (pictured below)

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“The slums were obviously extraordinary because we’re encroaching on people’s lives. At the same time we have got carte blanche and the green light to go in there and basically destroy their daily lives. You open a cupboard and a family of 15 falls out. And that’s not something you can control.”

— Best Cinematography winner Anthony Dod Mantle, on filming Slumdog Millionaire in the heart of Mumbai

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“I think there were much more important things in her life –having a baby, and that was good, actually. She took care of the baby. I wished her well.”

A.R. Rahman, composer of Slumdog Millionaire, on the absence of “O Saya” co-nominee M.I.A from the telecast (pictured below)

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“In our tradition, we believe that Om is a word that encompasses the whole experience of the universe. Indians can just listen, can just close your eyes and listen to the pains of living just by the sound of Om. That relates to me on a very personal level, being a sound person. That’s why I live for that.”

— Best Sound Mixing winner Resul Pookutty, the first Indian technician to earn a nomination

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“I have a secret, but if you are going to keep a secret, that will be fine. I am going to work in New York City in the fall, in a high wire walk to a library. I won’t tell you which one and it will be the beginning of a series of walks for literacy around the country to inspire the kids to read.”

Philippe Petit, subject of Best Documentary Winner Man on Wire (pictured below balancing an Oscar on his chin)

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“Meeting Mr. Jack Black was the most exciting thing for him. He always wanted to be funny as he is.”

— Best Animated Short director Kunio Kato (via translator) on his “Mr. Roboto” acceptance speech

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Still have Oscar fever? See the full list of winners from the 81st Annual Academy Awards, and browse our Oscars red carpet gallery. To find out where Slumdog Millionaire‘s 94 percent Tomatometer ranks among every Best Picture Oscar winner ever, check out our updated Best of the Best Pictures.

For award season interviews with Oscar nominees and winners, plus winners lists of every major award show and more, check out our Awards Tour.


Slumdog Millionaire took home eight Oscars at last night’s Academy Awards, including Best Picture. But how does Danny Boyle’s film fare against all the Best Pictures in Oscar history?

Pretty well, actually. With its 94 percent Tomatometer (and within our Bayesian formula), Slumdog is the 31st best-reviewed Best Picture of all time; it’s a notch below My Fair Lady and three slots behind last year’s victor No Country for Old Men but ahead of such noteworthy recent winners as The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (at number 32), The Departed (number 34) and Million Dollar Baby (number 40).

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Click here for the complete list, and take a stroll through Oscar history; we’ve compiled every winner from Wings to Slumdog. Where do your favorites rank? Check out Best of the Best Pictures to find out!

Slumdog Millionaire raked in eight Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Director for Danny Boyle. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button took home three Oscars, and Milk and The Dark Knight won two. Below, you’ll find all the winners from Oscar night.

And don’t forget to browse our full red carpet gallery and our own live analysis of the ceremony on Twitter.


Best Motion Picture of the Year


The Reader



The Reader


60%


Slumdog Millionaire



Slumdog
Millionaire


94%


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button




The Curious Case of Benjamin Button


71%


Milk


Milk

93%


Frost Nixon


Frost/Nixon

91%


Best Achievement in Directing

Stephen
Daldry


The Reader



The Reader


60%

Danny Boyle

Slumdog Millionaire



Slumdog
Millionaire


94%

David
Fincher


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button




The Curious Case of Benjamin Button


71%

Gus Van Sant

Milk


Milk

93%

Ron Howard

Frost Nixon


Frost/Nixon

91%


Best Performance by an Actor in a Leading Role


Brad Pitt


Brad Pitt




The Curious Case of Benjamin Button


71%

Mickey
Rourke


Mickey Rourke


The Wrestler

98%

Sean Penn

Sean Penn


Milk

93%

Frank
Langella


Frank Langella


Frost/Nixon

91%


Richard Jenkins


Richard Jenkins



The Visitor


91%


Best Performance by an Actress in a Leading Role

Kate Winslet

Kate Winslet



The Reader


60%

Meryl Streep

Meryl Streep



Doubt


77%

Anne
Hathaway


Anne Hathaway


Rachel
Getting Married


87%

Angelina
Jolie


Angelina Jolie


Changeling

61%


Melissa Leo


Melissa Leo



Frozen River


86%


Best Performance by an Actor in a Supporting Role

Heath Ledger


Heath Ledger


The Dark Knight

94%


Philip Seymour Hoffman


Philip Seymour Hoffman/



Doubt


77%

Robert
Downey Jr.


Robert Downey Jr


Tropic Thunder

83%

Josh Brolin


Josh Brolin


Milk

93%

Michael
Shannon


Michael Shannon



Revolutionary Road


71%


Best Performance by an Actress in a Supporting Role

Marisa Tomei

Marisa Tomei


The Wrestler

98%

Penelope
Cruz


Penelope Cruz


Vicky
Cristina Barcelona


81%

Amy Adams

Amy Adams


Doubt

77%

Viola Davis

Viola Davis



Doubt


77%

Taraji P.
Henson


Taraji P Henson




The Curious Case of Benjamin Button


71%


Original Screenplay Adapted Screenplay

Frozen River
(86%)


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)


Happy-Go-Lucky
(93%)

Doubt (77%)

In Bruges (81%)

Frost/Nixon (91%)

Milk (93%)-

The Reader
(60%)

WALL-E (96%)

Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)-
Foreign Language Film Documentary, Features

The Baader
Meinhof Complex
from Germany (82%)

The Betrayal (91%)

The Class from
France (96%)


Encounters at the End of the World
(93%)

Revanche
from Austria (80%)

The Garden

Departures from
Japan-

Man on Wire
(100%)-

Waltz With
Bashir
from Israel (96%)

Trouble the
Water
(97%)
Animated Feature Film Cinematography

Bolt (87%)

Changeling
(61%)

Kung Fu Panda
(88%)


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)

WALL-E (96%)-

The Dark Knight
(94%)

The Reader
(60%)

Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)-
Art Direction Costume Design

Changeling
(61%)

Australia (54%)


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)-


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)

The Dark Knight
(94%)

The Duchess
(59%)-

The Duchess
(59%)

Milk (93%)

Revolutionary
Road
(71%)

Revolutionary
Road
(68%)
Editing Sound


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)

The Dark Knight
(94%)

The Dark Knight
(94%)

Frost/Nixon (91%)


Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)-


Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)-

WALL-E (96%)

Milk (93%)

Wanted (72%)
Sound Editing Visual Effects

The Dark Knight
(94%)-


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)-

Iron Man (93%)

The Dark Knight
(94%)

Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)

Iron Man (93%)

WALL-E (96%)

Wanted (72%)
Makeup Original Song


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)-

“Jai Ho”:
Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)-

The Dark Knight
(94%)

“O Saya”:
Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)

Hellboy
II: The Golden Army
(88%)

“Down to Earth”: WALL-E
(96%)
Original Score Short Film, Animated


The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
(71%)
La Maison en Petits Cubes-

Defiance
(54%)
Lavatory – Lovestory

Milk (93%)
Oktapodi

Slumdog
Millionaire
(94%)-
Presto

WALL-E (96%)
This Way Up
Short Film, Live Action Documentary, Short Subject
On the Line The Conscience of Nhem En
Manon on the Asphalt The Final Inch
New Boy Smile Pinki-
The Pig The Witness – From the Balcony of Room 306
Toyland-

This Sunday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will bequeath little gold statuettes to films that it believes exemplify the finest in moviemaking. We at Rotten Tomatoes figured it was a good time to run down every single feature film that’s up for an Oscar, as well as compiling other major awards season honors each movie has received. And of course, we’ve included the Tomatometers for each film, lest the critics be lost in the shuffle.



DeparturesN/A

Oscar Nomination: Best Foreign Film

Other Major Awards: None

Departures, Japan’s Academy Award entry, has yet to be distributed in the United States. The film, which tells the story of an unemployed cellist who becomes a funeral professional, gained some recognition on the festival circuit.




The Garden</