(Photo by Disney /Courtesy Everett Collection)

All 18 Disney Live-Action Remakes Ranked

Ever since Disney’s $200 million psychedelic experiment Alice in Wonderland yielded a $1 billion return, the studio has been on the live-action remake train, adapting their classic cartoons for new generations to come.

We’ve seen critical hits (Cinderella), box office bonanzas (The Jungle Book), and even a dud or two according to the Tomatometer (Dumbo). For the completionist’s sake, we’re also including sequels like 102 Dalmatians in this list, and well as movies whose stories haven’t necessarily been told before, but which re-purpose old animated characters, like Christopher Robin.

We’re also including a few remakes from the 1990s which predate the current pile-on. In 2019 alone, there were five releases: Dumbo, Aladdin, The Lion King, Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, and Lady and the Tramp. And with Cruella now in theaters and on Disney+ (with Premiere Access), we’re taking a look back on every Disney live-action remake ranked by Tomatometer!

#18
Adjusted Score: 44282%
Critics Consensus: Alice Through the Looking Glass is just as visually impressive as its predecessor, but that isn't enough to cover for an underwhelming story that fails to live up to its classic characters.
Synopsis: After slipping through a mirror, Alice (Mia Wasikowska) finds herself back in Underland with the White Queen (Anne Hathaway), the... [More]
Directed By: James Bobin

#17

102 Dalmatians (2000)
31%

#17
Adjusted Score: 33034%
Critics Consensus: This sequel to the live-action 101 Dalmatians is simply more of the same. Critics say it also drags in parts, potentially boring children, and that it's too violent for a G-rated movie.
Synopsis: In this all-new tale, Cruella De Vil (Glenn Close) is released from prison on good behavior vowing that she will... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Lima

#16
Adjusted Score: 53814%
Critics Consensus: While it's far from cursed, Maleficent: Mistress of Evil too rarely supports its impressive cast and visuals with enough magical storytelling to justify its existence.
Synopsis: Maleficent travels to a grand old castle to celebrate young Aurora's upcoming wedding to Prince Phillip. While there, she meets... [More]
Directed By: Joachim Rønning

#15

101 Dalmatians (1996)
41%

#15
Adjusted Score: 41649%
Critics Consensus: Neat performance from Glenn Close aside, 101 Dalmatians is a bland, pointless remake.
Synopsis: Fashion designer Anita and computer-game writer Roger meet, fall in love and marry along with their dalmatians Perdita and Pongo.... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Herek

#14

Dumbo (2019)
46%

#14
Adjusted Score: 68160%
Critics Consensus: Dumbo is held partly aloft by Tim Burton's visual flair, but a crowded canvas and overstretched story leave this live-action remake more workmanlike than wondrous.
Synopsis: Struggling circus owner Max Medici enlists a former star and his two children to care for Dumbo, a baby elephant... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 61843%
Critics Consensus: Tim Burton's Alice sacrifices the book's minimal narrative coherence -- and much of its heart -- but it's an undeniable visual treat.
Synopsis: A young girl when she first visited magical Underland, Alice Kingsleigh (Mia Wasikowska) is now a teenager with no memory... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#12

The Lion King (2019)
52%

#12
Adjusted Score: 78243%
Critics Consensus: While it can take pride in its visual achievements,The Lion King is a by-the-numbers retelling that lacks the energy and heart that made the original so beloved--though for some fans that may just be enough.
Synopsis: Simba idolizes his father, King Mufasa, and takes to heart his own royal destiny on the plains of Africa. But... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#11

Maleficent (2014)
54%

#11
Adjusted Score: 64922%
Critics Consensus: Angelina Jolie's magnetic performance outshines Maleficent's dazzling special effects; unfortunately, the movie around them fails to justify all that impressive effort.
Synopsis: As a beautiful young woman of pure heart, Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) has an idyllic life in a forest kingdom. When... [More]
Directed By: Robert Stromberg

#10

Aladdin (2019)
57%

#10
Adjusted Score: 80015%
Critics Consensus: Aladdin retells its classic source material's story with sufficient spectacle and skill, even if it never approaches the dazzling splendor of the animated original.
Synopsis: Aladdin is a lovable street urchin who meets Princess Jasmine, the beautiful daughter of the sultan of Agrabah. While visiting... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 67466%
Critics Consensus: Lady and the Tramp's cute dogs and likable cast work well enough, but the live-action update lacks some of the magic that made the original 1955 film such a delight.
Synopsis: In this heartwarming romantic adventure, a timeless re-telling of the 1955 animated classic, Lady, an overachieving, pampered American Cocker Spaniel... [More]
Directed By: Charlie Bean

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 98942%
Critics Consensus: With an enchanting cast, beautifully crafted songs, and a painterly eye for detail, Beauty and the Beast offers a faithful yet fresh retelling that honors its beloved source material.
Synopsis: Belle (Emma Watson), a bright, beautiful and independent young woman, is taken prisoner by a beast (Dan Stevens) in its... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 88669%
Critics Consensus: Christopher Robin may not equal A.A. Milne's stories -- or their animated Disney adaptations -- but it should prove sweet enough for audiences seeking a little childhood magic.
Synopsis: Christopher Robin -- now a family man living in London -- receives a surprise visit from his old childhood pal,... [More]
Directed By: Marc Forster

#6

Mulan (2020)
73%

#6
Adjusted Score: 94596%
Critics Consensus: It could have told its classic story with greater depth, but the live-action Mulan is a visual marvel that serves as a stirring update to its animated predecessor.
Synopsis: To save her ailing father from serving in the Imperial Army, a fearless young woman disguises herself as a man... [More]
Directed By: Niki Caro

#5

Cruella (2021)
74%

#5
Adjusted Score: 96442%
Critics Consensus: Cruella can't quite answer the question of why its title character needed an origin story, but this dazzling visual feast is awfully fun to watch whenever its leading ladies lock horns.
Synopsis: Academy Award (R) winner Emma Stone ("La La Land") stars in Disney's "Cruella," an all-new live-action feature film about the... [More]
Directed By: Craig Gillespie

#4
Adjusted Score: 82247%
Critics Consensus: Rudyard Kipling's The Jungle Book may not hew as closely to the book as its title suggests, but it still offers an entertaining live-action take on a story best known in animated form.
Synopsis: When his father is killed by a jungle tiger, Mowgli (Jason Scott Lee) is orphaned and grows up in the... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#3

Cinderella (2015)
84%

#3
Adjusted Score: 93476%
Critics Consensus: Refreshingly traditional in a revisionist era, Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella proves Disney hasn't lost any of its old-fashioned magic.
Synopsis: After her father unexpectedly dies, young Ella (Lily James) finds herself at the mercy of her cruel stepmother (Cate Blanchett)... [More]
Directed By: Kenneth Branagh

#2

Pete's Dragon (2016)
88%

#2
Adjusted Score: 102285%
Critics Consensus: Pete's Dragon continues Disney's current live-action winning streak with an update that gives the original a visual overhaul without overwhelming its sweet, soulful charm.
Synopsis: Mr. Meacham (Robert Redford), a woodcarver, delights local children with stories of a mysterious dragon that lives deep in the... [More]
Directed By: David Lowery

#1

The Jungle Book (2016)
94%

#1
Adjusted Score: 114751%
Critics Consensus: As lovely to behold as it is engrossing to watch, The Jungle Book is the rare remake that actually improves upon its predecessors -- all while setting a new standard for CGI.
Synopsis: Raised by a family of wolves since birth, Mowgli (Neel Sethi) must leave the only home he's ever known when... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

(Photo by Warner Bros./ courtesy Everett Collection)

All Movies That Made Over A Billion Dollars, Ranked by Tomatometer

We heard it in a Hollywood movie once: “A million dollars isn’t cool. You know what’s cool? A billion dollars.”

And in this town, it’s true. A movie making that minimum seven figures isn’t cool, it’s a box office bomb. But 10 figures? Now we’re talking. Cracking a billion dollars globally requires a mighty recipe of the hottest stars, the shiniest filmmaking technology, and an engaging plot with twists and turns that never becomes super-duper complicated. And, of course, you’ll need an audience willing to turn out in droves the world over, from America to Lebanon to Zambia.

Now we’ve compiled all of the movies that have achieved just that and ranked them by Tomatometer. It’s a compelling window into our era of blockbusters and inflation. The Transformers and Pirates of the Caribbean series each have multiple entries, in the years before the franchises were run into the ground. Alice in Wonderland showed the way for Disney and these newfangled live-action remakes. The last Lord of the Rings was rewarded by fans with the highest gross of the trilogy, goodwill that transferred into The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, and then evaporated after that. The presence of the Jurassic and Star Wars movies, along with Skyfall, shows you can still wring plenty of money out of long-in-the-tooth franchise.

Then there’s the superheroes. The Dark Knight movies officially ushered in the era of big business for those who take their comic-book moviemaking seriously. Marvel took a lighter step, focusing on interconnected stories that create serious FOMO for those who skip the multiplex line, in movies like Avengers, Spider-Man, Captain Marvel, and Black Panther.

Re-releases of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone was enough to get it over the edge, while Spider-Man: No Way Home had no problem swinging over the line! And if you want to go more in-depth, check out our article on The 50 Highest-Grossing Movies Ever, which includes some of those lesser specimens that couldn’t quite break a billion.

#48
Adjusted Score: 25962%
Critics Consensus: With the fourth installment in Michael Bay's blockbuster Transformers franchise, nothing is in disguise: Fans of loud, effects-driven action will find satisfaction, and all others need not apply.
Synopsis: After an epic battle, a great city lies in ruins, but the Earth itself is saved. As humanity begins to... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#47
Adjusted Score: 42962%
Critics Consensus: It's shorter and leaner than the previous sequel, but this Pirates runs aground on a disjointed plot and a non-stop barrage of noisy action sequences.
Synopsis: The checkered past of Capt. Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) catches up to him when he encounters Angelica (Penélope Cruz), a... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#46
Adjusted Score: 44330%
Critics Consensus: Its special effects -- and 3D shots -- are undeniably impressive, but they aren't enough to fill up its loud, bloated running time, or mask its thin, indifferent script.
Synopsis: Sam Witwicky (Shia LaBeouf) and his new girlfriend, Carly (Rosie Huntington-Whiteley), join the fray when the evil Decepticons renew their... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#45
Adjusted Score: 73692%
Critics Consensus: Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom adds another set piece-packed entry to the blockbuster franchise, although genuinely thrilling moments are in increasingly short supply.
Synopsis: Three years after the destruction of the Jurassic World theme park, Owen Grady and Claire Dearing return to the island... [More]
Directed By: J.A. Bayona

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: 61843%
Critics Consensus: Tim Burton's Alice sacrifices the book's minimal narrative coherence -- and much of its heart -- but it's an undeniable visual treat.
Synopsis: A young girl when she first visited magical Underland, Alice Kingsleigh (Mia Wasikowska) is now a teenager with no memory... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#43
Adjusted Score: 62039%
Critics Consensus: Burdened by exposition and populated with stock characters, The Phantom Menace gets the Star Wars prequels off to a bumpy -- albeit visually dazzling -- start.
Synopsis: Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor) is a young apprentice Jedi knight under the tutelage of Qui-Gon Jinn (Liam Neeson) ; Anakin... [More]
Directed By: George Lucas

#42

The Lion King (2019)
52%

#42
Adjusted Score: 78243%
Critics Consensus: While it can take pride in its visual achievements,The Lion King is a by-the-numbers retelling that lacks the energy and heart that made the original so beloved--though for some fans that may just be enough.
Synopsis: Simba idolizes his father, King Mufasa, and takes to heart his own royal destiny on the plains of Africa. But... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#41
Adjusted Score: 83579%
Critics Consensus: Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker suffers from a frustrating lack of imagination, but concludes this beloved saga with fan-focused devotion.
Synopsis: When it's discovered that the evil Emperor Palpatine did not die at the hands of Darth Vader, the rebels must... [More]
Directed By: J.J. Abrams

#40
Adjusted Score: 61909%
Critics Consensus: Gone is Depp's unpredictability and much of the humor and originality of the first movie.
Synopsis: When ghostly pirate Davy Jones (Bill Nighy) comes to collect a blood debt, Capt. Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) must find... [More]
Directed By: Gore Verbinski

#39

Minions (2015)
55%

#39
Adjusted Score: 62949%
Critics Consensus: The Minions' brightly colored brand of gibberish-fueled insanity stretches to feature length in their self-titled Despicable Me spinoff, with uneven but often hilarious results.
Synopsis: Evolving from single-celled yellow organisms at the dawn of time, Minions live to serve, but find themselves working for a... [More]
Directed By: Pierre Coffin, Kyle Balda

#38

Aladdin (2019)
57%

#38
Adjusted Score: 80015%
Critics Consensus: Aladdin retells its classic source material's story with sufficient spectacle and skill, even if it never approaches the dazzling splendor of the animated original.
Synopsis: Aladdin is a lovable street urchin who meets Princess Jasmine, the beautiful daughter of the sultan of Agrabah. While visiting... [More]
Directed By: Guy Ritchie

#37

Despicable Me 3 (2017)
59%

#37
Adjusted Score: 70168%
Critics Consensus: Despicable Me 3 should keep fans of the franchise consistently entertained with another round of colorful animation and zany -- albeit somewhat scattershot -- humor.
Synopsis: The mischievous Minions hope that Gru will return to a life of crime after the new boss of the Anti-Villain... [More]
Directed By: Pierre Coffin, Kyle Balda

#36
Adjusted Score: 77350%
Critics Consensus: Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is an earnest, visually resplendent trip, but the film's deliberate pace robs the material of some of its majesty.
Synopsis: Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) lives a simple life with his fellow hobbits in the shire, until the wizard Gandalf (Ian... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#35

Aquaman (2018)
65%

#35
Adjusted Score: 90343%
Critics Consensus: Aquaman swims with its entertainingly ludicrous tide, offering up CGI superhero spectacle that delivers energetic action with an emphasis on good old-fashioned fun.
Synopsis: Once home to the most advanced civilization on Earth, the city of Atlantis is now an underwater kingdom ruled by... [More]
Directed By: James Wan

#34
#34
Adjusted Score: 90575%
Critics Consensus: The Fate of the Furious opens a new chapter in the franchise, fueled by the same infectious cast chemistry and over-the-top action fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: With Dom and Letty married, Brian and Mia retired and the rest of the crew exonerated, the globe-trotting team has... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#33

Joker (2019)
68%

#33
Adjusted Score: 105605%
Critics Consensus: Joker gives its infamous central character a chillingly plausible origin story that serves as a brilliant showcase for its star -- and a dark evolution for comics-inspired cinema.
Synopsis: Forever alone in a crowd, failed comedian Arthur Fleck seeks connection as he walks the streets of Gotham City. Arthur... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#32

Jurassic World (2015)
71%

#32
Adjusted Score: 84910%
Critics Consensus: Jurassic World can't match the original for sheer inventiveness and impact, but it works in its own right as an entertaining -- and visually dazzling -- popcorn thriller.
Synopsis: Located off the coast of Costa Rica, the Jurassic World luxury resort provides a habitat for an array of genetically... [More]
Directed By: Colin Trevorrow

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 98942%
Critics Consensus: With an enchanting cast, beautifully crafted songs, and a painterly eye for detail, Beauty and the Beast offers a faithful yet fresh retelling that honors its beloved source material.
Synopsis: Belle (Emma Watson), a bright, beautiful and independent young woman, is taken prisoner by a beast (Dan Stevens) in its... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

#30
#30
Adjusted Score: 90788%
Critics Consensus: Exuberant and eye-popping, Avengers: Age of Ultron serves as an overstuffed but mostly satisfying sequel, reuniting its predecessor's unwieldy cast with a few new additions and a worthy foe.
Synopsis: When Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) jump-starts a dormant peacekeeping program, things go terribly awry, forcing him, Thor (Chris Hemsworth),... [More]
Directed By: Joss Whedon

#29

Frozen II (2019)
78%

#29
Adjusted Score: 97997%
Critics Consensus: Frozen II can't quite recapture the showstopping feel of its predecessor, but it remains a dazzling adventure into the unknown.
Synopsis: Elsa the Snow Queen has an extraordinary gift -- the power to create ice and snow. But no matter how... [More]
Directed By: Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee

#28

Iron Man 3 (2013)
79%

#28
Adjusted Score: 92731%
Critics Consensus: With the help of its charismatic lead, some impressive action sequences, and even a few surprises, Iron Man 3 is a witty, entertaining adventure and a strong addition to the Marvel canon.
Synopsis: Plagued with worry and insomnia since saving New York from destruction, Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.), now, is more dependent... [More]
Directed By: Shane Black

#27

Captain Marvel (2019)
79%

#27
Adjusted Score: 113649%
Critics Consensus: Packed with action, humor, and visual thrills, Captain Marvel introduces the MCU's latest hero with an origin story that makes effective use of the franchise's signature formula.
Synopsis: Captain Marvel is an extraterrestrial Kree warrior who finds herself caught in the middle of an intergalactic battle between her... [More]
Directed By: Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck

#26
Adjusted Score: 89062%
Critics Consensus: Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone adapts its source material faithfully while condensing the novel's overstuffed narrative into an involving -- and often downright exciting -- big-screen magical caper.
Synopsis: Adaptation of the first of J.K. Rowling's popular children's novels about Harry Potter, a boy who learns on his eleventh... [More]
Directed By: Chris Columbus

#25

Avatar (2009)
81%

#25
Adjusted Score: 94650%
Critics Consensus: It might be more impressive on a technical level than as a piece of storytelling, but Avatar reaffirms James Cameron's singular gift for imaginative, absorbing filmmaking.
Synopsis: On the lush alien world of Pandora live the Na'vi, beings who appear primitive but are highly evolved. Because the... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#24

Furious 7 (2015)
82%

#24
Adjusted Score: 92414%
Critics Consensus: Serving up a fresh round of over-the-top thrills while adding unexpected dramatic heft, Furious 7 keeps the franchise moving in more ways than one.
Synopsis: After defeating international terrorist Owen Shaw, Dominic Toretto (Vin Diesel), Brian O'Conner (Paul Walker) and the rest of the crew... [More]
Directed By: James Wan

#23
Adjusted Score: 113393%
Critics Consensus: Rogue One draws deep on Star Wars mythology while breaking new narrative and aesthetic ground -- and suggesting a bright blockbuster future for the franchise.
Synopsis: Former scientist Galen Erso lives on a farm with his wife and young daughter, Jyn. His peaceful existence comes crashing... [More]
Directed By: Gareth Edwards

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 114162%
Critics Consensus: Avengers: Infinity War ably juggles a dizzying array of MCU heroes in the fight against their gravest threat yet, and the result is a thrilling, emotionally resonant blockbuster that (mostly) realizes its gargantuan ambitions.
Synopsis: Iron Man, Thor, the Hulk and the rest of the Avengers unite to battle their most powerful enemy yet --... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 103502%
Critics Consensus: The Dark Knight Rises is an ambitious, thoughtful, and potent action film that concludes Christopher Nolan's franchise in spectacular fashion.
Synopsis: It has been eight years since Batman (Christian Bale), in collusion with Commissioner Gordon (Gary Oldman), vanished into the night.... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Nolan

#20

Titanic (1997)
89%

#20
Adjusted Score: 101430%
Critics Consensus: A mostly unqualified triumph for James Cameron, who offers a dizzying blend of spectacular visuals and old-fashioned melodrama.
Synopsis: James Cameron's "Titanic" is an epic, action-packed romance set against the ill-fated maiden voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic; the pride... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#19

Frozen (2013)
90%

#19
Adjusted Score: 100194%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully animated, smartly written, and stocked with singalong songs, Frozen adds another worthy entry to the Disney canon.
Synopsis: When their kingdom becomes trapped in perpetual winter, fearless Anna (Kristen Bell) joins forces with mountaineer Kristoff (Jonathan Groff) and... [More]
Directed By: Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee

#18
Adjusted Score: 117397%
Critics Consensus: Captain America: Civil War begins the next wave of Marvel movies with an action-packed superhero blockbuster boasting a decidedly non-cartoonish plot and the courage to explore thought-provoking themes.
Synopsis: Political pressure mounts to install a system of accountability when the actions of the Avengers lead to collateral damage. The... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 118745%
Critics Consensus: A breezily unpredictable blend of teen romance and superhero action, Spider-Man: Far from Home stylishly sets the stage for the next era of the MCU.
Synopsis: Peter Parker's relaxing European vacation takes an unexpected turn when Nick Fury shows up in his hotel room to recruit... [More]
Directed By: Jon Watts

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 106031%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a script that emphasizes its heroes' humanity and a wealth of superpowered set pieces, The Avengers lives up to its hype and raises the bar for Marvel at the movies.
Synopsis: When Thor's evil brother, Loki (Tom Hiddleston), gains access to the unlimited power of the energy cube called the Tesseract,... [More]
Directed By: Joss Whedon

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 126927%
Critics Consensus: Star Wars: The Last Jedi honors the saga's rich legacy while adding some surprising twists -- and delivering all the emotion-rich action fans could hope for.
Synopsis: Luke Skywalker's peaceful and solitary existence gets upended when he encounters Rey, a young woman who shows strong signs of... [More]
Directed By: Rian Johnson

#14

Jurassic Park (1993)
92%

#14
Adjusted Score: 102600%
Critics Consensus: Jurassic Park is a spectacle of special effects and life-like animatronics, with some of Spielberg's best sequences of sustained awe and sheer terror since Jaws.
Synopsis: In Steven Spielberg's massive blockbuster, paleontologists Alan Grant (Sam Neill) and Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern) and mathematician Ian Malcolm (Jeff... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#13

Skyfall (2012)
92%

#13
Adjusted Score: 108066%
Critics Consensus: Sam Mendes brings Bond surging back with a smart, sexy, riveting action thriller that qualifies as one of the best 007 films to date.
Synopsis: When James Bond's (Daniel Craig) latest assignment goes terribly wrong, it leads to a calamitous turn of events: Undercover agents... [More]
Directed By: Sam Mendes

#12
Adjusted Score: 102799%
Critics Consensus: Visually breathtaking and emotionally powerful, The Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King is a moving and satisfying conclusion to a great trilogy.
Synopsis: The culmination of nearly 10 years' work and conclusion to Peter Jackson's epic trilogy based on the timeless J.R.R. Tolkien... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 114438%
Critics Consensus: A bigger, bolder Spider-Man sequel, No Way Home expands the franchise's scope and stakes without losing sight of its humor and heart.
Synopsis: For the first time in the cinematic history of Spider-Man, our friendly neighborhood hero's identity is revealed, bringing his Super... [More]
Directed By: Jon Watts

#10

Incredibles 2 (2018)
93%

#10
Adjusted Score: 116865%
Critics Consensus: Incredibles 2 reunites Pixar's family crimefighting team for a long-awaited follow-up that may not quite live up to the original, but comes close enough to earn its name.
Synopsis: Telecommunications guru Winston Deavor enlists Elastigirl to fight crime and make the public fall in love with superheroes once again.... [More]
Directed By: Brad Bird

#9
Adjusted Score: 110988%
Critics Consensus: Packed with action and populated by both familiar faces and fresh blood, The Force Awakens successfully recalls the series' former glory while injecting it with renewed energy.
Synopsis: Thirty years after the defeat of the Galactic Empire, the galaxy faces a new threat from the evil Kylo Ren... [More]
Directed By: J.J. Abrams

#8

Finding Dory (2016)
94%

#8
Adjusted Score: 115466%
Critics Consensus: Funny, poignant, and thought-provoking, Finding Dory delivers a beautifully animated adventure that adds another entertaining chapter to its predecessor's classic story.
Synopsis: Dory (Ellen DeGeneres) is a wide-eyed, blue tang fish who suffers from memory loss every 10 seconds or so. The... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Stanton

#7

The Dark Knight (2008)
94%

#7
Adjusted Score: 107468%
Critics Consensus: Dark, complex, and unforgettable, The Dark Knight succeeds not just as an entertaining comic book film, but as a richly thrilling crime saga.
Synopsis: With the help of allies Lt. Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) and DA Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart), Batman (Christian Bale) has... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Nolan

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 127912%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, entertaining, and emotionally impactful, Avengers: Endgame does whatever it takes to deliver a satisfying finale to Marvel's epic Infinity Saga.
Synopsis: Adrift in space with no food or water, Tony Stark sends a message to Pepper Potts as his oxygen supply... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo

#5
Adjusted Score: 109303%
Critics Consensus: Thrilling, powerfully acted, and visually dazzling, Deathly Hallows Part II brings the Harry Potter franchise to a satisfying -- and suitably magical -- conclusion.
Synopsis: A clash between good and evil awaits as young Harry (Daniel Radcliffe), Ron (Rupert Grint) and Hermione (Emma Watson) prepare... [More]
Directed By: David Yates

#4

Black Panther (2018)
96%

#4
Adjusted Score: 128732%
Critics Consensus: Black Panther elevates superhero cinema to thrilling new heights while telling one of the MCU's most absorbing stories -- and introducing some of its most fully realized characters.
Synopsis: After the death of his father, T'Challa returns home to the African nation of Wakanda to take his rightful place... [More]
Directed By: Ryan Coogler

#3

Toy Story 4 (2019)
97%

#3
Adjusted Score: 124742%
Critics Consensus: Heartwarming, funny, and beautifully animated, Toy Story 4 manages the unlikely feat of extending -- and perhaps concluding -- a practically perfect animated saga.
Synopsis: Woody, Buzz Lightyear and the rest of the gang embark on a road trip with Bonnie and a new toy... [More]
Directed By: Josh Cooley

#2

Zootopia (2016)
98%

#2
Adjusted Score: 115819%
Critics Consensus: The brilliantly well-rounded Zootopia offers a thoughtful, inclusive message that's as rich and timely as its sumptuously state-of-the-art animation -- all while remaining fast and funny enough to keep younger viewers entertained.
Synopsis: From the largest elephant to the smallest shrew, the city of Zootopia is a mammal metropolis where various animals live... [More]
Directed By: Byron Howard, Rich Moore

#1

Toy Story 3 (2010)
98%

#1
Adjusted Score: 110116%
Critics Consensus: Deftly blending comedy, adventure, and honest emotion, Toy Story 3 is a rare second sequel that really works.
Synopsis: With their beloved Andy preparing to leave for college, Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen), Jessie (Joan Cusack), and... [More]
Directed By: Lee Unkrich

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Avengers Endgame

(Photo by © Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, © Marvel Studios)

Updated: Monday, March 2, 2020. 

2019 may not have been the biggest year ever at the box office, but it had a number of massive films that entered the top 50 highest-grossing movies of all time – including one that took out the number 1 slot. Avengers: Endgame officially became the number 1 movie of all time, globally, when Disney and Marvel Studios re-released the film with a tiny amount of fan-baiting new footage (it was a gamble that paid off, as it was looking like the movie might not be able to catch previous number 1, Avatar, despite a record-shattering opening weekend box office). Meanwhile, the Mouse House’s live-action remake of The Lion King – or “computer-animated remake,” depending on which side of the argument you’re sitting on – entered the top 10 highest-grossing films of all time at number 7.

Simba’s kingly box office performance as well as a stellar result for Frozen II means that Disney now occupies six of the 10 top box office rankings of all time worldwide. Toy Story and Captain Marvel gave Disney even more reason to celebrate last year as they entered the top 50, and the year ended on a high note for the studio, with Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker joining the list, even if the final(?) Skywalker film – which has now passed $1 billion globally – underperformed expectations. Meanwhile, also in 2019, Sony released its highest-grossing film to date, Spider-Man: Far From Home, which entered the top 25.

Perhaps biggest box office surprise of 2019 – and maybe even its biggest box office story – was the phenomenal success of Warner Bros.’ R-rated Joker, the standalone DC film starring Joaquin Phoenix that is currently at number 31 on this list, having surpassed AladdinThe Dark Knight, Jurassic ParkThe Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, and Rogue One.

What does 2020 have in store? While there are no Avengers movies or any Star Wars films hitting theaters, the MCU carries on (Black WidowThe Eternals) and DC is throwing a bunch of potentially huge properties our way, including Wonder Woman 1984. Originals could also break through, with Christopher Nolan’s Tenet and Denis Villeneuve’s Dune eyed as major contenders to make a box office dent. We’ll update as the year’s films start to make their appearances on this list.

For the list below, we’ve included global box office performance, as well as domestic, and release date. We included dollars earned in re-releases, and in each of our descriptions, we look at where the film stood record-wise at the time of its run, and dive into things like critical and audience reception. We’ll be here to track the progress of new blockbusters and regularly update this list of top box office performers. So keep your eyes here, and check in with our weekly weekend box office wraps.  


1. $2.798 Billion 

Avengers: Endgame (2019) 94%


Domestic: $858.4 million (including re-releases)
Release date: April 26, 2019

The journey that began in 2008 with Iron Man was coming to an end – at least for some of the characters in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Audiences that had been holding their breath for an entire year after perhaps the biggest cliffhanger since Empire Strikes Back could not wait to buy their tickets – and did they ever buy those tickets when they finally could. Opening weekend for Avengers: Endgame in April 2019 surpassed Infinity War’s year-long record by nearly $100 million. In just eight days, the film had grossed a half-billion domestically. On day 10 it was over $621 million. One by one the records fell, leading many to ignore the words “if” and “can” and focus instead on “when” Avatar’s previous record ($2.787 billion) as the highest-grossing movie would fall. But Endgame began to show signs early in its run that its impressive sprinting start might not be enough for it to ultimately come out ahead of James Cameron’s epic; it only had the second-biggest second weekend ever and the fourth-best third weekend. In the era of the modern blockbuster, even a record-breaker can be front-loaded and only spend three weeks atop the charts. It really all came down to a final dash near the finish line. After just six weeks of release, Endgame was about $73 million away from dethroning Avatar – substantial ground to make up. But then Marvel and Disney re-released the film on June 28 with new goodies over its end credits. And then, over the weekend of July 19, 2019 – its 13th week of release – when another Disney release would begin its run for the top 10 all-time earners (hello, Lion King), Endgame squeaked ahead. It may not have been able to catch The Force Awakens for the all-time domestic leader, but by the time summer was over, it would pull in front of Avatar and become the king of the world (sorry, James).


2. $2.790 Billion 

Avatar (2009) 81%


Domestic: $760.5 million (including re-releases)
Release date: December 18, 2009

The world had to wait some 12 years for James Cameron to follow up the biggest film of all-time with what would become the new biggest film of all time. Nobody believed he was going to surpass Titanic’s numbers with this tale of an alien planet and the paraplegic Marine who teams up with its inhabitants in the battle for Unobtanium. But he did. At the peak of a 3-D reemergence, aided by the filmmaker’s usual technological gamesmanship (and higher ticket prices), Avatar‘s seven straight weekends at number 1 led to over $595 million at the North American box office. Then, two days later on Feb. 2, 2010, its 47th day of release, the movie became the highest domestic earner ever. Avatar held that record for five years and eleven months and went on to become the only film ever to earn $2 billion outside of the U.S. and Canada, making it the world’s highest grosser at the time. It held onto its impressive global record for nearly 10 years. Until Avengers: Endgame.


3. $2.194 Billion 

Titanic (1997) 89%


Domestic: $659.4 million (including re-releases)
Release date: December 19, 1997

James Cameron makes expensive movies. The Abyss, Terminator 2, and True Lies were all the most expensive movies of their time upon release. In 1997, Cameron blew out the budget again and this time there was worry he may have gone too far. Though delayed from July until December, Titanic nevertheless became a global phenomenon the likes of which the box office had never seen at the time. After 15 straight weeks at number 1, 14 Oscar nominations and 11 statuettes, Titanic, its stars and its song were ingrained in the hearts and tear ducts of the world, and the movie would hold the all-time box office record for 12 years – until Cameron would eclipse himself once again with Avatar.



4. $2.068 Billion 

Star Wars: The Force Awakens (2015) 93%


Domestic: $936.7 million
Release date: December 18, 2015

Twelve years after the completion of the Star Wars prequel trilogy, J.J. Abrams was tasked with making Episode VII – a monumental undertaking, and a risky one. Were people still interested after the prequels? Were they burnt out? The approach was to mix the old and the new, and it worked. Abrams gave a brand-new cast of characters the chance to interact with the original trio of Luke, Han, and Leia, and generations of fans were so ready for the adventure that they gave the film the highest opening weekend in history ($247.9 million). In just under three weeks, The Force Awakens became the all-time domestic champion, passing Avatar and joining the $2 billion club within 54 days. It still remains the highest-grossing domestic release of all time.


5. $2.048 Billion 

Avengers: Infinity War (2018) 85%


Domestic: $678.8 million
Release date: April 27, 2018

Just shy of 10 years since it began, the Marvel Cinematic Universe gathered nearly every one of its characters for a galaxy-wide showdown with the series’ Big Bad, Thanos. The movie featured one of the gutsiest cliffhangers in any franchise’s history, leaving audiences to wait in shock for an entire year to discover how Phase 3 of the epic series would end. The film bested The Force Awakens’ three-day opening weekend record with $257.6 million, and hit the $2 billion mark in 48 days. Domestically, it would ultimately come up just short of Black Panther, which was released two months prior.



6. $1.670 Billion 

Jurassic World (2015) 71%


Domestic: $652.3 million
Release date: June 12, 2015

Twenty-two years after Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park became the Jaws for a new generation, it was time for that generation’s kids to have their own version of dinosaur mayhem. The second-best–reviewed film in the Jurassic series (72% on the Tomatometer vs. the original’s 91%), Jurassic World trampled a competitive summer full of Avengers, Minions, and inner feelings, and became just the third film since Titanic in 1998 to pass $600 million in domestic box office.


7. $1.657 Billion 

The Lion King (2019) 52%


Domestic: $543.6 million
Release date: July 19, 2019

Having found success with its live-action re-imaginings of The Jungle Book and Beauty and the Beast, Disney tripled down in 2019 with three “new” remakes. Dumbo was a bit of a bust, Aladdin was a success, but The Lion King truly roared. That made sense given that the 1994 original, at the time, was one of the studio’s most successful films in the middle of its rebirth, and director Jon Favreau’s CGI-fueled version traced it for a new generation. The result is the highest-grossing domestic release to receive a Rotten score on the Tomatometer, at 53%. But its $191 million opening was the eighth highest of all time and it became the 14th film to pass a half-billion domestically and just the ninth film to rack up $1 billion overseas.



8. $1.519 Billion 

Marvel's the Avengers (2012) 91%


Domestic: $623.4 million
Release date: May 4, 2012

Want proof that Avengers work best together? Consider that the first combined outing for Iron Man, Thor, and Captain America bested the $1.4 billion that their origin stories had made combined. Five films into the MCU (including Edward Norton’s The Incredible Hulk), the team was finally assembled for a singular battle against Loki and his inherited army. Joss Whedon’s movie became the first ever to make over $200 million in a single weekend and was Marvel’s first entry into the Billion Dollar Club, which had just 12 members at the time.


9. $1.515 Billion 

Furious 7 (2015) 82%


Domestic: $353 million
Release date: April 3, 2015

What started out as a Point Break derivative – with cars! – became one of the unlikeliest mega franchises ever. Vin Diesel’s return in the series’ fourth film is what really got the Fast and Furious franchise engines revving, and Dwayne Johnson’s addition in the fifth film added some humor and helped get the critics on board. But it was the full embrace of the series’ now-signature bombast, as well as the untimely death of Paul Walker, that brought the combo of curiosity and tribute that helped make James Wan’s Furious 7 the franchise’s most successful entry. It hit with audiences – the opening weekend haul of $147 million was almost $50 million more than any previous entry – as well as with critics (it’s the highest-rated movie in the series at 81% on the Tomatameter).


10. $1.448 Billion 

Frozen II (2019) 78%


Domestic: $477 million
Release date: November 22, 2019

When a film becomes not just a global phenomenon but the highest-grossing film in your canon of animated entertainment, a sequel is inevitable. While not quite as well-received as the first film critically (77% vs. 90% on the Tomatometer), Frozen II virtually demanded that parents bring their children for a second adventure. It began with the third-highest opening weekend for an animated film (after Pixar sequels Incredibles 2 and Finding Dory) – $130.26 million – and then became the highest-grossing film over the five-day Thanksgiving holiday, which was all the more impressive given it had opened the prior weekend. In its fourth weekend of release, it became Disney’s sixth billion-dollar film of 2019, pushing Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle out of the Top 50 on the same weekend that its sequel The Next Level opened. Now, the movie has overtaken the original Frozen to become the highest-grossing animated film of all time.


11. $1.402 Billion 

Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015) 76%


Domestic: $459 million
Release date: May 1, 2015

If any film in the top 10 could be considered both a success and a disappointment it would be Joss Whedon’s Avengers sequel. Coming up shy of the first film’s record-breaking opening weekend – note that it was still the second-best opening of all time when it was released – the movie never matched its predecessor in dollars or affection. With a 75% Tomatometer rating, it doesn’t even rank among the top 10 Tomatometer scores of the MCU – though we think there’s a case to be made for reassessing its virtues – and it lost the summer of 2015 to the dinosaurs of Jurassic World. Still, it was just the 16th film ever to cross the $400 million line domestically in its initial run.


12. $1.347 Billion 

Black Panther (2018) 96%


Domestic: $700.1 million
Release date: February 16, 2018

After an introduction in Captain America: Civil War, T’Challa got his own film in February of 2019. Audiences were hungry for representation on screen and looking for a thrilling re-introduction to the character, and in Ryan Coogler’s action-packed, beautiful-looking epic, they got both. The movie became the fifth film in history to have a $200 million opening weekend, and just the third film ever to gross over $700 million in North America, outlasting even Avengers: Infinity War that summer. Why isn’t it even higher in the list? Because it remains the only post-Avengers film in the MCU to make less money internationally than domestically.



13. $1.342 Billion 

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2011) 96%


Domestic: $381.2 million
Release date: July 15, 2011

Fans of J.K. Rowling’s fantasy series got to see its characters (and the actors who played them) grow up in front of their eyes. The culmination of the journey that began in 2001 also ushered in a new trend of splitting final chapters in halves. The back half of the Potter finale set the new record for an opening weekend at the time with $169.1 million, and its $960 million international haul ranked only behind Avatar and Titanic. By the end of its run, the eight Harry Potter had films grossed a combined $7.72 billion.


14. $1.333 Billion 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi (2017) 91%


Domestic: $620.2 million
Release date: December 15, 2017

One of the more controversial entries in the Star Wars series – don’t get anyone started on the casino planet sequence! – Rian Johnson’s The Last Jedi took the standard dip that had afflicted other middle films in the franchise. The Empire Strikes Back made 31.9% less than A New HopeAttack of the Clones made 34.6% less than The Phantom Menace, and The Last Jedi fell 33.8% off The Force Awakens. Still, Johnson’s film joined Episodes IV, V, and VII in the 90%+ realm on the Tomatometer and may end up being the ultimate bridge to the next generation of Star Wars fans.


15. $1.308 Billion 

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (2018) 47%


Domestic: $417.7 million
Release date: June 22, 2018

J.A. Bayona’s follow-up to Colin Trevorrow’s continuation of Steven Spielberg’s series received the weakest Tomatometer score of the franchise to date (48%) and, following the path of many “second” entries in franchises (even if it’s technically the fifth), dropped 36% from Jurassic World in overall domestic box office. But it was still good enough for 23rd all-time in North America and 13th in overseas dollars. It was also the second-highest-grossing domestic film of the 2018 summer season, behind the #17 film on this list.


16. $1.281 Billion 

Frozen (2013) 90%


Domestic: $400.7 million
Release date: November 22, 2013

The Oscar-winning song that has tortured parents for nearly a decade was just part of what made Frozen the highest-grossing animated film in history. The story of two sisters searching for happily-ever-after with each other rather than the standard gentlemen suitors also won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature and bested 2012’s Ice Age: Continental Drift for the highest international haul for an animated film ever ($875.7 million compared to $715.9 million), a record it holds to this day despite challenges from Minions and Incredibles 2. (If you consider the new Lion King animated though, this is one crown the Arendelle princesses no longer wear.)



17. $1.264 Billion 

Beauty and the Beast (2017) 71%


Domestic: $504 million
Release date: March 17, 2017

Speaking of Disney soundtracks, it was the 2017 live-action redo and not the Best Picture-nominated animated Beauty and the Beast from 1991 that really broke the bank and remains in the record books. Bill Condon’s version of the tale as old as 1991, starring Emma Watson, was not the first of Disney’s splashy re-imaginings, but it certainly was the most successful at the time, becoming the seventh film to cross a half-billion in North America and the 16th to pass three-quarters of a billion overseas.


18. $1.243 Billion 

Incredibles 2 (2018) 93%


Domestic: $608.6 million
Release date: June 15, 2018

Brad Bird’s The Incredibles debuted a full four years before the MCU began, a time when the Pixar brand was as close to a guarantee of success (and quality) as the industry had. Fourteen years later and deep into the superhero cinematic explosion, Bird’s sequel more than doubled the original’s box office and became the highest-grossing animated film ever at the domestic box office. It was the ninth film to cross the $600 million mark in North America and remains in the top 10 all-time earners domestically.



19. $1.236 Billion 

The Fate of the Furious (2017) 67%


Domestic: $226 million
Release date: April 14, 2017

A half-billion dollars was put into the production of the seventh and eighth chapters of this franchise and they made a combined $2.75 billion globally. F. Gary Gray’s film was a bit of a comedown from the highs of James Wan’s Furious 7. It even fell behind the sixth Furious film domestically, but did incredibly well abroad: it was the sixth film ever to make a cool billion outside the U.S. and Canada alone. Though still Fresh (67% on the Tomatometer), it was the lowest-scored Fast and Furious movie among critics since the fourth film.


20. $1.215 Billion 

Iron Man 3 (2013) 79%


Domestic: $409 million
Release date: May 3, 2017

The first Marvel film released following the massive success of Joss Whedon’s The Avengers was also the most successful of the individual Iron Man films. Robert Downey Jr.’s Kiss Kiss Bang Bang director, Shane Black, took over for Jon Favreau and put a twist on some comic-book lore in ways that still draws out disappointment from some fans. The general moviegoing public ate it up, though. Iron Man 3 was just the 13th film to reach $400 million domestic in its initial run, and is the highest-grossing non-Avengers film in the MCU overseas with over $805 million. (And, if you are are keeping track, it is the 12th Disney property in the top 20.)



21. $1.159 Billion 

Minions (2015) 55%


Domestic: $336 million
Release date: July 10, 2015

After two successful Despicable Me films it was time to give Gru’s kooky supporting yellow folk their own story. Smart move. Minions had the largest opening for Illumination Entertainment ever, earning $115.7 million on its first weekend. Though it came up shy domestically of Despicable Me 2 ($336 million vs. $368 million) it can still boast the second-best overseas return for any animated film ($823.4 million), behind only Disney’s Frozen, and stands as the company’s biggest global success to date.


22. $1.153 Billion 

Captain America: Civil War (2016) 90%


Domestic: $408.1 million
Release date: May 6, 2016

It was not officially an Avengers film, but Civil War may as well have been. Thor and Hulk were AWOL, sure, but Spider-Man received his welcomed introduction into the MCU, as did Black Panther. The movie’s run kicked off with the fifth-highest opening in history, earning $179.1 million on opening weekend (that’s now the 11th-highest opening). Another $745 million internationally made this the fourth MCU film to reach $1 billion. Another fun fact: Anthony and Joe Russo are one of only two filmmakers/filmmaking pairs on this list to have three films in the top 50


23. $1.148 Billion 

Aquaman (2018) 65%


Domestic: $335.1 million
Release date: December 21, 2018

How could the DCEU get to $1 billion? Adding Batman into their Superman storyline couldn’t do it. Wonder Woman’s solid domestic numbers were nearly matched internationally, but even those figures came up short of Suicide Squad – and the goal. It would take Aquaman to crack the $1 billion mark for the DC Extended Universe. James Wan’s second billion-dollar film on the list may have had the second-smallest opening weekend of the Universe, but its prolonged success through the holiday season and beyond – the movie made nearly five-times its opening – was greater than any DC property since Tim Burton’s Batman in 1989.


24. $1.142 Billion 

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003) 93%


Domestic: $377.8 million
Release date: December 17, 2003

Peter Jackson’s (first) epic trilogy unfolded over three straight holiday seasons and its finale was rewarded in every fashion: Return of the King historically won all 11 Oscars that it was nominated for, including Best Picture and Best Director; it was one of the best-reviewed films of the year (Certified Fresh at 93%); and it became the fourth-highest domestic grosser of all time behind just TitanicThe Phantom Menace, and Sam Raimi’s first Spider-Man film. It was no slacker overseas, either: When Return finished its run, only Titanic had a greater number outside of the U.S. and Canada.



25. $1.132 Billion 

Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019) 90%


Domestic: $390.5 million
Release date: July 2, 2019

No wonder Disney and Sony made up: 2019’s Spider-Man: Far From Home, which might have been the end of their association had they not moved past their impasse, is Sony’s highest-grossing film of all time. Six of the studio’s eight highest-grossing films ever have involved Spider-Man (or Venom), but this was the first Sony flick to cross the $1 billion line, and the ninth film in the MCU to do it. (Spider-Man appeared in four of the MCU’s other members of the $1 Billion Club). It was also the fifth stand-alone Spider-Man film (live-action or animated) to register at 90% or higher on the Tomatometer – critics love their web-slinger.


26. $1.128 Billion 

Captain Marvel (2019) 79%


Domestic: $426.8 million
Release date: March 8, 2019

After getting tag-teased at the end of Infinity War, Brie Larson’s Carol Danvers made her debut in the MCU as the universe’s first headlining female superhero in 2019’s Captain Marvel. Outgrossing DC’s Wonder Woman around the world and at home, the breakthrough film was embraced by critics (though its Certified Fresh score of 78% ranks 18th out of the MCU’s 23 films). The space epic was only one of two films in 2018-19 to spend 10 straight weeks in the top 10 (the other being Black Panther), and was the seventh MCU film to reach $1 billion at the box office globally.


27. $1.124 Billion 

Transformers: Dark of the Moon (2011) 35%


Domestic: $352.4 million
Release date: June 29, 2011

The only Transformers sequel under the direction of Michael Bay to rank higher than 20% on the Tomatometer (a whopping 35%!) is not the series’ biggest domestic or international earner. But combined it remains the champion overall in worldwide gross (and bonus for the studio: it had one of the series’ lowest budgets). Only the final Harry Potter chapter could beat it in the summer of 2011, when they were the only films to pass $300 million domestic.



28. $1.109 Billion 

Skyfall (2012) 92%


Domestic: $304.4 million
Release date: November 9, 2012

The James Bond franchise got a boost with Pierce Brosnan and an even larger one with Daniel Craig. But there was no bigger boost to the long-running franchise than Craig’s Skyfall, the first film to cross $300 million domestically and $1 billion globally. A series that has existed for 50-plus years is going to get a little help from inflation – Goldfinger, Thunderball, and You Only Live Twice would have been $300 million grossers today – but we’re not doing inflation here. Skyfall was also a gold standard for Bond beyond the box office: It stands amongst the series’ top five scores on the Tomatometer, Certified Fresh at 92%.


29. $1.104 Billion 

Transformers: Age of Extinction (2014) 17%


Domestic: $245.4 million
Release date: June 27, 2014

The Transformers series was beginning to show its age in North America in 2014, but around the world it was more popular than ever. Shia LaBeouf was replaced with Mark Wahlberg as the franchise’s central hero, and the fourth film from Michael Bay approached a near three-hour running time at 165 minutes. But even as it dipped below $300 million for the first time at home, its $858 million international haul was still the sixth-highest total for any movie outside the U.S. and Canada at the time. (It is now 16th.) Bay’s fifth film of the franchise, The Last Knight, fell 47% in overall domestic and nearly 45% internationally. At 18% on the Tomatometer, Age of Extinction has the lowest Tomatometer score of the top 50 biggest films at the worldwide box office.


30. $1.081 Billion 

The Dark Knight Rises (2012) 87%


Domestic: $448.1 million
Release date: July 20, 2012

The conclusion of Christopher Nolan’s Batman trilogy gave us Bane, Catwoman, and even a surprise along the way. By the end of that summer only four films had grossed more domestically in their initial runs than The Dark Knight RisesAvatar, Titanic, The Dark Knight, and Marvel’s The Avengers, which was the only film to eclipse Rises in all of 2012. When all was said and done, Nolan’s trilogy had grossed over $2.46 billion worldwide.



31. $1.074 billion

Joker (2019) 68%


Domestic: $335 million
Release date: October 3, 2019

The director of The Hangover films wanted to make an origin story out of Batman’s most infamous nemesis. The project was met with skepticism, and then it began a run on the festival circuit. Venice awarded the film its top prize in the Golden Lion; some critics were hailing it a masterpiece. Though its Tomatometer score is among the lower scores in the Top 50 (69%), Todd Phillips’ Joker had the highest-opening ever in the month of October (passing the previous years’ Venom) and ultimately became the highest-grossing film ever released in that month in North America, surpassing Alfonso Cuaron’s Gravity domestically. The film has just taken over Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger TidesJurassic ParkFinding DoryThe Phantom MenaceAladdin, and Warner Bros’ The Dark Knight on this list, and also earns a place as one of its most profitable films of all time.


32. $1.073 Billion 

Toy Story 4 (2019) 97%


Domestic: $433.9 million
Release date: June 21, 2019

When the fourth entry of Pixar’s signature series opened to “only” $120 million, many labeled it “a disappointment.” Some had expected Toy Story 4 to have the studio’s biggest opening ever, and the film was then written off – by some – as part of a string of failed sequels in the summer of 2019. Well, Woody and the gang proved them all wrong. The movie went on to outgross the third film by over $12 million domestically. Even if it came up a bit short internationally, it still became the fourth billion-dollar grosser in Pixar’s history and their third-highest–grossing film overall.


33. $1.073 Billion 

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker (2019) 52%


Domestic: $514.7 million
Release date: December 20, 2019

The final chapter of the Skywalker saga may have broken the trend set by the other third entries in the franchise’s trilogies (each outgrossed the middle episodes), but it will become record that we may never see broken again. During the week of January 12, 2020, it became the seventh film released by Disney in 2019 to break the $1 billion barrier – it reached that marker in 28 days, whereas The Last Jedi did it in less than three weeks. That will be remembered far longer than having the 12th-highest opening of all-time – The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi were numbers one and two until Avengers: Infinity War opened – or that it had one of the lowest Tomatometer scores among the nine films. Nevertheless, it puts a capper on a nine-episode series from 1977-2019 that grossed (with re-releases) a collective $8.71 billion.


34. $1.067 Billion 

Toy Story 3 (2010) 98%


Domestic: $415 million
Release date: June 18, 2010

We all assumed it was the end for Woody, Buzz, and all their toy friends – that bittersweet finish was just so perfect. The series would have gone out with a box-office bang, too. The first summer release for the Toy Story franchise turned into the first $100 million opening weekend for Pixar as well as the studio’s first $400 domestic tally and first worldwide haul of $1 billion. For almost two years it was the second-highest–grossing domestic release in Disney’s history; by 2019 it was 16th.



35. $1.066 Billion 

Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (2006) 53%


Domestic: $423.3 million
Release date: July 7, 2006

Everyone mocked the concept of Disney turning one of their classic rides into a feature-length film. Well, some $300 million and an Oscar nomination for Johnny Depp’s portrayal of Captain Jack Sparrow later, we were looking at a franchise with a modicum of respect. At least, for a little while. Critics went from disdain for the concept before the first film was released to disdain for its epic-length and earnestness in the space of just two films, with the original movie’s score of 79% dropping to 53% on the Tomatometer for the sequel. But audiences went the other direction, giving Dead Man’s Chest a 38.6% boost in domestic earnings and an 84.2% boost internationally. It was Disney’s first $100-plus million opening ($135 million to be precise), and the studio has had 20 more since then. From 2006 until Toy Story 3 was released in 2010, Dead Man’s Chest was the highest-grossing domestic release in Disney’s history.



36. $1.056 Billion 

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (2016) 84%


Domestic: $532.2 million
Release date: December 16, 2016

A year after J.J. Abrams launched the record-breaking continuation of George Lucas’ Skywalker saga, audiences were given a go-between tale to help fill in the gaps that led to the destruction of the first Death Star. The Magnificent Seven-like story was an instant favorite for some and an average side-trip for others. It became just the seventh film to clear a half-billion dollars in domestic box office. A nearly-equal international haul filled in the other half needed for Rogue One to join the $1 Billion Club, a goal that Solo: A Star Wars Story came up more than $600 million short of.


37. $1.051 Billion 

Aladdin (2019) 57%


Domestic: $355.6 million
Release date: May 24, 2019

Aladdin wasn’t always a sure bet: A blue Will Smith was mocked in early reveals of his Genie character and Tim Burton’s live-action Dumbo proved to be a bust just two months before Aladdin‘s release. But Guy Ritchie’s new version of the beloved 1992 animated film took advantage of other 2019 summer under-performers like Godzilla: King of the MonstersDark Phoenix, and Men In Black Internationalgobbling them all up and staying in the top five at the box office for seven straight weeks. Its international haul was only $70 million less than 2017’s Beauty and the Beast, and was even higher than several films above it on this list including Black PantherIncredibles 2, and numbers 29-32.


38. $1.046 Billion 

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (2011) 33%


Domestic: $241.1 million
Release date: May 20, 2011

After Gore Verbinski’s Pirates trilogy grossed a combined $2.68 billion worldwide, Disney and Jerry Bruckheimer were not about to let the series sail into the sunset. The third film’s bloated length of 168 mins was roundly criticized (its Tomatometer score is just 45%), and this fourth film fared even worse with reviewers (33%), but it did the job at the box office. Domestic audiences showed up for the revamped outing with Jack Sparrow, just not in the expected droves, and a mammoth international total ($804.6 million) kept Stranger Tides in the record books.


39. $1.035 Billion 

Despicable Me 3 (2017) 59%


Domestic: $264.6 million
Release date: June 30, 2017

Though the third film in the Despicable Me franchise made just $13 million more than the original at the domestic box office, internationally the Despicable Me films had a 164% increase from the first film ($543.1 million) to the third ($1.035 billion). Released in 4,529 theaters, Gru’s third chapter did manage to have the largest launch in film history in North America until Avengers: Endgame came along. Four other films during the summer of 2019 also exceeded its one-time-record theater count.



40. $1.032 Billion 

Jurassic Park (1993) 92%


Domestic: $402.8 million (including re-releases)
Release date: June 11, 1993

Before James Cameron owned the top two spots in all-time domestic box office (for a period), it was Steven Spielberg who had pulled off that feat. His adaptation of Michael Crichton’s novel, Jurassic Park, was a return to the revered popcorn blockbusters he made his name on and it replaced the previous year’s Batman Returns as the top opener ever with $47 million and went on to gross over $357 million that summer. That was just a couple million dollars shy of his 1982 classic, E.T., but re-releases in 2-D and 3-D over the years have put the film over $400 million domestic and $1 billion worldwide.


41. $1.029 Billion 

Finding Dory (2016) 94%


Domestic: $486.3 million
Release date: June 17, 2016

Thirteen years after Finding Nemo became Pixar’s first $300 million domestic grosser and its biggest hit, the sequel focusing on Ellen Degeneres’ beloved memory-challenged sidekick reclaimed the throne, becoming again the animation house’s highest domestic grosser ever. The movie bested Toy Story 3 by over $71 million at home – even if it came up a bit short of that film internationally – and showed Pixar’s sequel business was really starting to thrive.


42. $1.027 Billion 

Star Wars: Episode I -- The Phantom Menace (1999) 52%


Domestic: $474.5 million (including re-releases)
Release date: May 19, 1999

George Lucas returned to the director’s chair after more than two decades to give fans what they thought they wanted 16 years after the release of Return of the Jedi. Fans certainly turned over their money but many left with a sense of disappointment that would help taint the prequel trilogy for decades to come. Phantom Menace was the highest-grossing film domestically to earn a Rotten score 55% (until 2019’s The Lion King came along). The $431 million earned in its initial run was enough to make it second only to Titanic all-time in North America; it took re-releases to push it over $1 billion globally. In 1999, it was the first film to clear $100 million in five days, beating the previous record holder, The Lost World: Jurassic Park, which earned $98.6 million in the same amount of time.



43. $1.026 Billion 

Alice in Wonderland (2010) 51%


Domestic: $334.2 million
Release date: March 5, 2010

Among the first five attempts Disney had made to bring its classic cartoons to life by 2010, Tim Burton’s Alice In Wonderland was by far the most successful. Its $116.1 million start was the sixth-largest movie opening ever at the time and the second-highest for Disney behind the second Pirates film. It was Burton’s seventh collaboration with Johnny Depp and the director has not had a film gross as much domestically in total as Alice made in its first three days since – not even with his attempt to replicate the success with Dumbo in 2019, which grossed a total of $114.7 million. But back in 2010, only Avatar, Titanic, and The Return of the King had made more money outside of North America than Alice did.


44. $1.024 Billion 

Zootopia (2016) 98%


Domestic: $341.3 million
Release date: March 4, 2016

To this day, Zootopia remains the second-highest–grossing animated Disney film not connected with Pixar. Since Frozen spent 16 straight weeks in the top 10, only three films have come as close, with 13 straight weeks in that top 10: Black Panther, La La Land, and yes,  Zootopia. Its $682 million overseas is the sixth-best ever for an animated film, the second-best for any Disney animated film, Pixar or otherwise. Also, it is just one of four films on this list to receive a Tomatometer score of 97%.



45. $1.017 Billion 

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey (2012) 64%


Domestic: $303 million
Release date: December 14, 2012

Almost a decade after wrapping up his landmark Lord of the Rings trilogy, Peter Jackson returned to the world of J.R.R. Tolkien to give audiences the Bilbo Baggins tale. A planned two-parter turned into a full-blown trilogy and critics were feeling the bloat: While Jackson’s Lord of the Rings films all scored over 90% on the Tomatometer, the Hobbit films never rose above 74%, with the first film right in the middle with 64%. Audiences were not tired just yet, though, even if this was the last of the Middle-earth series to hit $300 million domestic and $1 billion worldwide. On the glass-half-full side, Jackson’s first four Tolkien films grossed a combined $3.938 billion globally.


46. $1.005 Billion 

The Dark Knight (2008) 94%


Domestic: $535.2 million
Release date: July 18, 2008

The untimely passing of Heath Ledger in January 2008 was a gut punch, but it made anticipation for what would become his iconic, Oscar-winning portrayal of Batman’s arch-nemesis, the Joker, even more feverish. It was the central piece of what is considered one of the greatest comic-book films ever made. The movie’s $158 million opening weekend broke the previous record-holder, Spider-Man 3, by more than $7 million, and Dark Knight held the record for nearly three years to the day until the final Harry Potter chapter was released. The opening is still 17th all-time and the movie’s domestic total haul is the 12th-highest ever.



47. $978.1 Million 

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (2001) 81%


Domestic: $318 million
Release date: November 16, 2001

Four years after the publication of J.K. Rowling’s first Harry Potter book, Chris Columbus brought it to the big screen and its legions of fans turned up in record numbers. A $90.2 million opening weekend crushed the previous title holder from four years earlier, The Lost World: Jurassic Park, by over $18 million. The Sorcerer’s Stone‘s final domestic total ranked sixth all-time behind the initial runs of Titanic, The Phantom Menace, E.T., Jurassic Park, and Forrest Gump. That total remained the highest of the series until Deathly Hallows: Part 2 in 2011.


48. $976.9 Million 

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2 (2011) 96%


Domestic: $296 million
Release date: November 17, 2010

If Quentin Tarantino could do it, why not Harry Potter? Warner Bros. tried to maximize their profits by splitting J.K. Rowling’s final book into two films. The first 150 minutes missed getting close to the $300 million mark, perhaps as some fans figured they could catch up on home video just before Part 2 hit theaters the following summer. Still, only five films had done better than its $125 million opening (The Dark KnightSpider-Man 3The Twilight Saga: New MoonDead Man’s ChestIron Man 2). The combined power of the Deathly Hallows resulted in $677.1 million domestic and $2.3 billion worldwide alone (but together.)


49. $970.8 Million 

Despicable Me 2 (2013) 75%


Domestic: $368.1 million
Release date: July 3, 2013

Despicable Me was a surprise hit in 2010, announcing the arrival of Illumination Entertainment as a major player in the animation game. So, after the losses of Hop and the decent success of Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax, the studio doubled down on their biggest hit and struck gold. Another $325,000 and the film would be its highest domestic grosser instead of The Secret Life of Pets, which, along with Minions, would follow Despicable Me 2 with $100-plus million openings. By the end of that summer, the only animated film to have grossed more money worldwide was Toy Story 3. Also if you had guessed earlier that maybe Steven Spielberg or George Lucas were the other director/s – along with the Russo Bros. and their ilk – with a trifecta on this list, you would have been wrong, because the correct answer is Pierre Coffin, who directed (or co-directed) all three Despicable Me films, as well as Minions.


50. $968.5 Million 

The Lion King (1994) 93%


Domestic: $422.8 million
Release date: June 15, 1994

For 25 years, this film has remained relevant in pop culture through an acclaimed stage show, direct-to-video sequels, spinoffs, television series, and that mammoth re-imagination. The original Lion King was the second-highest–grossing film of 1994 behind Forrest Gump, which was – at the time – third only to the initial runs of E.T. and Jurassic Park at the all-time domestic box office. That made The Lion King the fourth highest-grossing film ever (not counting re-releases) and the number 1 domestic animated release of all time, a title it held for nine years until Finding Nemo.


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Thumbnail image courtesy Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures, Warner Bros. 

A Wrinkle in Time, adaptation of the Madeleine L’engle kids fantasy novel and Ava DuVernay’s sojourn into $100 million filmmaking, isn’t getting the best reviews. As the score settles in the lower-40s, Wrinkle would place somewhere in the middle of this week’s gallery: the 24 worst children’s book adaptations, each rated PG and ranked by Tomatometer.

Alan-Rickman

(Photo by Matej Divizna/Getty Images)

 

Alan Rickman, whose dramatic breadth and distinctive vocal delivery made him a legend among cinematic villains and a versatile supporting player in a long list of critically acclaimed films, has passed away at the age of 69 after a battle with cancer.

Born in the Acton ward of London’s Ealing borough, Rickman gained his first acting experience as a teenager, although his working-class background prevented him from immediately seeking it out as a profession. Initially pursuing a career in graphic design, he eventually auditioned with the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, earning a spot among the student body and winning several awards during his tenure at the school.

Initially focusing his efforts on the stage, Rickman picked up some early TV credits — including an appearance in the 1982 BBC program The Barchester Chronicles — but his first taste of widespread acclaim came courtesy of his Tony-winning portrayal of the Vicomte de Valmont in Les Liaisons Dangereuses, a role he held during the play’s 1985 Royal Shakespeare Company run and reprised when the production moved to Broadway in 1987.

Rickman’s first major film appearance arrived in 1988’s Die Hard, in which he played Hans Gruber, the delightfully snide terrorist whose takeover of a Los Angeles high rise is foiled by the indefatigable efforts of New York cop John McClane (Bruce Willis) — but not before hero and heavy engage in a battle of wits and one-liners that spawned several sequels and a legion of countless action-thriller imitators. It was followed by a number of memorable roles that included eminently loathable bad guys (like the Sheriff of Nottingham in 1991’s Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves), comedic turns in films such as Dogma and Galaxy Quest, and several appearances as Severus Snape in the Harry Potter franchise.

Along the way, Rickman continued to compile a varied list of stage and television credits. He moved into directing, helming The Winter Guest (1995) and A Little Chaos (2015). His voice could be heard in episodes of King of the Hill and Back at the Barnyard. He won a Golden Globe Award, an Emmy Award and a Screen Actors Guild Award for his work in the 1996 HBO movie Rasputin: Dark Servant of Destiny — and as a recent testament to his range, in 2013, he portrayed Ronald Reagan (in The Butler) as well as legendary club owner Hilly Kristal (in CBGB).

One of Rickman’s most frequent collaborators, Emma Thompson, was among the first to pay tribute after news of his passing broke, sharing that she’d “just kissed him goodbye” and offering a tender eulogy filled with fond memories of their relationship. “He was the ultimate ally. In life, art and politics,” wrote Thompson. “I trusted him absolutely. He was, above all things, a rare and unique human being and we shall not see his like again.”


Disney revealed this morning the first images of the Alice Through the Looking Glass characters. The movie is a sequel to 2010’s Alice in Wonderland. Click on the thumbnails below to see the full photos, and check out the first trailer here.


Black Mass explores the real life unholy alliance between the FBI and Irish Mob, namely that of gangster James ‘Whitey’ Bulger who’s played by Johnny Depp. Depp is known as the actor with a thousand faces, a title earned after the end of his star-making TV show 21 Jump Street led to his obsession in seeking out bizarre and dynamic roles he could fully disappear into. His part in Black Mass — which manipulates his voice, eye color, and hairline — is no exception.

In this week’s 24 Frames gallery, we stare straight into the faces of Depp with some of his craziest acting transformations.


This was a relatively slow week in the realm of movie development news, as most sites were busy covering the various awards season nominations, or providing links to any of the various trailers that will be in theaters this weekend with The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. What did get announced this week includes sequels for The Adventures of Tintin, Alice in Wonderland, The Muppets, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, and Transformers, new movie adaptations of Angry Birds and The Equalizer, and new roles for Glenn Close, Will Ferrell, Nick Nolte, and Michael Shannon.


This Week’s Top Story

DISNEY PLANS RETURN TRIP FOR ALICE IN WONDERLAND

The billion dollar success of 2010’s Alice in Wonderland has inspired Walt Disney Pictures to greenlight a series of live action movies based on classic fantasy stories that includes 2013’s Oz the Great and the Powerful, 2014’s Maleficent (based on Sleeping Beauty), and probably for 2015, a new version of Cinderella. This week, the news broke that Disney is also planning a much more direct answer to the success of that film, in the form of an Alice in Wonderland sequel. To that end, Disney has hired that film’s screenwriter Linda Woolverton (who also worked on Maleficent). What isn’t known is anything else, including a premise, or whether Tim Burton will be returning to fill the director’s chair.

Fresh Developments This Week

#1 PETER JACKSON’S TINTIN SEQUEL STILL ON TRACK FOR 2015 RELEASE

In the past year since the release in 2011 of The Adventures of Tintin, pretty much all of the movie development news relating to director Peter Jackson has been about The Hobbit, and in particular, the move to expand that adaptation from two movies to three. The notion that Jackson was also planning on directing a Tintin sequel (after Steven Spielberg directed the first) has seemingly almost been forgotten. Well, not so fast, as Jackson confirmed this week that he plans on doing the stop motion filming on the second film in 2013, so that it can still make the planned 2015 release window. This filming of the second Adventures of Tintin film joins the estimated 6 to 8 weeks of additional filming that Jackson is also planning on doing in 2013 for The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug and The Hobbit: There and Back Again. The 2015 release target for the second Tintin film also means that for the first time ever, there will be four movies directed by Peter Jackson in as many consecutive years. There’s still no word on who might direct the third planned Tintin movie.

#2 THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE TO BE SLINGSHOTTED INTO THEATERS IN THE SUMMER OF 2016

We’re not even out of 2012 yet, and movies are already being scheduled for the summer of 2016. Producer John Cohen (Despicable Me) is teaming up with Rovio Entertainment for the 3D CGI animated adaptation of the hit mobile video game franchise Angry Birds. The game, which just this week celebrated its third anniversary, tells the epic story of a bunch of birds that are propelled via slingshots at pigs sitting on crudely erected structures. That pretty much nails what Angry Birds is about, except for the “epic” and “story” parts. John Cohen previously collaborated with Illumination Entertainment for Despicable Me, but it’s not yet known what animation studio will be working on the Angry Birds movie, or what studio might be distributing.

#3 DRIVE DIRECTOR NICOLAS WINDING REFN TO ESCORT THE EQUALIZER

Sony Pictures has had an adaptation of the 1980s TV series The Equalizer on their schedule for April 11th, 2014 for a while now, with Denzel Washington attached to star, but until now, it hasn’t seemed to make much of an impact with fans online. The anticipation level for The Equalizer may have cranked up considerably as of this week’s news that Nicolas Winding Refn has signed on. The Danish director is still hardly a household name in the USA, but his 2011 film Drive was very well received by critics, and well regarded by many moviegoers (those who weren’t expecting it to be a Fast and the Furious clone, anyway). The late Edward Woodward starred in the original CBS TV series as a retired intelligence officer who offers his services to those in need by way of an anonymous advertisement in the newspaper.

#4 TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY SEQUEL IN THE WORKS

The British 2011 espionage thriller Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy probably isn’t remembered by most as one of that year’s big box office successes, but with only a $21 million budget, its $80 million worldwide gross was a nice ROI regardless. And so, Swedish director Tomas Alfredson (who also directed Let the Right One In) is now working with screenwriter Peter Straughan on a sequel to that adaptation of the novel by John Le Carre. That’s what was confirmed this week by producer Eric Fellner, but what’s currently not verified is what exactly the sequel will be adapting (if any specific novel at all). Gary Oldman did say earlier this year that a sequel based on the novel Smiley’s People was being considered, although that’s hardly a firm confirmation. If the sequel does end up being Smiley’s People, then it would be about Oldman’s character having to come out of retirement following the death of one of his agents, a covert Soviet general. The confusing element about all of this is that Smiley’s People was actually the third novel of a trilogy, with the second of Le Carre’s Smiley novels being The Honorable Schoolboy.

#5 TY BURRELL FROM MODERN FAMILY IS THE NEW LEAD IN THE NEXT MUPPETS MOVIE

Ty Burrell has replaced Christoph Waltz” is a phrase that will almost certainly never be used in any movie news story ever again. The movie in question is Disney’s follow up to 2011’s The Muppets, and the role is that of an Interpol agent following the Muppets around as they travel through Europe as part of a caper storyline. Anyone who watches Modern Family knows that Burrell is an odd choice to play an Interpol agent, but given that this is a Muppets movie… that’s probably the point (and may actually be why Christoph Waltz is being replaced). James Bobin, who directed The Muppets, is returning for this currently untitled sequel as well, which Disney currently has scheduled for release on December 20, 2013.

#6 SAMANTHA MORTON AND MICHAEL SHANNON TEND THE HARVEST FOR THE DIRECTOR OF WILD THINGS

It’s been so long now that it might be hard to put it within context, but there was a time in the 1990s when John McNaughton was considered one of the hot young rising star directors of the time, with a career that began in 1990 with Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer, and included 1998’s Wild Things. McNaughton has still been getting work, mostly on cable TV, but it’s with a new independently produced movie called The Harvest that his career finally appears likely to be returning to the big screen. Michael Shannon (Boardwalk Empire) and Samantha Morton (Minority Report) will star in the psychological thriller as a married couple who keep their ill son secluded, until the arrival of a new neighbor in the form of a young girl “unravels the overprotective parents’ strictly regulated world.”

#7 KEVIN HART TO HELP WILL FERRELL GET HARD

Comic actors Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart (Think Like a Man) are attached to star in the comedy Get Hard, which Warner Bros is currently in negotations to produce and distribute. If production moves forward, Ferrell will star as an investment banker sentenced to serve at a maximum security prison who recruits his car washer (Hart) to get him physically and mentally prepared. If Warner Bros picks up the pitch, Get Hard will be written by the screenwriting team of Ian Roberts and Jay Martel, who are executive producers of the Comedy Central sketch program Key & Peele.

Rotten Ideas of the Week

#2 NICK NOLTE AND GLENN CLOSE TO STAR IN THE ALZHEIMER’S DRAMA ALWAYS ON MY MIND

This article was an example of one where this writer had to check facts before presuming he knew of a movie that Nick Nolte and Glenn Close starred in together before. Glenn Close isn’t Barbra Streisand (The Prince of Tides), Susan Sarandon (Lorenzo’s Oil), or Jessica Lange (Cape Fear), and Nick Nolte, well, there’s really no one that you could confuse Nick Nolte with (though I did consider that maybe he was in The Big Chill). The movie that will finally be bringing these actors together is called Always on My Mind, and it is the story of an aging rock star (Nolte) coping with Alzheimer’s, with his wife left to “pick up the pieces of his hard-lived rock n’ roll life.” The reason that Always on My Mind is one of the Rotten Ideas this week is that it’s the next movie from writer/director Chris D’Arienzo, who created the Broadway musical Rock of Ages, and cowrote the recent movie adaptation of that play, which has a “Rotten” RT Tomatometer score of 41%.

#1 MORE CASTING NEWS FOR TRANSFORMERS 4 MEANS IT’S STILL HAPPENING

Unless the Mayans were right, the world is going to go on, and there’s still going to be Transformers movies directed by Michael Bay. Earlier this year, Mark Wahlberg was confirmed as being the new lead actor of Transformers 4, and now, we have learned that Wahlberg’s teenage daughter will be played by Nicola Peltz (The Last Airbender), and her “biker boyfriend” will be played by Brenton Thwaites (Blue Lagoon: The Awakening). Or, maybe the world will explode before I finish typ

For more Weekly Ketchup columns by Greg Dean Schmitz, check out the WK archive, and you can contact GDS via Facebook.

It’s the fifth-highest grossing film of all time internationally and the biggest hit of director Tim Burton’s career, and this week Alice in Wonderland arrives on DVD and Blu-ray — just in time to capitalise on the movie’s box-office momentum. To mark the release of the film here’s an interview with one of the stars, Helena Bonham Carter, who discusses her role as Underland’s shrieking Red Queen.


What’s it like performing to green screen?

I got to act with lots of green people. They’re the unsung heroes, all the actors who won’t ever be seen or heard, frankly, because we had a legion of actors in green leotards reading for the other characters. And they’re brilliant. We couldn’t do it without them. You always have to have something to act with, otherwise, there’s a lot of looking at stray marks, tennis balls and things. Alice always was changing size, so it was always about looking up or down. It’s all about imagining, anyway, acting — they should just call it imagining instead of acting. But you just have to do a bit more of it on this one.

How did having a big head affect your performance?

One thing I couldn’t do was put my hand up to my face, which you do more than you realize, because then the hand would be inflated along with my head. But the big hazard was I lost my voice pretty much every day by ten o’clock, because she shouts a lot. “Off with his head! Off with her head!” It’s quite exhausting losing your temper all the time.

Was the makeup process a difficult one?

It’s basically a weird cartoon version of Elizabeth I, so they took my eyebrows away and gave me a high forehead. I had a bald cap that extends from the fold of my eyelids right across my head. And then, on top, I had this glorious red wig, and on top of it, a glorious crown. And I had lovely blue eye shadow, which is Tim, because he thinks that blue is sort of a bit trashy colour. She’s not a natural Queen. She’s somebody who really puts it all on, because she shouldn’t really be Queen at all. So blue eye make-up and painted eyebrows. There’s a bit of Toulouse Lautrec, too. Both Johnny and I have clown elements as well, white make-up. My lips are perfect, a bow mouth, a little heart. It’s a strong look. It takes about three hours. I’d get my head pasted down, my hair wrapped. Then, they’d wrap me in a cocoon, and I’d get to lie down and sleep while they painted me. When I wake up two hours later, I’m a really unattractive bald alien. Then they’d put my beauty make-up on, my eyebrows, my eye shadow and my lovely, big eyelashes — that was my idea — and my lips with a stencil. Then wig and crown.

Describe your costume and props.

I’m in a sort of Elizabethan costume, which is funny, because I remember playing Lady Jane Grey. It was my first part ever. And she was in Elizabethan costume. So, after 24 years, I got back into Elizabethan shape. I’ve got a scepter that I always carry around, just to remind everybody that I am Queen. And then, I’ve got the crown. I’ve got lovely pink spectacles, my idea, to play croquet with. I always drink with a straw, because my mouth is very, very tiny. I always have lots of props. I wanted an axe, but Tim said no. Too literal.

What do you like about Tim’s work?

It’s always a surprise to see what he’s had in his head. He’s so private when it comes to his creativity. He doesn’t let on. There’s a superstitious silence around it, and he does a lot of unconscious marinating — he doesn’t want to talk about things, because it’ll stop his process. So I know now to give him a wide berth and I’ll never ask questions. And he will let me know the essentials. Sometimes, I feel very privileged, when he actually asks my opinion and wants to discuss things. He’s got an amazing emotional intuition about people and about what fits and what is needed. His taste is impeccable. His eye’s impeccable, too, and his sense of humor. It’s always intensely original.

Is it difficult to work with your significant other?

It’s always interesting, working with your boyfriend. Sweeney Todd was quite stressful, but there was a lot of pressure on us, and I’d never sung before. And he’d never done a musical. But Tim was very relaxed on Alice. I think maybe we’ve matured as people, or not. I don’t know. But it was definitely fun.

How do you balance family and filmmaking?

I think that it’s definitely made easier, because the job that we have is essentially child-like. We’re just pretending, you know? So my son Bill and I are on the same level, really. And Tim’s always been on that level, anyway. It makes it easy to explain to Billy why I can’t be with him. It is hard work, yeah, but it’s fine, because it’s a finite job. And you have to have understanding children.

What has been most rewarding about being in this movie?

Working with Tim and Johnny. It’s always fun to work with them. No, it’s a privilege. And also, Alice in Wonderland is one of my all-time favorites. To be a part of Wonderland, and playing Queen! The fact that we have our own daughter, too, it seems really serendipitous. It’s amazing. It’s also amazing, because Tim bought this house, not long ago, as a production office. And it’s Arthur Rackham’s house, and he did his own illustrated book of Alice in the early 1900s. So, 100 years later, for Tim Burton to be in the same house to re-imagine Alice, it’s kind of extraordinary. Rackham’s drawings are so part of Tim’s imagery, too. Rackham also illustrated Sleepy Hollow. So there’s been a creative connection across time, something weird and wonderful going on, so it all feels right. And when Tim asked me to be Queen, I was really touched, and I felt so privileged to be in that position. And it was a great part. I had this hilarious moment, reading the script and coming across my character description, something like “Queen, small, but has very large-size head.” So I loved being her. I miss being Queen.


Alice in Wonderland is released on Disney DVD and in a Blu-ray/DVD value pack, 1 July 2010.

Break out your candy stripes and scissors and get ready to glide on down Vampira-style to the Australian Centre for the Moving Image this Wednesday, for the one and only Tim Burton is in town — and he’ll be gracing the red carpet at Flinders Street to mark the opening of his exhibition in Melbourne.

Following an enormously successful run at New York’s Museum of Modern Art — it was their third most-attended show ever, behind Picasso and Matisse — Tim Burton: The Exhibition is making its international debut Thursday, June 24 at ACMI, where it will run through Sunday October 10.

A treat for both Burton fans and connoisseurs of the weird and wonderful in cinema, the exhibition brings the filmmaker’s distinct world out of the shadows to reveal a rich legacy of material, from his early sketches and teenage movies through his work at Disney, big-budget endeavours and scores of props and artworks from films including Beetlejuice, Edward Scissorhands, The Nightmare Before Christmas and Alice in Wonderland. Oh, and there’s also a Batmobile.

Tim Burton will walk the red carpet from 5:30pm Wednesday, where he will be joined by MoMA director Glenn Lowry, curators Ron Magliozzi, Jenny He and Rajendra Roy and ACMI’s Head of Exhibitions Conrad Bodman.

Click here to get your tickets for the exhibition, watch the trailer and explore the forthconing retrospective of Burton’s films at ACMI.

If you haven’t seen it, here’s the magic little trailer created for the show:

The first month of the Summer movie season is officially over, and some of the big releases from earlier this year are making their way to home video. This week, we’ve got the latest collaboration between Tim Burton and Johnny Depp (as well as Burton regulars Helena Bonham Carter and composer Danny Elfman), which was hotly anticipated but received mixed reviews. Then, we’ve got the Universal remake of a monster classic, as well as a couple of big budget films on Blu-Ray for the first time, a tribute to the Super Bowl winners of last year, a groundbreaking nature series, and a collection of some of the most iconic Westerns ever made. Read on to see the full list!



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Alice in Wonderland

Fans of Tim Burton (Edward Scissorhands, Sleepy Hollow) have been fantasizing about what he could do to the classics of the Victorian era ever since Frankenweenie came out and he grumpily parted ways with Disney. The 1951 Disney cartoon wasn’t just a staple, it was a standard, even with all its sojourns into weirdness. Those talking flowers were dreamy until they got mean-the same can be said of the expectant fans waiting years for this film’s release. Screenwriter Linda Woolverton opted to relocate Alice (Mia Wasikowska), now 19, to a “surprise!” engagement party she’s desperate to escape. With less overt metaphor than could be found in other renditions of the story, Alice finds her way half-knowingly through Wonderland and restores balance to the country by helping the White Queen (a balletic Anne Hathaway) reclaim power from her more evil and far more colorful sister, The Red Queen (a cranially enhanced Helena Bonham-Carter). Tamer than Burton’s last (Sweeney Todd) but with just as much sickly eye shadow (maybe more), Alice offers as much to love as to deride, which might sound like faint praise, but it’s exactly this mix of emotions that inspires a person to buy a DVD and repeat view. Extras, split into “Wonderland Characters” and “Making Wonderland” sections, are littered with featurettes and the enthusiasm of the cast.



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The Wolfman

The Universal Horrors are widely adored and after the major success that was Steven Sommers’ Mummy revamp, the door seemed open and the audiences ready for more. Since there’s always a clutch of fans resistant to the notion of an update, the revamps were couched in their originating period, which meant these revisionings had to put snazzy effects into the past, and we’ve learned from Kevin Costner that explosions look ridiculous in Medieval England. Joe Johnson’s Wolfman used its Victorian England setting to showcase the tension between the pagan lore of the Wolfman and the modern medicine of the era — medicine we can call draconian because it’s all kinds of cruel. The subtitle of this one might as well be Daddy Dearest, and with what the scenery-chewing Sir Hopkins does here he could inspire a whole new branch of camp. Extras are plenty on the Blu-Ray and include alternate endings and a director’s cut. The focus is on the effects and makeup but that’s what extras are all about: showing you again that thing you couldn’t believe first time round.



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Bad Boys – Blu-Ray

Long before Michael Bay was making headlines about Megan Fox and an army of robots in disguise, he was accompanied by Will Smith and Martin Lawrence for his feature debut in the 1995 Jerry Bruckheimer production Bad Boys. Marcus Burnett (Lawrence) and Mike Lowrey (Smith) are Miami detectives that discover the biggest drug bust of their careers – a stash valued at $100 million – has been stolen from what was thought to be a secured police vault. Facing the shutdown of their department if the drugs aren’t recovered, Burnett and Lowrey trade identities and well, what ensues is a chorus of crowd pleasing one-liners and situations that many thought were heavily influenced by fellow buddy cop franchise Lethal Weapon en route to [SPOILER ALERT] solving the crime. With the comedic talents of Smith and Lawrence, paired with the early days of Michael Bay, you know what you’re getting into for this action-comedy: Lots of jokes, “Aww Gina!”s, explosions, gunfights, and the beginning of a franchise that it appears could still have legs over fifteen years after its initial release. Before the film’s much speculated third installment, the first chapter in the story finds its way to Blu-Ray this week.



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War of the Worlds (2005) – Blu-Ray

Almost 30 years after Steven Spielberg waxed (action packed) poetic about the loving relationship between humans and aliens, he showed us exactly how the human race would bite it: by blistering, otherworldly light beams. Gosh, remember that candy colored light show at the end of Close Encounters? Spielberg’s earlier-career aliens communicated by synth lullaby and Reece’s Pieces! But in this heavy-hype revisioning of the H.G. Wells book (by way of the 1953 Byron Haskin adaptation), the aliens are conquering, the people kinda deserve it, and Tom Cruise does a lot of running. Dakota Fanning, again playing a tragically precocious little girl (tooootally pre Runaways), does her fair share of show stealing. And legacy is basically what the DVD Blu-Ray extras point to. Well, legacy and technology, since a whole mess of pixels went into the look of those tripods. Extras include content on the characters, previsualizations, production diaries, featurettes called “Revisiting the Invasion,” “Designing the Enemy,” “Scoring War of the Worlds,” Steven Spielberg and the Original War of the Worlds and the H.G.Wells Legacy.


New Orleans Saints: Road to Super Bowl XLIV

Who dat? Who dat? Who dat say they gonna beat them Saints?! For NFL fans and the city of New Orleans last year, no one had the answer for the offensive playmaking abilities of Drew Brees, Reggie Bush, Pierre Thomas, and Marques Colston and teams were left shaking their heads at the team’s opportunistic and athletic defense lead by Darren Sharper, Will Smith, and Jonathan Vilma. Arriving on both DVD and Blu-Ray, fans can relive New Orleans’ exciting Week 13 victory against the Washington Redskins along with all the team’s playoff games against the Arizona Cardinals, Minnesota Vikings, and the Super Bowl showdown against the Indianapolis Colts that was the Saints’ first-ever Super Bowl win in 43 seasons. Keep in mind that these are not just highlights, but the original full broadcasts of the games, making this a 4 DVD/Blu-ray set for your pigskin-loving friends. With the NFL’s preseason just three months away, this set should hold over Saints fans for at least a solid weekend, with the disclaimer that it might only add to the anticipation and cause cravings for buffalo wings, domestic brews, and pizza.


Life

The BBC has been churning out amazing nature documentaries for decades, providing viewers with astonishing and unbelievable footage of landscapes and wildlife from all over the world. In 2006, a groundbreaking series titled Planet Earth captivated audiences with its high definition footage and never-before-seen imagery, and to follow that up, the BBC teamed up with the Discovery Channel once again to launch a 2009 series called Life. Similar to Planet Earth, Life utilizes state of the art technology and four years’ worth of on-location filming to introduce its viewers to the fantastic spectacles observable in nature. Focusing on different categories of animals in each episode (“Mammals,” “Insects,” “Plants”), Life explores the ways in which living things have evolved over time to adapt to various environments and survive. If you are a fan of nature programming, and if you were beset by wonder and awe upon your first viewing of Planet Earth, then you owe it to yourself to pick up this latest series, and even more so on Blu-Ray.


The Man with No Name Trilogy – Blu-Ray

Sergio Leone’s spaghetti westerns of the 1960s helped to further define the genre, and Clint Eastwood’s portrayal of “The Man with No Name” in these films put an iconic face on the archetypal cowboy persona. With that in mind, fans of Leone and Eastwood will want to get their hands on this collection of the “Man with No Name” Trilogy on Blu-Ray. Comprised of A Fistful of Dollars (1964), For a Few Dollars More (1965), and The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966), the unofficial trilogy only came to be grouped together later, as a result of Eastwood’s consistent portrayal of his character, as well as the outfit he wears. Other than the central character, the films are not related to each other in plot. Though there have been some grumblings about the apparent slight “zoomed-in” picture, the picture quality is overall consistently good, and each film comes with a large collection of extra features, compiled from several previous editions of each film. That alone should make the collection worth picking up.

Written by Sara Maria Vizcarrondo, David Chung, and Ryan Fujitani

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