This week in DVD news, Francis Ford Coppola brings you the Godfather trilogy (again), Quentin Tarantino is super excited about the original Inglorious Bastards, and Hancock may soon stream directly into your TV set. Plus, we’ve got Vantage Point, Drillbit Taylor, a new X-Files DVD and more new releases!


Leave the cannoli. Take the DVDs.

On September 23, Paramount Home Entertainment is making you an offer that you can’t refuse: The Godfather Collection: The Coppola Restoration, on both DVD and Blu-Ray. Francis Ford Coppola himself spent a year overseeing the frame-by-frame restoration, a painstaking process which is documented in one of four new featurettes; the complete set includes the entire Godfather trilogy (for those of you who count Godfather III), extras from the previous box set, and more new material. Shell out $72.99 for the DVD set, $119.99 for Blu-Ray.

Tarantino To Geek Out on O.G. Inglorious Bastards DVD

If you’re a Quentin Tarantino nut, then you know he recently completed his script for the long-gestating war movie, Inglorious Bastards. But have you seen the original The Inglorious Bastards upon which QT’s flick is rumored to be based? You’ll get your chance when Enzo G. Castellari‘s 1978 cult film hits; the WWII tale of a band of military criminals on a suicide mission in Nazi territory stars ’70s action icons Bo Svenson and Fred Williamson, and will be released in a 3-disc Special Edition on July 29. Best of all, Tarantino will appear in the DVD extras, hosting a night of Castellari’s films and talking all things Inglorious with the veteran filmmaker.

Watch Hancock At Home Before DVD Hits

Forget Netflix and iTunes; Sony’s jumping into the digital delivery game with the release of Will Smith‘s Hancock, which will be made available for web-equipped owners of Sony’s Bravia TV sets before the film hits DVD. However, it still comes with a hefty price: $300 for the Bravia Internet link and $7.50 — nearly the price of admission these days — to stream, but not download, the movie. Another thing: you can’t Bravia Hancock, out in theaters this week, until November.

Click for this week’s new releases!

Vantage Point

Tomatometer: 36%

Patriot Games meets Rashomon in this trying thriller about an assassination attempt, as seen from more points of view than you can shake a stick at. Okay, so you can’t shake a stick at a point of view, but neither can you inundate critics with the same twenty minutes over and over again for two hours without being accused of silliness and incoherence. Go see Rashomon instead.

Bonus Features:

There are plenty of extras here to enjoy, assuming you want to relive the making of a story that you’ve just seen play out eight times over (director commentary, cast and crew interviews, featurettes, and outtakes).

Drillbit Taylor

Tomatometer: 27%

The Judd Apatow touch failed to boost Drillbit Taylor to the ranks of Superbad and Knocked Up (and in fact is the producer’s worst-reviewed film to date); even comic wunderkind Seth Rogen, who co-wrote the script, couldn’t keep it afloat. Even worse? The idea about a homeless scam artist (Owen Wilson) hired as bodyguard to a bunch of bullied kids came from none other than John Hughes.

Bonus Features:

If you must watch Drillbit Taylor, then pick up the unrated Extended Survival Edition — how else could an Apatow film be seen, but with more swear words and tomfoolery? Check out additional features about co-star Danny McBride (The Foot Fist Way) and the on-set rap battle to enrich your experience.

Tyler Perry’s Meet the Browns

Tomatometer: 29%

Tyler Perry is back, which means that you already know if Meet the Browns is for you. (If you know who his Madea character is — and it doesn’t make you groan inwardly — then you’re in his demographic.) This time, Angela Bassett wades her way through soap opera-esque melodrama and borderline stereotypical jokes in a heartwarming tale about family.

Bonus Features:

A two-disc DVD gives you four featurettes and a digital copy; otherwise, check out the single disc release for the movie alone.

My Blueberry Nights

Tomatometer: 47%

Wong Kar-Wai (In the Mood for Love, 2046) makes his Hollywood debut in this tale of a woman (songstress Norah Jones) nursing heartbreak on a cross-country road trip, a vibrant ode to iconic modern Americana made with the reverent eye of an outsider. Laden with metaphors and partly shot in his gorgeous, Wong Kar-Wai style, My Blueberry Nights was nevertheless deemed a mixed bag of tricks.

Bonus Features:

If film-as-art and the creative process interest you, then check out the handful of extras here: a making-of featurette and lengthy Q&A with Wong Kar-Wai, plus on-set and scouting photo galleries.

X-Files: Revelations

Tomatometer: N/A

With the long-awaited (and highly secretive) sequel X-Files: I Want to Believe hitting theaters soon, you may need a refresher on the previous adventures of Mulder and Scully. Creators Frank Spotnitz and Chris Carter handpick and provide commentary for eight of their favorite series episodes, and throw in a few sequel-related extras just to tease you.

Bonus Features:

Brief introductions to each episode provide some insight into each selection, but much like the big DVD extra — the X-Files 2 panel at WonderCon — you won’t find any new info about the sequel here.

‘Til next week, happy viewing!

Four new releases take a gamble debuting in theaters across North America hoping to hit the jackpot with audiences. The blackjack drama 21 and the spoof comedy Superhero Movie lead the way and will try their best to reach the number one spot. Other choices for ticket buyers include the soldier drama Stop-Loss and the marathon comedy Run, Fat Boy, Run in what should be another down weekend for the industry.

Kevin Spacey leads a team of math wizards from M.I.T. to a life of card-counting riches in Las Vegas in the new Sony pic 21. The PG-13 flick stars Jim Sturgess, Kate Bosworth, and Laurence Fishburne and is based on a true story. Teens and young adults will be the target audience here as well as card sharks everywhere. The marketing has been slick and even though the film is not all that high on starpower, the subject matter and the look should help it connect with audiences. The studio has given 21 a big push and it should play as something new for young adults to get excited about instead of the same tired old formula. Competition will be a factor though, given that some of the other new flicks will appeal to the same age range. Opening in more than 2,500 locations, 21 could debut with about $15M.


Kevin Spacey and Jim Sturgess in 21

The spoof comedy, the movie staple that won’t go away, returns again with the new film Superhero Movie from MGM and The Weinstein Company. Rated PG-13, the pic lampoons several comic book flicks like Spider-Man and Fantastic Four and will target teens and young adults looking for immature fun. Meet the Spartans proved in January that the genre still makes money thanks to its $18.5M top spot bow. However, Superhero does not look as funny as some of the recent spoof hits as commercials are lacking in the joke department. Plus it lacks the special touch that Fox gives to these kinds of films to steer them to solid debuts. Flying into 2,700 theaters, Superhero Movie could capture about $14M this weekend.


Drake Bell in Superhero Movie

The frame’s sole R-rated title is also the best-reviewed film of the lot. Paramount’s Stop-Loss stars Ryan Phillippe as a decorated soldier home from Iraq who tries to reclaim his former life in his small Texas hometown. Channing Tatum and Abbie Cornish co-star giving the film some star wattage with teens and young adults. And good marks from critics can’t hurt. But the rating could cut into some of the sales from younger teens and subject matter remotely related to conflicts in the Middle East have driven audiences away time and time again. The studio and producer MTV Films have downplayed the war element and instead wisely focused on the young hip stars. Competition will come mostly from 21 and Superhero Movie which will play to many of the same folks and carry a more commercially viable PG-13. Landing in roughly 1,200 sites, Stop-Loss could take in about $6M this weekend.


Channing Tatum and Ryan Phillippe in Stop-Loss

An overweight man fights for his true love in the new comedy Run, Fat Boy, Run which arrives in the fewest theaters of any new release. The PG-13 film stars Simon Pegg of Shaun of the Dead fame and could tap into his cult fan base in the U.S. which grew bigger after last year’s Hot Fuzz. Unfortunately that audience is not large enough to command big numbers at the turnstiles. Picturehouse’s sneak previews last weekend helped to circulate some buzz but most other major films have more. Mixed reviews won’t do much to spark a frenzy either. Running low on starpower, hype, and theaters, Run, Fat Boy, Run could debut to the tune of around $4M from 1,050 locations this weekend.


Hank Azaria and Simon Pegg in Run, Fat Boy, Run

Horton Hears A Who will try to become the first film of the year to threepeat atop the box office charts but will have to fend off the advances of a couple of potential new hits. Luckily the Fox toon has no direct competition for its family audience so its decline should be less than last weekend’s. A 40% drop would give the Dr. Seuss pic around $15M over three days and boost the overall tally to $114M.

Tyler Perry will see a sizable fall for his latest venture Meet the Browns since his loyal audience shows up in big numbers on the first weekend. Look for Lionsgate to lose half of its sales and bank around $10 for a ten-day total of $35M.

Fellow sophomores Shutter and Drillbit Taylor should fall hard too. The weekend could result in a 55% fall for the Fox thriller to $4.5M and 50% decline for the Paramount comedy to $5M. Totals would rise to about $19M a piece.

LAST YEAR: Two new comedies posted strong debuts to end the first quarter with a bang. Will Ferrell‘s figure skating pic Blades of Glory opened at number one with a solid $33M for Paramount. After spending two weeks on top, the sports comedy went on to score $118.6M domestically. Disney’s animated film Meet the Robinsons snagged second place with $25.1M on its way to $97.8M. The stylish actioner 300 placed third with $11.4M for Warner Bros. and was followed by the studio’s kidpic TMNT with $9.2M and Disney’s biker comedy Wild Hogs with $8.7M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

March Madness hits the North American box office as three new releases hit the multiplexes hoping to take down the reigning Dr. Suess toon. Tyler Perry returns with his latest comedic drama Meet the Browns, Owen Wilson makes a return of his own in the comedy Drillbit Taylor, and Joshua Jackson jets off to Japan for his horror flick Shutter. The Good Friday holiday will help boost weekend numbers since the majority of students and many adults have the day off. But the start of the NCAA college basketball tournament will keep many male moviegoers and sports fans glued to their flat-screens watching the endless string of games all day everyday over the weekend. Fox meanwhile will try to repeat at number one with its animated hit Horton Hears A Who which could become the top-grossing film of 2008 after only ten days.

Shooting for his fourth $20M+ opener, filmmaker Tyler Perry goes hunting for elephants at the box office with his latest work Meet the Browns. The PG-13 pic stars Angela Bassett as a Chicago single mother down on her luck who travels down to Georgia after the death of her father to meet the family she never knew. Starpower will come primarily from Bassett and from Perry himself who in addition to writing and directing brings the wildly popular Madea character back to the big screen after a two-year absence. The role is small but the marketing has made it known that the outlandish law-breaking matriarch is back for some laughs. Former basketball star Rick Fox also has a major role and could be useful in drawing hoops fans.

Perry has been a dependable box office sensation for over three years now drawing in sizable African American moviegoers with stories that skew a bit female. There’s no reason to believe that Browns will fail to reach the heights of his last film Why Did I Get Married? which opened to $21.4M in October. Good Friday and Easter should help boost the numbers too. Hollywood routinely underestimates Perry’s power so expect a sizzling average here. Hitting his top debut, $30M for Madea’s Family Reunion, may not be in the works, but a strong second place showing is a virtual guarantee. Lionsgate will open Meet the Browns in 2,006 theaters and may find itself with around $23M this weekend.


Rick Fox and Angela Bassett in Meet the Browns

Owen Wilson takes up the title role of Paramount’s new high school comedy Drillbit Taylor playing a homeless soldier of fortune who takes an assignment to protect a trio of teenage nerds. The actor’s biggest commercial hits have come from pairings with other big-name actors like Vince Vaughn and Ben Stiller. Here he flies solo as the only star and historically that that has led to small grosses. Younger teens will make up the primary crowd so the PG-13 rating may give pause to parents of kids in the high single digits. A slight male skew is also likely. There’s ample competition so a large debut is not likely, plus Wilson’s main draw comes with adults not twelve-year-olds. The Friday holiday will get things started well, but word-of-mouth will have to take it the rest of the way. Reviews have not been too bright and March Madness will take many boys out of the picture this weekend. Debuting in about 2,700 theaters, Drillbit Taylor could punch up about $12M this weekend.


Owen Wilson in Drillbit Taylor

Another spooky Asian fright film gets the photocopy treatment by the idea-starved American horror industry in Fox’s Shutter. The PG-13 chiller stars Joshua Jackson as a photographer who discovers creepy images of a dead woman in his snapshots. The insatiable horror audience is the target here and the rating will make sure that younger teens up for a scare will be able to buy a ticket. Jackson is far removed from his Dawson’s Creek days and lacks the drawing power he once had. Plus the studio’s marketing push has not been very forceful so awareness is low. Don’t look for this one to open like The Eye or One Missed Call which both bowed in the $12-13M range. The only factors working for it are the 85 minute running time and the fact that there have been no horror films released since the Jessica Alba‘s thriller from the first weekend of February. Snapping into around 2,700 locations, Shutter could gross about $8M this weekend.


Shutter

Fox has no intentions of giving up its hold on the number one spot. The studio’s Seuss hit Horton Hears A Who looks unlikely to be defeated by the newcomers and should take advantage of the Good Friday school holiday to post a better-than-usual sophomore hold. Ice Age dropped by 35% in its second frame in 2002 while its Fox sibling Robots fell by 42% in 2005. Both were March openers but neither had the Easter holiday helping the sophomore session. The well-liked Horton might drop by 30% to about $31M and boost its ten-day total to a robust $91M.

10,000 BC should stabilize after its 53% plunge last weekend. A fall of 45% seems likely giving Warner Bros. $9M for the weekend and $76M after 17 days. A similar decline could await Never Back Down putting it at $4.5M for a ten-day sum of $16M for Summit. Martin Lawrence hasn’t exactly been setting the box office on fire with his latest comedy College Road Trip. The Disney title might drop by 30% to roughly $5.5M and lift its cume to $33M.

LAST YEAR: A six-pack of new releases cleaned house in the top ten led by the animated actioner TMNT which still had turtle power with a $24.3M debut. Warner Bros. went on to bank $54.1M with the toon which had weak legs. The studio followed in second with its Spartan blockbuster 300 which collected $19.9M in its third fight. Modern-day action was at the center of Mark Wahlberg‘s Shooter which opened in third with $14.5M on its way to a solid $47M for Paramount. Disney’s Wild Hogs followed with $13.9M. New Line’s The Last Mimzy bowed in fifth with $10M while the horror sequel The Hills Have Eyes 2 debuted close behind with $9.7M. Final grosses reached $21.5M and $20.8M, respectively. Adam Sandler‘s dramatic turn in Reign Over Me led to a $7.5M launch before a $19.7M finish. Lionsgate suffered the worst opening among the new titles with just $3.5M for the swimming drama Pride which ended with a $7.1M take.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

This week at the movies, we’ve got a wacky bodyguard (Drillbit Taylor, starring Owen Wilson and Leslie Mann), a wild family reunion (Meet the Browns, starring Angela Basset and Rick Fox), and paranormal Polaroids (Shutter, starring Joshua Jackson). What do the critics have to say?

Everybody has their off days, even Judd Apatow, whose critical winning streak comes to an end (temporarily, at least) with Drillbit Taylor. This Apatow-produced comedy stars Owen Wilson as the title character, a man who has been hired as a bodyguard for three oft-bullied teens; it turns out Taylor is wilder and crazier than he first appears. Pundits say the problem with Drillbit is that it just isn’t very funny: it doesn’t build on its premise, and offers mediocre gags, despite some decent performances. At 17 percent on the Tomatometer, Drillbit is a little dull. And it’s the worst-reviewed movie Apaptow has ever been involved with. (Apatow discussed his favorite movies with RT; click here to check it out.)



Seth, Evan, and McLovin: the early years.

The other two wide openers this week, Tyler Perry’s Meet the Browns and Shutter, were either embargoed or not screened for critics. Meet the Browns is the story of a single mom who goes to the funeral of her father (who she never knew) and finds her extend family is pretty wild. In Shutter, a pair of newlyweds find spectral images in their photos. You know what time it is: guess those Tomatometers! (And check out this week’s Total Recall.)



“Wait a minute… what’s my girlfriend doing with Elliot Spitzer?”

Also opening this week in limited release:



“Hey, settle down. We know you’d win in a game of one-on-one.”

Finally, props to dethburger for coming the closest to guessing Doomsday‘s 34 percent Tomatometer. Just think: if we could eradicate mad cow disease, he could change his name to lfeburger.

Recent Judd Apatow-Produced Movies:
————————————————
74% — Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story (2007)
87% — Superbad (2007)
90% — Knocked Up (2007)
64% — The TV Set (2007)
72% — Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006)

This week, the prolific Tyler Perry reels off Meet the Browns, his latest examination of African American family life. With that in mind, we thought it would be a good time to take a look at other black directors who’ve followed their own paths to bring personal stories to the screen.

Though critics have yet to fully warm to Perry’s films (his best reviewed effort, Why Did I Get Married?, is at 47 percent on the Tomatometer), there’s no disputing their commercial success. Filling a void that’s been left empty by Hollywood (and much of the overall entertainment targeted at African Americans), Perry’s movies have hit a nerve with black moviegoers. “I know my audience, and they’re not people that the studios know anything about,” Perry has said.


Tyler Perry on the set of Madea’s Family Reunion

He’s not the first black director to attempt to fill that space. As early as the 1910s, African American filmmakers were working to document their experience — or, at the very least, to recast traditional genres with black faces. In 1915, George and Noble Johnson founded the Lincoln Motion Picture Co. in order to cater to the “race” market; later, such pioneers as Oscar Micheaux and Spencer Williams made films in a variety of genres that played to enthusiastic black audiences — and were virtually ignored by whites. (Many race films were screened at “midnight rambles” — so called because segregated cinemas would show movies for blacks at midnight.) In the 1970s, the blaxploitation era ushered in a cast of larger-than-life black action heroes, as well as a sharp crop of black directors.

However, there were a number of young black filmmakers who weren’t interested in following Hollywood archetypes. One was Charles Burnett, who, as a student at UCLA, sought to channel the humanism of Europeans like Jean Renoir and the Italian neorealists into a portrait of blue-collar inner-city life. The result was Killer of Sheep (Certified Fresh at 97 percent), a stunningly beautiful, occasionally funny, and at times achingly sad landmark in the history of independent cinema. The film follows the daily lives of some Watts residents, most notably Stan (Henry G. Sanders) and his wife (Kaycee Moore) and children. Stan works in a slaughterhouse, a job that has taken a toll; he’s constantly looking for something more, and his family finds him cold and distant. Burnett shot the film on a shoestring budget over the course of two years, using non-professional actors; the film was briefly released in 1977, but the rich, evocative soundtrack (featuring Paul Robeson, Louis Armstrong, Etta James, and Earth, Wind, and Fire, among others) became a liability when the rights could not be cleared. (In 2007, the legal issues had been straightened out, and the film received a limited theatrical release.)

Killer of Sheep is very thinly plotted, and probably won’t appeal to those who demand a strong narrative structure. But it has no shortage of striking images: scenes of children at play, of domestic joy and longing, of the poetry of faces, of everyday trials and tribulations. (In one memorable moment, Stan and a friend carry a car motor down a steep flight of stairs and put it in the back of a pickup — and watch it fly out the back as they drive away.) In its own quiet way, Killer of Sheep embodies the disillusionment many felt after the heady promise of the civil rights era. (It’s hard not to get a chill at the scenes of sheep being led to slaughter juxtaposed with those of everyday ghetto life.) John Beifuss of the Memphis Commercial Appeal calls it “a time capsule of 1970s style and attitude that remains utterly timeless in its respect for its characters and its recognition of the despair, passion, boredom, playfulness and cruelty nurtured not just by life in the ghetto but by life itself.”




Of course, the black experience is not confined to the ghetto. It may be an obvious point, but as more African Americans picked up cameras, they began to document life from a number of different perspectives. Case in point: Spike Lee‘s debut feature She’s Gotta Have It, a witty tale of romance set in a more middle class milieu. Shot on a bare-bones budget, Gotta is the story of fiercely independent Nola Darling (Tracy Camilla Johns), who finds herself courted by three very different men: Greer (John Canada Terrell), a narcissistic model; Mars Blackman (Lee), a wacky, childish bike messenger; and Jamie (Tommy Redmond Hicks), a decent, well-meaning guy who also has some control issues. Nola has little problem remaining unattached to these guys, until they become embittered with each other — and demand that she make a choice.

Lee would go on to make greater films (like the nearly perfect Do the Right Thing, 100 percent), as well as movies that delved more deeply into the complexities of the black experience (Get on the Bus [88 percent], for one). But while She’s Gotta Have It may be Lee’s most playful film, it doesn’t shy away from potent, tough questions about identity, class, and the rules of romance. With this early effort, Lee was already on his way to becoming one of American cinema’s most inquisitive, probing filmmakers. “Lee’s first feature posed him as a mid-’80s rival to Woody Allen, nearly equaling him in the psychological authenticity of his characters and perhaps bettering him in grace and virtuosity and sheer creative glee,” wrote Peter Keough of The Chicago Reader.



The 1990s saw an influx of African American filmmaking talent gain commercial and critical success in Hollywood. Some, like John Singleton (Boyz N the Hood, 98 percent) and the Hughes Brothers (Menace II Society, 86 percent), sought to bring a clear eye to the struggles of inner city African Americans, investing their films with incendiary power and bleak grandeur. If those films feel like a gut-punch, George Tillman, Jr‘s Soul Food (Certified Fresh at 80 percent) is more like a comforting hug. But it’s no less significant, in that it proved (if proof was needed) that African American-themed films could follow their own rules — and become huge hits in the process. Soul Food is the story of a family that gathers at the home of Mama Joe (Irma P. Hall) every Sunday for tasty food and honest talk. But when Joe takes ill, the family bonds are ruptured; Joe’s three daughters, workaholic Teri (Vanessa Williams), stay-at-home Mom Maxine (Vivica A. Fox), and sweet newlywed Bird (Nia Long) find themselves in the midst of personal crises that sometimes spill over into the family’s affairs. Maxine and Teri have always been rivals, and Teri and her husband are drifting apart; meanwhile, Bird worries that her new husband Lem (Mekhi Phifer), newly released from the joint, won’t be able to find a job (or fully connect with her tight-knit clan). The story is narrated by Maxine’s young son Ahmad (a wonderful Brandon Hammond), who takes it upon himself to bring everyone together, just like his grandma used to.

If Soul Food‘s plot veers into soap opera territory at times, and if the characters are generally archetypal, the actors invest in their characters such weight that we like these people, despite their faults (it should come as little surprise that the movie inspired a TV spinoff). Soul Food has more than a little to say about the importance of maintaining tradition and familial ties, and the shots of sumptuous dishes are savory enough to qualify as a character in their own right. Peter Stack of the San Francisco Chronicle called Soul Food “a warm, funny, touching African American family drama, the kind of bittersweet melodrama that critics tend to relegate as crowd-pleasing corn. We could use more when it’s this well done.”



In addition, check out the Tinseltown-skewering Hollywood Shuffle (87 percent) the teenage antics of House Party (95 percent), the period intrigue of Eve’s Bayou (79 percent) and the ribald talk of Barbershop (84 percent) for more fine work from talented African American directors.

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