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All Bradley Cooper Movies Ranked

After breaking into the mainstream as smarm personified in Wedding Crashers, Bradley Cooper seemed poised for a career filled with rude comedies and rom-coms — and for a few years, his filmography threatened to live down to those limited expectations, with stuff like Failure to Launch and All About Steve surrounding his follow-up hit The Hangover. Once he had half a chance, however, Cooper flashed his dramatic chops, giving audiences a feel for what he could really do in Limitless before vaulting into the Oscar-nominated A-list with American SniperSilver Linings Playbook, and American Hustle. Factor in his MCU stint as the lovably misanthropic Rocket in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and it’s clear we’ve seen just the tip of what this multi-hyphenate talent can do. For further proof, here’s a look at all Bradley Cooper movies, rounded up and sorted by Tomatometer!

#35

All About Steve (2009)
6%

#35
Adjusted Score: 11370%
Critics Consensus: All About Steve is an oddly creepy, sour film, featuring a heroine so desperate and peculiar that audiences may be more likely to pity than root for her.
Synopsis: After a lovely blind date, crossword-puzzle creator Mary Horowitz (Sandra Bullock) falls head over heels in love with Steve (Bradley... [More]
Directed By: Phil Traill

#34

Serena (2014)
16%

#34
Adjusted Score: 20021%
Critics Consensus: Serena unites an impressive array of talent on either side of the cameras -- then leaves viewers to wonder how it all went so wrong.
Synopsis: In Depression-era North Carolina, the barren wife (Jennifer Lawrence) of an ambitious timber baron (Bradley Cooper) sets out to murder... [More]
Directed By: Susanne Bier

#33

Valentine's Day (2010)
18%

#33
Adjusted Score: 24076%
Critics Consensus: Eager to please and stuffed with stars, Valentine's Day squanders its promise with a frantic, episodic plot and an abundance of rom-com cliches.
Synopsis: In a series of interconnected stories, various Los Angeles residents (Jessica Alba, Jessica Biel, Bradley Cooper) wend their way through... [More]
Directed By: Garry Marshall

#32

Aloha (2015)
20%

#32
Adjusted Score: 25441%
Critics Consensus: Meandering and insubstantial, Aloha finds writer-director Cameron Crowe at his most sentimental and least compelling.
Synopsis: While on assignment in Oahu, Hawaii, military contractor Brian Gilcrest (Bradley Cooper) reconnects with his old flame Tracy Woodside (Rachel... [More]
Directed By: Cameron Crowe

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 28218%
Critics Consensus: Less a comedy than an angrily dark action thriller, The Hangover Part III diverges from the series' rote formula but offers nothing compelling in its place.
Synopsis: It's been two years since the gang known as the Wolfpack narrowly escaped disaster in Bangkok. Now, Phil (Bradley Cooper),... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#30

Case 39 (2009)
21%

#30
Adjusted Score: 22268%
Critics Consensus: Director Christian Alvert has a certain stylish flair, but it's wasted on Case 39's frightless, unoriginal plot.
Synopsis: In her many years as a social worker, Emily Jenkins (Renée Zellweger) thinks she has seen it all -- until... [More]
Directed By: Christian Alvart

#29

The Words (2012)
24%

#29
Adjusted Score: 29022%
Critics Consensus: Neither as clever nor as interesting as it appears to think it is, The Words maroons its talented stars in an overly complex, dramatically inert literary thriller that's ultimately a poor substitute for a good book.
Synopsis: When shallow wannabe-writer Rory (Bradley Cooper) finds an old manuscript tucked away in a bag, he decides to pass the... [More]

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 29240%
Critics Consensus: The few comic gags sprinkled throughout the movie fail to spice up this formulaic rom-com.
Synopsis: A young man (Matthew McConaughey) continues to live at the home of parents who, in desperation to push him out... [More]
Directed By: Tom Dey

#27

Burnt (2015)
28%

#27
Adjusted Score: 33172%
Critics Consensus: Burnt offers a few spoonfuls of compelling culinary drama, but they're lost in a watery goulash dominated by an unsavory main character and overdone clichés.
Synopsis: Adam Jones (Bradley Cooper) was once a top chef in Paris until drugs and alcohol led to a meltdown that... [More]
Directed By: John Wells

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 42727%
Critics Consensus: A crueler, darker, raunchier carbon copy of the first installment, The Hangover Part II lacks the element of surprise -- and most of the joy -- that helped make the original a hit.
Synopsis: Two years after the disastrous events in Las Vegas, it is now Stu's (Ed Helms) turn to walk down the... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 40243%
Critics Consensus: Like many anthologies, New York, I Love You has problems of consistency, but it isn't without its moments.
Synopsis: On the eve of her wedding, a Hasidic woman (Natalie Portman) considers a romance with another man, in one of... [More]

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 40409%
Critics Consensus: Wet Hot American Summer's incredibly talented cast is too often outmatched by a deeply silly script that misses its targets at least as often as it skewers them.
Synopsis: Set on the last day of camp, in the hot summer of 1981, "Wet Hot American Summer" follows a group... [More]
Directed By: David Wain

#23
Adjusted Score: 47692%
Critics Consensus: Despite the best efforts of a talented cast, He's Just Not That Into You devotes too little time to each of its protagonists, thus reducing them to stereotypes.
Synopsis: Baltimore-based friends and lovers, all in their 20s and 30s, try to navigate their way through the complexities of modern... [More]
Directed By: Ken Kwapis

#22

Yes Man (2008)
46%

#22
Adjusted Score: 51994%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's comic convulsions are the only bright spots in this otherwise dim and predictable comedy.
Synopsis: Carl Allen (Jim Carrey) is stuck in a rut with his negative ways. Then he goes to a self-help seminar... [More]
Directed By: Peyton Reed

#21

Hit & Run (2012)
48%

#21
Adjusted Score: 53445%
Critics Consensus: Though Hit & Run has some surprisingly oft-kilter filmmaking, the action doesn't add to much and the writing's a bit smug.
Synopsis: Charlie Bronson (Dax Shepard), a nice guy with a shady past as a getaway driver, breaks out of the witness... [More]
Directed By: Dax Shepard, David Palmer

#20

The A-Team (2010)
49%

#20
Adjusted Score: 56211%
Critics Consensus: The A-Team assembles a top-rate cast only to ditch the show's appealingly silly premise for explosive yet muddled blockbuster filmmaking.
Synopsis: A man who loves when a plan comes together, Hannibal Smith (Liam Neeson) leads a close-knit team of elite operatives.... [More]
Directed By: Joe Carnahan

#19

Joy (2015)
60%

#19
Adjusted Score: 70283%
Critics Consensus: Joy is anchored by a strong performance from Jennifer Lawrence, although director David O. Russell's uncertain approach to its fascinating fact-based tale only sporadically sparks bursts of the titular emotion.
Synopsis: A story of a family across four generations, centered on the girl who becomes the woman (Jennifer Lawrence) who founds... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#18

War Dogs (2016)
61%

#18
Adjusted Score: 74626%
Critics Consensus: War Dogs rises on the strength of Jonah Hill's compelling performance to take a lightly entertaining look at troubling real-world events.
Synopsis: With the war in Iraq raging on, a young man (Jonah Hill) offers his childhood friend a chance to make... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#17

My Little Eye (2002)
67%

#17
Adjusted Score: 52547%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: As part of an Internet reality show, five people sign up to spend six months in a mansion while cameras... [More]
Directed By: Marc Evans

#16

Limitless (2011)
69%

#16
Adjusted Score: 76702%
Critics Consensus: Although its script is uneven, Neil Burger directs Limitless with plenty of visual panache, and Bradley Cooper makes for a charismatic star.
Synopsis: Facing unemployment and his girlfriend's rejection, writer Eddie Morra (Bradley Cooper) is sure that he has no future. That all... [More]
Directed By: Neil Burger

#15

The Mule (2018)
71%

#15
Adjusted Score: 81208%
Critics Consensus: A flawed yet enjoyable late-period Eastwood entry, The Mule stubbornly retains its footing despite a few missteps on its occasionally unpredictable path.
Synopsis: Broke, alone and facing foreclosure on his business, 90-year-old horticulturist Earl Stone takes a job as a drug courier for... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#14

American Sniper (2014)
72%

#14
Adjusted Score: 84403%
Critics Consensus: Powered by Clint Eastwood's sure-handed direction and a gripping central performance from Bradley Cooper, American Sniper delivers a tense, vivid tribute to its real-life subject.
Synopsis: U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) takes his sole mission -- protect his comrades -- to heart and becomes... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 72502%
Critics Consensus: A creative and energetic adaptation of a Clive Barker short story, with enough scares and thrills to be a potential cult classic.
Synopsis: When struggling photographer Leon Kaufman (Bradley Cooper) meets the owner of a prominent art gallery, he sees a chance for... [More]
Directed By: Ryûhei Kitamura

#12

Wedding Crashers (2005)
76%

#12
Adjusted Score: 82402%
Critics Consensus: Wedding Crashers is both raunchy and sweet, and features top-notch comic performances from Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson.
Synopsis: Jeremy (Vince Vaughn) and John (Owen Wilson) are divorce mediators who spend their free time crashing wedding receptions. For the... [More]
Directed By: David Dobkin

#11
Adjusted Score: 86068%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious to a fault, The Place Beyond the Pines finds writer/director Derek Cianfrance reaching for -- and often grasping -- thorny themes of family, fatherhood, and fate.
Synopsis: In upstate New York, two men (Ryan Gosling, Bradley Cooper), and later, their sons (Dane DeHaan, Emory Cohen) must deal... [More]
Directed By: Derek Cianfrance

#10

The Hangover (2009)
78%

#10
Adjusted Score: 87951%
Critics Consensus: With a clever script and hilarious interplay among the cast, The Hangover nails just the right tone of raunchy humor, and the non-stop laughs overshadow any flaw.
Synopsis: Two days before his wedding, Doug (Justin Bartha) and three friends (Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Zach Galifianakis) drive to Las... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#9

Nightmare Alley (2021)
80%

#9
Adjusted Score: 94640%
Critics Consensus: While it may not hit quite as hard as the original, Guillermo del Toro's Nightmare Alley is a modern noir thriller with a pleasantly pulpy spin.
Synopsis: When charismatic but down-on-his-luck Stanton Carlisle (Bradley Cooper) endears himself to clairvoyant Zeena (Toni Collette) and her has-been mentalist husband... [More]
Directed By: Guillermo del Toro

#8
Adjusted Score: 116210%
Critics Consensus: Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2's action-packed plot, dazzling visuals, and irreverent humor add up to a sequel that's almost as fun -- if not quite as thrillingly fresh -- as its predecessor.
Synopsis: Peter Quill and his fellow Guardians are hired by a powerful alien race, the Sovereign, to protect their precious batteries... [More]
Directed By: James Gunn

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 114161%
Critics Consensus: Avengers: Infinity War ably juggles a dizzying array of MCU heroes in the fight against their gravest threat yet, and the result is a thrilling, emotionally resonant blockbuster that (mostly) realizes its gargantuan ambitions.
Synopsis: Iron Man, Thor, the Hulk and the rest of the Avengers unite to battle their most powerful enemy yet --... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo

#6

A Star Is Born (2018)
90%

#6
Adjusted Score: 121924%
Critics Consensus: With appealing leads, deft direction, and an affecting love story, A Star Is Born is a remake done right -- and a reminder that some stories can be just as effective in the retelling.
Synopsis: Seasoned musician Jackson Maine discovers -- and falls in love with -- struggling artist Ally. She has just about given... [More]
Directed By: Bradley Cooper

#5

Licorice Pizza (2021)
91%

#5
Adjusted Score: 103953%
Critics Consensus: Licorice Pizza finds Paul Thomas Anderson shifting into a surprisingly comfortable gear -- and getting potentially star-making performances out of his fresh-faced leads.
Synopsis: Alana Kane and Gary Valentine grow up, run around and fall in love in California's San Fernando Valley in the... [More]
Directed By: Paul Thomas Anderson

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 102337%
Critics Consensus: Silver Linings Playbook walks a tricky thematic tightrope, but David O. Russell's sensitive direction and some sharp work from a talented cast gives it true balance.
Synopsis: After losing his job and wife, and spending time in a mental institution, Pat Solatano (Bradley Cooper) winds up living... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#3

American Hustle (2013)
92%

#3
Adjusted Score: 103246%
Critics Consensus: Riotously funny and impeccably cast, American Hustle compensates for its flaws with unbridled energy and some of David O. Russell's most irrepressibly vibrant direction.
Synopsis: Irving Rosenfeld (Christian Bale) dabbles in forgery and loan-sharking, but when he falls for fellow grifter Sydney Prosser (Amy Adams),... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 105691%
Critics Consensus: Guardians of the Galaxy is just as irreverent as fans of the frequently zany Marvel comic would expect -- as well as funny, thrilling, full of heart, and packed with visual splendor.
Synopsis: Brash space adventurer Peter Quill (Chris Pratt) finds himself the quarry of relentless bounty hunters after he steals an orb... [More]
Directed By: James Gunn

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 127908%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, entertaining, and emotionally impactful, Avengers: Endgame does whatever it takes to deliver a satisfying finale to Marvel's epic Infinity Saga.
Synopsis: Adrift in space with no food or water, Tony Stark sends a message to Pepper Potts as his oxygen supply... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Russo, Joe Russo

Walter Mitty

(Photo by @ Fox/courtesy Everett Collection. Thumbnail: 20th Century Fox Film Corp)

22 Most Inspirational Movies

A new year can represent opportunity for new hopes and resolutions, and movies have the gift to inspire that personal change. If you’re eager to turn the page on 2021, here’s 22 of the most inspirational movies to charge your 2022.

Diet and exercise are always high contenders on new year’s resolutions lists, and movies like Brittany Runs a Marathon or Chariots of Fire will get you in motion. There are movies for getting in touch with inner hope (The Shawshank Redemption) and your roots (Lion), along with picking up new skills (Julie & Julia) and rekindling determination (Remember the Titans, Hidden Figures). And those entering 2021 with open hearts ought to seek out Wild and Groundhog Day. And some movies guide us through trauma and disaster, like Life of Pi, and Soul Surfer.

If it’s a new year, it’s a new you: Here’s 22 movies to inspire your 2022.

#1

A Beautiful Mind (2001)
74%

#1
Adjusted Score: 82555%
Critics Consensus: The well-acted A Beautiful Mind is both a moving love story and a revealing look at mental illness.
Synopsis: A human drama inspired by events in the life of John Forbes Nash Jr., and in part based on the... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 99276%
Critics Consensus: Brittany Runs a Marathon is an earnest and hilarious dramedy that finally gives Jillian Bell a role worthy of her gifts.
Synopsis: A hard-partying woman receives a startling wake-up call when a visit to the doctor reveals how unhealthy she is. Motivated... [More]
Directed By: Paul Downs Colaizzo

#3

The Bucket List (2007)
41%

#3
Adjusted Score: 47961%
Critics Consensus: Not even the earnest performances of the two leads can rescue The Bucket List from its schmaltzy script.
Synopsis: Billionaire Edward Cole (Jack Nicholson) and car mechanic Carter Chambers (Morgan Freeman) are complete strangers, until fate lands them in... [More]
Directed By: Rob Reiner

#4

Chariots of Fire (1981)
82%

#4
Adjusted Score: 88074%
Critics Consensus: Decidedly slower and less limber than the Olympic runners at the center of its story, the film nevertheless manages to make effectively stirring use of its spiritual and patriotic themes.
Synopsis: In the class-obsessed and religiously divided United Kingdom of the early 1920s, two determined young runners train for the 1924... [More]
Directed By: Hugh Hudson

#5

Chef (2014)
87%

#5
Adjusted Score: 93975%
Critics Consensus: Chef's charming cast and sharp, funny script add enough spice to make this feel-good comedy a flavorful -- if familiar -- treat.
Synopsis: After a controlling owner (Dustin Hoffman) pushes him too far, chef Carl Casper (Jon Favreau) quits his position at a... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#6

Forrest Gump (1994)
71%

#6
Adjusted Score: 78314%
Critics Consensus: Forrest Gump may be an overly sentimental film with a somewhat problematic message, but its sweetness and charm are usually enough to approximate true depth and grace.
Synopsis: Slow-witted Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks) has never thought of himself as disadvantaged, and thanks to his supportive mother (Sally Field),... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 101368%
Critics Consensus: It follows a predictable narrative arc, but Good Will Hunting adds enough quirks to the journey -- and is loaded with enough powerful performances -- that it remains an entertaining, emotionally rich drama.
Synopsis: Will Hunting (Matt Damon) has a genius-level IQ but chooses to work as a janitor at MIT. When he solves... [More]
Directed By: Gus Van Sant

#8

Groundhog Day (1993)
97%

#8
Adjusted Score: 103334%
Critics Consensus: Smart, sweet, and inventive, Groundhog Day highlights Murray's dramatic gifts while still leaving plenty of room for laughs.
Synopsis: Phil (Bill Murray), a weatherman, is out to cover the annual emergence of the groundhog from its hole. He gets... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#9

Hidden Figures (2016)
93%

#9
Adjusted Score: 117280%
Critics Consensus: In heartwarming, crowd-pleasing fashion, Hidden Figures celebrates overlooked -- and crucial -- contributions from a pivotal moment in American history.
Synopsis: Three brilliant African American women at NASA -- Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson -- serve as the brains... [More]
Directed By: Theodore Melfi

#10

The Intouchables (2011)
75%

#10
Adjusted Score: 79772%
Critics Consensus: It handles its potentially prickly subject matter with kid gloves, but Intouchables gets by thanks to its strong cast and some remarkably sensitive direction.
Synopsis: An unlikely friendship develops between a wealthy quadriplegic (François Cluzet) and his caretaker (Omar Sy), just released from prison.... [More]

#11

Julie & Julia (2009)
77%

#11
Adjusted Score: 86331%
Critics Consensus: Boosted by Meryl Streep's charismatic performance as Julia Child, Julie and Julia is a light, but fairly entertaining culinary comedy.
Synopsis: Frustrated with a soul-killing job, New Yorker Julie Powell (Amy Adams) embarks on a daring project: she vows to prepare... [More]
Directed By: Nora Ephron

#12

Last Holiday (2006)
55%

#12
Adjusted Score: 59859%
Critics Consensus: Although Queen Latifah's bountiful life-affirming spirit permeates the film, director Wayne Wang is unable to revive this remake with any real flair.
Synopsis: The discovery that she has a terminal illness prompts introverted saleswoman Georgia Byrd (Queen Latifah) to reflect on what she... [More]
Directed By: Wayne Wang

#13

Life of Pi (2012)
86%

#13
Adjusted Score: 96913%
Critics Consensus: A 3D adaptation of a supposedly "unfilmable" book, Ang Lee's Life of Pi achieves the near impossible -- it's an astonishing technical achievement that's also emotionally rewarding.
Synopsis: After deciding to sell their zoo in India and move to Canada, Santosh and Gita Patel board a freighter with... [More]
Directed By: Ang Lee

#14

Lion (2016)
84%

#14
Adjusted Score: 99753%
Critics Consensus: Lion's undeniably uplifting story and talented cast make it a moving journey that transcends the typical cliches of its genre.
Synopsis: Five year old Saroo gets lost on a train which takes him thousands of miles across India, away from home... [More]
Directed By: Garth Davis

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 74432%
Critics Consensus: Will Smith's heartfelt performance elevates The Pursuit of Happyness above mere melodrama.
Synopsis: Life is a struggle for single father Chris Gardner (Will Smith). Evicted from their apartment, he and his young son... [More]
Directed By: Gabriele Muccino

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 76982%
Critics Consensus: An inspirational crowd-pleaser with a healthy dose of social commentary, Remember the Titans may be predictable, but it's also well-crafted and features terrific performances.
Synopsis: In Virginia, high school football is a way of life, an institution revered, each game celebrated more lavishly than Christmas,... [More]
Directed By: Boaz Yakin

#17

Rocky (1976)
91%

#17
Adjusted Score: 97731%
Critics Consensus: This story of a down-on-his-luck boxer is thoroughly predictable, but Sylvester Stallone's script and stunning performance in the title role brush aside complaints.
Synopsis: Rocky Balboa (Sylvester Stallone), a small-time boxer from working-class Philadelphia, is arbitrarily chosen to take on the reigning world heavyweight... [More]
Directed By: John G. Avildsen

#18
Adjusted Score: 58865%
Critics Consensus: It doesn't lack for ambition, but The Secret Life of Walter Mitty fails to back up its grand designs with enough substance to anchor the spectacle.
Synopsis: Walter Mitty (Ben Stiller), an employee at Life magazine, spends day after monotonous day developing photos for the publication. To... [More]
Directed By: Ben Stiller

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 96492%
Critics Consensus: The Shawshank Redemption is an uplifting, deeply satisfying prison drama with sensitive direction and fine performances.
Synopsis: Andy Dufresne (Tim Robbins) is sentenced to two consecutive life terms in prison for the murders of his wife and... [More]
Directed By: Frank Darabont

#20

Soul Surfer (2011)
45%

#20
Adjusted Score: 48567%
Critics Consensus: There's an amazing true story at the heart of Soul Surfer -- and unfortunately, it's drowned by waves of Hollywood cheese.
Synopsis: A natural talent in the sport of surfing, teenager Bethany Hamilton (AnnaSophia Robb) loses an arm in a shark attack.... [More]
Directed By: Sean McNamara

#21

Wild (2014)
88%

#21
Adjusted Score: 99462%
Critics Consensus: Powerfully moving and emotionally resonant, Wild finds director Jean-Marc Vallée and star Reese Witherspoon working at the peak of their respective powers.
Synopsis: Driven to the edge by the loss of her beloved mother (Laura Dern), the dissolution of her marriage and a... [More]
Directed By: Jean-Marc Vallée

#22

Yes Man (2008)
46%

#22
Adjusted Score: 51994%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's comic convulsions are the only bright spots in this otherwise dim and predictable comedy.
Synopsis: Carl Allen (Jim Carrey) is stuck in a rut with his negative ways. Then he goes to a self-help seminar... [More]
Directed By: Peyton Reed

(Photo by Warner Bros. / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Jim Carrey Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Earth Girls Are Easy sounds like one of those debased projects that occur either at the beginning of a career, out of naivete, or at the end of one, out of desperation. But we doubt Jim Carrey looks back on the 1988 comedy with embarassment, and probably not his co-stars Jeff Goldblum, Damon Wayans, and Geena Davis either. It’s silly, it’s Fresh, and it helped Carrey land In Living Color. And that show helped make the man who would talk out of his ass on the big screen, to the delight of millions. Ace Ventura: Pet Detective made over $100 million, and that was the lowest-grossing of Carrey’s comedies that year, behind Dumb & Dumber and The Mask.

After that breakout in 1994, Carrey was locked and loaded to be the manic centerpiece of 1995’s summer blockbuster event: Playing the Riddler in Batman Forever. The comic book caper was the highest-grossing movie of the year… the same couldn’t be said about 1996’s The Cable Guy, Carrey’s first box office bomb. Fret not: He sprung back in 1997 with Liar Liar, and The Truman Show in 1998.

Part of Carrey’s early enduring quality was a subtle sensitivity hiding beneath the flailing limbs and facial contortions, and the sudden pathos that could erupt from his oddball characters. Carrey began displaying this knack for drama more nakedly in serious projects like Man on the Moon, where he transformed into his comedy idol Andy Kaufman, and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, the most memorably melancholic romance of recent decades. Of course, Carrey continued to crowd-please with slapstick like Fun With Dick and Jane, Bruce Almighty, Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and Yes Man.

After a quiet decade pursuing personal hobbies and middling movie work, Carrey spin-dashed into the 2020s with Sonic the Hedgehog, playing iconic villain Dr. Robotnik (see where it landed on the video game movies list). Today, though, we celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Cable Guy, which rebounded from its lowly box office performance to become a cult classic. See where it ranks in his filmography as we rank Jim Carrey movies by Tomatometer!

#28

Dark Crimes (2016)
0%

#28
Adjusted Score: 1377%
Critics Consensus: Dark Crimes is a rote, unpleasant thriller that fails to parlay its compelling true story and a committed Jim Carrey performance into even modest chills.
Synopsis: A hard-boiled detective becomes suspicious of an author when the incidents described in his hit novel resemble the inner-workings of... [More]
Directed By: Alexandros Avranas

#27

Once Bitten (1985)
10%

#27
Adjusted Score: 9746%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A centuries-old vampire, the countess (Lauren Hutton) has kept her youthful look by drinking the blood of male virgins. Since... [More]
Directed By: Howard Storm

#26
Adjusted Score: 26175%
Critics Consensus: Nature Calls in this Ace Ventura sequel, and it's answered by the law of diminishing returns.
Synopsis: Legendary pet detective Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey) returns for another adventure when he's coerced out of retirement while on a... [More]
Directed By: Steve Oedekerk

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 33034%
Critics Consensus: This muddled comedy has a few laughs, but never sustains a consistent tone.
Synopsis: After Dick Harper (Jim Carrey) loses his job at Globodyne in an Enron-esque collapse, he and his wife, Jane (Téa... [More]
Directed By: Dean Parisot

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 35235%
Critics Consensus: Dumb and Dumber To does have its moments, but not enough of them -- and the Farrelly brothers' brand of humor is nowhere near as refreshingly transgressive as it once seemed.
Synopsis: In need of a new kidney and having learned that he has a long-lost daughter, dimwit Harry Dunne (Jeff Daniels)... [More]

#23

Kick-Ass 2 (2013)
32%

#23
Adjusted Score: 40442%
Critics Consensus: Kick-Ass 2 falls short in its attempt to emulate the original's unique blend of ultra-violence and ironic humor.
Synopsis: Dave (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), aka Kick-Ass, and Mindy (Chloë Grace Moretz), aka Hit Girl, are trying to live as normal teenagers... [More]
Directed By: Jeff Wadlow

#22
Adjusted Score: 44776%
Critics Consensus: The Incredible Burt Wonderstone serves up some goofy laughs, but given its outrageous conceit, it's surprisingly safe and predictable.
Synopsis: Superstar magicians Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) and his partner, Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi), have reigned as kings of the Las... [More]
Directed By: Don Scardino

#21

Batman Forever (1995)
38%

#21
Adjusted Score: 42282%
Critics Consensus: Loud, excessively busy, and often boring, Batman Forever nonetheless has the charisma of Jim Carrey and Tommy Lee Jones to offer mild relief.
Synopsis: Batman (Val Kilmer) faces off against two foes: the schizophrenic, horribly scarred former District Attorney Harvey Dent, aka Two-Face (Tommy... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#20

The Majestic (2001)
42%

#20
Adjusted Score: 46415%
Critics Consensus: Ponderous and overlong, The Majestic drowns in forced sentimentality and resembles a mish-mash of other, better films.
Synopsis: Rising Hollywood screenwriter Peter Appleton (Jim Carrey) is blacklisted in the early 1950s Red Scare. Following a drunken car accident,... [More]
Directed By: Frank Darabont

#19

Yes Man (2008)
46%

#19
Adjusted Score: 51994%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's comic convulsions are the only bright spots in this otherwise dim and predictable comedy.
Synopsis: Carl Allen (Jim Carrey) is stuck in a rut with his negative ways. Then he goes to a self-help seminar... [More]
Directed By: Peyton Reed

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 50475%
Critics Consensus: While Jim Carrey's comedic skills earn some laughs, Me, Myself and Irene sports a tired, unsatisfying plot.
Synopsis: Meet Charlie Baileygates, a 17-year veteran of the Rhode Island police force. Charlie is mild-mannered, hard-working, always helpful, and a... [More]

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 51247%
Critics Consensus: Blandly inoffensive and thoroughly predictable, Mr. Popper's Penguins could have been worse -- but it should have been better.
Synopsis: Mr. Popper (Jim Carrey) is a successful real estate developer in Manhattan. He lives in a posh apartment on Park... [More]
Directed By: Mark Waters

#16

Bruce Almighty (2003)
48%

#16
Adjusted Score: 54578%
Critics Consensus: Carrey is hilarious in the slapstick scenes, but Bruce Almighty gets bogged down in treacle.
Synopsis: Bruce Nolan's (Jim Carrey) career in TV has been stalled for a while, and when he's passed over for a... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#15
Adjusted Score: 52830%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's twitchy antics and gross-out humor are on full, bombastic display in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, which is great news for fans of his particular brand of comedy but likely unsatisfying for anyone else.
Synopsis: When the dolphin mascot of Miami's NFL team is abducted, Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey), a zany private investigator who specializes... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#14
Adjusted Score: 54292%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey shines as the Grinch. Unfortunately, it's not enough to save this movie. You'd be better off watching the TV cartoon.
Synopsis: In this live-action adaptation of the beloved children's tale by Dr. Seuss, the reclusive green Grinch (Jim Carrey) decides to... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#13
Adjusted Score: 60193%
Critics Consensus: Robert Zemeckis' 3-D animated take on the Dickens classic tries hard, but its dazzling special effects distract from an array of fine performances from Jim Carrey and Gary Oldman.
Synopsis: Though London awaits the joyful arrival of Christmas, miserly Ebenezer Scrooge (Jim Carrey) thinks it's all humbug, berating his faithful... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#12

The Cable Guy (1996)
54%

#12
Adjusted Score: 57583%
Critics Consensus: The Cable Guy's dark flashes of thought-provoking, subversive wit are often -- but not always -- enough to counter its frustratingly uneven storytelling approach.
Synopsis: Oddball cable installer Chip Douglas (Jim Carrey) attempts to strike up a friendship with customer Steven Kovacs (Matthew Broderick) by... [More]
Directed By: Ben Stiller

#11

Man on the Moon (1999)
64%

#11
Adjusted Score: 68222%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey is eerily dead-on in his portrayal of Andy Kaufman, which helps to elevate Man on the Moon above the script's formulaic biopic cliches.
Synopsis: Jim Carrey stars as the late Andy Kaufman, who was considered one of the most innovative, eccentric and enigmatic performers... [More]
Directed By: Milos Forman

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 79111%
Critics Consensus: Fittingly fleet and frequently fun, Sonic the Hedgehog is a video game-inspired adventure the whole family can enjoy -- and a fine excuse for Jim Carrey to tap into the manic energy that launched his career.
Synopsis: The world needed a hero -- it got a hedgehog. Powered with incredible speed, Sonic embraces his new home on... [More]
Directed By: Jeff Fowler

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 71494%
Critics Consensus: Earth Girls Are Easy is messy, silly, and not particularly bright -- qualities it comes by honestly and deliberately.
Synopsis: In this musical comedy, Valerie (Geena Davis) is dealing with her philandering fiancé, Ted (Charles Rocket), when she finds that... [More]
Directed By: Julien Temple

#8

Dumb & Dumber (1994)
68%

#8
Adjusted Score: 70196%
Critics Consensus: A relentlessly stupid comedy elevated by its main actors: Jim Carrey goes bonkers and Jeff Daniels carries himself admirably in an against-type performance.
Synopsis: Imbecilic best friends Lloyd Christmas (Jim Carrey) and Harry Dunne (Jeff Daniels) stumble across a suitcase full of money left... [More]

#7
Adjusted Score: 76749%
Critics Consensus: This fact-based romantic comedy has its flaws, but they're mostly overcome by its consistently sweet, funny tone and one of the best performances of Jim Carrey's career.
Synopsis: Steven Russell (Jim Carrey) becomes a cop, gets married and starts a family, but after a terrible car accident, he... [More]
Directed By: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa

#6
Adjusted Score: 76697%
Critics Consensus: Although it softens the nasty edges of its source material, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events is a gothic visual treat, and it features a hilariously manic turn from Jim Carrey as the evil Count Olaf.
Synopsis: After the three young Baudelaire siblings are left orphaned by a fire in their mansion, they are carted off to... [More]
Directed By: Brad Silberling

#5

The Mask (1994)
79%

#5
Adjusted Score: 82196%
Critics Consensus: It misses perhaps as often as it hits, but Jim Carrey's manic bombast, Cameron Diaz' blowsy appeal, and the film's overall cartoony bombast keep The Mask afloat.
Synopsis: When timid bank clerk Stanley Ipkiss (Jim Carrey) discovers a magical mask containing the spirit of the Norse god Loki,... [More]
Directed By: Charles Russell

#4
Adjusted Score: 84142%
Critics Consensus: Horton Hears A Who! is both whimsical and heartwarming, and is the rare Dr. Seuss adaptation that stays true to the spirit of the source material.
Synopsis: Animated elephant Horton (Jim Carrey) finds a speck of dust floating in the Jungle of Nool. Upon investigation of the... [More]

#3

Liar Liar (1997)
83%

#3
Adjusted Score: 85692%
Critics Consensus: Despite its thin plot, Liar Liar is elevated by Jim Carrey's exuberant brand of physical humor, and the result is a laugh riot that helped to broaden the comedian's appeal.
Synopsis: Conniving attorney Fletcher Reede (Jim Carrey) is an ace in the courtroom, but his dishonesty and devotion to work ruin... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#2
Adjusted Score: 101335%
Critics Consensus: Propelled by Charlie Kaufman's smart, imaginative script and Michel Gondry's equally daring directorial touch, Eternal Sunshine is a twisty yet heartfelt look at relationships and heartache.
Synopsis: After a painful breakup, Clementine (Kate Winslet) undergoes a procedure to erase memories of her former boyfriend Joel (Jim Carrey)... [More]
Directed By: Michel Gondry

#1

The Truman Show (1998)
95%

#1
Adjusted Score: 101730%
Critics Consensus: A funny, tender, and thought-provoking film, The Truman Show is all the more noteworthy for its remarkably prescient vision of runaway celebrity culture and a nation with an insatiable thirst for the private details of ordinary lives.
Synopsis: He doesn't know it, but everything in Truman Burbank's (Jim Carrey) life is part of a massive TV set. Executive... [More]
Directed By: Peter Weir

This week’s new releases include a few Hollywood takes on science fiction (Fox’s remake of The Day The Earth Stood Still; the 1984 sequel 2010: The Year We Make Contact on Blu-ray), and a few that fall into the fantasy genre (Adam Sandler’s Bedtime Stories; Jim Carrey in Yes Man, where he romances the 18-years younger Zooey Deschanel — a middle-aged male fantasy if there ever was one). Awards-watchers have an Oscar-nominated film new to DVD (Doubt) and a new double-dip from a Coen brothers classic in the making (No Country for Old Men Collector’s Edition). Read on for more!

The Day the Earth Stood Still — 20%

When studios remake films, the question always arises: Why fix it if it ain’t broken? (The original 1951 sci-fi classic sits pretty at a robust 94 percent on the Tomatometer.) The folks at Fox apparently don’t like such questions, because they decided to “update” the tale of an alien visitor named Klaatu who brings a message of peace — and then, potential destruction — to the callow denizens of Earth. Keanu Reeves‘ monotone delivery as Klaatu didn’t help TDTESS‘s clunky direction and script, though in his defense, he was doing it on purpose. Find the 3-Disc version for a plethora of bonus materials (production photos, storyboards, and concept art) and tons of thematic and making-of featurettes; unfortunately, the lone commentary track does not feature the film’s stars or its director, Scott Derrickson. The good news? Limited editions of the 2-Disc and 3-Disc DVDs also come with the original The Day The Earth Stood Still, so you might get some enjoyment out of the release after all.

Next: Adam Sandler in Bedtime Stories

Back again with another family-friendly comic clunker, Adam Sandler stars as a goofball uncle named Skeeter who entertains his niece and nephew with fantastical stories — stories that begin to come to life! Although the appealing Keri Russell co-stars as Sandler’s love interest, and the rascally Russell Brand as his best friend, this high concept comedy fell flat. Even director Adam Shankman (Hairspray) couldn’t breathe enough pep and life into the proceedings, and he was able to make people enjoy watching John Travolta in drag. Special features include pieces on the film’s special effects, child actors, and computer-generated guinea pig, bloopers, deleted scenes, and an infomercial-type appearance by Big Daddy co-stars Cole and Dylan Sprouse (now bonafide Disney idols).

Next: Multiple Oscar nominee, Doubt

Doubt — 78%

Oscar-watchers absolutely must see this Certified Fresh chamber piece, which earned five Academy Award nominations and was adapted by director John Patrick Shanley from his own Pulitzer-winning play. With creds like these, is there any, ahem, doubt, that serious moviegoers should move this to the top of their Netflix queue this week? A strong cast led by Meryl Streep, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and Amy Adams give this period piece about suspicion and the specter of abuse in a 1950s parish serious weight, though a brief, powerhouse performance by Viola Davis steals the show.

Next: Say maybe to Jim Carrey’s Yes Man

Jim Carrey is a shadow of his former self in Yes Man, a predictable comedy about a straight-laced banker who battles his mid-life crisis by embracing a single word: yes. Unfortunately, critics overwhelmingly disagreed with the film’s central theme (“Say yes to everything!”), despite a winning if strained performance by Carrey, who plays against his strengths as the straight man with the occasional glimmer of that slapsticky, classic Carrey. And then, there’s Zooey Deschanel. Always winning as the token “manic pixie dream girl,” she’s extra-quirky in a role as a scooter-driving, rock band-fronting, Silverlake-dwelling free spirit who, naturally, falls in love with Carrey (18 years her senior in real life). Deschanel’s musical performances, included in full as bonus features, are the highlight of Yes Man on DVD – watch one below!

Next: Contemplate your credit history with I.O.U.S.A.

I.O.U.S.A. — 91%

Economy got you in a funk? If watching an entire documentary about the nation’s money woes won’t sink you further into depression, then we fervently recommend picking up I.O.U.S.A. (maybe a rental — it’s more cost-effective). This nonpartisan doc aims to educate America about fiscal responsibility — but in an entertaining way, unlike your bank’s customer service agents — utilizing engaging graphics to make its terrifying point. Another bonus: I.O.U.S.A. is directed by award-winning filmmaker Patrick Creadon, whose 2006 doc Wordplay introduced audiences to the nation’s biggest crossword nerds — and won a Golden Tomato award to boot.

Next: Yup, someone made a movie entitled Donkey Punch

Donkey Punch — 47%

The title does bear explanation, but you’ll have to watch this film to find out what it means. It’s got a promising premise; this British thriller follows a group of young partiers adrift on a boat trip that takes a dangerous turn at sea. Critics liked it to a point, but gave it negative reviews for giving way to tired genre cliché. Brutal violence, drug use, and general hedonism abound, if you like that sort of thing…but while curiosity is bound to get the best of anyone looking for sordid thrills, Donkey Punch might turn out less impactful than its own title.

Next: Painterly animation and adventure in The Tale of Despereaux

When it comes to animation, it would seem that American studios (Pixar, DreamWorks) have a monopoly on critical success. European studio Framestore Animation nonetheless tried their hand with The Tale of Despereaux, whose titular character is a mouse of particular courage and manners. Despereaux aimed to capture the imaginations of young audiences but ended up splitting critics, who credited it with handsome, painterly CG visuals but complained of a lack of spirit. The bland allegory, based on the novel by author Kate DiMillo, might serve hardcore fans of animation (and those with small children) best; all else, be warned. A few games and making-of featurettes highlight the DVD.

Next: Get naughty and nostalgic with the Pre-Code Hollywood Collection

Hearken back to an Old Hollywood unencumbered by silly “morals,” before that stuffy Hays Code took effect, with six delightfully dirty classics: The Cheat (1931, pictured above), Merrily We Go To Hell (1932), Hot Saturday (1932), Torch Singer (1933), Murder at the Vanities (1934), and Search For Beauty (1934). Among the set are films starring the likes of Tallulah Bankhead, Cary Grant, Lucille Ball and Claudette Colbert, with salacious storylines that span the un-PC themes of adultery, wedlock, murder, and good old-fashioned smut. (Bankhead’s The Cheat plays like an early version of Indecent Proposal, as an indebted woman considers paying the ultimate price to a “lecherous scoundrel.”) A mini-handbook reprint of the infamous 1934 Production Code accompanies the set; here, we share our favorite bylaws: “Revenge in modern times shall not be justified” and “Excessive and lustful kissing, lustful embraces, suggestive postures and gestures, are not to be shown.”

Next: Should you double dip with the No Country For Old Men Collector’s Edition?

No Country For Old Men Collector’s Edition Blu-ray — 94%

Double-dip home video releases are never enticing to fans who already own a title, but this week’s Blu-ray release of the Coen Brothers’ Oscar-winning No Country For Old Men comes with enough new bonus material that fervent Coen fans should take a look. When No Country first hit DVD and Blu-ray a while back, only a trio of features accompanied the film; all three of those features are ported over to the new Collector’s Edition 2-Disc Blu-ray and 3-Disc DVD, and share space with a wealth of new extras, which include Josh Brolin‘s behind-the-scenes feature, a Q&A with Joel and Ethan Coen and cinematographer Roger Deakins, and nine additional pieces featuring the Coens and their stars talking with various media programs about No Country. If you’ve spent hours analyzing the film’s ending, shot compositions, or Anton Chigurh’s hairdo of choice, consider these materials study guides to the Coen classic.

Next: 2010: The Year We Make Contact hits Blu-ray

It was an audacious idea to begin with; who in their right mind would attempt to follow Stanley Kubrick‘s science fiction classic, 2001: A Space Odyssey, with a sequel? In the year 1984, that person was director Peter Hyams (Capricorn One, The Star Chamber, Timecop), whose adaptation of Arthur C. Clarke’s follow-up novel picked up nine years after the events of 2001. Roy Scheider stars as Dr. Heywood Floyd, a now-disgraced aeronautics expert investigating the HAL 9000 glitch, who along with John Lithgow, Helen Mirren, and Bob Balaban, tries to unlock the secret of the monolith. While the release comes with woefully few bonus features (a vintage featurette and the theatrical trailer), it’s a great High Def release for science fiction purists.

Until next week, happy renting!

This weekend moviegoers gave a clear yes to Jim Carrey and a definite maybe to Will Smith as the A-list Hollywood stars took the top two spots at the North American box office with their newest films. Carrey’s comedy Yes Man finished first, Smith’s odd drama Seven Pounds locked up the runnerup spot, while another new release – the animated mouse adventure The Tale of Despereaux – debuted in third place. Ticket sales were hurt by huge snowstorms and sub-freezing temperatures across much of the northeast. Add in the frenzy of the final shopping weekend before Christmas and it was clear that going to the movies was not a top priority this weekend with the top ten crashing by nearly 50% versus a year ago. Studios are hoping to pick up some of the lost business in the coming days when people leave work and school for the holidays.

Warner Bros. claimed the top spot for the third time in four weeks with Yes Man which took in an estimated $18.2M from 3,434 theaters for a moderate $5,288 average. Carrey’s return to broad comedy opened below expectations, though it is difficult to say exactly how much weather and holiday shopping impacted the grosses. The funnyman’s last live-action comedy also bowed during the yuletide season. His 2005 pic Fun with Dick and Jane debuted on the Wednesday before the Santa holiday grossing $21.5M over the Friday-to-Monday holiday frame and $29.1M over six days. Comparisons would not be fair given the weak numbers of Christmas Eve and the stronger-than-usual sales on Christmas Day which affected its opening weekend. Dick went on to reach $110.3M.

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Yes Man posted the smallest gross for a top spot debut in two months. The last six films to open at number one this year all debuted with more than $30M each. But the studio should see solid numbers in the days ahead as audiences become more available. Plus Yes is one of very few funny and feel-good films this holiday season that won’t make moviegoers cry by the end so that should make it stand out.

Will Smith’s streak of eight consecutive number one openings came to an end with his latest film Seven Pounds which debuted in second place with an estimated $16M from 2,758 locations for a $5,801 average. The Sony release reunited the world’s biggest box office star with director Gabriele Muccino who enjoyed a much stronger $26.5M bow for their uplifting drama The Pursuit of Happyness which also debuted in mid-December. That film, however, had better reviews, a Golden Globe nomination for Smith, and strong word-of-mouth which allowed it to have good legs throughout the winter season on its way to a $162.6M final. Their latest collaboration drew an audience that was 55% female and 64% 25 or older.

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Seven Pounds has attracted some of the worst reviews of the superstar’s career – not so much for his acting, but for the storyline. The $55M-budgeted film will still try to pick up more business over the next two weeks, but with five new wide releases hitting the multiplexes on Christmas Day, it may be an uphill battle. The last film for Smith to open lower was 2001’s Ali which grossed $14.7M on its opening weekend. However, that film debuted on Christmas Day which fell on a Tuesday so its gross in the first three days was $20M. Before that, Smith and a pre-Bourne Matt Damon starred in The Legend of Bagger Vance which bowed on a regular November weekend to $11.5M which would be $15M at today’s prices.

Universal enjoyed a promising start to its kidpic offering for the holiday season The Tale of Despereaux which grossed an estimated $10.5M from 3,104 theaters for a $3,385 average. Ordinarily that would be a mild performance but with children getting out of school this week and parents having extra time off, every day between Christmas and New Year’s will be a virtual Saturday at the box office so the bulk of the business lies ahead. Studios often launch family films in mid-December to establish themselves in the marketplace before the holidays begin. Two years ago, Charlotte’s Web opened to $11.5M on its way to a $83M final (seven times its debut), 2000’s animated film The Emperor’s New Groove bowed to $9.8M leading to a $89.3M cume (nine times the debut), and the previous year’s mouse flick Stuart Little opened to $15M and ended with $140M (nine times its debut). The G-rated Tale benefited from little competition for its target audience this weekend and should be able to ride out the holiday season in style.

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Following its top spot debut last weekend, The Day the Earth Stood Still came crumbling down in its second frame falling a steep 67% to an estimated $10.2M. After ten days, the Keanu Reeves sci-fi pic has amassed just $48.6M for Fox giving the studio yet another disappointment. Earth cost $80M to produce and was backed by a pricey marketing campaign. Word-of-mouth was poor which contributed to the big sophomore decline. The doomsday film will be looking for a holiday bonus in the coming weeks to help it finish with about $70M from North America.

The Warner Bros. hit Four Christmases saw some competition from studio stablemate Yes Man and dropped by 41% in its fourth frame to an estimated $7.8M for a cume to date of $100.2M. Summit’s Twilight continued to show good legs thanks to repeat business from die-hard fans dipping 34% to an estimated $5.2M pushing the total to $158.5M. Of all films in the Top 20 showing a decline from last weekend, the vampire flick’s was the smallest.

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Dropping 43% was Disney’s 3D toon Bolt which grossed an estimated $4.3M for a $95M sum to date. Fox Searchlight saw a strong national expansion for its awards contender Slumdog Millionaire which widened from 169 to 589 locations this weekend and jumped into the top ten in its sixth frame with an estimated $3.2M. The Danny Boyle-directed indie hit averaged $5,348 – second best in the top ten – and lifted its cume to $12.1M and counting.

Fox’s expensive historical epic Australia continued to sink falling 44% to an estimated $2.3M while the 007 hit Quantum of Solace rounded out the top ten with an estimated $2.2M for Sony, down 42%. Totals are now $41.9M and $161.3M, respectively.

Mickey Rourke’s critically-praised comeback film The Wrestler got off to the second best start of the year for a limited release opener. The Fox Searchlight pic platformed in four theaters and grossed an estimated $209,474 marking a scorching $52,369 average. Only Frost/Nixon debuted with a stronger average with its $60,236 from three theaters two weeks ago. Since its Wednesday launch, The Wrestler has taken in $295,000 and the film will slowly add more venues during each of the coming weekends.

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A handful of acclaimed pics in limited release continued to shine ahead of their Christmas expansions. Miramax’s Meryl Streep-Philip Seymour Hoffman drama Doubt grossed an estimated $729,000 from 39 theaters for a strong $18,692 average. Total is $1.4M. Gran Torino from director/star Clint Eastwood averaged a stellar $24,632 with an estimated $468,000 from 19 sites for Warner Bros. The political drama Frost/Nixon remained in 39 locations and grossed an estimated $365,000, off 42%, for a $9,359 average. Cumes are $860,000 and $1.5M, respectively.

The top ten films grossed an estimated $79.7M which was down a sharp 46% from last year when National Treasure: Book of Secrets opened in the top spot with $44.8M; and down significantly from 2006 when Night at the Museum debuted at number one with a four-day holiday take of $42.2M when Christmas fell on a Monday.

Author: Gitesh Pandya,
www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

This week at the movies, we’ve got self-improvement (Yes Man, starring Jim Carrey and Zooey Deschanel), mysterious altruism (Seven Pounds, starring Will Smith and Rosario Dawson), and rodent adventures (The Tale of Despereaux, with voice work by Matthew Broderick and Dustin Hoffman). What do the critics have to say?

After a disastrous detour to dramatic territory with The Number 23, Jim Carrey is back to the realm of wacky comedy. Unfortunately, critics say his return is only sporadically successful in Yes Man. Carrey plays Carl, a man gripped by depression who enters a self-help program that encourages its devotees to say yes to each and every question. However, Carl finds answering in the affirmative can sometimes have negative consequences. The pundits say the film has its moments, thanks to Carrey’s manic energy, but it’s ultimately little more than a series of comedic set-pieces that don’t build or cohere; worse, we’ve already seen Carrey do a pretty fine variation on this theme in Liar Liar. At 40 percent on the Tomatometer, you may want to say “no” to Yes Man. (Check out this week’s Total Recall, in which we count down Carrey’s best-reviewed films.)

“What’s it called? Gallipoli? Sounds hilarious!”

It’s unsurprising that Will Smith would want to shed his blockbuster baggage every once in a while and throw himself into a smaller, more dramatically weighty role; unfortunately, critics say his latest, Seven Pounds, is more leaden than anything else. Smith stars as Ben, an IRS agent haunted by past misdeeds. As a way of making amends, he decides to practice random acts of kindness on strangers, a plan that goes in intriguing directions when he falls in love with terminally-ill Emily (Rosario Dawson). Some pundits have given Smith credit for attempting riskier material, but they also say Seven Pounds doesn’t follow the rules of logic very closely, and its tone is somber and portentous. At 35 percent on the Tomatometer, Seven Pounds may not be worth your 10 dollars.

“I’m really sorry that I said girls ain’t nothin’ but trouble.”

Another week, another so-so animated feature. The Tale of Despereaux is a fantasy tale about a heroic little mouse who becomes an outcast for refusing to conform; he befriends a group of rats, with whom he shares a journey of self-discovery and adventure. The pundits say Despereaux looks pretty good, and is mercifully free of the toilet humor and pop culture references that have become commonplace in animated features. However, it’s also lacking a sense of magic, and doesn’t really take dramatic flight. At 42 percent on the Tomatometer, this mouse is a tail’s-length behind Ratatouille.

“Man, it’s taking forever to read this book!””

Also opening this week in limited release:

Recent Jim Carrey Movies:

Hollywood titans Jim Carrey and Will Smith go head-to-head at the North American box office but only one can add to his long list of number one openings. Carrey has the edge with his comedy Yes Man while Smith could fail to reach the top spot for the first time in seven years with Seven Pounds, his new dramatic offering. Most holdovers will be in the single-digit millions so audiences should welcome these two new star-driven vehicles. Also debuting is the animated mouse adventure The Tale of Despereaux which will target young children.

Jim Carrey returns to his core genre – the broad comedy – with Yes Man playing a loan officer who changes his mundane life when he joins a self-help program requiring him to give a thumbs up to anything and everything life throws at him. The PG-13 film should play to a wide audience and since the actor doesn’t do these types of comedies that much any more, it should prove to be highly in demand not just this weekend, but over the holiday weeks ahead. Star-driven comedies sell when the trailers and commercials have plenty of jokes and this one fits the bill. No, this isn’t a defining moment in his career artistically, but for now audiences that have already laughed it up with Vince and Reese will be looking to move on to the next big comedy and Carrey is most bankable in this type of role, especially one which offers plenty o’ physical humor.

The funnyman’s last live-action comedy came three years ago over Christmas weekend with Fun With Dick and Jane which bowed to a four-day take of $21.5M and a six-day Wednesday-to-Monday tally of $29.1M from 3,056 sites. Warner Bros. has done a fine job in marketing the film focusing on the its two biggest assets – Carrey and the funny situations. These are the two elements that will sell the pic – not reviews, not awards, and not co-stars. Teens and young adults will respond in solid numbers. Mature adults may be distracted by the final shopping weekend before Christmas and may catch it later. Audiences want to laugh and feel good right now and this should deliver the goods at the turnstiles. Marching into 3,434 theaters, Yes Man may open to about $26M and post good holds in the weeks ahead.

Jim Carrey in Yes Man

What could be the least hyped Will Smith film since The Legend of Bagger Vance opens this Friday in the form of Seven Pounds. With it comes a serious threat to the A-plus-lister’s amazing streak of eight consecutive $100M+ blockbusters which began in 2002. But Sony has been in the most difficult of positions as the PG-13 film’s story is so full of twists and turns that most of it cannot be revealed in the pre-release marketing. Without giving away too much, Smith plays a tax man who seeks to help seven strangers with acts that go well beyond the world of kindness. Essentially it is a story that audiences must unravel as the film progresses so the studio can do little more than just say ‘Hey, it’s Will Smith. Buy a ticket!’ In fact the poster is really just a headshot of the man.

Seven reunites Smith with Gabriele Muccino who directed The Pursuit of Happyness which bowed to $26.5M two years ago around this same time. That pic was in ways an easier sell with its uplifting rags-to-riches story and kiss of approval from Oprah. This time around, moviegoers are left to wonder as most don’t really know what the hell Seven Pounds is about. The marketing push is there, but the volume has been low considering the name that hangs above the title. The film has been noticeably absent from awards season with no major group highlighting the pic and reviews have been lukewarm. Strong critical acclaim and some big nominations could have really helped here.

That man in black’s name will certainly be enough for many fans who will just trust their guy and give this a shot on opening weekend. But many might wait for the recommendations of friends and will choose the guaranteed laughs of Mr. Carrey for this weekend’s entertainment instead. Landing in roughly 2,600 locations, Seven Pounds could debut with about $17M. With Brad, Leo, Tom, and Adam all launching new films next week, Will will need to win over fans fast in order to compete in the long-term.

Will Smith in Seven Pounds

Universal secures a spot in the marketplace for its kidpic offering for the holiday season with the animated mouse flick The Tale of Despereaux. The G-rated film is not necessarily out for a big opening, but just looking to settle into the marquees now so when kids start to break for the holidays and parents get some time off of their own, it will be in perfect position to take in some cash. The one big problem is that it is not based on any well-known brand and that will hurt its chances in the short-term. Still, the week between Christmas and New Year’s when everyday is a Saturday at the multiplexes will be the key period when this film can draw in some sales. Overall excitement is not too high and reviews will be mostly irrelevant. It’s really about how many kids will get excited enough to bug their parents to see this new character. Debuting in 2,739 theaters, The Tale of Despereaux could collect about $8M this weekend.

The Tale of Despereaux

Fox Searchlight opened its Mickey Rourke pic The Wrestler in four theaters in New York and Los Angeles on Wednesday and begins a platform rollout this weekend. Already winning numerous Best Actor prizes for his performance as a down-and-out grappler looking for redemption, the Darren Aronofsky-directed film has earned unanimous acclaim from critics and also scored the Golden Lion at this year’s Venice Film Festival.

Klaatu and Gort will see a big dip this weekend. After ruling the chart this past week, the sci-fi thriller The Day the Earth Stood Still should face a hefty decline as word-of-mouth is quite poor. The Keanu Reeves pic sits with a weak C+ average from 3,700+ voters on Yahoo Movies. However, there are no new action pictures opening so a total collapse may not occur. Look for Day to drop by 45% to about $16M which would give Fox $55M in ten days.

The holiday comedy smash Four Christmases has been seeing great strength at the box office as moviegoers have been spreading good will and with Santa’s big day approaching, the subject matter is becoming even more relevant. Looking at 2003 when the calendar was exactly the same, the Christmas laughers witnessed slim declines this very weekend. Bad Santa starring the former Mr. Jolie dipped only 15% in its fourth weekend while Will Ferrell‘s Elf eased only 9% in its seventh frame. All this despite a record-breaking opening by the final Lord of the Rings epic which played broadly. Four Christmases does have Jim Carrey stealing some laughs so it may witness a 15% slide to around $11M pushing the cume to a stellar $103M for Warner Bros.

LAST YEAR: Leading a wave of five new releases over the pre-Christmas weekend, Disney shot straight to number one with its action sequel National Treasure: Book of Secrets which bowed to $44.8M on its way to a stellar $220M domestically and $457M worldwide. Sophomore juggernauts I Am Legend and Alvin and the Chipmunks followed with $33.5M and $28.2M, respectively. Debuting in fourth place was the Tom HanksJulia Roberts dream team in Universal’s Charlie Wilson’s War which grossed $9.7M. Johnny Depp was close behind with Paramount’s Sweeney Todd which bowed to $9.3M from half as many theaters. Final grosses were $66.7M and $52.9M, respectively. The Warner Bros. romance P.S. I Love You opened in sixth place with $6.5M leading to a $53.7M stateside tally, but a much stronger $88.4M haul overseas. The frame’s biggest casualty was the Judd Apatow project Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story which debuted to just $4.2M finishing with only $18.3M for Sony.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

He’s one of the most bankable stars in Hollywood, one whose career has weathered
such box-office storms as The Majestic and The Number 23 to amass
over $3 billion in receipts — and with his latest release,
Yes Man
,
bowing this weekend, we decided there was no time like the present to take a
look at the best-reviewed films of Jim Carrey’s career.

He earned his first real success by tapping into America’s unquenchable thirst
for broad slapstick comedy, but Carrey always had bigger ambitions than anyone
could have guessed by watching Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, and he’s
proved it repeatedly by choosing projects beyond the scope of Farrelly-friendly
laffers. His reach has occasionally exceeded his grasp, but few careers can
boast a range extending from Dumb and Dumber to Eternal Sunshine of
the Spotless Mind
— and on that note, let’s take a look at Jim Carrey’s 10
most critic-friendly films!




more info…



10.


Dumb & Dumber

(1994)





Tomatometer: 60 percent


Sea Bass! Part of Carrey’s 1994 trilogy of broad-as-a-barn, occasionally
revolting comedies, Dumb and Dumber paired the rising star with Jeff
Daniels as a pair of well-meaning dimwits who stumble into a cross-country
adventure involving Lauren Holly and a briefcase full of cash. While not quite
the across-the-board smash that There’s Something About Mary turned out
to be a few years later, Dumb and Dumber still managed to include
enough charm between the goofy jokes to reach 60 percent on the Tomatometer.
It didn’t win any points for smarts, obviously, but that was beside the point
— as recognized by writers such as Entertainment Weekly’s Owen Gleiberman,
who noted that “Carrey…does literal-minded doofdom with peerless
enthusiasm.”






more info…



9. Earth
Girls are Easy

(1992)





Tomatometer: 61 percent


You might be surprised to find this late-night cable mainstay on a list that
includes cult favorites like The Cable Guy and box-office champs like Bruce
Almighty
, but the Tomatometer does not lie, and critics cheered loudly
enough to send this 1989 cult classic all the way up to 61 percent. Although
quite a few scribes sniffed at at Earth Girls are Easy‘s low ambitions
and thick layer of cheese, a greater number were able to grin and bear Julien
Temple’s brightly colored send-up of hokey sci-fi and ’80s life in the San
Fernando Valley. As a furry red alien named Wiploc, Carrey received one of his
first major chunks of screen time here, and although his efforts were rewarded
with minimal box-office success, he did get to trade lines with Geena Davis
and Julie Brown — and help earn some delightfully backhanded praise from the
likes of Luke Y. Thompson of the New Times, who declared the film to be
“stupid but wonderful.”





more info…



8. Man on the Moon

(1999)





Tomatometer: 62 percent


For most of the ’80s and ’90s, Andy Kaufman was a little-remembered comic,
mostly known for his portrayal of dimwitted immigrant mechanic Latka Gravas on
the ABC sitcom Taxi — but the late ’90s witnessed a resurgence in
interest surrounding Kaufman’s often pioneering work, thanks to a pair of
biographies, a handful of DVD reissues, and the R.E.M.-referencing Man on
the Moon
. Carrey continued his ’90s run of prestige pictures with Moon,
subsuming himself so completely into the role of the inscrutable Kaufman that
most critics were willing to forgive the movie’s fuzzy, weightless middle, its
fudging of certain facts, and a few fumble-fingered attempts at going meta.
Although many scribes were quick to point out the movie’s flaws — and
Kaufman’s all-too-apparent flaws as a protagonist — praise for Moon‘s
star was all but universal, typified by Jeffrey M. Anderson of Combustible
Celluloid, who applauded, “Carrey gets inside Kaufman’s skin.”






more info…



7.
Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events

(2004)





Tomatometer: 70 percent


It was a bit of a non-starter at the box office, failing to recoup its $140
million budget with its domestic receipts, but few roles in the history of
children’s fiction have ever been better-suited to an actor than the
villainous master of disguise known as Count Olaf and his on-screen
counterpart, Jim Carrey. Although A Series of Unfortunate Events drew
the ire of some fans of the books for softening their frequently nasty edges,
it remains a visual feast, as well as a tour de force for Carrey, who was able
to take advantage of his manic energy in a way not seen since his mid ’90s
heyday. A sequel remains in development limbo, but don’t let Hollywood’s cold
feet keep you from giving Unfortunate a rental — as the Reno
Gazette-Journal’s Forrest Hartman put it, “not many children’s movies center
on recently orphaned children delivered to the home of a homicidal thespian.
Then again, not many children’s movies are as good as this one.”





more info…



6. The Mask

(1994)





Tomatometer: 76 percent


One of the only films to ever net its star nominations from both the Golden
Globes and the Golden Raspberries, 1994’s The Mask presented filmgoers
with something of an early ’90s trifecta: State of the art special effects,
some marvelously over-the-top mugging from Jim Carrey, and a heaping helping
of va-va-va-voom from instant star Cameron Diaz, who turned Carrey’s nebbishy
bank clerk Stanley Ipkiss into a leering Tex Avery wolf (and had roughly the
same effect on male viewers). It’s loud and far from subtle, but The Mask
is also a lot of fun, not least because Carrey’s impossibly limber performance
ultimately proves to be as much of a special effect as anything else on the
screen. Variety’s Leonard Klady spoke for many of his peers when he summed it
up as “adroitly directed, viscerally and visually dynamic and just plain fun.”






more info…



5. Dr. Seuus’
Horton Hears a Who!

(2008)





Tomatometer: 79 percent


Carrey’s first brush with a Seuss-inspired adaptation didn’t go so well, which
may have scared a few viewers away from the CG-animated Dr. Seuss’ Horton
Hears a Who!
— but it was their loss, as attested by the mostly quite
positive reviews that greeted the second film adaptation of this timeless tale
of a good-hearted elephant who teaches his detractors that “a person’s a
person, no matter how small.” As Horton’s voice, Carrey did a better job of
adding marquee value than bringing hidden layers of meaning to his character,
and critics were quick to point out that Horton suffers most of the
same difficulties that are bound to trouble a 90-minute film based on an
illustrated short story, but for most, the movie’s charms proved impossible to
resist — such as Brian Webster of the Apollo Guide, who happily reported that
“taking on Seuss has proven a challenge for Hollywood, but a nice balance has
been struck here between authenticity and new ideas. This one’s a winner.”





more info…



4. Liar Liar

(1997)





Tomatometer: 84 percent


Given that Carrey and Liar Liar director Tom Shadyac had previously
collaborated on Ace Ventura, a person could have been forgiven for
assuming that their reunion would rely on the same scatalogical humor and
over-the-top physical comedy that the world’s most famous pet detective rode
to box-office riches…and they would have been right, to an extent, although
Liar Liar features a much softer-edged version of Carrey’s manic
persona. It isn’t his sharpest comedy, but at this point, even critics who had
grown accustomed to hating Carrey’s work found themselves surprisingly
susceptible to his charms — most notably Roger Ebert, who wrote “I am
gradually developing a suspicion, or perhaps it is a fear, that Jim Carrey is
growing on me.” Filmgoers had no such fear, driving this family-friendly tale
of a pathological fibber rendered unable to lie for a day to global grosses in
excess of $300 million.






more info…



3. Peggy Sue Got
Married
(1986)





Tomatometer: 88 percent


Okay, so he didn’t have the biggest part in the movie — but for a young actor
who’s just starting out, even a bit role in a movie with a pedigree like Peggy
Sue Got Married
is worth remembering. Despite a troubled two-year birth
that saw the departures of its original star (Debra Winger) and director
(Penny Marshall), Peggy Sue ultimately did all right for itself,
picking up Francis Ford Coppola behind the cameras and over $40 million in
box-office receipts (resuscitating Coppola’s commercial fortunes in the
process). Carrey doesn’t exactly steal the show as a younger version of one of
the time-traveling Peggy Sue’s boyfriends, but it’s still an interesting
glimpse of the future star in action — and besides, Peggy Sue Got
Married
is well worth watching for a host of reasons that have nothing to
do with this week’s Total Recall subject. As Time Magazine’s Richard Corliss
put it, “this prom-night balloon of a movie floats easily above the year’s
other exercises in ’50s nostalgia. If you dare reach for it, it will land
smartly in your heart.”






more info…



2.
Eternal Sunshine of
the Spotless Mind

(2004)





Tomatometer: 94 percent


While he spent the early ’90s mugging it up for fans of perfectly obvious
comedy, few people could have guessed that Jim Carrey would wind up sharing
top billing with one of the premier actresses of her generation in a
mindbending, critically beloved drama about the nature of love and memory —
but that’s exactly what he did in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind,
going toe to toe with Kate Winslet in one of the most unusual and eye-catching
films of the early aughts. Armed with a script co-written by Charlie Kaufman,
director Michel Gondry riddles the film with stunning visual effects that,
depending on what you want out of the movie, either deepen its metaphorical
layers of meaning or are simply really cool to look at. It’s admittedly too
strange and/or chilly to appeal to everyone, but at its heart, the movie lives
up to Mariko McDonald of Film Threat’s assessment of it as “fresh, heartfelt
and ultimately heartbreaking in its honest portrayal of a modern
relationship.”






more info…



1. The
Truman Show

(1998)





Tomatometer: 95 percent


Is it science fiction? A comedy? A drama? A psychiatric syndrome? Actually,
1998’s The Truman Show is all of the above — which has a lot to do
with why it’s not only the best-reviewed film of Jim Carrey’s career, but a
high-water mark for ’90s cinema in general. Carrey stars as Truman Burbank,
the unwitting star of a wildly popular reality series engineered by a producer
named Christof (played by Ed Harris), in which Truman’s life — complete
with fake wife, fake friends, and a whole fake town — is lapped up by eager
audiences. It didn’t net Carrey the Academy Award that many were anticipating,
but The Truman Show has endured over the last 10 years, and predicted
the overwhelming popularity of reality television in the years to come. In the
words of Hollywood Report Card’s Ross Anthony, “this is clearly one of the
decade’s cleverest, most original pictures.”



Check out the rest of our Total Recall columns from the archives, and click here for
Carrey’s full filmography.

In this week’s Ketchup, some Incredible Hulk spoilers surface, the next Terminator appears on track with a new director, and The Karate Kid might get younger. Also, The Indy 4 thief gets apprehended, and Vin Diesel and Paul Walker are on the verge of a Fast and the Furious reunion.

This Week’s Most Popular News:

The Incredible Hulk Spoilers!
Five short years after Ang Lee underwhelmed critics and comics fans with his Hulk, Edward Norton will be seeking to smash box-office records with The Incredible Hulk — and if IESB is to be believed, Norton’s off to an excellent start.

Terminator 4: Rise of the McG?
It looks like those rumors about Terminator 4 arriving in 2009 might have been on target — according to a report published at CHUD on Tuesday, the sequel has been fast-tracked at Halcyon, and may even have found its director.

Jaden Smith IS The Karate Kid?
Sure, Jaden Smith can act — we all saw the proof in The Pursuit of Happyness. But can he do a crane kick?

Indy IV Thief Thwarted By FBI; Spielberg Lets Out Sigh of Relief
Steven Spielberg has a huge debt of gratitude to pay to the anonymous online blogger who helped thwart a plan to sell thousands of stolen Indiana Jones IV set photos and the film’s production budget to the highest bidder.

Vin Diesel, Paul Walker Still Fast, Furious
You probably thought they had slowed down and mellowed out, but no: According to The Hollywood Reporter, Vin Diesel and Paul Walker are just a few strokes of the pen away from a Fast and the Furious reunion.


Because we just couldn’t get enough the first (or second, or third) time.
In Other News:

  • Bradley Cooper has joined the cast of the Jim Carrey comedy Yes Man, scheduled to release in 2009 with Peyton Reed directing.
  • J.T. Petty will write and direct Goth, a thriller based on a Japanese graphic novel for Fox Atomic.
  • Catherine Hardwicke will direct Twilight, an adaptation of Stephenie Meyer’s bestselling novel, for Summit Entertainment.
  • Marc Forster has been signed to direct a big screen adaptation of the 2002 British miniseries The Jury, for Fox 2000.
  • Natalie Portman will star with Jake Gyllenhaal and Tobey Maguire in the American remake of the Danish drama Brothers for Relativity Media.
  • Universal has acquired film rights to Katherine Marsh’s young adult novel The Night Tourist.
  • Eduardo Rodriguez will direct the zombie thriller Fragile, based on the graphic novel by Stephano Raffaele, for Rogue Pictures.
  • Eddie Murphy and Brian Robbins are in talks to re-team for the comedy A Thousand Words for DreamWorks.
  • Warner Bros. has acquired Hangover, a comedy to be produced and directed by Todd Phillips.
  • New Regency has aquired rights to Brandon Mull’s novel The Candy Shop War, with Fox acting as distributor.
  • Dominique Swain has been signed to star in Slaughter, the horror film whose script was the winner of the Slamdance Film Festival Horror Screenplay Competition. Victor Garcia will direct.


The creative geniuses behind this are back for more.

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