(Photo by Jonny Cournoyer / © Paramount Pictures /Courtesy Everett Collection)

All Emily Blunt Movies Ranked

Emily Blunt‘s first two Rotten Tomatoes-rated movies were Certified Fresh: My Summer of Love, which you’ve never heard of, and The Devil Wears Prada, which you definitely have. The $124-million grossing and decidedly unromantic comedy paved a path for more female-led films and served as a launching vector for actresses like Anne Hathaway and Blunt. Her appearances in high-profile Charlie Wilson’s War, The Wolfman and The Muppets kept the momentum going, but it wasn’t until releasing Looper that Blunt got that most coveted of validations: internet fan cred. Following that up with Edge of Tomorrow and A Quiet Place has cemented her image of poise and natural radiant strength. She was Mary Poppins, y’all.She was even Tempest Shadow in My Little Pony: The Movie. That’s cross-generational.

In 2021, she set course with A Quiet Place Part II and Jungle Cruise. Wee where those two land as we rank Emily Blunt movies by Tomatometer! Alex Vo

#32
Adjusted Score: 33086%
Critics Consensus: The Huntsman: Winter's War is visually arresting and boasts a stellar cast, but neither are enough to recommend this entirely unnecessary sequel.
Synopsis: Betrayed by her evil sister Ravenna (Charlize Theron), heartbroken Freya (Emily Blunt) retreats to a northern kingdom to raise an... [More]
Directed By: Cedric Nicolas-Troyan

#31

Arthur Newman (2012)
20%

#31
Adjusted Score: 20366%
Critics Consensus: Despite the natural charisma of its leads, Arthur Newman does little with its intriguing setup, and the result is bland and unconvincing.
Synopsis: Frustrated with his boring life, Wallace Avery (Colin Firth) fakes his own death and sets out to make a new... [More]
Directed By: Dante Ariola

#30
#30
Adjusted Score: 23412%
Critics Consensus: Though Jack Black is back doing what he does best, Gulliver's Travels largely fails to do any justice to its source material, relying instead on juvenile humor and special effects.
Synopsis: Lemuel Gulliver (Jack Black) works in a mailroom at a city newspaper. While he is on an assignment in the... [More]
Directed By: Rob Letterman

#29

Sherlock Gnomes (2018)
27%

#29
Adjusted Score: 30288%
Critics Consensus: Sherlock Gnomes is sadly, utterly stumped by the mystery of the reason for its own existence.
Synopsis: When Gnomeo and Juliet first arrive in London with their friends and family, their biggest concern is getting a new... [More]
Directed By: John Stevenson

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 33946%
Critics Consensus: Fatally undermined by dodgy accents and a questionable story, Wild Mountain Thyme is a baffling misfire for a talented filmmaker and impressive cast.
Synopsis: John Patrick Shanley, who created the classic MOONSTRUCK, brings his sweeping romantic vision to Ireland with Wild Mountain Thyme. The... [More]
Directed By: John Patrick Shanley

#27

Wild Target (2010)
33%

#27
Adjusted Score: 33465%
Critics Consensus: An ineptly staged farce that dishonors the original film and squanders the comedic potential of its fine actors.
Synopsis: Longing to get out of the assassination business, a hit man (Bill Nighy) decides not to follow through with his... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Lynn

#26

The Wolfman (2010)
33%

#26
Adjusted Score: 41891%
Critics Consensus: Suitably grand and special effects-laden, The Wolfman suffers from a suspense-deficient script and a surprising lack of genuine chills.
Synopsis: Though absent from his ancestral home of Blackmoor for many years, aristocrat Lawrence Talbot (Benicio Del Toro) returns to find... [More]
Directed By: Joe Johnston

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 64236%
Critics Consensus: Emily Blunt's outstanding performance isn't enough to keep The Girl on the Train from sliding sluggishly into exploitative melodrama.
Synopsis: Commuter Rachel Watson (Emily Blunt) catches daily glimpses of a seemingly perfect couple, Scott and Megan, from the window of... [More]
Directed By: Tate Taylor

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 50304%
Critics Consensus: Charming and sweet, My Little Pony: The Movie will please its dedicated fanbase, even if it's unlikely to encourage non-devotees to gallop along for the ride.
Synopsis: Twilight Sparkle, Applejack, Rainbow Dash, Pinkie Pie, Fluttershy and Rarity embark on an epic journey to save Ponyville from a... [More]
Directed By: Jayson Thiessen

#23

Wind Chill (2007)
46%

#23
Adjusted Score: 45193%
Critics Consensus: Wind Chill is a ghost story with a clunky and unpolished script that fails to keep viewers in suspense.
Synopsis: Just before their university campus goes quiet for the winter break, a young woman (Emily Blunt) asks a classmate (Ashton... [More]
Directed By: Gregory Jacobs

#22

Gnomeo & Juliet (2011)
55%

#22
Adjusted Score: 58809%
Critics Consensus: While it has moments of inspiration, Gnomeo and Juliet is often too self-referential for its own good.
Synopsis: In Stratford-Upon-Avon, birthplace of William Shakespeare, Miss Capulet and Mr. Montague feud over whose garden is the better. Garden gnomes... [More]
Directed By: Kelly Asbury

#21

Jungle Cruise (2021)
62%

#21
Adjusted Score: 80560%
Critics Consensus: Its craft isn't quite as sturdy as some of the classic adventures it's indebted to, but Jungle Cruise remains a fun, family-friendly voyage.
Synopsis: Join fan favorites Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt for the adventure of a lifetime on Disney's JUNGLE CRUISE, a rollicking... [More]
Directed By: Jaume Collet-Serra

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 70746%
Critics Consensus: While certainly overlong, The Five-Year Engagement benefits from the easy chemistry of its leads and a funny, romantic script with surprising depth and intelligence.
Synopsis: On their one-year anniversary, sous chef Tom Solomon (Jason Segel) plans to surprise his girlfriend, Violet Barnes (Emily Blunt), with... [More]
Directed By: Nicholas Stoller

#19

Dan in Real Life (2007)
65%

#19
Adjusted Score: 71454%
Critics Consensus: The fine performances elevate Dan in Real Life beyond its sentimental plot.
Synopsis: Dan Burns (Steve Carell), a widower and advice columnist, meets a beautiful stranger (Juliette Binoche) in a bookstore and is... [More]
Directed By: Peter Hedges

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 70449%
Critics Consensus: Though at times formulaic and sentimental, Jane Austen Book Club succeeds on the strength of its likable ensemble cast. Even those not familiar with Jane Austen's work may find much to enjoy this lighthearted romance.
Synopsis: Six Californians (Maria Bello, Amy Brenneman, Emily Blunt) form a book club devoted to studying the works of the 19th-century... [More]
Directed By: Robin Swicord

#17
Adjusted Score: 72379%
Critics Consensus: Quirky and a little reserved, Salmon Fishing in the Yemen is nonetheless a charming little romantic drama sold by some strong central performances.
Synopsis: Dr. Alfred Jones (Ewan McGregor) is a fisheries scientist who one day receives an unusual request: A businesswoman named Harriet... [More]
Directed By: Lasse Hallström

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 74458%
Critics Consensus: By turns fluffy and biting, this show biz comedy is given girth by comic heavyweight John Malkovich and made all the more charming by Emily Blunt.
Synopsis: Defying his father and dropping out of law school, aspiring writer Troy Gable (Colin Hanks) looks for a way to... [More]
Directed By: Sean McGinly

#15

Into the Woods (2014)
71%

#15
Adjusted Score: 79845%
Critics Consensus: On the whole, this Disney adaptation of the Sondheim classic sits comfortably at the corner of Hollywood and Broadway -- even if it darkens to its detriment in the final act.
Synopsis: As the result of the curse of a once-beautiful witch (Meryl Streep), a baker (James Corden) and his wife (Emily... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 81936%
Critics Consensus: First-time writer/director George Nolfi struggles to maintain a consistent tone, but The Adjustment Bureau rises on the strong, believable chemistry of its stars.
Synopsis: Just as he is on the brink of winning a Senate seat, politician David Norris (Matt Damon) meets a ballerina... [More]
Directed By: George Nolfi

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 81527%
Critics Consensus: Despite a sometimes overly familiar plot, Sunshine Cleaning benefits from the lively performances of its two stars.
Synopsis: Though they once seemed to have a bright future, life seems to be passing by the Norkowski sisters. Rose (Amy... [More]
Directed By: Christine Jeffs

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 82516%
Critics Consensus: A rare film that surpasses the quality of its source novel, this Devil is a witty expose of New York's fashion scene, with Meryl Streep in top form and Anne Hathaway more than holding her own.
Synopsis: Andy (Anne Hathaway) is a recent college graduate with big dreams. Upon landing a job at prestigious Runway magazine, she... [More]
Directed By: David Frankel

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 82390%
Critics Consensus: Emily Blunt shines as Victoria in this romantic but plodding royal portrait.
Synopsis: As the only legitimate heir of England's King William, teenage Victoria (Emily Blunt) gets caught up in the political machinations... [More]
Directed By: Jean-Marc Vallée

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 102565%
Critics Consensus: Mary Poppins Returns relies on the magic of its classic forebear to cast a familiar -- but still solidly effective -- family-friendly spell.
Synopsis: Now an adult with three children, bank teller Michael Banks learns that his house will be repossessed in five days... [More]
Directed By: Rob Marshall

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 90144%
Critics Consensus: Charlie Wilson's War manages to entertain and inform audiences, thanks to its witty script and talented cast of power players.
Synopsis: In the 1980s U.S.Rep. Charlie Wilson (Tom Hanks), Texas socialite Joanne Herring (Julia Roberts) and CIA agent Gust Avrakotos (Philip... [More]
Directed By: Mike Nichols

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 89090%
Critics Consensus: Superbly acted and satisfyingly engaging, Your Sister's Sister subverts rom-com conventions with sensitive direction, an unconventional screenplay, and a big heart.
Synopsis: A man (Mark Duplass) falls into bed with his best friend's (Emily Blunt) sister (Rosemarie DeWitt), leading to an unexpected... [More]
Directed By: Lynn Shelton

#7

The Wind Rises (2013)
88%

#7
Adjusted Score: 95593%
Critics Consensus: The Wind Rises is a fittingly bittersweet swan song for director Hayao Miyazaki.
Synopsis: A lifelong love of flight inspires Japanese aviation engineer Jiro Horikoshi, whose storied career includes the creation of the A-6M... [More]

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 93498%
Critics Consensus: My Summer of Love is a moody, bittersweet love story featuring outstanding performances from the leads.
Synopsis: When upper-class Tamsin (Emily Blunt) meets working-class Mona (Natalie Press) they are immediately drawn to each other. Although coming from... [More]
Directed By: Paul Pavlikovsky

#5

Edge of Tomorrow (2014)
91%

#5
Adjusted Score: 106034%
Critics Consensus: Gripping, well-acted, funny, and clever, Edge of Tomorrow offers entertaining proof that Tom Cruise is still more than capable of shouldering the weight of a blockbuster action thriller.
Synopsis: When Earth falls under attack from invincible aliens, no military unit in the world is able to beat them. Maj.... [More]
Directed By: Doug Liman

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 110702%
Critics Consensus: A nerve-wracking continuation of its predecessor, A Quiet Place Part II expands the terrifying world of the franchise without losing track of its heart.
Synopsis: Following the deadly events at home, the Abbott family must now face the terrors of the outside world as they... [More]
Directed By: John Krasinski

#3

Sicario (2015)
92%

#3
Adjusted Score: 102836%
Critics Consensus: Led by outstanding work from Emily Blunt and Benicio del Toro, Sicario is a taut, tightly wound thriller with much more on its mind than attention-getting set pieces.
Synopsis: After rising through the ranks of her male-dominated profession, idealistic FBI agent Kate Macer (Emily Blunt) receives a top assignment.... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#2

Looper (2012)
93%

#2
Adjusted Score: 104231%
Critics Consensus: As thought-provoking as it is thrilling, Looper delivers an uncommonly smart, bravely original blend of futuristic sci-fi and good old-fashioned action.
Synopsis: In a future society, time-travel exists, but it's only available to those with the means to pay for it on... [More]
Directed By: Rian Johnson

#1

A Quiet Place (2018)
96%

#1
Adjusted Score: 119211%
Critics Consensus: A Quiet Place artfully plays on elemental fears with a ruthlessly intelligent creature feature that's as original as it is scary -- and establishes director John Krasinski as a rising talent.
Synopsis: If they hear you, they hunt you. A family must live in silence to avoid mysterious creatures that hunt by... [More]
Directed By: John Krasinski

(Photo by Warner Bros. / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Laurence Fishburne Movies Ranked

Laurence Fishburne made his movie debut in just about the best way possible: As part of the platoon that goes up the river in Apocalypse Now. He was 14 when filming started and production was so troubled that by the time the movie released, Fishburne had already celebrated his 17th birthday.

The ensuing ’80s saw the actor taking mostly smaller roles but working with big name directors (Steven Spielberg in The Color Purple, Spike Lee in School Daze) that kept him — still credited as Larry at the time — employed and just a performance away from stardom. The chance came in 1991 with John Singleton’s explosive dramatic debut, Boyz n the Hood, in which he played young father Furious Styles. And Fishburne famously closed out the decade with The Matrix, a movie still at the forefront of pop culture 20 years later. When Fishburne was cast as the Bowery King in John Wick: Chapter 2, there was immediate rejoicing that he was reuniting on-screen with Matrix alum Keanu Reeves.

And after 2019’s Parabellum, what further wacky misadventures await Reeves and Fishburne in the series? As we await another sequel, we’re ranking all Laurence Fishburne movies by Tomatometer! Alex Vo

#59

Imprisoned (2018)
0%

#59
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A prison warden frames a parolee for a murder.... [More]
Directed By: Paul Kampf

#58
#58
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An Indian Vietnam veteran (Stephen Lang) trains five street punks in the Everglades to fight vice in Miami.... [More]
Directed By: Paul Michael Glaser

#57

Quicksilver (1986)
13%

#57
Adjusted Score: 7609%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A hotshot stock-exchange floor trader (Kevin Bacon) loses his shirt and becomes a bicycle messenger in a hilly city.... [More]
Directed By: Tom Donnelly

#56

Fled (1996)
18%

#56
Adjusted Score: 18516%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: During a routine prison work detail, convict Piper (Laurence Fishburne) is chained to Dodge (Stephen Baldwin), a cyberhacker, when gunfire... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Hooks

#55

Ride Along (2014)
18%

#55
Adjusted Score: 22528%
Critics Consensus: Kevin Hart's livewire presence gives Ride Along a shot of necessary energy, but it isn't enough to rescue this would-be comedy from the buddy-cop doldrums.
Synopsis: For two years, security guard Ben (Kevin Hart) has tried to convince James (Ice Cube), a veteran cop, that he... [More]
Directed By: Tim Story

#54

The Colony (2013)
20%

#54
Adjusted Score: 20625%
Critics Consensus: A formulaic sci-fi thriller, The Colony features cliched dialogue, cheesy special effects, and underdeveloped characters.
Synopsis: Forced to live underground, survivors of an ice age embark on a mission to reach another outpost.... [More]
Directed By: Jeff Renfroe

#53

Just Cause (1995)
26%

#53
Adjusted Score: 25554%
Critics Consensus: Just Cause you round up a phenomenal cast, that doesn't mean you have everything you need for a solid legal thriller -- and this film is forgettable proof.
Synopsis: Paul Armstrong (Sean Connery), a law professor who staunchly fights the death penalty, is lured into defending a death row... [More]
Directed By: Arne Glimcher

#52

Biker Boyz (2003)
22%

#52
Adjusted Score: 24954%
Critics Consensus: Waste of a good cast. For a movie about bike racing, it never gets up to speed.
Synopsis: Slick Will, the mechanic for a legendary motorcycle racer named Smoke (Laurence Fishburne), is struck dead during an off-the-grid race.... [More]
Directed By: Reggie Rock Bythewood

#51
#51
Adjusted Score: 24656%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A tenacious federal agent traces the supply line of a group of cagey and experienced cocaine dealers.... [More]
Directed By: Jason Cabell

#50

Bad Company (1994)
27%

#50
Adjusted Score: 12482%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An ex-CIA man (Laurence Fishburne) sleeps with his new boss (Ellen Barkin), out to kill her partner (Frank Langella) in... [More]
Directed By: James Hong, Damian Harris

#49

Event Horizon (1997)
29%

#49
Adjusted Score: 32141%
Critics Consensus: Despite a strong opening that promises sci-fi thrills, Event Horizon quickly devolves into an exercise of style over substance whose flashy effects and gratuitous gore fail to mask its overreliance on horror clichés.
Synopsis: When the Event Horizon, a spacecraft that vanished years earlier, suddenly reappears, a team is dispatched to investigate the ship.... [More]
Directed By: Paul Anderson

#48

Once in the Life (2000)
28%

#48
Adjusted Score: 28071%
Critics Consensus: Once in a Life is a promising directorial effort by Laurence Fishburne. But the story is too conventional and similar to the many ghetto action/dramas that come before it.
Synopsis: A gritty drama centered around brotherhood and friendship, "Once in the Life" is a realistic depiction of how everyday choices... [More]
Directed By: Laurence Fishburne

#47
Adjusted Score: 56814%
Critics Consensus: Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice smothers a potentially powerful story -- and some of America's most iconic superheroes -- in a grim whirlwind of effects-driven action.
Synopsis: It's been nearly two years since Superman's (Henry Cavill) colossal battle with Zod (Michael Shannon) devastated the city of Metropolis.... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#46

Passengers (2016)
30%

#46
Adjusted Score: 47796%
Critics Consensus: Passengers proves Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence work well together -- and that even their chemistry isn't enough to overcome a fatally flawed story.
Synopsis: On a routine journey through space to a new home, two passengers, sleeping in suspended animation, are awakened 90 years... [More]
Directed By: Morten Tyldum

#45

Death Wish II (1982)
33%

#45
Adjusted Score: 27224%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Relocating to Los Angeles from New York City, vigilante Paul Kersey (Charles Bronson) wants to start a safer life for... [More]
Directed By: Michael Winner

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: 42204%
Critics Consensus: A disappointing conclusion to the Matrix trilogy as characters and ideas take a back seat to the special effects.
Synopsis: In a dystopia overrun by robots, Neo (Keanu Reeves), mankind's greatest hope, is trapped in a limbo world. Meanwhile, the... [More]

#43

21 (2008)
36%

#43
Adjusted Score: 43079%
Critics Consensus: 21 could have been a fascinating study had it not supplanted the true story on which it is based with mundane melodrama.
Synopsis: Ben Campbell (Jim Sturgess), a brilliant student at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, needs some quick cash to pay his tuition... [More]
Directed By: Robert Luketic

#42
Adjusted Score: 44555%
Critics Consensus: While an improvement on its predecessor, Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer is nevertheless a juvenile, simplistic picture that has little benefit beyond its special effects.
Synopsis: Reed (Ioan Gruffudd), Susan (Jessica Alba), Johnny (Chris Evans) and Ben (Michael Chiklis) face an intergalactic messenger who has arrived... [More]
Directed By: Tim Story

#41

Cherry 2000 (1988)
38%

#41
Adjusted Score: 36475%
Critics Consensus: While Cherry 2000 has a certain low-budget appeal, all but the most ardent genre enthusiasts are likely to find its silly story and uneven performances unintentionally amusing.
Synopsis: In the post-apocalyptic California of 2017, Sam Treadwell (David Andrews) manages a recycling plant. His companion is Cherry 2000 (Pamela... [More]
Directed By: Steve DeJarnatt

#40

Armored (2009)
40%

#40
Adjusted Score: 41601%
Critics Consensus: This B-grade thriller has a good cast and director but is undone by plot holes and messy conclusion.
Synopsis: Following his return from Iraq, Ty Hackett (Columbus Short) takes a job at the same armored-car company where his father... [More]
Directed By: Nimród Antal

#39

Cadence (1990)
42%

#39
Adjusted Score: 24466%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A misfit soldier (Charlie Sheen) lands in a bully's (Martin Sheen) stockade with five men united by their race and... [More]
Directed By: Martin Sheen

#38

Hoodlum (1997)
43%

#38
Adjusted Score: 42480%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Having just been released from jail, Bumpy Johnson (Laurence Fishburne) returns to his criminal ways as a linchpin in the... [More]
Directed By: Bill Duke

#37

Khumba (2013)
44%

#37
Adjusted Score: 38019%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After his herd rejects him for having only half his stripes, a young zebra (Jake T. Austin) sets out on... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Silverston

#36

Higher Learning (1995)
45%

#36
Adjusted Score: 47077%
Critics Consensus: It's hard to fault Higher Learning's goals; unfortunately, writer-director John Singleton too often struggles to fit his themes within a consistently engaging story.
Synopsis: In John Singleton's powerful portrait of college life in the 1990s, a group of incoming freshmen at Columbus University --... [More]
Directed By: John Singleton

#35

Gardens of Stone (1987)
44%

#35
Adjusted Score: 27238%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Grizzled war veteran Sgt. Clell Hazard (James Caan) is disheartened when he is stationed as a guard in Arlington National... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#34

Bobby (2006)
47%

#34
Adjusted Score: 53532%
Critics Consensus: Despite best intentions from director Emilio Estevez and his ensemble cast, they succumb to a script filled with pointless subplots and awkward moments working too hard to parallel contemporary times.
Synopsis: In 1968 the lives of a retired doorman (Anthony Hopkins), hotel manager (William H. Macy), lounge singer (Demi Moore), busboy... [More]
Directed By: Emilio Estevez

#33
Adjusted Score: 60905%
Critics Consensus: Where'd You Go, Bernadette offers dispiriting proof that a talented director, bestselling source material, and terrific cast can add up to far less than the sum of their parts.
Synopsis: Former architect Bernadette Fox seems to have it all -- a beautiful home in Seattle, a successful and loving husband,... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#32

Osmosis Jones (2001)
56%

#32
Adjusted Score: 59098%
Critics Consensus: The animated portion of Osmosis is zippy and fun, but the live-action portion is lethargic.
Synopsis: A cutting-edge, live action/animated action adventure comedy about one white blood cell's (Chris Rock) race against the biological clock to... [More]

#31

Standoff (2016)
53%

#31
Adjusted Score: 53024%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Armed with a shotgun and one bullet, a war veteran (Thomas Jane) tries to protect a young murder witness from... [More]
Directed By: Adam Alleca

#30

School Daze (1988)
57%

#30
Adjusted Score: 58231%
Critics Consensus: School Daze is undeniably messy, but thought-provoking themes, strong performances, and Spike Lee's ingratiating energy help tie it all together.
Synopsis: At historically black Mission College, the activist-minded Dap (Larry Fishburne) immerses himself in a world of political rhetoric and social... [More]
Directed By: Spike Lee

#29

Man of Steel (2013)
56%

#29
Adjusted Score: 70739%
Critics Consensus: Man of Steel's exhilarating action and spectacle can't fully overcome its detours into generic blockbuster territory.
Synopsis: With the imminent destruction of Krypton, their home planet, Jor-El (Russell Crowe) and his wife seek to preserve their race... [More]
Directed By: Zack Snyder

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 65981%
Critics Consensus: This remake has been praised by some as an expertly made B-movie, and dismissed by others as formulaic.
Synopsis: While en route to prison, a bus carrying criminals Marion (Laurence Fishburne), Beck (John Alberto Leguizamo) and Anna (Aisha Hinds)... [More]
Directed By: Jean Richet

#27

The Signal (2014)
61%

#27
Adjusted Score: 63418%
Critics Consensus: Director William Eubank clearly has big ideas and an impressive level of technical expertise; unfortunately, The Signal fritters them away on a poorly constructed story.
Synopsis: A surprise awaits three college students (Brenton Thwaites, Beau Knapp, Olivia Cooke) who think they have tracked a rival computer... [More]
Directed By: William Eubank

#26

Rudderless (2014)
64%

#26
Adjusted Score: 64148%
Critics Consensus: Rudderless asks its cast to carry an awful lot of weight for its occasionally manipulative story; fortunately, this talented bunch -- led by Billy Crudup -- is often more than up to the task.
Synopsis: After a grieving father finds a box of demo tapes made by his now-dead son, he forms a band in... [More]
Directed By: William H. Macy

#25

Predators (2010)
65%

#25
Adjusted Score: 72079%
Critics Consensus: After a string of subpar sequels, this bloody, action-packed reboot takes the Predator franchise back to its testosterone-fueled roots.
Synopsis: Brought together on a mysterious planet, a mercenary (Adrien Brody) and a group of coldblooded killers now become the prey.... [More]
Directed By: Nimród Antal

#24

Red Heat (1988)
68%

#24
Adjusted Score: 68984%
Critics Consensus: Red Heat's overreliance on genre formula is bolstered by Walter Hill's rugged direction and a strong touch of humor.
Synopsis: A Moscow detective (Arnold Schwarzenegger) shows his local police escort (James Belushi) how to hunt a Soviet drug smuggler in... [More]
Directed By: Walter Hill

#23

Othello (1995)
68%

#23
Adjusted Score: 70153%
Critics Consensus: Perhaps less than the sum of its parts, Othello is still highly entertaining, and features excellent performances from Laurence Fishburne and Kenneth Branagh.
Synopsis: Heroic general Othello (Laurence Fishburne), the only African in the Venetian army, is carrying on a courtship with white noblewoman... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Parker

#22

The Mule (2018)
70%

#22
Adjusted Score: 80479%
Critics Consensus: A flawed yet enjoyable late-period Eastwood entry, The Mule stubbornly retains its footing despite a few missteps on its occasionally unpredictable path.
Synopsis: Broke, alone and facing foreclosure on his business, 90-year-old horticulturist Earl Stone takes a job as a drug courier for... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 79833%
Critics Consensus: Fast-paced, with eye-popping stunts and special effects, the latest Mission: Impossible installment delivers everything an action fan could ask for. A thrilling summer popcorn flick.
Synopsis: Retired from active duty, and training recruits for the Impossible Mission Force, agent Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) faces the toughest... [More]
Directed By: J.J. Abrams

#20

Rumble Fish (1983)
75%

#20
Adjusted Score: 77513%
Critics Consensus: Rumble Fish frustrates even as it intrigues, but director Francis Ford Coppola's strong visual style helps compensate for a certain narrative stasis.
Synopsis: Disaffected and restless, Rusty James (Matt Dillon) is spoiling for a fight. Abandoned by his mother and living with his... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#19

King of New York (1990)
72%

#19
Adjusted Score: 73411%
Critics Consensus: King of New York covers familiar narrative ground with impressive style -- and leaves plenty of room for its talented cast to deliver gripping performances.
Synopsis: A crime lord plots to take control of New York's underground drug economy and distribute the profits to the poor.... [More]
Directed By: Abel Ferrara

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 82296%
Critics Consensus: Though its heady themes are a departure from its predecessor, The Matrix Reloaded is a worthy sequel packed with popcorn-friendly thrills.
Synopsis: Freedom fighters Neo (Keanu Reeves), Trinity (Carrie-Anne Moss) and Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne) continue to lead the revolt against the Machine... [More]

#17
Adjusted Score: 73315%
Critics Consensus: A Nightmare on Elm Street 3: Dream Warriors offers an imaginative and surprisingly satisfying rebound for a franchise already starting to succumb to sequelitis.
Synopsis: During a hallucinatory incident, young Kristen Parker (Patricia Arquette) has her wrists slashed by dream-stalking monster Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund).... [More]
Directed By: Chuck Russell

#16

Class Action (1991)
76%

#16
Adjusted Score: 77136%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Liberal activist lawyer Jedediah (Gene Hackman) alienated daughter Maggie (Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio) years ago when she discovered his many affairs.... [More]
Directed By: Michael Apted

#15

The Cotton Club (1984)
77%

#15
Adjusted Score: 77502%
Critics Consensus: Energetic and brimming with memorable performers, The Cotton Club entertains with its visual and musical pizazz even as its plot only garners polite applause.
Synopsis: The lives of various characters intersect at Harlem's renowned Cotton Club. Handsome horn player Dix Dwyer (Richard Gere) falls for... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#14

Last Flag Flying (2017)
77%

#14
Adjusted Score: 92682%
Critics Consensus: Last Flag Flying balances raw drama against refreshing moments of humor in an impeccably cast film that wrestles with questions of patriotism, family, and grief.
Synopsis: Thirty years after serving together in the Vietnam War, Larry "Doc" Shepherd, Sal Nealon and the Rev. Richard Mueller reunite... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#13

The Color Purple (1985)
76%

#13
Adjusted Score: 77007%
Critics Consensus: It might have been better served by a filmmaker with a deeper connection to the source material, but The Color Purple remains a worthy, well-acted adaptation of Alice Walker's classic novel.
Synopsis: An epic tale spanning forty years in the life of Celie (Whoopi Goldberg), an African-American woman living in the South... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 90881%
Critics Consensus: A warm, family-friendly underdog story, featuring terrific supporting performances from Keke Palmer, Laurence Fishburne, and Angela Bassett.
Synopsis: Akeelah, an 11-year-old girl living in South Los Angeles, discovers she has a talent for spelling, which she hopes will... [More]
Directed By: Doug Atchison

#11

Contagion (2011)
85%

#11
Adjusted Score: 96733%
Critics Consensus: Tense, tightly plotted, and bolstered by a stellar cast, Contagion is an exceptionally smart -- and scary -- disaster movie.
Synopsis: When Beth Emhoff (Gwyneth Paltrow) returns to Minnesota from a Hong Kong business trip, she attributes the malaise she feels... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#10

Deep Cover (1992)
87%

#10
Adjusted Score: 86285%
Critics Consensus: Deep Cover rises above standard-issue crime thriller fare thanks to a smartly cynical script and powerhouse performances from its unorthodox but well-matched leads.
Synopsis: David Jason (Jeff Goldblum) is the biggest drug dealer in Los Angeles, and Russell Stevens (Larry Fishburne) is an undercover... [More]
Directed By: Bill Duke

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 31150%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A semi-fictionalized account of the Tuskegee Airmen, the first all-African-American Air Force squadron during World War II, the film centers... [More]
Directed By: Robert Markowitz

#8

The Matrix (1999)
88%

#8
Adjusted Score: 95070%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to the Wachowskis' imaginative vision, The Matrix is a smartly crafted combination of spectacular action and groundbreaking special effects.
Synopsis: Neo (Keanu Reeves) believes that Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne), an elusive figure considered to be the most dangerous man alive, can... [More]

#7

Mystic River (2003)
88%

#7
Adjusted Score: 95657%
Critics Consensus: Anchored by the exceptional acting of its strong cast, Mystic River is a somber drama that unfolds in layers and conveys the tragedy of its story with visceral power.
Synopsis: When the daughter (Emmy Rossum) of ex-con Jimmy Marcus (Sean Penn) is murdered, two of his childhood friends from the... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 106235%
Critics Consensus: A lighter, brighter superhero movie powered by the effortless charisma of Paul Rudd and Evangeline Lilly, Ant-Man and The Wasp offers a much-needed MCU palate cleanser.
Synopsis: Scott Lang is grappling with the consequences of his choices as both a superhero and a father. Approached by Hope... [More]
Directed By: Peyton Reed

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 109347%
Critics Consensus: John Wick: Chapter 2 does what a sequel should -- which in this case means doubling down on the non-stop, thrillingly choreographed action that made its predecessor so much fun.
Synopsis: Retired super-assassin John Wick's plans to resume a quiet civilian life are cut short when Italian gangster Santino D'Antonio shows... [More]
Directed By: Chad Stahelski

#4
Adjusted Score: 100332%
Critics Consensus: With a fascinating real-life story and powerhouse performances from Angela Bassett and Laurence Fishburne, What's Love Got to Do With It? is a can't miss biopic.
Synopsis: Based on the life of the legendary soul singer, Tina Turner (Angela Bassett) -- born Anna Mae Bullock -- discovers... [More]
Directed By: Brian Gibson

#3

Boyz N the Hood (1991)
96%

#3
Adjusted Score: 99896%
Critics Consensus: Well-acted and thematically rich, Boyz N the Hood observes Black America with far more depth and compassion than many of the like-minded films its success inspired.
Synopsis: Tre (Cuba Gooding Jr.) is sent to live with his father, Furious Styles (Larry Fishburne), in tough South Central Los... [More]
Directed By: John Singleton

#2

Apocalypse Now (1979)
98%

#2
Adjusted Score: 105306%
Critics Consensus: Francis Ford Coppola's haunting, hallucinatory Vietnam War epic is cinema at its most audacious and visionary.
Synopsis: In Vietnam in 1970, Captain Willard (Martin Sheen) takes a perilous and increasingly hallucinatory journey upriver to find and terminate... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#1
Adjusted Score: 103209%
Critics Consensus: As sensitive as the young man at its center, Searching for Bobby Fischer uses a prodigy's struggle to find personal balance as the background for a powerfully moving drama.
Synopsis: After he beats his dad (Joe Mantegna) in a chess match, Josh Waitzkin (Max Pomeranc), a 7-year-old, gets noticed for... [More]
Directed By: Steven Zaillian

Noam Galai/WireImage

(Photo by Noam Galai/WireImage)

Shiri Appleby has been on TV since before she was a teenager. Early on, she guest-starred in shows like 7th Heaven and Baywatch, and more recently, she headlined Lifetime’s acclaimed Bachelor-skewering drama UnREAL. But the actress’ game-changing role was the lead in 1999’s Roswell — a sci-fi drama series that began with her character, New Mexico high-schooler Liz, being shot and brought back to life by an alien.

Now, Appleby is stepping behind the camera — and returning to one of her most iconic roles to do so. She’s directing the Tuesday, March 19 episode of Roswell, New Mexico, a reboot of her late ’90s series. Both iterations of Roswell feature aliens, romance, and feelings of otherness, but in the new series, the characters are 10 years older and their conflicts are much more contemporary.

“You know, [in] our show, these kids were in high school and the alien theme was about how everyone felt in high school — you felt out of place and you didn’t feel like you belonged,” Appleby told Rotten Tomatoes of the original Roswell. “In today’s story, these kids are in their late 20s and the alien is about illegal immigration. It feels very timely and very relevant.”

Her upcoming Roswell, New Mexico episode, “Songs About Texas,” will be a first for Appleby. In the past, she’s directed TV episodes in which she also starred. This time, she’s staying behind the camera, but that doesn’t mean she’ll stop acting — she says she’s just “taking a minute” to find the right long-term role.

Ahead of the episode, Appleby told us about what she’s been bingeing lately and what’s coming soon for her career — both in front of and behind the camera.


What’s appointment viewing for you?

Byron Cohen / Touchstone Television / Courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by Byron Cohen / Touchstone Television / Courtesy Everett Collection)

The last time I did that I was watching Felicity… That should tell you how many years it’s been. I used to love that show. It was my absolute favorite. There was nothing better than Keri Russell. Right?


What’s in your streaming queue?

Hulu

(Photo by Hulu)

Right now I’m watching Russian Doll. I love Russian Doll … I have been watching Light as a Feather on Hulu. I’m going to direct two episodes of it, so I’ve been really bingeing on that show. I think it’s so charming and wonderful. I was also watching a lot of Pretty Little Liars because I just directed an episode of The Perfectionists. And, I am going to go — which is so funny — to my Netflix account right now so I can tell you what else I’ve been watching.

I love to watch a lot of documentaries. I was watching, let’s see, I watched the Fyre documentaries on both Hulu and Netflix. I still watch Stranger Things… I like watching My Next Guest [Needs No Introduction] with David Letterman. I love that.


What shows are on your DVR?

Courtesy of Netflix

(Photo by Courtesy of Netflix)

I don’t watch real TV anymore! I watched Tidying Up with Marie Kondo, and I’ve been cleaning out my closet obsessively since then.


What’s coming soon that you’re excited for?

ABC/Eric McCandless

(Photo by ABC/Eric McCandless)

The Fix. My best friend, Robin Tunney, has a new show premiering on Monday night on ABC, so I cannot wait to watch every single episode of that.


Sophie-Marie Prime for Rotten Tomatoes: Did you go back and watch any of the original Roswell while preparing to direct your episode?

Well, I had made every single episode, so I felt very confident that I didn’t need to watch it again and see myself as a 20-year-old. I was just going to let myself go and be immersed in the world that they’ve created.

Have you been in contact with any of the original cast at all? I know Jason Behr sent you flowers on your first day.

Yeah, Jason and I are still in touch. I’ve been actually texting with Katherine Heigl a lot. Colin Hanks I see, and he’s texted. Majandra [Delfino] lives maybe three blocks away from me so I run into her. It’s such a small, little, tiny community. When you think about that experience, it’s like friends from high school. You know, you kind of pick up right where you left off.

We all came from such different backgrounds and we’re going through this really out-of-body experience together. It’s kind of fun to get back to each other and see each other. Everyone has kids now, and [it’s fun] to see what’s happened with their lives and their careers.


20th Century Fox Film Corp. / Courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by 20th Century Fox Film Corp. / Courtesy Everett Collection)

What do you and the rest of the original cast think of the reboot?

It’s like building a legacy. It’s a complete compliment. I just feel incredibly flattered.

What was your first impression when you saw the pilot for the new series?

I thought they did an incredible job of having some very iconic moments that we share: like Liz getting shot in the Crashdown Café and Max coming over and saving her life — those really big moments that were very much a big thread of the original series. Then very quickly it becomes its own show, which I thought was so smart, and it tackles these bigger topics.

You know, our show, these kids were in high school and the alien theme was about how everyone felt in high school. You felt out of place and you didn’t feel like you belonged. In today’s story, these kids are in their late 20s and the alien is about illegal immigration. It feels very timely and very relevant.


Lewis Jacobs/The CW

(Photo by Lewis Jacobs/The CW)

How is it working with Jeanine Mason as the new Liz?

I just couldn’t pick someone better to take over the role. She is so impressive as both an actress and a human being. We really had a great time finding ways to get creative with the performance and doing different things. She was just really up for it all. I had a really wonderful time. It felt very much like passing the baton forward. I love what she’s created with this new Liz.

What role did the original Roswell play in your career as an actress?

Well, it’s so funny, it’s playing a similar role as a director. It really changed my life. I went from a girl that was in high school and I had worked since I was a young kid, but it gave me a career. It really was like everything was “before Roswell” and “after Roswell.”

Now I’ve been making this transition into directing, and Roswell is the first show that’s given me a job directing where I’m not acting. Because they gave it to me, Marlene King felt more comfortable giving me an episode directing Pretty Little Liars, and now Hulu is giving me two more episodes of Light as a Feather. It’s just continuing to build. Again, Roswell has come in and just been an incredible, huge part of my journey as a director.


Lifetime

(Photo by Lifetime)

You’ve had such a diverse career on TV. Do you have any favorite roles that you’ve played?

I have this wall in our house where I have my costumes in frames. I have the Roswell gunshot [costume] framed and my mic from Life Unexpected, and then I have Rachel Goldberg’s T-shirt that says “This is What a Feminist Looks Like” with a green coat and her little fanny pack [from UnREAL]. Those were definitely my iconic roles.

And Girls was an incredible part for me. It really pushed the envelope. To be on a show that was so culturally relevant was really game changing. I think working on Mike Nichols’ movie Charlie Wilson’s War with Julia Roberts and Tom Hanks and Philip Seymour Hoffman and Amy Adams and Emily Blunt — to be surrounded by all of these incredible talents and feel like I had a real seat at the table — that really changed things for me as well.


20th Century Fox Film Corp. / Courtesy: Everett Collection.

(Photo by 20th Century Fox Film Corp. / Courtesy: Everett Collection.)

How and when did you decide to jump from acting to directing? Did you always know that was something you wanted to do?

When I did Roswell, there weren’t female directors. We had 61 episodes and we had one female director on the last episode. I didn’t grow up seeing an image of a female director, so I never thought it was something that I could have. I definitely spent my time in editing during Roswell and asked a lot of questions and paid attention, but during my 20s, you just didn’t see it.

Then when I was on Life Unexpected they brought on a female director, Liz Allen, and it really kind of rocked my world. Through my relationship with her, she was like, “You can do this.” I started shadowing a lot after I got off Life Unexpected. That’s where I was like, “OK, this is something that I can do.”

By the time I did UnREAL, I came to them right away, and I was like, “I have done my homework. I am prepared. I would really love an opportunity.” I’m really grateful to them that in the second season they gave me an episode to direct. I ended up doing four during the course of the series.

What has your experience been like directing a show that you’re also acting in, versus something like Roswell, New Mexico and Pretty Little Liars where you’re not appearing on screen?

The difference is that you’re not really splitting your focus, but at the same time when you’re directing and acting, it’s pretty powerful. You know, you’re really in it and you can really command the energy of a scene because your acting is putting that out. So, you can really craft how you want it to be.

When you’re not acting in it, when you’re sitting back, you can take a breather and really see the scope of the piece. I think it’s incredibly rewarding to work in this space. All this information that I’ve learned and all of these tricks of the trade, of crafting an episode of performance and an episode of TV — to be able to push that information forward and share with these young actors and watch their performance blossom, it is so gratifying. It’s a way of giving back in some ways, and I am just really relishing it.


Lewis Jacobs/The CW

(Photo by Lewis Jacobs/The CW)

It’s mentorship from a totally different angle.

Absolutely. You know, there are directors that come through your career that really give you these little nuggets that change the way you work. I try to give it as much as I can, because I want to have an impact in the few days that I’m with them.

Do you think that there will be an opportunity for you to appear on screen in Roswell, New Mexico?

Carina MacKenzie — she’s so talented — if she wants to figure out a way, I’ll do it.

 

Can you share anything else about your upcoming projects? Do you have any on-screen appearances planned?

I did an episode of Law & Order: SVU and Lucy Liu was directing it. That was really fun. I just did an episode of Drunk History that aired. But, quite honestly, following up Rachel Goldberg on UnREAL, there are big shoes to fill. I’m just kind of taking a minute to find the right thing… because I really want to give it my all and find the next right character and the next right story.

Roswell, New Mexico episode “Songs About Texas” airs Tuesday at 9 p.m. on The CW


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She’s only been making movies for a little over a decade, but Emily Blunt has already managed to put together an impressive string of critical and commercial hits — and she looks to add to that list with this weekend’s A Quiet Place. In honor of its arrival, we decided to take a fond look back at some of the brighter highlights from Ms. Blunt’s fast-growing filmography. It’s time for Total Recall!


Use the arrows to rank the movies, or click here to see them ranked by Tomatometer!

She’s only been making movies for a little over a decade, but Emily Blunt has already managed to put together an impressive string of critical and commercial hits — and she looks to add to that list with this weekend’s The Girl on the Train. In honor of its arrival, we decided to take a fond look back at some of the brighter highlights from Ms. Blunt’s fast-growing filmography. It’s time for Total Recall!


10. Sunshine Cleaning (2008) 74%

sunshine-cleaning

If you’re going to film a quirky indie comedy about a cheerleader-turned-hardworking single mom who decides to clean crime scenes for a living so she can send her son to private school, you could hardly find a better person for the role than Amy Adams — and it would be just as hard to improve upon Emily Blunt as her not-so-sunny sister. While critics carped that the Christine Jeffs-directed Sunshine Cleaning was ultimately a little too burdened with quirky indie clichés to achieve its full potential, they had nothing but kind words to say about its stars. The Toronto Star’s Peter Howell  reflected the opinions of many of his peers when he wrote, “Adams and Blunt rise above the clunky premise and execution to once again demonstrate why they’ve become the go-to girls for any director seeking smart, versatile and warm-blooded talent.”


9. The Adjustment Bureau (2011) 71%

adjustment-bureau

Star-crossed lovers are nothing new at the cinema, but The Adjustment Bureau — adapted from the 1954 Philip K. Dick short story “Adjustment Team” — adds a novel sci-fi twist by literally pitting its lovers against the agents of fate. Budding politician David Norris (Matt Damon) meets a mysterious woman (Blunt) on the eve of his unsuccessful campaign for the U.S. Senate, and becomes determined to find her after they share a kiss — a desire that only intensifies after he meets members of the “Adjustment Bureau” who inform him that he has to stay away from her in order to fulfill “the Plan.” It’s the type of loopy premise that can easily spin off into melodramatic gobbledygook, but according to most critics, Bureau stayed pleasantly grounded thanks to the palpable spark between its leads. As Peter Rainer wrote for the Christian Science Monitor, “Because the chemistry between Damon and Blunt is so strong, what might have been a jumble of Matrix-style oddments comes across instead as ardent.”


8. The Young Victoria (2009) 76%

young-victoria

Blunt received a raft of award nominations — including one from the Golden Globes — for her work in the title role of this Jean-Marc Vallée period drama, which dramatizes the power struggle leading up to Queen Victoria’s ascension to the throne as well as the contentious political atmosphere that surrounded her afterwards. Of course, political intrigue will only get you so far with a movie about a queen — you also need a good old-fashioned romance, and Victoria’s tale offered up a doozy in her courtship with Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Rupert Friend), who sparked a real romance with the young monarch after being sent to the royal court as part of a would-be seduction ploy by his uncle, the King of Belgium. It all added up to just the sort of beautifully mounted period piece that tends to hit a reliable home run with critics and arthouse audiences, and The Young Victoria did pretty well on both fronts, with Blunt earning copious praise for her performance. “Blunt, her eyes sparking, her manner playful, smart, and proud, shines in the title role,” wrote the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Steven Rea. “If the film itself isn’t brilliant, its star most definitely is.”


7. The Devil Wears Prada (2006) 75%

devil-wears-prada

Two years after making arthouse audiences swoon with My Summer of Love, Blunt made her second trip to the big screen — and scored her first blockbuster success. Of course, The Devil Wears Prada‘s $300 million-plus gross had a lot more to do with Meryl Streep and Anne Hathaway’s names on the marquee, but Blunt’s supporting appearance proved she could hold her own with those talented ladies (and displayed a gift for comedy she hadn’t necessarily had a chance to display with her first film). Starring Streep as fashion magazine editor and all-around hellish boss Miranda Priestly, Hathaway as Priestly’s fresh-out-of-college new assistant, and Blunt as Hathaway’s far more experienced co-worker, Prada poked fun at the fashion industry while unabashedly embracing its glamour — and the gambit worked with critics as well as audiences. “The Devil Wears Prada is a movie that revels in pleasure,” wrote Slate’s Dana Stevens. “The pleasure of fashion, of luxury, of power and ambition. It’s also a tremendous pleasure to watch.”


6. Charlie Wilson's War (2007) 82%

charlie-wilsons-war

Sign up for a movie whose cast includes Tom Hanks, Julia Roberts, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Amy Adams, and Ned Beatty, and you probably aren’t going to come anywhere near top billing. But even if her supporting turn in Charlie Wilson’s War isn’t one of Blunt’s biggest roles, it rates a mention for a few reasons — it put her in some magnificent closing-credits company, for one thing, and for another, whatever her screentime lacked in quantity, it made up in memorability. Most of all, this Mike Nichols-directed period dramedy about a real-life U.S. Congressman (Hanks) who works with the CIA to try and tilt the balance of the Afghan-Soviet War is pretty all-around entertaining; as Rene Rodriguez wrote for the Miami Herald, “It is so much fun watching these actors enjoy bouncing off each other, it’s almost too easy to forget the importance of the story being told.”


5. Your Sister's Sister (2011) 83%

your-sisters-sister

Ah, the love triangle — always good for a bit of drama. That’s exactly what you get out of Lynn Shelton’s Your Sister’s Sister, an absorbingly low-key drama starring Mark Duplass as a guy who borrows a cabin from his deceased brother’s ex-girlfriend (Blunt), only to show up and find her sister (Rosemarie DeWitt). Questions of grief, unspoken feelings, and sexual identity soon follow — as well as a generous helping of the well-rounded characters and naturalistic dialogue fans of the filmmaker have come to expect. “Even when the storyline tries to wrench the characters in a certain direction, they keep returning to something real and honest,” wrote Deadspin’s Will Leitch. “I want these people to be my friends.”


4. My Summer of Love (2004) 90%

my-summer-of-love

After acclaimed early performances on the stage and on television, Blunt continued her winning streak with her big-screen debut, 2004’s My Summer of Love, in which she played an upper-class British teen who embarks on a seemingly star-crossed relationship with a girl from the wrong side of the tracks. Although it wasn’t a huge commercial hit, Love was consistently acclaimed — Blunt and co-star Natalie Press shared an  Evening Standard British Film Award for Most Promising Newcomer — and it led directly into more high-profile roles, something predicted by more than a few critics. “Remember these names,” wrote Moira MacDonald for the Seattle Times. “Remember this strange, lovely movie.”


3. Edge of Tomorrow (2014) 91%

edge-of-tomorrow

By the time Edge of Tomorrow arrived in theaters, we’d all seen Tom Cruise play action hero countless times — and he’d even helped save the world from an alien invasion, as his character was called upon to do in this Doug Liman-directed sci-fi flick. But Tomorrow came with a couple of fairly nifty twists: one in the form of a timeloop plot device that sent Cruise plummeting back into the same chaotic day on the battlefield until he could manage to get it right, and the second with a story that made Cruise an unwilling and borderline incompetent hero who needed to be trained to fight by the movie’s true badass, played by Blunt. The end result, as critics were fond of pointing out, was a little like Starship Troopers meets Groundhog Day, and all kinds of blockbuster fun. As Kenneth Turan put it for the Los Angeles Times, “It’s a star-driven mass-market entertainment that’s smart, exciting and unexpected while not stinting on genre satisfactions.”


2. Looper (2012) 93%

looper

On a superficial (and wholly enjoyable) level, Rian Johnson’s 2012 sci-fi hit Looper is about one man’s life-or-death struggle against his future self. But underneath all the twisty time travel narrative and cool set pieces, it’s really a surprisingly tender drama about a mother’s love — and one grounded by the flinty yet vulnerable performance delivered by Blunt, who plays a homesteading single mom determined to protect her young son at all costs (and maybe unwittingly change the world for the better in the bargain). “That first hour cooks,” marveled the Chicago Tribune’s Michael Phillips. “And the second hour brings Emily Blunt into the story, which is a fine thing for any second half to offer.”


1. Sicario (2015) 92%

sicario

Some pretty powerful films have been made about the international drug trade, and at this point, if you’re going to throw your cinematic hat in the ring, you’d better be prepared to add a singular statement to the genre. Director Denis Villeneuve managed to pull it off with 2015’s Sicario, starring Blunt as an FBI agent who teams up with a pair of CIA operatives (Josh Brolin and Benicio del Toro) to bring down a Mexican cartel. In terms of plot outline, it’s boilerplate stuff — but in Villeneuve and screenwriter Taylor Sheridan’s hands, and through the stellar efforts of the well-chosen cast, the end results are elevated considerably. “Far from being just another crime story,” wrote the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s Calvin Wilson, “Sicario is cinema at its most ambitious.”

She’s an Oscar-winning thespian and one of the world’s most bankable superstars — and this week, Julia Roberts reunites with director Garry Marshall for the ensemble dramedy Mother’s Day, which gives us the perfect excuse to take a fond look back at some of her best-remembered (and all-around best) roles. There’s stuff to make you laugh, cry, and give you food for thought here — just like a great Julia Roberts movie. It’s time for Total Recall!


Mystic Pizza (1988) 78%

Just a year after making her big-screen debut in the largely unloved Justine Bateman rock dramedy Satisfaction, Roberts rebounded with a role in Mystic Pizza. Although the movie wasn’t a huge hit, its amiably affectionate look at a group of small-town friends’ coming-of-age travails resonated with a cult audience that’s only continued to grow over the years — not least because Roberts was only one member of a ferociously talented young ensemble cast that included budding stars such as Annabeth Gish, Vincent D’Onofrio, Lili Taylor, and a debuting Matt Damon. “Though in essence this is little more than a girls’ romance novel brought to life, it has been filled with heart and humor,” wrote Janet Maslin for the New York Times. “The place, the people and even the largely predictable situations in which they find themselves are presented in an entirely winning way.”

Watch Trailer


Steel Magnolias (1989) 68%

Roberts earned a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination for her work in this Herbert Ross dramedy, which — much like Mystic Pizza the year before — takes viewers on a gently memorable tour through a handful of ups and downs experienced by a predominantly female cast of characters. While not quite as critically successful as Pizza, Steel Magnolias was a major commercial success, and remains a tissue-worthy touchstone for dramedy-seeking fans of heartwarmingly old-fashioned entertainment. “Steel Magnolias is essentially a series of comic one-liners leading up to a teary tragedy,” admitted Roger Ebert. “But let it be said that the one-liners are mostly funny and the tragedy deserves most, but not all, of the tears.”

Watch Trailer


Pretty Woman (1990) 65%

Okay, so it’s far from Julia Roberts’ best-reviewed film. But no matter how many movies she makes, she’ll always be most closely identified with Pretty Woman, and any list of her most definitive works is incomplete without a mention of the Garry Marshall blockbuster that catapulted her to megastardom. And while the plot — about a well-heeled businessman who hires an escort to accompany him to a handful of functions, only to fall in love along the way — is fairly unseemly no matter how many Roxette songs you put on the soundtrack, there’s no getting around the sparks thrown by Roberts and Richard Gere in what could have been a pair of largely thankless roles. “Yes, yes, the ’80s are over,” admitted the New York Times’ Caryn James. “But isn’t there room in the time capsule for Pretty Woman, the romantic comedy about a lovelorn corporate raider and a sweet, wholesome streetwalker from Hollywood Boulevard? This one truly deserves a place. It is something special.”

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My Best Friend's Wedding (1997) 73%

Aligning one of the most preposterously attractive love triangles of the 1990s, My Best Friend’s Wedding imagined a scenario in which a successful sportswriter (Dermot Mulroney) gets engaged to a blonde 20-year-old heiress (Cameron Diaz), thus sparking a romantic awakening — and subsequent fit of insane jealousy — from his best friend (Julia Roberts). It’s the kind of pillow-soft rom-com premise that screenwriters’ dreams are made of, particularly with a cast like this attached, and for the most part, critics felt this was one Wedding worth attending. Although it definitely didn’t hurt that director P.J. Hogan assembled a supporting cast that included M. Emmet Walsh and a scene-stealing Rupert Everett, it was Roberts who toplined the film — and Roberts that the San Francisco Chronicle’s Ruthe Stein described as “at her vibrant best.”

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Notting Hill (1999) 83%

Even in a filmography dotted with better-than-average rom-coms, 1999’s Notting Hill stands out as a particular critics’ favorite. Here, Roberts plays a movie star abroad who wanders into a quaint bookstore while she’s in London on a shoot — and ends up falling for the proprietor (Hugh Grant) even though they’re from two different worlds. It’s the type of story we’ve all watched more times than we can count, but even if Notting Hill doesn’t reinvent the wheel where class and/or culture-clash romantic comedies are concerned, it has something special in the chemistry between its charming leads. Entertainment Weekly’s Lisa Schwarzbaum singled out Roberts for particular praise, writing, “The legendarily luminous Julia Roberts represents the pinnacle of movie stardom, in a confident performance that’s the sum and payoff of everything she has ever learned, the hard way, about being Julia Roberts.”

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Erin Brockovich (2000) 85%

This fact-based courtroom drama earned a slew of awards for its portrayal of a legal file clerk (Roberts) who discovered that a town’s public utility company was poisoning its water supply and continued to pursue the case until justice was served. Roberts’ Brockovich performance cleaned up at the awards circuit, winning her Best Actress honors from SAG, BAFTA, the Golden Globes, and the Oscars — and the film was a hit with audiences as well as critics, earning more than $250 million at the box office while bringing praise from critics like Michael Wilmington of the Chicago Tribune, who called it “One of the gutsiest, most exciting, and most satisfying courtroom docudramas ever, one that genuinely lifts the spirits as you watch it.”

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Ocean's Eleven (2001) 83%

Glamour is a big part of what used to make going to the movies so much fun, and thanks to a variety of factors — not least the rising tide of paparazzi journalism — the wonderful spectacle of Hollywood’s brightest stars has lost a great deal of its wattage over the last decade and change. Director Steven Soderbergh managed to turn back the clock a little with his 2001 remake of the minor 1960 Rat Pack classic, lining up a cast of heavyweights so impressive that even the most jaded filmgoers couldn’t help but give in to the spectacle. Critics were suitably dazzled, too, noting that the fun being had onscreen by George Clooney (as the titular Danny Ocean) and his luminous co-stars (including Matt Damon, Brad Pitt, and Julia Roberts) was too infectious to resist. Writing for the Philadelphia Weekly, Sean Burns applauded, “It’s a giant ice-cream cake of a movie that tickles the pleasure centers of your brain — restoring the good name of large-scale, old-fashioned Hollywood entertainment.”

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Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002) 79%

Did noted game show producer Chuck Barris actually spy and kill for the CIA? The world may never know for sure, but if the stories he tells in his memoir are accurate, his secret life might have looked something like Confessions of a Dangerous Mind. Directed by George Clooney and adapted from Barris’ memoir of the same name, Confessions dots its allegedly fact-based landscape with a handful of Clooney’s famous friends, including Roberts as Barris’ Mata Hari-like CIA contact (as well as Brad Pitt and Matt Damon in a pair of funny cameos). Arriving long after Barris’ delightfully cheesy TV hits had faded from memory, it never really had a prayer of taking off at the box office, but it was worth watching for critics like USA Today’s Claudia Puig, who wrote, “Confessions may not be a straightforward bio, nor does it offer much in the way of Barris’ motivations, but the film is an oddly fascinating depiction of an architect of pop culture.”

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Charlie Wilson's War (2007) 82%

Tom Hanks and Julia Roberts as a pair of Texans — and Roberts blonde to boot? By all rights, Charlie Wilson’s War should have been too distracting to truly resonate, even without the added responsibility of living up to its reality-inspired story about a larger-than-life Congressman who went from partying with strippers to appropriating funds for the Afghan mujahideen during the Soviet-Afghan War. Roberts, as beauty queen-turned-socialite/activist Joanne Herring, adds one more nutty layer to a movie that already would have been stranger than fiction — and one that was grounded by the efforts of a fantastic cast that also included Amy Adams, Emily Blunt, and the Oscar-nominated Philip Seymour Hoffman. “Charlie Wilson’s War takes a kernel of truth and roasts it into a popcorn movie,” wrote Rick Groen for the Globe and Mail. “There’s terrific fun to be had, and much wry comedy too.”

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The Normal Heart (2014) 94%

Roberts earned SAG and Emmy nominations for her portrayal of a pioneering and compassionate doctor in director Ryan Murphy’s HBO adaptation of the Larry Kramer play, which takes a hard street-level look at the dawn of the public’s awareness of the AIDS crisis in the early 1980s. Surrounded by a sterling cast that included Mark Ruffalo and Alfred Molina, Roberts helped dramatize agonizing events that impacted real people — some of whom directly inspired the characters in the film. “You should watch,” wrote David Wiegand of the San Francisco Chronicle, “because Larry Kramer’s play is so much more than an agitprop relic from the early years of AIDS — it is a great play that has become an even greater television film.”

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http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/spotlights/2008/cwa.jpgCharlie Wilson’s War tells a tale of political intrigue, backroom
dealings, and debauchery so wild it would seem unbelievable — were it not a
true story. With the release of the Certified Fresh War, starring
Tom
Hanks
and Julia Roberts, to DVD this week, RT relived the saga with one of its
key players: Charlie Wilson himself.

As the saying goes, Washington is Hollywood for ugly people. If anyone broke
that mold, it was Charlie Wilson: the affable, good-looking former congressman’s
life has been nothing if not cinematic. In the early 1980s, the Texas Democrat
known around town as “Good Time Charlie” was distinguished more for his taste in
booze, babes, and parties than for his legislative record — that is, until he
played a major role in the demise of the Soviet Union.

Once the Russians invaded Afghanistan in 1979, Congress dedicated $5 million to
Afghan guerillas to fight the Soviets. Wilson (Hanks), who sympathized with
the plight of the Afghanis, felt that figure was nowhere near enough. With the
help of the conservative anti-communist billionaire socialite Joanne Herring
(Roberts) and a cynical CIA operative named Gust Avrakotos (Philip Seymour
Hoffman
), Wilson helped bump that figure to $1 billion. The money helped the
Afghan forces drive the Soviets out of Afghanistan (the U.S.S.R. collapsed two
years later), and the plan was implemented with almost no notice from the public
— until the 2003 publication of George Crille’s book 2003 book Charlie
Wilson’s War: The Extraordinary Story of the Largest Covert Operation in
History
. However, during the conflict, young men from around the
Middle East (the so-called “Afghan Arabs,” whose ranks included Osama Bin Laden)
went to Afghanistan to fight the Soviets; when the war ended, a power void was
left that the Taliban eventually filled.

Wilson, now 74 and retired from Congress, has been happily married for nine years
— and he’s as honest and charming as ever. We talked to Wilson about making the
story as accurate as possible, the culture of Washington then and now, and the
future of Afghanistan.

Obviously, anytime someone’s making a biopic, they’re going to have to change
certain things to make the narrative work. How much of the movie is as it was,
and how much did they embellish?

CW: I would say that at least 80 percent was really true to the story. It’s
amazing how much of that hour and 37 minutes was real stuff. Maybe some of
Joanne’s sayings weren’t exactly the way they were. But that’s so picky.
Mike
Nichols
held it so close to the real story. If you read the book and saw the
movie… the book is absolutely 95 percent accurate.

Did the movie get you right?

CW: Yeah, they got me perfect. They got me perfect. I’m guilty as charged of all
the misbehavior they showed in the movie.

What was your involvement in making the movie?

CW: They were very generous with my wife and me with letting us on the set
whenever we wanted to come, which was fairly often. On the set, I had no
authority whatsoever, but I was able to point out, y’know, technical things,
things in the story where I felt it wasn’t the way it came down. They did me the
great honor of listening to me. Mike Nichols was always open, and was willing to
make changes when he was convinced that maybe they didn’t have it quite right.
With his openeness, that’s one of the ways they got a lot of the errors out that
would ordinarily show up in a movie like this.


Julia Roberts as Joanne Herring and Tom Hanks as Charlie Wilson


Did you spend much time with Tom Hanks?

CW: He was extremely generous with his time, and we spent a lot of time talking,
and telling jokes. Tom’s a wonderful guy.

A lot of what happened in the early 1980s has come back into the news. The
Soviet Union is obviously gone, but there was concern that funding the
mujahideen would have a blowback effect. How do you respond to that?

CW: It just doesn’t really hold water. You gotta remember that it was 11 years
after the Russians left Afghanistan that we ever heard of the Taliban. You just
can’t predict those kinds of things. You have no idea, no earthly idea. The
[CIA] — and I know this is true, ’cause I was in the middle of it — never
recruited a single [Afghan] Arab to fight with the mujahideen. In the first
place, the Arabs weren’t nearly as good fighters. Also, we had limitless
manpower, so why would we go out and recruit Arabs? There were none recruited.
The second thing is they’re not using any weapons at all that they would have
found that were used by the mujahideen. None. So the idea that we either trained
or equipped the Taliban is just silly. The final thing is, if they had indeed
captured any weapons, the only one that would have been of any value to them
would have been the stinger. If they had any stingers, we would have seen some
airliners shot down.

When was the last time you were in Afghanistan?

CW: The last time I was in Afghanistan was about a year before the Soviets left.
The Soviets left in 1989 in February, so it would have been in ’88.

What’s your take on what’s happening there now?

CW: The [Bush] administration started out really well when they first attacked
Afghanistan and rolled back the Taliban without very much problem, and then
started a lot of public works programs to rebuild the country. The Iraq war,
unfortunately, changed the emphasis, and we took a lot of resources out of
Afghanistan to put ’em in Iraq, both military and reconstruction-type things.
We’ve suffered greatly because of that.


That’s one of the things the movie emphasizes: in addition to defeating the
Soviets, you didn’t want a power vacuum in Afghanistan.

CW: That’s absolutely right, and that’s what we got. Congress had been so good
up until that time, but they just turned deaf ears; once the Russians stepped
out of there, Congress just lost interest. I fought it as hard as I could, but
obviously, I was unsuccessful.

Do you think people have lost interest in Afghanistan now, with the emphasis
being on Iraq?

CW: I don’t think so, because there’s been so much about Afghanistan in the
papers, and so much about the Taliban resurgence, and so much about some of the
NATO allies not wanting their soldiers to fight. I don’t know if I can take
credit for this, but everybody in Congress today says Afghanistan is the good
war and Iraq is the bad one. The Democrats who ferociously opposed the Iraq war
support the Afghan war. I think there would be a chance, if we could shut down
Iraq, we could achieve the kind of unanimity we had before, and we could get
something done.

Another reason Afghanistan has been in the papers lately is the question of
boycotting the Olympics. After the invasion of Afghanistan, the U.S. didn’t
participate in the Moscow games. Do you think the 1980 boycott was effective?
Would you favor a boycott of the Beijing Olympics over the issue of Tibet?

CW: Well, I don’t know if it was effective, but it damn sure seriously offended
the Soviets and caused them great embarrassment. There’s no question about that.
The sins of the Chinese are not up to the sins of the Soviets invading a country
with 170,000 soldiers. I don’t want it to appear that I’m not sensitive to civil
rights violations, but we need to keep things in perspective here, and the
current situation doesn’t rise to the standard of outrage that the invasion of a
small country did.

One of the things that’s so remarkable about what happened was that it was so
under the radar, that both parties worked together to defeat the Soviets. Do you
think Washington has become more ideological since you left Congress in 1996?

CW: [Since the early 1990s] it’s gotten more bitterly partisan. In rebuilding
Afghanistan, if we didn’t have the Iraq thorn in our side, I think Congress
could come together on that.



In the early 1980s, you had something of a reputation…

CW: Yup. (laughs) When the book came out, I was gonna sue ’em, but my lawyer
convinced me they could prove everything.

Do you think, given the way politics is covered now, that any of this stuff
could have happened, from bringing down the Soviets to your general day-to-day
activities?

CW: Probably not. Probably not. And it’s too bad, too.

Why’s that?

CW: Well, it was fun, y’know?

So Washington’s gotten a lot more sterile since you left?

CW: It has. Not because of my leaving, but it has. They all look like they’re
running for president of the Rotary Club.

How’s your health these days?

CW: I had a heart transplant. I’m recovering, but you don’t get over a heart
transplant in six months, which is how long I’ve been out. I’m looking forward
to making a lot of progress in the next six months. But with the anesthetic and
all, my memory’s not good, and I’ve had some physical problems, but I hope to
get better with vigorous exercise, under the lash of my ballerina wife.

How was the premiere of the film?

CW: It was just spectacular for me. Just absolutely spectacular. I really wasn’t
supposed to go to the premiere [after the heart transplant], but I begged and
begged my doctor. Finally, he agreed to let me go as long as he got to come too.
But I paid a terrible price, and I was unable to go to the various festivities
in Washington.

We wanted to ask you, what are your favorite movies?

CW: Well, my very favorite is
Casablanca
. I just love everything about
it. I love the story, love Bogart. I like
Primary Colors
. I like Dr.
Strangelove
. I love Bulworth, although that one didn’t do much. I
loved Patton. I like Jaws a lot.
E.T.

What makes a good movie for you?

CW: Ooooh, gosh…. I can’t tell you, but I know it when I see it.

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a Slusho, whatever that is! Cloverfield stomps its way onto DVD as not only the most exciting new release of the week, but the one most chock-full of special features. Charlie Wilson’s War, The Savages, and The Orphanage are also new — but be on the lookout as the year’s worst flick to date, One Missed Call, also shuffles onto shelves.


Cloverfield


Tomatometer:
76%

The best-kept secret of 2007 (look up viral marketing in the dictionary and see J.J. Abram’s grinning mug) turned out to be the rebirth of the kaiju — a Godzilla-esque creature wreaking havoc in Manhattan, as seen through the eyes of Handicam-wielding twenty-somethings. Online campaigns involving Slusho and the mysterious 1-11-08 teaser title made for a gonzo opening weekend take, but significant drop-off suggests that many of you were waiting for DVD.

Bonus Features:

Two alternate endings, deleted scenes, commentary by director Matt Reeves and tons of Easter Eggs make Cloverfield a must-own. Now, figure out where to buy it, since no less than four special store-specific editions will be available, ranging from a Steelbook case (FYE and Suncoast), exclusive ringtone (K-Mart and Sears), “T.J. Miller’s Video Diary” bonus DVD (Best Buy) and our recommendation, a “Rob’s Goin’ to Japan Party Mix” CD (Target).

 

Charlie Wilson’s War


Tomatometer: 83%

If modern, smarmy Tom Hanks doesn’t rub you the wrong way (why, oh why, couldn’t he have stopped at A League of Their Own??) and you’d like to see him charm the pants off of Julia Roberts’ conservative socialite, then perhaps there’s nothing stopping you from watching the true story of Texas Congressman Charlie Wilson and how he run the Soviets out of Afghanistan. But if you’re paying attention, you already know how that situation panned out.

Bonus Features:

There’s not much here, but a “Who Is Charlie Wilson?” featurette brings us up close and personal with not only Hanks, producer Aaron Sorkin, and director Mike Nichols (The Graduate), but also Wilson himself and his lover/benefactor, Joanne Herring.


The Savages



Tomatometer: 90%

After a nine-year absence, Tamara Jenkins (Slums of Beverly Hills) wins us over again. This time, her angsty protagonists are middle-aged siblings (Best Actress nominee Laura Linney, Philip Seymour Hoffman) whose perfectly rancorous relationship is tested when they must deal with their increasingly senile, elderly father (Philip Bosco). One of last year’s critical darlings, The Savages deserves a wider audience for its bittersweet, acute observations — you’ll laugh, you’ll cry, you’ll see poop on the walls.

Bonus Features:

There’s not much to see here: extended scenes, interviews, and a “Behind the Scenes” photo gallery. But don’t let that deter you; give The Savages a try and you’ll likely end up touched. After all, who doesn’t love their parents?


The Orphanage


Tomatometer: 84%

Orphaned by the Oscars (it was Spain’s official entry but didn’t make the final cut) and at the box office, here your chance to adopt this overlooked flick! In the Guillermo del Toro-produced stab at familial horror, Laura (Belen Rueda) moves into the orphanage she grew up in, but finds the house already occupied by spirits who seemingly kidnap her son. Come for the thrills, stay for the surprisingly tender story.

Bonus Features:

The Orphanage largely takes place in one setting, so location, location, location was undoubtedly a vital adage on set. Two DVD features reveal the efforts taken to bring Laura’s nightmarish world to life: the first, “When Laura Grew Up,” shows the filmmakers at work building the orphanage set. The second takes us into “Tomas’ Secret Room,” where the haunting climax of the movie takes place.

 


Starting Out in the Evening



Tomatometer: 86%

I don’t know about you, but nothing gets our blood boiling like a good May-December pairing. Starting Out in the Evening boasts the match-up of sexagenarian Frank Langella and Lauren Ambrose (Six Feet Under) as an aging writer and grad student , respectively, who grow close in Andrew Wagner’s film about relational intimacy and alienation.

Bonus Features:

Director Wagner offers in-depth commentary in the disc’s only non-trailer offering.


Hannah Takes the Stairs



Tomatometer: 67%

Is the movie movement known as mumblecore (a certain brand of D.I.Y. flicks with ultra-low budgets and nonprofessional actor) all it’s cracked up to be? Take the first step in making your call with the latest notable mumblecore effort, a wry, intimate story about a flaky girl and her crush on two goofy co-workers.

Bonus Features:

Those mumblecore kids are majorly hands-on with the filmmaking process and their subsequent DVD releases. Hannah continues the trend with a commentary, behind-the-scenes footage, deleted scenes, and a short film by director Joe Swanberg, Thanks for the ADD! And speaking of which, check out Swanberg’s MySpace page for even more short films, including the trailer to his next feature, Nights and Weekends.

 


One Missed Call



Tomatometer: 0%

At last, the worst-reviewed movie of 2008 has arrived on DVD! (Okay, it’s only the worst so far, but we’re betting it can go the distance.) It takes something special to go 64 reviews without a single fresh rating, but this remake of Takashi Miike’s J-horror pic — in which people like Shannyn Sossamon get phone calls portending their imminent deaths — manages the feat. Even Uwe Boll’s Dungeon Siege: In the Name of the King notched a five percent Tomatometer. Bravo, One Missed Call. Bravo.

Bonus Features:

Here’s the kicker: there are no bonus features. Zilch. Zero. Nada. Can you blame Warner Bros. or their no-name filmmakers (not to mention Sossaman and co-star Ed Burns, who both seemed listless while promoting the flick at Comic-Con) for washing their hands of the career-killing box office bomb?

Fun fact: One Missed Call‘s Australian title is Don’t Pick Up the Cell Phone! (Note exclamation point.) Rent accordingly.

 

Tell the truth: Do you think you could look at a picture of the desert and tell whether it was taken in Iran or Morocco?

Mike Newell, director of the upcoming big-screen adaptation of Prince of Persia: Sands of Time, is betting you couldn’t — Variety reports that his production has settled on Morocco as a stand-in for the country formerly known as Persia. From the article:

Epic project is a live-action feature based on the videogame. “Prince of Persia” has a script by Jeffrey Nachmanoff (“The Day After Tomorrow“) and vidgame creator Jordan Mechner. The vidgame spawned six installments and numerous spin-offs, boosting Disney execs’ hopes for a lucrative new tentpole.

Jimmy Abounouom, whose Dune Films is handling the Moroccan shoot for Disney, breaks it down for Variety, saying “Producers are always looking for cheap places to shoot, and Morocco is one of them.” Newell follows Ridley Scott and Paul Greengrass into the North African country; Scott’s Body of Lies recently wrapped a shoot there, as did Greengrass’ “untitled Iraq war thriller.” Dune also handled the Moroccan shoots for Charlie Wilson’s War and Stop-Loss.

According to Abounouom, Prince of Persia should start rolling in Morocco by mid-June — providing, of course, a SAG strike doesn’t bring everything grinding to a halt.

Source: Variety

Mere days after being left at the altar by (ex-) director Mark Romanek, Universal’s The Wolf Man has found itself a new helmer.

Variety reports that the horror remake will now be directed by Joe Johnston, the man responsible for bringing films such as Honey I Shrunk the Kids, October Sky, and, um, Jurassic Park III to the big screen. From the article:

Benicio Del Toro has long been attached to play the title character, but Romanek’s exit comes after the studio firmed up Anthony Hopkins to play the title character’s father, and for Emily Blunt (“Charlie Wilson’s War“) to play the female lead.

Universal has now dodged bullets with two of its highest-profile 2009 pictures; the studio quickly replaced Brad Pitt with Russell Crowe when the former left State of Play, and with Johnston’s hiring, they ensure that the long-gestating Wolf Man (or Wolfman — these news reports can’t seem to make up their minds) will have a chance to start earning back its $85 million budget on time.

Source: Variety