Elizabeth Goodenough/Everett Collection

(Photo by Warner Bros/Everett Collection)

All Ryan Gosling Movies Ranked

Not every child actor grows up to be a multiple Oscar nominee, but then, not every child actor is Ryan Gosling. After a stint singing and dancing alongside Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears on The Mickey Mouse Club, Gosling flashed early signs of his potential in movies like Remember the Titans and The Believer, then melted hearts everywhere as Noah Calhoun in The Notebook. Just two years later, he’d garner his first Best Actor nod for Half Nelson, as he starred in a string of acclaimed independent films like Lars and the Real Girl and Blue Valentine. Even as he’s risen to the A-list, he continues to star in a wide variety of projects, from cult favorites like Drive and The Nice Guys to high-profile spectacles like Blade Runner 2049 and La La Land, which earned him his second Oscar nomination. With all of that in mind, we’ve rounded up all Ryan Gosling movies and sorted them by Tomatometer. Have look below and see where your favorites land!

#24

Stay (2005)
27%

#24
Adjusted Score: 30542%
Critics Consensus: A muddled brain-teaser, Stay has a solid cast and innovative visuals but little beneath the surface.
Synopsis: Sam Foster (Ewan McGregor), a psychiatrist, has a new patient, Henry Letham (Ryan Gosling), who claims to be suicidal. In... [More]
Directed By: Marc Forster

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: 34891%
Critics Consensus: A predictable police procedural that works better as a character study rather than a thriller.
Synopsis: The body of a young woman is found in a ditch in the woods of the small California coastal town... [More]
Directed By: Barbet Schroeder

#22

Gangster Squad (2013)
31%

#22
Adjusted Score: 38313%
Critics Consensus: Though it's stylish and features a talented cast, Gangster Squad suffers from lackluster writing, underdeveloped characters, and an excessive amount of violence.
Synopsis: Ruthless, Brooklyn-born mobster Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn) has 1949 Los Angeles in an iron fist, as he accumulates a fortune... [More]
Directed By: Ruben Fleischer

#21
Adjusted Score: 36652%
Critics Consensus: The United States of Leland has its moments, but they're undermined by a muddled plot, unsympathetic characters, and frustratingly uneven performances.
Synopsis: A withdrawn young man, Leland Fitzgerald (Ryan Gosling) is imprisoned for the murder of a mentally disabled boy, who also... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Ryan Hoge

#20

All Good Things (2010)
35%

#20
Adjusted Score: 37222%
Critics Consensus: It's well-acted, and the true story that inspired it offers plenty of drama -- which is why it's so frustrating that All Good Things is so clichéd and frustratingly ambiguous.
Synopsis: Heir to a real-estate dynasty, David Marks (Ryan Gosling) lives in the shadow of his father, Sanford (Frank Langella). He... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Jarecki

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 47522%
Critics Consensus: Director Refn remains as visually stylish as ever, but Only God Forgives fails to add enough narrative smarts or relatable characters to ground its beautifully filmed depravity.
Synopsis: In Thailand, a drug trafficker's (Ryan Gosling) icy mother (Kristin Scott Thomas) sends him on a mission to avenge his... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

#18

Song to Song (2017)
44%

#18
Adjusted Score: 52287%
Critics Consensus: As visually sumptuous as it is narratively spartan, Terrence Malick's Song to Song echoes elements of the writer-director's recent work -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Set against the Austin, Texas, music scene, two entangled couples -- struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling),... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#17

The Notebook (2004)
53%

#17
Adjusted Score: 59400%
Critics Consensus: It's hard not to admire its unabashed sentimentality, but The Notebook is too clumsily manipulative to rise above its melodramatic clichés.
Synopsis: In 1940s South Carolina, mill worker Noah Calhoun (Ryan Gosling) and rich girl Allie (Rachel McAdams) are desperately in love.... [More]
Directed By: Nick Cassavetes

#16

Fracture (2007)
71%

#16
Adjusted Score: 78326%
Critics Consensus: Though Fracture's plot is somewhat implausible, the onscreen face-off between Gosling and Hopkins overshadows any faults.
Synopsis: Willy Beachum (Ryan Gosling), a hotshot prosecutor, is about to leave his post for a lucrative job at a private... [More]
Directed By: Gregory Hoblit

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 76982%
Critics Consensus: An inspirational crowd-pleaser with a healthy dose of social commentary, Remember the Titans may be predictable, but it's also well-crafted and features terrific performances.
Synopsis: In Virginia, high school football is a way of life, an institution revered, each game celebrated more lavishly than Christmas,... [More]
Directed By: Boaz Yakin

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 74217%
Critics Consensus: A bleak but original indie, The Slaughter Rule benefits from outstanding performances by Ryan Gosling and David Morse.
Synopsis: Roy (Ryan Gosling) gets cut from his high school football team just days after his estranged father dies. For him,... [More]

#13
Adjusted Score: 86074%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious to a fault, The Place Beyond the Pines finds writer/director Derek Cianfrance reaching for -- and often grasping -- thorny themes of family, fatherhood, and fate.
Synopsis: In upstate New York, two men (Ryan Gosling, Bradley Cooper), and later, their sons (Dane DeHaan, Emory Cohen) must deal... [More]
Directed By: Derek Cianfrance

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 88253%
Critics Consensus: It never lives up to the first part of its title, but Crazy, Stupid, Love's unabashed sweetness -- and its terrifically talented cast -- more than make up for its flaws.
Synopsis: Cal Weaver (Steve Carell) is living the American dream. He has a good job, a beautiful house, great children and... [More]
Directed By: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 86172%
Critics Consensus: Lars and the Real Girl could've so easily been a one-joke movie. But the talented cast, a great script, and direction never condescends to its character or the audience.
Synopsis: Extremely shy Lars (Ryan Gosling) finds it impossible to make friends or socialize. His brother (Paul Schneider) and sister-in-law (Emily... [More]
Directed By: Craig Gillespie

#10

The Believer (2001)
83%

#10
Adjusted Score: 84526%
Critics Consensus: Gosling commands the screen with a raw, electrifying performance.
Synopsis: A little knowledge is a dangerous thing -- an adage proven with shocking ramifications in Henry Bean's "The Believer." The... [More]
Directed By: Henry Bean

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 92727%
Critics Consensus: While not exactly exposing revelatory truths, The Ides of March is supremely well-acted drama that moves at a measured, confident clip.
Synopsis: As Ohio's Democratic primary nears, charming Gov. Mike Morris (George Clooney) seems a shoo-in for the nomination over his opponent,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#8

Blue Valentine (2010)
86%

#8
Adjusted Score: 94133%
Critics Consensus: This emotionally gripping examination of a marriage on the rocks isn't always easy to watch, but Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling give performances of unusual depth and power.
Synopsis: Dean (Ryan Gosling) and Cindy (Michelle Williams) live a quiet life in a modest neighborhood. To the casual observer, everything... [More]
Directed By: Derek Cianfrance

#7

First Man (2018)
87%

#7
Adjusted Score: 115362%
Critics Consensus: First Man uses a personal focus to fuel a look back at a pivotal moment in human history - and takes audiences on a soaring dramatic journey along the way.
Synopsis: Hoping to reach the moon by the end of the decade, NASA plans a series of extremely dangerous, unprecedented missions... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 120779%
Critics Consensus: Visually stunning and narratively satisfying, Blade Runner 2049 deepens and expands its predecessor's story while standing as an impressive filmmaking achievement in its own right.
Synopsis: Officer K (Ryan Gosling), a new blade runner for the Los Angeles Police Department, unearths a long-buried secret that has... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#5

The Big Short (2015)
89%

#5
Adjusted Score: 101793%
Critics Consensus: The Big Short approaches a serious, complicated subject with an impressive attention to detail -- and manages to deliver a well-acted, scathingly funny indictment of its real-life villains in the bargain.
Synopsis: In 2008, Wall Street guru Michael Burry realizes that a number of subprime home loans are in danger of defaulting.... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#4

Half Nelson (2006)
91%

#4
Adjusted Score: 96526%
Critics Consensus: Half Nelson features powerful performances from Ryan Gosling and Shareeka Epps. It's a wise, unsentimental portrait of lonely people at the crossroads.
Synopsis: Dan Dunne (Ryan Gosling) is a history teacher at a Brooklyn school. Though well-liked by his students and colleagues, he... [More]
Directed By: Ryan Fleck

#3

La La Land (2016)
91%

#3
Adjusted Score: 120063%
Critics Consensus: La La Land breathes new life into a bygone genre with thrillingly assured direction, powerful performances, and an irresistible excess of heart.
Synopsis: Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) are drawn together by their common desire to do what they love. But... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#2

The Nice Guys (2016)
91%

#2
Adjusted Score: 110281%
Critics Consensus: The Nice Guys hearkens back to the buddy comedies of a bygone era while adding something extra courtesy of a knowing script and the irresistible chemistry of its leads.
Synopsis: Holland March (Ryan Gosling) is a down-on-his-luck private eye in 1977 Los Angeles. Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe) is a hired... [More]
Directed By: Shane Black

#1

Drive (2011)
93%

#1
Adjusted Score: 102675%
Critics Consensus: With its hyper-stylized blend of violence, music, and striking imagery, Drive represents a fully realized vision of arthouse action.
Synopsis: Driver is a skilled Hollywood stuntman who moonlights as a getaway driver for criminals. Though he projects an icy exterior,... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

(Photo by Priscilla Grant/Everett Collection)

Even with a ton of screen credits to his name, including appearances in major feature films, popular TV staples, and a number of animated projects, Tony Hale is still best known for his roles as Buster Bluth on Arrested Development and Gary Walsh on Veep, the latter of which has already earned him two Emmy awards and another nomination this year. This week, he makes a trip to the big screen in Brave New Jersey, a comedy about a small New Jersey town whose terrified citizens panic after hearing Orson Welles’ famous War of the Worlds radio broadcast.

Hale graciously took some time out of his family vacation in Tennessee, where Brave New Jersey was shot, to talk to RT about his Five Favorite Films, mass hysteria, quarter-pounders with cheese, and the amount of abuse he takes on his most popular show.

Punch-Drunk Love (2002) 79%

Punch-Drunk Love is at the very top of the list. Like everybody else, I’m a huge fan of Paul Thomas Anderson. The journey that he took Adam Sandler on in that movie, starting as a guy who is very put-upon and all this kind of stuff, and then love came into his life through Emily Watson. Just to see that journey. There’s a great scene at the end when he just totally stands up to Philip Seymour Hoffman at his mattress store, and there’s that time when Emily’s in the car with him, and he grabs… I think it was a tire iron in the car and swings. It’s just such a great moment. And then that crying scene with the therapist in the closet. I mean, it was just perfection, that entire film, for me.

Lars and the Real Girl (2007) 81%

And then I would say second would be Lars and the Real Girl by Craig Gillepsie. You read the log line and you’re like, “Huh, blow-up doll. Interesting.” But then, the whole movie is really talking about everybody’s desperate need for community. We’re not made to be isolated; we’re not made to be alone. And also how the town embraces the doll. There’s even one time when Ryan Gosling had to let the doll go, and the whole town came and sat in his living room, and they didn’t say anything. Many times, in those kinds of death scenes, people have a lot of talking, but they just kind of sat there with him. I loved that.

The Goonies (1985) 77%

I’m going to throw The Goonies in there, because as a kid, that was just the ultimate fantasy. That was every kid’s fantasy. I watched it over and over and over. The fact that they slid through the rocks, and she’s playing the bone piano, and all that kind of stuff. You’re like, “What? Is this really happening?” And it never gets old. I saw it recently with my daughter, and I was still into it.

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) 92%

I’d put The Fellowship of the Ring in there. I just think Peter Jackson did a fantastic job with the movie, and I loved those books. It’s one of those things where, reading the books, and getting so excited about them, and just praying that the movie did it justice. And it totally did, to me. Plus, the relationship between Frodo and Sam, and Gollum, and all of that. I loved it. I’m also a huge fan of The Chronicles of Narnia, and I had the opposite experience with that, where it just didn’t click like it did with The Lord of the Rings. So I just loved what Peter Jackson did with that.

Inside Out (2015) 98%

Rounding it out would be Inside Out. I remember seeing that with my family on one of our family vacations during the summer, and just how they interpreted emotions to kids. There’s such an emphasis in society to “Be happy, be happy, be happy!” but you have to give kids the permission to feel sad. You have to give them permission to feel the range of emotions. That’s really healthy. And how creatively it was done, and it didn’t hurt that Amy Poehler was the voice of Joy. It just worked. I’m a huge Pixar fan, and it just completely worked.


Ryan Fujitani for Rotten Tomatoes: I haven’t seen Brave New Jersey, but I love the idea behind it. Having said that, I know the public panic at the time has been greatly exaggerated in the years since. Do you know if the story is based on some obscure real-life incident that actually happened? Or was it just a fun idea to explore?

Tony Hale: That’s a great question. I know that there was, in New Jersey, a lot of widespread panic that happened, because back then, all they had was the radio. So the family would sit around at night and they would listen to the radio. They got most of their news, they got most of their entertainment from that. It just so happened that this small town in Jersey missed the first part where it was announced that this was a dramatic reading, and they just took everything else as fact and really thought Martians were coming to destroy the Earth, and they were like an hour from where they were in Jersey. So the town just went into hysteria.

I think that’s what initially drew me to it, because back then, they only had the radio, so it kind of made sense that they didn’t have a fact-checker. Whereas today, there’s still mass hysteria, and we have fact-checkers. We actually can check facts and sources. So that was really interesting to me.

Also, just the idea that somebody said, “If today was your last day to live, how would you do things differently?” For my character, Clark, he was a guy who was kind of put upon; he was a mayor that was just going through the motions, and it forced him to analyze what he wants and what he values, and priorities just got knocked into place.

RT: Did you guys do any fun research for the film, like listening to the original broadcast or reading old newspaper clippings of the incident?

Hale: Yeah, Jody had really done his research and sent us all that. He sent us the broadcast, he sent us all the articles, so we were able to kind of see the hysteria that happened from this broadcast. Actually, after it, I think Orson Welles did an apology, and from what I heard, it was done very, very well. It sounded very authentic. I mean, if I were put in that position, I would have done the same thing.

RT: You did touch on this a minute ago, and I’m sure you’ve already answered it a million times, so I’m not going to ask what you would do on your last day on Earth. Instead, I’d like to know what you would choose as your last meal, and what would be the one exciting, dangerous, possibly illegal thing or crazy adventure you’d attempt that you never had the chance to do before?

Hale: Oh, good question. That, I love. My sister’s actually in the car, and she’s going to be very angry with this answer, because she’s a very good cook, but it would be a quarter-pounder with cheese, with fries and a chocolate shake. That would, hands down, be it, immediately. My first and final answer. And my wife just said, “Oh yeah, that would definitely be your last meal. Because you would die.”

I don’t know if I would do anything crazy. This is kind of going back to the general question, but it forces you to be present. I think so much of my life is a fight to be present, you know? And so, rather than doing something, it would just force you to stay where you are and be in the now. It wouldn’t be as much of a fight, because you would say, “No, I’ve got to force myself today to at least do that, to at least be present.”

(Photo by Gravitas Ventures)

RT: What’s your character in Brave New Jersey like?

Hale: Well, he’s the mayor of the town. I think he was probably pushed into that role. I don’t think he carries a lot of weight; he doesn’t have a lot of responsibility. It’s just in title alone, and people’s expectations of him are kind of low. He doesn’t really step up to the plate. So he just goes through the motions, and I think he very much feels the fact that he’s going through the motions. He’s ready for something to change, but he doesn’t know how to change it. He’s just kind of walking through water a little bit.

When this happens, he’s still trying to figure out what to do, but then he has that moment of, “I’ve gotta step up to the plate. I’ve gotta act. Whatever my emotions, my thoughts, are saying, forget it, and just do it.” He’s a pretty average guy, just living day-to-day in a bit of a fog, and this snaps him out of it.

RT: So, speaking of average, put-upon characters living in a fog, you’re best known for your work on Arrested Development and Veep, and on both shows, you play anxious, put-upon characters who take a lot of abuse. Now, I don’t remember when I first saw you do a live interview, but what struck me was how well-composed, well-spoken, thoughtful, and genuinely nice you seem to be. How do you get into that headspace to play characters like Buster Bluth or Gary on Veep and not come home from a day on set just exhausted?

Hale: Oh, it comes from a lot of pain. A lot of pain. I think the scary thing is that it comes very naturally. Here’s the thing. I can only speak for myself, but when I enter into these things, I have to come from a place where you have to begin believing what people are saying. If I really believed what somebody was saying to me, how would I react? Like, I remember Reid Scott, who plays Dan on Veep, called me “cow eyes” on one of the episodes, and it’s just kind of like, “Wow, that’s jarring.”

But it’s just naturally how I would react. There are so many sexual jokes and crazy things talked about on the set. If I were standing there, in an elevator, listening to that stuff, I would probably have the same reaction. You know, like, “I can’t believe I’m overhearing this conversation.” I can’t say anything — and this is just Tony speaking — because I’m not in their conversation, but even as Gary, he doesn’t really speak up. He doesn’t speak about politics, he doesn’t know anything about politics. So his facial reactions are how I think anybody would respond, like, “Whoa, that was harsh,” or “I didn’t need to hear that.”

What I’m most amazed about with Gary is that he stays, because the amount of abuse that he gets, and then bounces back, it’s pretty fascinating. I mean, that’s incredibly dysfunctional. But he just kind of bounces back. Even though, in the show, you get used to a certain type of dialogue and language, it’s intense language, and I think a lot of it is just acting naturally. That’s how I would respond.

What I get the most joy out of on Veep is, the writers work very, very hard on the scripts, and they give us a lot of material to work with. But when we get on set and we’re in a scene, there’s a moment that Julia and I typically have, where we can find the physicality in the script. “Okay, what if I drop your coat here?” or “What if you fell over the bannister here, and I try to catch you?” You know, stuff that’s not scripted, but we can take it, hopefully, to another level — that, to me, is the most fun, because I love that kind of physical humor.


Brave New Jersey opens in limited release this Friday, August 4.

Ryan Gosling reunites with his Crazy, Stupid, Love. and Gangster Squad co-star Emma Stone for this weekend’s La La Land — and even though it’s only opening in New York and L.A., this festival favorite is already Certified Fresh and well on its way to ending up as one of the better-reviewed movies of the year. In honor of its arrival, we decided to take a fond look back at some of the brighter highlights from Mr. Gosling’s growing filmography, and you know what that means, folks: It’s time for Total Recall!


10. The Place Beyond the Pines (2012) 78%

gosling-place-beyond-pines

After accruing critical acclaim together with Blue Valentine, Gosling and writer-director Derek Cianfrance reunited for 2013’s The Place Beyond the Pines — a very different sort of drama that, instead of picking over the bones of a doomed relationship, traces the aftermath of a man’s fateful decision to turn to crime in order to support his child. Starring Gosling in the lead opposite Bradley Cooper as the cop who targets his character after he breaks the law, Pines earned its hefty 140-minute running time with an ambitious multi-generational story that proved Valentine‘s accolades were no fluke; as Steven Rea wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer, “This is a story about legacy, the sins of the father, the restlessness in our souls. It’s powerful, it’s bold, it hits you hard.”

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9. Lars and the Real Girl (2007) 81%

gosling-lars-real-girl

It may have a perfectly tasteless-sounding plot, but Lars and the Real Girl is actually far more empathetic, wise, and finely shaded than any movie about a man in a relationship with a sex doll has a right to be — and that’s largely because few actors could have grounded its largely inscrutable and possibly demented central character as sensitively as Gosling, who earned a Golden Globe nomination for his work. Gosling was supported with a solid cast and a tender script that, in the words of the Globe and Mail’s Rick Groen, offered “A sweet little fable about how a delusional man-child is helped by the loving ministrations of his family and community, the kind of throwback flick where human nature is seen as inherently good — a notion so quaint that it feels damn near buoyant.”

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8. The Believer (2001) 83%

gosling-the-believer

Less than a decade removed from his early career as a children’s TV fixture on shows like Young Hercules and the mid-’90s Mickey Mouse Club revival — and just a year after popping up briefly in Remember the Titans — Gosling scored the lead role in Henry Bean’s The Believer, a harrowing dramatization of the incredible life story of Jewish Neo-Nazi Daniel Burros. While Gosling’s character in the film achieves a somewhat happier ending than the real-life Burros, who shot himself after his heritage was publicly revealed, that doesn’t make the rest of The Believer any easier to watch — and neither does it detract from Gosling’s searing performance. “It’s blunt, controversial and never takes the easy road through its themes and situations,” observed Rich Cline of Shadows on the Wall. “It’s also profoundly moving.”

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 7. The Ides of March (2011) 84%

gosling-ides-of-march

Howard Dean’s 2004 presidential campaign may not have amounted to much besides a lot of mocking soundbites from pundits, but it did provide the inspiration for Beau Willimon’s well-reviewed play Farragut North — which, in turn, inspired George Clooney to adapt its script into the screenplay for The Ides of March, a solidly reviewed 2011 political drama about, as Willimon put it, “the lust for power and the costs one will endure to achieve it.” While it wasn’t exactly a blockbuster, Ides outperformed at the box office considering its Beltway subject matter — and it found no shortage of critical accolades for Clooney (who starred, directed, and earned an Oscar nomination for his screenplay), Gosling (who picked up another Golden Globe nomination for his work as a conflicted campaign manager), or the film itself. As Charlie McCollum put it for the San Jose Mercury News, “This is intelligent filmmaking, and a provocative moral fable. It may not be perfect, but it stands as one of the better, most realistic movies about the way we elect our leaders.”

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6. The Big Short (2015) 89%

gosling-big-short

How do you take the 2008 financial crisis and turn it into an entertaining movie? Hand the reins to ex-SNL writer and frequent Will Ferrell confederate Adam McKay, stock the larder with a top-shelf cast that includes Brad Pitt, Steve Carrell, Christian Bale, and Ryan Gosling, and focus your story on the trials and tribulations of a hedge fund manager — oh, and while you’re at it, line up Margot Robbie and Selena Gomez to explain modern finance. The end result is The Big Short, an all-star dramedy that manages to make banking shenanigans entertaining — no small feat, especially considering that many people are still dealing with the real-life effects of the story. As Dana Stevens put it for Slate, “One of the most appealing things about this very appealing movie — a stylistic Chex Mix of storytelling, satire, advocacy, and clip art — is its high regard for the intellect of the viewer.”

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5. Blue Valentine (2010) 86%

gosling-blue-valentine

Writer/director Derek Cianfrance struggled for years to find funding for Blue Valentine, but his faith was handsomely rewarded when the film’s sensitive, non-linear portrayal of a young urban couple’s courtship and divorce ended up earning some of the most passionate critical accolades of 2010 — including a Golden Globe nomination for Gosling and an Academy Award nomination for Michelle Williams. Boasting improvised dialogue and appropriately raw performances, Valentine enraptured critics like Mike Scott of the Times-Picayune, who observed, “It’s at its root a hard-to-resist character study. That’s because the character being studied is you and me and everyone else who has ever fallen in, and out of, love.”

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4. Half Nelson (2006) 91%

gosling-half-nelson

Gosling earned an Academy Award nomination for his work in this Sundance favorite, a piercing drama about a middle-school teacher whose worsening drug problem complicates — and serves as an unlikely basis for — his friendship with a student (Shareeka Epps) who’s facing her own substance-related struggles. Though it was far from a big hit at the box office, Half Nelson proved definitively that its star could carry more than just handsomely lensed weepies like The Notebook — and it proved an instant favorite for critics like Terry Lawson of the Detroit Free Press, who wrote, “Although the subject promises more than the film can deliver, there is compensation in Gosling’s convincing, unromanticized portrayal of someone seeking escape from longing and loss that neither he nor the movie can really define.”

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3. Drive (2011) 93%

gosling-drive

He didn’t have much dialogue — or even really a name — but Ryan Gosling’s character in Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive came equipped with enough cool to rock a satin scorpion jacket — and enough hard-won knowledge of the L.A. underworld to try and make a difference in the lives of his alluringly sad neighbor (Carey Mulligan) and her recently returned ex-con husband (Oscar Isaac). Sleek, dark, and stylish, Drive doled out a heaping helping of action thrills without sacrificing smarts or character; as Jason Best put it for Movie Talk, “From its opening shots, Refn’s movie is as cool and controlled as its protagonist… at once unhurriedly stylish and intensely gripping. You’d like to lean back and admire, but the action keeps pulling you to the edge of your seat.”

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2. The Nice Guys (2016) 91%

gosling-the-nice-guys

In the right hands, even the most well-worn formula can make for entertaining viewing, and The Nice Guys offers delightfully profane proof. Starring Gosling alongside Russell Crowe as a pair of LAPD detectives who stumble into a conspiracy while investigating the death of a porn star, it highlights its leads’ comic chemistry while underscoring director/co-writer Shane Black’s way with a buddy cop picture — plus, its ’70s setting makes room for a cool soundtrack and all sorts of questionable wardrobe choices. “The Nice Guys flies high on the chemistry between Gosling and Crowe, and Black gives them plenty to chew on,” wrote Adam Graham for the Detroit News. “It’s a gourmet summer treat. Nice, guys.”

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1. La La Land (2016) 91%

ryan-gosling-lalaland-recall

Not many screen couples get the opportunity to team up for more than one movie — and those who do often learn the hard way that lightning rarely strikes twice. Gosling and Emma Stone suffered the sophomore jinx with their second outing, Gangster Squad, but their effervescent onscreen chemistry rebounded in a big way with La La Land. In this throwback musical from Whiplash writer-director Damian Chizelle, Stone plays an aspiring starlet and Gosling is a musician dedicated to a dream — a time-tested setup that pays an affectionate debt to the classics of yesteryear while unfolding against the backdrop of a lovingly filmed Los Angeles. To say critics were charmed would be an understatement; after wowing festival crowds and a rapturously received limited theatrical release, La La Land ranked among the best-reviewed films of 2016. “Catch the film on the largest screen you can find, with a sound system to match,” urged the New Yorker’s Anthony Lane. “Even if that means journeying all day.”

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This week on streaming video, we’ve got some beloved classics from the 1980s and 1990s, a handful of fan favorites, and some worthy recent indies, among others. Read on for the full list.


New on Netflix

 

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) 99%

Steven Spielberg’s family classic — the tale of a young boy named Elliott who discovers an orphaned alien in his backyard — boasts one of the most beloved movie characters in history.

Available now on: Netflix


Hush (2016) 93%

This psychological thriller centers on a deaf writer who is terrorized by a masked man who traps her in her remote house in the woods.

Available now on: Netflix


The Hallow (2015) 70%

This horror film revolves around a scientist whose study of an Irish forest conjures an assortment of malevolent supernatural beings.

Available now on: Netflix


The Beauty Inside (2015) 70%

In this romantic comedy from South Korea, a man who wakes up each day in the body of a different person must figure out how to return to his own body and reunite with his beloved.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Hulu

 

The Book of Negroes: Season 1 (2015) 100%

Aunjanue Ellis stars in this BET original period miniseries about a black woman during the Revolutionary War whose help is enlisted to secure freedom and passage to Nova Scotia for British Black Loyalists.

Available now on: Hulu


New on Amazon Prime

 

Lars and the Real Girl (2007) 81%

Ryan Gosling, Emily Mortimer, Patricia Clarkson, Kelli Garner, and Paul Schneider star is this dramedy about a socially-withdrawn twentysomething who treats a life-size sex doll as his girlfriend.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

Sometimes, there’s a movie. And I’m talkin’ about The Big Lebowski here. Sometimes, there’s a movie, well, it’s the movie for its time and place. It fits right in there.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) 81%

Matthew Broderick stars in John Hughes’ 1980s classic about a teenage iconoclast who takes his best pal on a wild tour of Chicago in an effort to cheer him up.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976) 93%

Martin Sheen and a young Jodie Foster star in this psychological horror film about a young girl who harbors a dark secret about her absent father.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Bananas (1971) 83%

In this early comedy from Woody Allen, a neurotic New Yorker inadvertently becomes the leader of a South American country, and hilarity ensues.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Amistad (1997) 77%

Matthew McConaughey, Morgan Freeman, and Anthony Hopkins headline Steven Spielberg’s Certified Fresh historical drama about a mutiny aboard a slave ship in 1839 and the court battle that ensued.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


You've Got Mail (1998) 70%

Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan star in Nora Ephron’s romantic comedy about two rival bookstore owners who unwittingly fall in love with each other online.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Devil's Advocate (1997) 63%

Keanu Reeves, Al Pacino, and Charlize Theron star in this thriller about a young hotshot lawyer who suspects his new boss is more than merely an attorney.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Available to Purchase

 

The Invitation (2015) 89%

Michiel Huisman, Tammy Blanchard, and John Carroll Lynch star in Karyn Kusama’s Certified Fresh thriller about a man who is invited to a dinner party hosted by his ex-wife and her new husband, but suspects dark ulterior motives.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu


Krampus (2015) 67%

Toni Collette, Adam Scott, Allison Tolman, and David Koechner star in a holiday horror/comedy about a Christmas spirit who bedevils anyone who refuses to participate in holiday cheer.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


Joy (2015) 60%

Directed by David O. Russell, Joy stars Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, and Robert De Niro in a drama based on the life of Miracle Mop inventor Joy Mangano.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu

Christmas is just around the corner and you know what that means: holiday mirth, exchanging gifts, eating foods you wouldn’t touch at any other time in the year, and, yes, ugly sweaters!  The holiday tradition inspires this week’s 24 Frames gallery, which looks at some of the most compelling knitted monstrosities from film and TV history.

If you’re not sick of hearing Diablo Cody this, hamburger phone that, then this week’s bonus-packed release of Juno should be numero uno on your list, home skillet. Otherwise, there’s plenty else to keep you company — bring home your very own Predalien, a guy with a blow-up doll, Uwe Boll’s latest, and Tila Tequila.


Juno


Tomatometer:
93%

Diablo Cody‘s Oscar-winning screenplay had all the zippy earmarks of a trailblazing hipster film — yes, Cody herself was a stripper (get over it, world!) who blogged her zany life and lip balm reviews all the way to fame, crafting her story of a wry teen protagonist named Juno into Oscar gold while single-handedly reviving the market for Sunny D and telephones shaped like hamburgers.

Bonus Features:

Juno‘s standard release is surprisingly well packed with goodies for all the home skillets out there craving more. Peep the commentary with director Jason Reitman and Cody, a “Cast and Crew Jam,” and 11 deleted scenes, including the “Café Triste” scene in which Juno performs a hilariously direct song about getting knocked up, then talks about her 8-minute song about Danny Trejo.


Aliens vs. Predator: Requiem


Tomatometer: 15%

Speaking of the miracle of life, after four Aliens, two Predators and one cross-over flick, we’ve now got the heretofore unthinkable: a Predalien! This time a whole new cast of relative unknowns and B-listers are caught between warring extraterrestrial races, in a gore-filled effects extravaganza that earned not one, but two Razzie nominations last year.

Bonus Features:

If you’re going to go for AVP:R, you might as well go big: pick up the unrated 2-disc release, which includes an additional seven minute runtime, commentary by special effects experts/former music video specialists-turned-directors the Brothers Strause, and a digital download copy of the film.




Lars and the Real Girl


Tomatometer: 80%

Now here’s a movie for all of you guys out there who dragged feet to The Notebook, or refused to see it at all — a Ryan Gosling flick in which he’s not some hunky romantic, but instead a socially-withdrawn, borderline-creepy romantic! Performances all around in this festival charmer garnered raves, but more importantly, Lars struck a chord with critics for its story of unconditional love and acceptance.

Bonus Features:

One deleted scene, a making-of video, and a gimmicky cast and crew featurette (in which everyone talks about Lars’ doll, Bianca, as if she is real) does not a fantastic DVD make…good thing the movie itself is why you’ll be picking up the disc.


Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead



Tomatometer: 88%

One of last year’s best thrillers came from one of America’s best living directors, Sidney Lumet (12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon, Serpico), which should be reason enough to watch Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead. A violent, tragic tale of two brothers (Ethan Hawke, Philip Seymour Hoffman) who scheme to rob their parents’ jewelry store goes awry, the pic earned a place on no less than twenty critics’ top ten lists.

Bonus Features:

A film this good doesn’t really need a huge bonus menu to bolster its appeal; the DVD offers a full-length commentary by Lumet, Hawke, and Hoffman, a making-of documentary and the theatrical trailer. But it was also shot in high definition, and watching Devil on DVD allows for repeat viewings of Marisa Tomei’s steamy love scenes.


I Want Someone To Eat Cheese With



Tomatometer: 74%

Second City comedian Jeff Garlin wrote, starred in and directed this indie rom-com about a food-addicted comedian living with his mother and looking for love in Chicago. Sarah Silverman appears in an amusing turn as a bawdy, ice cream scooping “chubby-chaser.” Part of IFC’s First Take, IWStECW was released simultaneously on pay cable and in theaters.

Bonus Features:

Check out the director’s commentary for insights on how Garlin reportedly shot the entire feature over 18 days spread over a two-year span.


A Shot At Love With Tila Tequila



Tomatometer: N/A

Those crazy folks at MTV really outdid themselves when they gave Tila Tequila, MySpace’s most Friend Requested “musician,” her own dating show…in which both men and women compete for her bisexual affections! Even those of us who watched along during the nail-biting first season (spoiler alert: there will be a second season) will want to re-watch every scantily clad minute over again. Unrated and with more swearing!

Bonus Features:

Really, all ten episodes (plus the all-important reunion show) are their own reward, but owning A Shot At Love on DVD will give you the benefit of extended scenes, deleted scenes, and the ability to watch Brandi and Vanessa’s surprise double-elimination lesbian cat fight whenever you need it. By which I mean, daily.


In the Name of the King: A Dungeon Siege Tale



Tomatometer: 2%

Yes, we saved the best for last. Uwe Boll‘s latest endeavor nabbed the likes of Jason Statham, Ray Liotta, Leelee Sobieski, Ron Perlman, and Burt Reynolds for a hokey medieval adventure unlike any other you’ve seen before. Statham plays a farmer called to fight evil orc-like creatures being controlled by…heck, all you need to know is that it garnered a two percent rating on the Tomatometer. Two percent. That’s out of 100.

Bonus Features:

Did you really expect any great bonus features on a release like this? Take it from someone who may have seen Dungeon Siege at midnight on opening day (for camp factor alone, of course): hammy performances from otherwise respectable actors abound, Liotta pins Statham in a fight with magical books, and ninjas inexplicably fall from the trees in this Middle Earth adventure rip-off. In twenty years, this will be a cult classic.

Romantics swooned over him in The Notebook, and critics loved his turn as the doll-toting lead character in last year’s Lars and the Real Girl — and if the latest rumors are correct, Ryan Gosling could soon be adding “action hero” to his résumé.

According to Moviehole, Gosling “might be” Paramount’s choice to take over the central role in the studio’s next attempt to resurrect the studio’s dormant Jack Ryan franchise. The fictional historian/CIA agent/President, created by Tom Clancy for 1984’s The Hunt for Red October, has been the focus of multiple Clancy novels, four of which — Red October, Patriot Games, Clear and Present Danger, and The Sum of All Fears — have been made into movies.

Turnover in the role is nothing new — Ryan has been played by Alec Baldwin, Harrison Ford, and Ben Affleck — and a new film in the series has been rumored since 2006, when Moviehole reported that Paramount was interested in filming a script (now rumored to be titled By Any Means Necessary) not based on any of Clancy’s books.

Even if he isn’t the new Jack Ryan, however, Gosling is still lining up work: Variety reports that he’s signed on to star in Andrew Jarecki‘s feature directing debut, All Good Things. The movie, described as a “period love story/murder mystery,” will be filmed from a script by Jarecki, Marcus Hinchey, and Marc Smerling. According to Variety, Kirsten Dunst is in negotiations to star opposite Gosling. From the article:

Set in the 1980s, story centers on the scion of a New York real estate dynasty (Gosling) who falls for a beautiful girl from the wrong side of the tracks (Dunst). But the fairy tale ends when the girl disappears. As a down-and-out detective stumbles on info that may lead to the truth, the political stakes get higher and people close to the case end up dead.

Source: Moviehole
Source: Variety

If there’s one Hollywood awards ceremony that you’d think would be able to go off without a hitch this year, it’d be the Writers Guild Awards — but you’d be wrong.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the WGA “pooped its own party” Thursday when the western branch unilaterally canceled its awards banquet, “blindsiding” WGA East. West and East traded brief statements in the wake of the announcement, with WGAW saying “There will be no Writers Guild of America, West show until the strike is over,” and the WGAE responding with “We are exploring our options, and we will let you know when we have made a decision.”

Ah, creative types — they can never agree on anything. Anything, that is, except for nominations — the WGA at least got its stuff together long enough to come up with the following list of 2008 Writers Guild Award nominees. The list follows below, with Tomatometer percentages in parentheses:

Original screenplay
Juno, written by Diablo Cody (93 percent)
Michael Clayton, written by Tony Gilroy (90 percent)
The Savages, written by Tamara Jenkins (91 percent)
Knocked Up, written by Judd Apatow (90 percent)
Lars and the Real Girl, written by Nancy Oliver (79 percent)

Adapted screenplay
No Country for Old Men, screenplay by Ethan Coen & Joel Coen, based on the novel by Cormac McCarthy (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood, screenplay by Paul Thomas Anderson, based on the novel Oil by Upton Sinclair (89 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, screenplay by Ronald Harwood, based on the book by Jean-Dominique Bauby (93 percent)
Into the Wild, screenplay by Sean Penn, Based on the book by Jon Krakauer (82 percent)
Zodiac, screenplay by James Vanderbilt, Based on the book by Robert Graysmith (89 percent)

Documentary screenplay
The Camden 28, written by Anthony Giacchino (88 percent)
Nanking, screenplay by Bill Guttentag & Dan Sturman & Elisabeth Bentley, story by Bill Guttentag & Dan Sturman (96 percent)
No End in Sight, written by Charles Ferguson (94 percent)
The Rape of Europa, written by Richard Berge, Nicole Newnham and Bonni Cohen (76 percent)
Sicko, written by Michael Moore (93 percent)
Taxi to the Dark Side, written by Alex Gibney (100 percent)

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

The nominations for the 65th annual Golden Globe Awards were announced this morning. Did your favorite films, stars, and songs make the cut?

The nominees were read at the Beverly Hilton by a surreal panel consisting of Dane Cook, Hayden Panettiere, Ryan Reynolds, and Quentin Tarantino. The film nominations follow below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Picture, Drama:

American Gangster (79 percent)
Atonement (85 percent)
Eastern Promises (88 percent)
The Great Debaters
Michael Clayton (90 percent)
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood (100 percent)

Actress, Drama:
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)
Jodie Foster, The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Keira Knightley, Atonement

Actor, Drama:
George Clooney, Michael Clayton
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood
James McAvoy, Atonement
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises
Denzel Washington, American Gangster

Picture, Musical or Comedy:
Across the Universe (52 percent)
Charlie Wilson’s War (92 percent)
Hairspray (92 percent)
Juno (92 percent)
Sweeney Todd (92 percent)

Actress, Musical or Comedy:

Amy Adams, Enchanted (94 percent)
Nikki Blonsky, Hairspray
Helena Bonham Carter, Sweeney Todd
Marion Cotillard, La Vie En Rose (74 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno

Actor, Musical or Comedy:

Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Tom Hanks, Charlie Wilson’s War
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages (89 percent)
John C. Reilly, Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Supporting Actress:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)
Julia Roberts, Charlie Wilson’s War
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

Supporting Actor:
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War
John Travolta, Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

Director:
Tim Burton, Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)
Ridley Scott, American Gangster
Joe Wright, Atonement

Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Christopher Hampton, Atonement
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin, Charlie Wilson’s War

Foreign Language:
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, Romania (96 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, France and U.S.
The Kite Runner, U.S. (65 percent)
Lust, Caution, Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis, France (100 percent)

Animated Film:
Bee Movie (52 percent)
Ratatouille (97 percent)
The Simpsons Movie (88 percent)

Original Score:
Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder, Into the Wild (82 percent)
Clint Eastwood, Grace Is Gone (70 percent)
Alberto Iglesias, The Kite Runner
Dario Marianelli, Atonement
Howard Shore, Eastern Promises

Original Song: Despedida from Love in the Time of Cholera (28 percent)
Grace Is Gone from Grace Is Gone
Guaranteed from Into the Wild
That’s How You Know from Enchanted

Walk Hard from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Source: Associated Press
Source: Golden Globes

December 31 is just a few weeks away, and you know what that means — ’tis the season for year-end lists and awards.

The National Board of Review of Motion Pictures, traditionally the first group to announce its favorites, made its list of 2007 winners public yesterday. The Board’s pick for best film? No Country for Old Men.

The Coen Brothers’ latest, starring Tommy Lee Jones, Javier Bardem, and Josh Brolin, currently boasts an impressive 96 percent Tomatometer rating.

The Board’s best-director nod went to Tim Burton, for his work on this month’s Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street. Advance reviews for the film, opening in wide release on December 21, have been uniformly positive — Sweeney Todd currently sits at 100 percent on the Tomatometer.

Best actor? George Clooney, for his role in Michael Clayton (90 percent on the Tomatometer); on the distaff side, the Board agreed with Away From Her‘s 95 percent Tomatometer rating, giving Julie Christie the best actress award.

Among supporting actors, Casey Affleck (The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, 75 percent) and Amy Ryan (Gone Baby Gone, 93 percent) led the pack.

Rounding out the major awards were nods for Diablo Cody (Juno, 92 percent) and Nancy Oliver (Lars and the Real Girl, 78 percent) who tied in the screenwriting category.

To read more about the National Board of Review of Motion Pictures’ 2007 awards, click on the link below!

Source: Associated Press

It looks like Ryan Gosling will be hitting the treadmill a little sooner than anticipated.

Variety reports that Gosling — who packed on pounds and put away his razor for his role in the Peter Jackson-directed adaptation of Alice Sebold’s The Lovely Bones — exited the production the day before filming began, and has been replaced by Mark Wahlberg. From the article:

Wahlberg has taken the role of Jack Salmon, the grieving father of a young girl. That role was vacated Friday by “Lars and the Real Girl” star Ryan Gosling, who stepped out after gaining 20 pounds and growing a beard for the job. Sources attributed the exit to creative differences.

After reading the script, Wahlberg quickly committed Sunday. He joins Rachel Weisz as a couple whose world is shattered after their daughter is murdered. The girl watches over her family and her killer from heaven. Jackson wrote the script with Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens.

This news is unexpected, to say the least — it was just two weeks ago that RT’s own Fred Topel talked to Gosling about his preparation for the role and his admiration for Peter Jackson.

Shooting is underway in Philadelphia, where Wahlberg recently starred in The Happening for M. Night Shyamalan. After finishing Bones, Wahlberg is set to appear opposite Brad Pitt in Darren Aronofsky‘s The Fighter — capping a five-year stretch in which the erstwhile underwear model and Funky Bunch leader will have worked with Aronofsky, Jackson, Shyamalan, and Martin Scorsese. God bless America.

Source: Variety

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