(Photo by Sony Pictures Classics)

Every Cate Blanchett Movie Ranked by Tomatometer

There isn’t a whole lot that can be consistently counted on to deliver in this crazy modern world, but Cate Blanchett movies come pretty close. From Elizabeth to Carol, the Lord of the Rings franchise to Blue Jasmine (for which she won the Best Actress Oscar), she’s tackled a preposterously eclectic list of roles — and she’s nailed pretty much all of them, consistently imbuing her characters with enough inner life to elevate even subpar material and earning a mantel full of awards along the way.

By just about any criteria, Blanchett has put together one of the most widely acclaimed careers enjoyed by any actor working today — which makes it only natural for us to celebrate all that success by taking a fond look back at all the steps she took along the way. From her first major role to her most recent release, here’s Cate Blanchett’s complete filmography, ranked from worst to best.

#48
#48
Adjusted Score: 40977%
Critics Consensus: Its intentions are noble and its cast is impressive, but neither can compensate for The Monuments Men's stiffly nostalgic tone and curiously slack narrative.
Synopsis: During World War II, the Nazis steal countless pieces of art and hide them away. Some over-the-hill art scholars, historians,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#47

Charlotte Gray (2001)
33%

#47
Adjusted Score: 34993%
Critics Consensus: A dull adaptation of Sebastian Faulk's novel despite gorgeous cinematography and Cate Blanchett's best efforts.
Synopsis: This is a drama set in Nazi-occupied France at the height of World War II. Charlotte Gray tells the compelling... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#46

The Good German (2006)
34%

#46
Adjusted Score: 39241%
Critics Consensus: Though Steven Soderbergh succeeds in emulating the glossy look of 1940s noirs, The Good German ultimately ends up as a self-conscious exercise in style that forgets to develop compelling characters.
Synopsis: Jake Geismar (George Clooney), an Army correspondent, helps his former lover, Lena Brandt (Cate Blanchett), comb post-World War II Berlin... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 36095%
Critics Consensus: The storyline is overwrought and awkward, and the audience is distanced from the flatly drawn characters.
Synopsis: A Russian Jewish girl (Christina Ricci) is separated from her father in 1927 and escapes to England, where she's rechristened... [More]
Directed By: Sally Potter

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: 40991%
Critics Consensus: This sequel is full of lavish costumes and elaborate sets, but lacks the heart and creativity of the original Elizabeth
Synopsis: Queen Elizabeth I (Cate Blanchett) faces threats to her rule from abroad and at home. Determined to restore England to... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#43

Robin Hood (2010)
43%

#43
Adjusted Score: 51693%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott's revisionist take on this oft-told tale offers some fine acting and a few gripping action sequences, but it's missing the thrill of adventure that made Robin Hood a legend in the first place.
Synopsis: After the death of Richard the Lion-Hearted, a skilled archer named Robin Longstride (Russell Crowe) travels to Nottingham, where villagers... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#42

Song to Song (2017)
44%

#42
Adjusted Score: 52287%
Critics Consensus: As visually sumptuous as it is narratively spartan, Terrence Malick's Song to Song echoes elements of the writer-director's recent work -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Set against the Austin, Texas, music scene, two entangled couples -- struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling),... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#41

Paradise Road (1997)
45%

#41
Adjusted Score: 45645%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A group of foreign women -- including an educated British musician (Glenn Close), an Australian nurse (Cate Blanchett) and an... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#40

Knight of Cups (2015)
47%

#40
Adjusted Score: 57170%
Critics Consensus: Knight of Cups finds Terrence Malick delving deeper into the painterly visual milieu he's explored in recent efforts, but even hardcore fans may struggle with the diminishing narrative returns.
Synopsis: A Los Angeles screenwriter (Christian Bale) indulges his wild side with a stripper (Teresa Palmer), a model (Freida Pinto) and... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#39

Pushing Tin (1999)
48%

#39
Adjusted Score: 49446%
Critics Consensus: Solid performances by the leads, but the generic ending needs help.
Synopsis: Two air traffic controllers (John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton) who thrive on living dangerously compete to outdo each other on... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#38
Adjusted Score: 60537%
Critics Consensus: Where'd You Go, Bernadette offers dispiriting proof that a talented director, bestselling source material, and terrific cast can add up to far less than the sum of their parts.
Synopsis: Former architect Bernadette Fox seems to have it all -- a beautiful home in Seattle, a successful and loving husband,... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#37

Veronica Guerin (2003)
53%

#37
Adjusted Score: 56576%
Critics Consensus: Cate Blanchett gives another great performance in a movie that doesn't shed much light on its title character.
Synopsis: In this true story, Veronica Guerin (Cate Blanchett) is an investigative reporter for an Irish newspaper. As the drug trade... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: 58924%
Critics Consensus: Though solidly made and acted, The Shipping News is rather heavy-handed and dull, especially given the nature of its protagonist.
Synopsis: Traces one man's extraordinary journey toward self -discovery when he returns to his ancestral home on the coast of Newfoundland.... [More]
Directed By: Lasse Hallström

#35
Adjusted Score: 64301%
Critics Consensus: Much like the titular oceanographer, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou's overt irony may come off as smug and artificial -- but for fans of Wes Anderson's unique brand of whimsy it might be worth the dive.
Synopsis: Renowned oceanographer Steve Zissou (Bill Murray) has sworn vengeance upon the rare shark that devoured a member of his crew.... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#34

The Gift (2000)
57%

#34
Adjusted Score: 61406%
Critics Consensus: With a reported budget of around 10 million, The Gift is obviously a labor of love for those involved. Unfortunately, the A-list cast can't prevent the movie from becoming a by-the-numbers whodunit with an ending that's all but unsatisfactory.
Synopsis: In the tiny town of Brixton, Georgia where nothing is private, a woman with supernatural clairvoyance, a young beautiful socialite... [More]
Directed By: Sam Raimi

#33

The Missing (2003)
58%

#33
Adjusted Score: 63832%
Critics Consensus: An expertly acted and directed Western. But like other Ron Howard features, the movie is hardly subtle.
Synopsis: When rancher and single mother of two Maggie Gilkeson (Cate Blanchett) sees her teenage daughter, Lily (Evan Rachel Wood), kidnapped... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#32
Adjusted Score: 70453%
Critics Consensus: Though somewhat overwhelmed by its own spectacle, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies ends Peter Jackson's second Middle-earth trilogy on a reasonably satisfying note.
Synopsis: Having reclaimed Erebor and vast treasure from the dragon Smaug, Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) sacrifices friendship and honor in seeking... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#31

Truth (2015)
63%

#31
Adjusted Score: 69114%
Critics Consensus: Truth's terrific cast and compelling message are often enough to overcome its occasionally didactic and facile dramatization of a nuanced real-life tale.
Synopsis: Controversy surrounds CBS anchor Dan Rather (Robert Redford) and "60 Minutes" producer Mary Mapes (Cate Blanchett) after the network broadcasts... [More]
Directed By: James Vanderbilt

#30

Bandits (2001)
64%

#30
Adjusted Score: 69236%
Critics Consensus: The story may not warrant its lengthy running time, but the cast of Bandits makes it an enjoyable ride.
Synopsis: Joe (Bruce Willis) and Terry (Billy Bob Thornton) have escaped from prison. Cutting a swath from Oregon through California, these... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 67947%
Critics Consensus: Episodes vary in quality, but overall this talky film is quirkily engaging.
Synopsis: This 11-vignette film focuses on the human interactions that happen while partaking in the everyday indulgence of coffee and cigarettes.... [More]
Directed By: Jim Jarmusch

#28
Adjusted Score: 77362%
Critics Consensus: Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is an earnest, visually resplendent trip, but the film's deliberate pace robs the material of some of its majesty.
Synopsis: Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) lives a simple life with his fellow hobbits in the shire, until the wizard Gandalf (Ian... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#27
Adjusted Score: 78135%
Critics Consensus: An entertaining PG detour for gore maestro Eli Roth, The House with a Clock in Its Walls is a family-friendly blend of humor and horror with an infectious sense of fun.
Synopsis: Ten-year-old Lewis goes to live with his oddball uncle in a creaky old house that contains a mysterious ticktock noise.... [More]
Directed By: Eli Roth

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 67467%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After a childhood of abuse by his evangelistic father, misfit Oscar Hopkins (Ralph Fiennes) becomes an Anglican minister and develops... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#25

Babel (2006)
69%

#25
Adjusted Score: 77718%
Critics Consensus: In Babel, there are no villains, only victims of fate and circumstance. Director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu weaves four of their woeful stories into this mature and multidimensional film.
Synopsis: An accident connects four groups of people on three different continents: two young Moroccan goatherds, a vacationing American couple (Brad... [More]

#24

Ocean's 8 (2018)
69%

#24
Adjusted Score: 90321%
Critics Consensus: Ocean's 8 isn't quite as smooth as its predecessors, but still has enough cast chemistry and flair to lift the price of a ticket from filmgoers up for an undemanding caper.
Synopsis: Five years, eight months, 12 days and counting -- that's how long Debbie Ocean has been devising the biggest heist... [More]
Directed By: Gary Ross

#23
Adjusted Score: 81612%
Critics Consensus: Curious Case of Benjamin Button is an epic fantasy tale with rich storytelling backed by fantastic performances.
Synopsis: Born under unusual circumstances, Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) springs into being as an elderly man in a New Orleans nursing... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#22

Hanna (2011)
71%

#22
Adjusted Score: 80124%
Critics Consensus: Fantastic acting and crisply choreographed action sequences propel this unique, cool take on the revenge thriller.
Synopsis: Raised by her father (Eric Bana) in the Finnish wilderness, teenage Hanna (Saoirse Ronan) has trained all her life to... [More]
Directed By: Joe Wright

#21
Adjusted Score: 83238%
Critics Consensus: While still slightly hamstrung by "middle chapter" narrative problems and its formidable length, The Desolation of Smaug represents a more confident, exciting second chapter for the Hobbit series.
Synopsis: Having survived the first part of their unsettling journey, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) and his companions (Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage)... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#20

I'm Not There (2007)
77%

#20
Adjusted Score: 83263%
Critics Consensus: I'm Not There's unique editing, visuals, and multiple talented actors portraying Bob Dylan make for a deliciously unconventional experience. Each segment brings a new and fresh take on Dylan's life.
Synopsis: Several actors portray legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan at different stages in his personal life and career. In 1959 a guitar-strumming... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#19
Adjusted Score: 88420%
Critics Consensus: Though the plot elements are certainly familiar, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull still delivers the thrills and Harrison Ford's return in the title role is more than welcome.
Synopsis: It's the height of the Cold War, and famous archaeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), returning from his latest adventure, finds... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#18

Elizabeth (1998)
83%

#18
Adjusted Score: 85074%
Critics Consensus: No mere historical drama, Elizabeth is a rich, suspenseful journey into the heart of British Royal politics, and features a typically outstanding performance from Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: Elizabeth Tudor (Cate Blanchett) becomes queen of a divided and dangerous England in 1558. She is roundly perceived as weak... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#17
Adjusted Score: 84536%
Critics Consensus: It doesn't quite live up to its marvelously lurid premise, but The Galapagos Affair is still stranger than fiction in a very entertaining way.
Synopsis: Dr. Fredrich Ritter and his lover Dore Strauch have their idyllic lives on an island invaded by a baroness and... [More]
Directed By: Dan Geller, Dayna Goldfine

#16

Cinderella (2015)
84%

#16
Adjusted Score: 93476%
Critics Consensus: Refreshingly traditional in a revisionist era, Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella proves Disney hasn't lost any of its old-fashioned magic.
Synopsis: After her father unexpectedly dies, young Ella (Lily James) finds herself at the mercy of her cruel stepmother (Cate Blanchett)... [More]
Directed By: Kenneth Branagh

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 88838%
Critics Consensus: With Matt Damon's unsettling performance offering a darkly twisted counterpoint to Anthony Minghella's glossy direction, The Talented Mr. Ripley is a suspense thriller that lingers.
Synopsis: To be young and carefree amid the blue waters and idyllic landscape of sun-drenched Italy in the late 1950s; that's... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Minghella

#14

An Ideal Husband (1999)
85%

#14
Adjusted Score: 85880%
Critics Consensus: Brevity is the soul of wit, eh? This adaptation gets to the nitty gritty of Wilde's stage piece and plays on eternal human foibles.
Synopsis: Sir Robert Chiltern (Jeremy Northam) is a respected government official and a loving husband. His friend, Lord Arthur Goring (Rupert... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Parker

#13

The Turning (2013)
86%

#13
Adjusted Score: 85254%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Eighteen of Australian author Tim Winton's short stories.... [More]

#12

The Aviator (2004)
86%

#12
Adjusted Score: 93426%
Critics Consensus: With a rich sense of period detail, The Aviator succeeds thanks to typically assured direction from Martin Scorsese and a strong performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, who charts Howard Hughes' descent from eccentric billionaire to reclusive madman.
Synopsis: Billionaire and aviation tycoon Howard Hughes (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a successful public figure: a director of big-budget Hollywood films such... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 94378%
Critics Consensus: In this sharp psychological thriller, Judi Dench and Cate Blanchett give fierce, memorable performances as two schoolteachers locked in a battle of wits.
Synopsis: Barbara Covett (Judi Dench), a veteran teacher at St. George's, senses a kindred spirit in Sheba Hart (Cate Blanchett), the... [More]
Directed By: Richard Eyre

#10

Little Fish (2005)
90%

#10
Adjusted Score: 89381%
Critics Consensus: Fueled by powerful work from a strong cast led by Cate Blanchett, Little Fish is a hard-hitting story worth watching -- and a major step forward for director Rowan Woods.
Synopsis: Four years clean, video store manager Tracy (Cate Blanchett) lives quietly, avoiding anything that might trigger a heroin relapse. Her... [More]
Directed By: Rowan Woods

#9
Adjusted Score: 105855%
Critics Consensus: The rare trilogy capper that really works, How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World brings its saga to a visually dazzling and emotionally affecting conclusion.
Synopsis: When the sudden appearance of a female Light Fury coincides with the darkest threat their village has ever faced, Hiccup... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois

#8
Adjusted Score: 100587%
Critics Consensus: Full of eye-popping special effects, and featuring a pitch-perfect cast, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring brings J.R.R. Tolkien's classic to vivid life.
Synopsis: The future of civilization rests in the fate of the One Ring, which has been lost for centuries. Powerful forces... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#7

Blue Jasmine (2013)
91%

#7
Adjusted Score: 99899%
Critics Consensus: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine finds the director in peak late-period form -- and benefiting from a superb cast led by Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: After her marriage to a wealthy businessman (Alec Baldwin) collapses, New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) flees to San Francisco... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#6

Ponyo (2008)
91%

#6
Adjusted Score: 96828%
Critics Consensus: While not Miyazaki's best film, Ponyo is a visually stunning fairy tale that's a sweetly poetic treat for children of all ages.
Synopsis: During a forbidden excursion to see the surface world, a goldfish princess encounters a human boy named Sosuke, who gives... [More]
Directed By: Hayao Miyazaki

#5
Adjusted Score: 98830%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, emotionally resonant, and beautifully animated, How to Train Your Dragon 2 builds on its predecessor's successes just the way a sequel should.
Synopsis: Five years have passed since Hiccup and Toothless united the dragons and Vikings of Berk. Now, they spend their time... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois, Tom Owens

#4
Adjusted Score: 102798%
Critics Consensus: Visually breathtaking and emotionally powerful, The Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King is a moving and satisfying conclusion to a great trilogy.
Synopsis: The culmination of nearly 10 years' work and conclusion to Peter Jackson's epic trilogy based on the timeless J.R.R. Tolkien... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#3

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
93%

#3
Adjusted Score: 126308%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, funny, and above all fun, Thor: Ragnarok is a colorful cosmic adventure that sets a new standard for its franchise -- and the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
Synopsis: Imprisoned on the other side of the universe, the mighty Thor finds himself in a deadly gladiatorial contest that pits... [More]
Directed By: Taika Waititi

#2

Carol (2015)
94%

#2
Adjusted Score: 106076%
Critics Consensus: Shaped by Todd Haynes' deft direction and powered by a strong cast led by Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, Carol lives up to its groundbreaking source material.
Synopsis: Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) spots the beautiful, elegant Carol (Cate Blanchett) perusing the doll displays in a 1950s Manhattan department... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#1
Adjusted Score: 103668%
Critics Consensus: The Two Towers balances spectacular action with emotional storytelling, leaving audiences both wholly satisfied and eager for the final chapter.
Synopsis: The sequel to the Golden Globe-nominated and AFI Award-winning "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," "The... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

All Christian Bale Movies Ranked

Welcome to Rotten Tomatoes, where we’ve got Bale by the barrel! There’s skinny Bale (The Machinist) and big Bale (American Hustle), edgy Bale (The Fighter) and business Bale (American Psycho). Not to mention two varieties of P.O.W. Bale (Empire of the Sun, Rescue Dawn)! We’ve got cowl Bale (The Dark Knight) if that’s your fever, along with cool Bale (Equilibrium) and magic Bale (The Prestige). Then there’s bard Bale (A Midsummer Night’s Dream) if you’re a person of letters, which we suggest pairing with a biblical Bale (Exodus: Gods and Kings). A Christian Bale, if you please.

Bale’s been nominated for an Oscar four times (winning in 2011 for The Fighter), with the latest in 2019 for Vice. Ford v Ferrari wasn’t nominated for any of its performances, though it did land one for Best Picture. And now he’s in talks to jump from the world of DC to Marvel for a role in Thor: Love and Thunder. Come what may in 2021: First, we’re ranking the best Christian Bale movies (and the worst) by Tomatometer!

#42
Adjusted Score: 31338%
Critics Consensus: The cinematography is gorgeous, but the movie plays it fast and loose with history and the novel it was adapted from. Mostly, the movie fails because the romance between the leads strains credulity and the story is largely uninvolving.
Synopsis: An epic tale about the enduring hope of love and the devastating brutality of war, set amid the Italian occupation... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#41
#41
Adjusted Score: 38865%
Critics Consensus: While sporadically stirring, and suitably epic in its ambitions, Exodus: Gods and Kings can't quite live up to its classic source material.
Synopsis: Egyptian Princes Moses (Christian Bale) and Ramses (Joel Edgerton) are raised together as brothers. When Ramses becomes pharaoh, Moses is... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#40
#40
Adjusted Score: 43834%
Critics Consensus: With storytelling as robotic as the film's iconic villains, Terminator Salvation offers plenty of great effects but lacks the heart of the original films.
Synopsis: Although Judgment Day has in fact occurred, the future for which John Connor (Christian Bale) was prepared has been partly... [More]
Directed By: McG

#39

Newsies (1992)
39%

#39
Adjusted Score: 41683%
Critics Consensus: Extra! Extra! Read all about Newsies instead of suffering through its underwhelming musical interludes, although Christian Bale makes for a spirited hero.
Synopsis: In this musical, homeless New York City newsboy Jack "Cowboy" Kelly (Christian Bale) befriends two newcomers to his trade, brothers... [More]
Directed By: Kenny Ortega

#38

Equilibrium (2002)
41%

#38
Adjusted Score: 42450%
Critics Consensus: Equilibrium is a reheated mishmash of other sci-fi movies.
Synopsis: In a futuristic world, a regime has eliminated war by suppressing emotions: books, art and music are strictly forbidden and... [More]
Directed By: Kurt Wimmer

#37
#37
Adjusted Score: 42731%
Critics Consensus: Zhang Yimou's stylistic flair is in full bloom during The Flowers of War, but his colorful treatment of a historical genocide ultimately does a disservice to the horrifying events' inherent drama.
Synopsis: An American (Christian Bale) tries to protect a group of Chinese students and prostitutes from Japanese soldiers in 1937 Nanjing.... [More]
Directed By: Zhang Yimou

#36

Reign of Fire (2002)
42%

#36
Adjusted Score: 46559%
Critics Consensus: Reign of Fire gains some altitude with its pyrotechnic action and a smolderingly campy Matthew McConaughey, but the feature's wings are clipped by a derivative script and visual effects that fizzle out.
Synopsis: In present-day London, 12-year-old Quinn watches as his mother wakes an enormous fire-breathing beast from its centuries-long slumber. Twenty years... [More]
Directed By: Rob Bowman

#35
#35
Adjusted Score: 49154%
Critics Consensus: Beautiful, indulgently heady, and pretentious, The Portrait of a Lady paints Campion's directorial shortcomings in too bright a light.
Synopsis: Ms. Isabel Archer (Nicole Kidman) isn't afraid to challenge societal norms. Impressed by her free spirit, her kindhearted cousin writes... [More]
Directed By: Jane Campion

#34

Knight of Cups (2015)
47%

#34
Adjusted Score: 57170%
Critics Consensus: Knight of Cups finds Terrence Malick delving deeper into the painterly visual milieu he's explored in recent efforts, but even hardcore fans may struggle with the diminishing narrative returns.
Synopsis: A Los Angeles screenwriter (Christian Bale) indulges his wild side with a stripper (Teresa Palmer), a model (Freida Pinto) and... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#33

Harsh Times (2005)
48%

#33
Adjusted Score: 51716%
Critics Consensus: Despite a dedicated performance by Christian Bale, Harsh Times suffers from a heavy-handed and overly bleak plot.
Synopsis: Jim (Christian Bale) is a Gulf War veteran and he believes it is his sworn duty to protect Americans by... [More]
Directed By: David Ayer

#32

The Promise (2016)
51%

#32
Adjusted Score: 61638%
Critics Consensus: The Promise wastes an outstanding cast and powerful real-life story on a love triangle that frustratingly fails to engage.
Synopsis: Brilliant medical student Michael (Oscar Isaac) meets beautiful dance instructor Ana (Charlotte Le Bon) in late 1914. Their shared Armenian... [More]
Directed By: Terry George

#31
Adjusted Score: 35797%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In 1880s London, pornographic bookseller Verloc (Bob Hoskins) is a double agent for the Russian government, providing information to Chief... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Hampton

#30
Adjusted Score: 57812%
Critics Consensus: Mowgli: Legend of the Jungle brings impressive special effects to bear on the darker side of its classic source material, but loses track of the story's heart along the way.
Synopsis: Human child Mowgli is raised by a wolf pack in the jungles of India. As he learns the often harsh... [More]
Directed By: Andy Serkis

#29

Swing Kids (1993)
56%

#29
Adjusted Score: 55745%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: American big-band jazz beats in the hearts of young German friends (Robert Sean Leonard, Christian Bale, Frank Whaley) confronted by... [More]
Directed By: Thomas Carter

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 60866%
Critics Consensus: While it may not make the most of its incredible cast, Out of the Furnace is still so packed with talent that it's hard to turn away.
Synopsis: Steelworker Russell Baze (Christian Bale) works a dead-end job and holds tight to his sense of family, duty and loyalty.... [More]
Directed By: Scott Cooper

#27

Pocahontas (1995)
55%

#27
Adjusted Score: 58349%
Critics Consensus: Pocahontas means well, and has moments of startling beauty, but it's largely a bland, uninspired effort, with uneven plotting and an unfortunate lack of fun.
Synopsis: This is the Disney animated tale of the romance between a young American Indian woman named Pocahontas (Irene Bedard) and... [More]

#26

Velvet Goldmine (1998)
59%

#26
Adjusted Score: 59975%
Critics Consensus: Velvet Goldmine takes a visual and narrative approach befitting its larger-than-life subject, although it's still disappointingly less than the sum of its parts.
Synopsis: Glam rock star Brian Slade (Jonathan Rhys Myers) plays a character on stage named Maxwell Demon who predicts his death... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#25

The New World (2005)
63%

#25
Adjusted Score: 69491%
Critics Consensus: Despite arresting visuals and strong lead performances, The New World suffers from an unfocused narrative that will challenge viewers' attention spans over its 2 1/2 hours.
Synopsis: Arriving with a British expedition in Virginia in 1607, Capt. John Smith (Colin Farrell) is captured by Native Americans. His... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#24

Metroland (1997)
64%

#24
Adjusted Score: 65094%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In late-1970s suburban London, Chris (Christian Bale) and Marion (Emily Watson) have settled into a comfortable yet all-too-predictable middle-class existence.... [More]
Directed By: Philip Saville

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: 65487%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Bobby (Christian Bale) is a mentally handicapped young man with an affinity for animals. He runs away from home after... [More]
Directed By: Jeremy Thomas

#22

Vice (2018)
65%

#22
Adjusted Score: 87578%
Critics Consensus: Vice takes scattershot aim at its targets, but writer-director Adam McKay hits some satisfying bullseyes -- and Christian Bale's transformation is a sight to behold.
Synopsis: Gov. George W. Bush of Texas picks Dick Cheney, the CEO of Halliburton Co., to be his Republican running mate... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#21
Adjusted Score: 70062%
Critics Consensus: Faultless production and shining performances display the Bard's talent propitiously.
Synopsis: This version of the renowned comedic play finds the world of humans intersecting with the realm of magic. The lovely... [More]
Directed By: Michael Hoffman

#20

Shaft (2000)
67%

#20
Adjusted Score: 70184%
Critics Consensus: With a charismatic lead, this new Shaft knows how to push the right buttons.
Synopsis: Crooked cops on the take -- small-time drug lords -- sleazy informers and sadistic rich kids ready to kill ---... [More]
Directed By: John Singleton

#19

Public Enemies (2009)
68%

#19
Adjusted Score: 78789%
Critics Consensus: Michael Mann's latest is a competent and technically impressive gangster flick with charismatic lead performances, but some may find the film lacks truly compelling drama.
Synopsis: Depression-era bank robber John Dillinger's (Johnny Depp) charm and audacity endear him to much of America's downtrodden public, but he's... [More]
Directed By: Michael Mann

#18

Laurel Canyon (2002)
69%

#18
Adjusted Score: 71398%
Critics Consensus: Though the movie itself is flawed, McDormand is fantastic as Jane.
Synopsis: Sam (Christian Bale) and his fiancée, Alex (Kate Beckinsale), move to Los Angeles for the summer to stay at the... [More]
Directed By: Lisa Cholodenko

#17

American Psycho (2000)
69%

#17
Adjusted Score: 74646%
Critics Consensus: If it falls short of the deadly satire of Bret Easton Ellis's novel, American Psycho still finds its own blend of horror and humor, thanks in part to a fittingly creepy performance by Christian Bale.
Synopsis: In New York City in 1987, a handsome, young urban professional, Patrick Bateman (Christian Bale), lives a second life as... [More]
Directed By: Mary Harron

#16

Hostiles (2017)
71%

#16
Adjusted Score: 83455%
Critics Consensus: Hostiles benefits from stunning visuals and a solid central performance from Christian Bale, both of which help elevate its uneven story.
Synopsis: In 1892, legendary Army Capt. Joseph Blocker reluctantly agrees to escort a dying Cheyenne war chief and his family back... [More]
Directed By: Scott Cooper

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 79377%
Critics Consensus: One of Steven Spielberg's most ambitious efforts of the 1980s, Empire of the Sun remains an underrated gem in the director's distinguished filmography.
Synopsis: Jamie Graham (Christian Bale), a privileged English boy, is living in Shanghai when the Japanese invade and force all foreigners... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#14

The Prestige (2006)
76%

#14
Adjusted Score: 83670%
Critics Consensus: Full of twists and turns, The Prestige is a dazzling period piece that never stops challenging the audience.
Synopsis: An illusion gone horribly wrong pits two 19th-century magicians, Alfred Borden (Christian Bale) and Rupert Angier (Hugh Jackman), against each... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Nolan

#13

I'm Not There (2007)
77%

#13
Adjusted Score: 83263%
Critics Consensus: I'm Not There's unique editing, visuals, and multiple talented actors portraying Bob Dylan make for a deliciously unconventional experience. Each segment brings a new and fresh take on Dylan's life.
Synopsis: Several actors portray legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan at different stages in his personal life and career. In 1959 a guitar-strumming... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#12

The Machinist (2004)
77%

#12
Adjusted Score: 80912%
Critics Consensus: Brad Anderson's dark psychological thriller about a sleepless factory worker is elevated by Christian Bale astonishingly committed performance.
Synopsis: Factory worker Trevor Reznik (Christian Bale) suffers from insomnia so severe that his condition has taken its toll on his... [More]
Directed By: Brad Anderson

#11

Batman Begins (2005)
84%

#11
Adjusted Score: 95916%
Critics Consensus: Brooding and dark, but also exciting and smart, Batman Begins is a film that understands the essence of one of the definitive superheroes.
Synopsis: A young Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) travels to the Far East, where he's trained in the martial arts by Henri... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Nolan

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 103517%
Critics Consensus: The Dark Knight Rises is an ambitious, thoughtful, and potent action film that concludes Christopher Nolan's franchise in spectacular fashion.
Synopsis: It has been eight years since Batman (Christian Bale), in collusion with Commissioner Gordon (Gary Oldman), vanished into the night.... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Nolan

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 92524%
Critics Consensus: Exquisitely illustrated by master animator Miyazaki, Howl's Moving Castle will delight children with its fantastical story and touch the hearts and minds of older viewers as well.
Synopsis: Sophie (Emily Mortimer) has an uneventful life at her late father's hat shop, but all that changes when she befriends... [More]
Directed By: Hayao Miyazaki

#8

The Big Short (2015)
89%

#8
Adjusted Score: 101793%
Critics Consensus: The Big Short approaches a serious, complicated subject with an impressive attention to detail -- and manages to deliver a well-acted, scathingly funny indictment of its real-life villains in the bargain.
Synopsis: In 2008, Wall Street guru Michael Burry realizes that a number of subprime home loans are in danger of defaulting.... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#7

3:10 to Yuma (2007)
89%

#7
Adjusted Score: 97742%
Critics Consensus: This remake of a classic Western improves on the original, thanks to fiery performances from Russell Crowe and Christian Bale as well as sharp direction from James Mangold.
Synopsis: Outlaw Ben Wade (Russell Crowe) terrorizes 1800s Arizona, especially the Southern Railroad, until he is finally captured. Wade must be... [More]
Directed By: James Mangold

#6

Rescue Dawn (2006)
90%

#6
Adjusted Score: 94175%
Critics Consensus: Director Werner Herzog has once again made a compelling tale of man versus nature, and Christian Bale completely immerses himself in the role of fighter pilot (and prisoner of war) Dieter Dengler.
Synopsis: During the Vietnam War, Dieter Dengler (Christian Bale), a U.S. fighter pilot, is shot down over Laos and taken captive... [More]
Directed By: Werner Herzog

#5

The Fighter (2010)
91%

#5
Adjusted Score: 99782%
Critics Consensus: Led by a trio of captivating performances from Mark Wahlberg, Christian Bale, and Amy Adams, The Fighter is a solidly entertaining, albeit predictable, entry in the boxing drama genre.
Synopsis: For Micky Ward (Mark Wahlberg), boxing is a family affair. His tough-as-nails mother is his manager. His half-brother, Dicky (Christian... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#4

Little Women (1994)
93%

#4
Adjusted Score: 94167%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a powerhouse lineup of talented actresses, Gillian Armstrong's take on Louisa May Alcott's Little Women proves that a timeless story can succeed no matter how many times it's told.
Synopsis: In this 1994 adaptation of Louisa May Alcott's classic, the March sisters confront growing pains, financial shortages, family tragedies and... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#3

American Hustle (2013)
92%

#3
Adjusted Score: 103253%
Critics Consensus: Riotously funny and impeccably cast, American Hustle compensates for its flaws with unbridled energy and some of David O. Russell's most irrepressibly vibrant direction.
Synopsis: Irving Rosenfeld (Christian Bale) dabbles in forgery and loan-sharking, but when he falls for fellow grifter Sydney Prosser (Amy Adams),... [More]
Directed By: David O. Russell

#2

Ford v Ferrari (2019)
92%

#2
Adjusted Score: 114298%
Critics Consensus: Ford v Ferrari delivers all the polished auto action audiences will expect -- and balances it with enough gripping human drama to satisfy non-racing enthusiasts.
Synopsis: American automotive designer Carroll Shelby and fearless British race car driver Ken Miles battle corporate interference, the laws of physics... [More]
Directed By: James Mangold

#1

The Dark Knight (2008)
94%

#1
Adjusted Score: 107468%
Critics Consensus: Dark, complex, and unforgettable, The Dark Knight succeeds not just as an entertaining comic book film, but as a richly thrilling crime saga.
Synopsis: With the help of allies Lt. Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) and DA Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart), Batman (Christian Bale) has... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Nolan

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(Photo by Wilson Webb / © The Weinstein Company / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Cate Blanchett Movies Ranked

It’s been a few years since Cate Blanchett’s had an Oscar nomination — don’t you think it’s time again? Ever since Blanchett’s international breakthrough — 1998’s Elizabeth, which got her nominated for her first Best Actress nod — she’s been a regular fixture at the Dolby Theater for the Oscar ceremonies, where she’s frequently recognized for the good-humored elegance she brings to her most iconic roles. She was double-nominated in 2008 for I’m Not There and Elizabeth: The Golden Age, while 2005 and 2014 got her Oscar wins for The Aviator and Blue Jasmine, respectively.

Blanchett got her start in native Australia, where steady stage and television roles eventually landed her in films Paradise Road and Oscar and Lucinda, both 1997 releases. It was only a year later that Elizabeth put her on the road to household name status, which was followed up with a mix of comedies (Pushing Tin), literary thrillers (Talented Mr. Ripley), and dramas (Charlotte Gray). Blanchett’s brief but highly memorable appearances as Galadriel in Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy meant fanboy cineaste goodwill for decades to come. Roles in the likes of Indiana Jones, Thor: Ragnarok, and The Aviator are just more on top.

Blanchett teams up with director Richard Linklater for Where’d You Go, Bernadette, based on the best-seller about an agoraphobic woman who goes missing. Is another awards contender imminent? Or is this something to show up on an “underrated gems” list on the internet somewhere in the future? Before we find out, we’re ranking Cate Blanchett’s best movies (and her worst) by Tomatometer!

#48
#48
Adjusted Score: 40977%
Critics Consensus: Its intentions are noble and its cast is impressive, but neither can compensate for The Monuments Men's stiffly nostalgic tone and curiously slack narrative.
Synopsis: During World War II, the Nazis steal countless pieces of art and hide them away. Some over-the-hill art scholars, historians,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#47

Charlotte Gray (2001)
33%

#47
Adjusted Score: 34993%
Critics Consensus: A dull adaptation of Sebastian Faulk's novel despite gorgeous cinematography and Cate Blanchett's best efforts.
Synopsis: This is a drama set in Nazi-occupied France at the height of World War II. Charlotte Gray tells the compelling... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#46

The Good German (2006)
34%

#46
Adjusted Score: 39241%
Critics Consensus: Though Steven Soderbergh succeeds in emulating the glossy look of 1940s noirs, The Good German ultimately ends up as a self-conscious exercise in style that forgets to develop compelling characters.
Synopsis: Jake Geismar (George Clooney), an Army correspondent, helps his former lover, Lena Brandt (Cate Blanchett), comb post-World War II Berlin... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 40991%
Critics Consensus: This sequel is full of lavish costumes and elaborate sets, but lacks the heart and creativity of the original Elizabeth
Synopsis: Queen Elizabeth I (Cate Blanchett) faces threats to her rule from abroad and at home. Determined to restore England to... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: 36095%
Critics Consensus: The storyline is overwrought and awkward, and the audience is distanced from the flatly drawn characters.
Synopsis: A Russian Jewish girl (Christina Ricci) is separated from her father in 1927 and escapes to England, where she's rechristened... [More]
Directed By: Sally Potter

#43

Robin Hood (2010)
43%

#43
Adjusted Score: 51693%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott's revisionist take on this oft-told tale offers some fine acting and a few gripping action sequences, but it's missing the thrill of adventure that made Robin Hood a legend in the first place.
Synopsis: After the death of Richard the Lion-Hearted, a skilled archer named Robin Longstride (Russell Crowe) travels to Nottingham, where villagers... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#42

Song to Song (2017)
44%

#42
Adjusted Score: 52287%
Critics Consensus: As visually sumptuous as it is narratively spartan, Terrence Malick's Song to Song echoes elements of the writer-director's recent work -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Set against the Austin, Texas, music scene, two entangled couples -- struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling),... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#41
Adjusted Score: 60537%
Critics Consensus: Where'd You Go, Bernadette offers dispiriting proof that a talented director, bestselling source material, and terrific cast can add up to far less than the sum of their parts.
Synopsis: Former architect Bernadette Fox seems to have it all -- a beautiful home in Seattle, a successful and loving husband,... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#40

Knight of Cups (2015)
47%

#40
Adjusted Score: 57170%
Critics Consensus: Knight of Cups finds Terrence Malick delving deeper into the painterly visual milieu he's explored in recent efforts, but even hardcore fans may struggle with the diminishing narrative returns.
Synopsis: A Los Angeles screenwriter (Christian Bale) indulges his wild side with a stripper (Teresa Palmer), a model (Freida Pinto) and... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#39

Paradise Road (1997)
45%

#39
Adjusted Score: 45645%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A group of foreign women -- including an educated British musician (Glenn Close), an Australian nurse (Cate Blanchett) and an... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#38

Pushing Tin (1999)
48%

#38
Adjusted Score: 49446%
Critics Consensus: Solid performances by the leads, but the generic ending needs help.
Synopsis: Two air traffic controllers (John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton) who thrive on living dangerously compete to outdo each other on... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#37

Veronica Guerin (2003)
53%

#37
Adjusted Score: 56576%
Critics Consensus: Cate Blanchett gives another great performance in a movie that doesn't shed much light on its title character.
Synopsis: In this true story, Veronica Guerin (Cate Blanchett) is an investigative reporter for an Irish newspaper. As the drug trade... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: 58924%
Critics Consensus: Though solidly made and acted, The Shipping News is rather heavy-handed and dull, especially given the nature of its protagonist.
Synopsis: Traces one man's extraordinary journey toward self -discovery when he returns to his ancestral home on the coast of Newfoundland.... [More]
Directed By: Lasse Hallström

#35
Adjusted Score: 64301%
Critics Consensus: Much like the titular oceanographer, The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou's overt irony may come off as smug and artificial -- but for fans of Wes Anderson's unique brand of whimsy it might be worth the dive.
Synopsis: Renowned oceanographer Steve Zissou (Bill Murray) has sworn vengeance upon the rare shark that devoured a member of his crew.... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#34

The Gift (2000)
57%

#34
Adjusted Score: 61406%
Critics Consensus: With a reported budget of around 10 million, The Gift is obviously a labor of love for those involved. Unfortunately, the A-list cast can't prevent the movie from becoming a by-the-numbers whodunit with an ending that's all but unsatisfactory.
Synopsis: In the tiny town of Brixton, Georgia where nothing is private, a woman with supernatural clairvoyance, a young beautiful socialite... [More]
Directed By: Sam Raimi

#33

The Missing (2003)
58%

#33
Adjusted Score: 63832%
Critics Consensus: An expertly acted and directed Western. But like other Ron Howard features, the movie is hardly subtle.
Synopsis: When rancher and single mother of two Maggie Gilkeson (Cate Blanchett) sees her teenage daughter, Lily (Evan Rachel Wood), kidnapped... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#32
Adjusted Score: 70453%
Critics Consensus: Though somewhat overwhelmed by its own spectacle, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies ends Peter Jackson's second Middle-earth trilogy on a reasonably satisfying note.
Synopsis: Having reclaimed Erebor and vast treasure from the dragon Smaug, Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) sacrifices friendship and honor in seeking... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#31

Truth (2015)
63%

#31
Adjusted Score: 69114%
Critics Consensus: Truth's terrific cast and compelling message are often enough to overcome its occasionally didactic and facile dramatization of a nuanced real-life tale.
Synopsis: Controversy surrounds CBS anchor Dan Rather (Robert Redford) and "60 Minutes" producer Mary Mapes (Cate Blanchett) after the network broadcasts... [More]
Directed By: James Vanderbilt

#30

Bandits (2001)
64%

#30
Adjusted Score: 69236%
Critics Consensus: The story may not warrant its lengthy running time, but the cast of Bandits makes it an enjoyable ride.
Synopsis: Joe (Bruce Willis) and Terry (Billy Bob Thornton) have escaped from prison. Cutting a swath from Oregon through California, these... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 67947%
Critics Consensus: Episodes vary in quality, but overall this talky film is quirkily engaging.
Synopsis: This 11-vignette film focuses on the human interactions that happen while partaking in the everyday indulgence of coffee and cigarettes.... [More]
Directed By: Jim Jarmusch

#28
Adjusted Score: 77362%
Critics Consensus: Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is an earnest, visually resplendent trip, but the film's deliberate pace robs the material of some of its majesty.
Synopsis: Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) lives a simple life with his fellow hobbits in the shire, until the wizard Gandalf (Ian... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: 67467%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After a childhood of abuse by his evangelistic father, misfit Oscar Hopkins (Ralph Fiennes) becomes an Anglican minister and develops... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#26
Adjusted Score: 78135%
Critics Consensus: An entertaining PG detour for gore maestro Eli Roth, The House with a Clock in Its Walls is a family-friendly blend of humor and horror with an infectious sense of fun.
Synopsis: Ten-year-old Lewis goes to live with his oddball uncle in a creaky old house that contains a mysterious ticktock noise.... [More]
Directed By: Eli Roth

#25

Babel (2006)
69%

#25
Adjusted Score: 77718%
Critics Consensus: In Babel, there are no villains, only victims of fate and circumstance. Director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu weaves four of their woeful stories into this mature and multidimensional film.
Synopsis: An accident connects four groups of people on three different continents: two young Moroccan goatherds, a vacationing American couple (Brad... [More]

#24

Ocean's 8 (2018)
69%

#24
Adjusted Score: 90321%
Critics Consensus: Ocean's 8 isn't quite as smooth as its predecessors, but still has enough cast chemistry and flair to lift the price of a ticket from filmgoers up for an undemanding caper.
Synopsis: Five years, eight months, 12 days and counting -- that's how long Debbie Ocean has been devising the biggest heist... [More]
Directed By: Gary Ross

#23
Adjusted Score: 81612%
Critics Consensus: Curious Case of Benjamin Button is an epic fantasy tale with rich storytelling backed by fantastic performances.
Synopsis: Born under unusual circumstances, Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) springs into being as an elderly man in a New Orleans nursing... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#22

Hanna (2011)
71%

#22
Adjusted Score: 80124%
Critics Consensus: Fantastic acting and crisply choreographed action sequences propel this unique, cool take on the revenge thriller.
Synopsis: Raised by her father (Eric Bana) in the Finnish wilderness, teenage Hanna (Saoirse Ronan) has trained all her life to... [More]
Directed By: Joe Wright

#21
Adjusted Score: 83238%
Critics Consensus: While still slightly hamstrung by "middle chapter" narrative problems and its formidable length, The Desolation of Smaug represents a more confident, exciting second chapter for the Hobbit series.
Synopsis: Having survived the first part of their unsettling journey, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) and his companions (Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage)... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#20

I'm Not There (2007)
77%

#20
Adjusted Score: 83263%
Critics Consensus: I'm Not There's unique editing, visuals, and multiple talented actors portraying Bob Dylan make for a deliciously unconventional experience. Each segment brings a new and fresh take on Dylan's life.
Synopsis: Several actors portray legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan at different stages in his personal life and career. In 1959 a guitar-strumming... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#19
Adjusted Score: 88420%
Critics Consensus: Though the plot elements are certainly familiar, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull still delivers the thrills and Harrison Ford's return in the title role is more than welcome.
Synopsis: It's the height of the Cold War, and famous archaeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), returning from his latest adventure, finds... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#18

Elizabeth (1998)
83%

#18
Adjusted Score: 85074%
Critics Consensus: No mere historical drama, Elizabeth is a rich, suspenseful journey into the heart of British Royal politics, and features a typically outstanding performance from Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: Elizabeth Tudor (Cate Blanchett) becomes queen of a divided and dangerous England in 1558. She is roundly perceived as weak... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 88838%
Critics Consensus: With Matt Damon's unsettling performance offering a darkly twisted counterpoint to Anthony Minghella's glossy direction, The Talented Mr. Ripley is a suspense thriller that lingers.
Synopsis: To be young and carefree amid the blue waters and idyllic landscape of sun-drenched Italy in the late 1950s; that's... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Minghella

#16
Adjusted Score: 84536%
Critics Consensus: It doesn't quite live up to its marvelously lurid premise, but The Galapagos Affair is still stranger than fiction in a very entertaining way.
Synopsis: Dr. Fredrich Ritter and his lover Dore Strauch have their idyllic lives on an island invaded by a baroness and... [More]
Directed By: Dan Geller, Dayna Goldfine

#15

An Ideal Husband (1999)
85%

#15
Adjusted Score: 85880%
Critics Consensus: Brevity is the soul of wit, eh? This adaptation gets to the nitty gritty of Wilde's stage piece and plays on eternal human foibles.
Synopsis: Sir Robert Chiltern (Jeremy Northam) is a respected government official and a loving husband. His friend, Lord Arthur Goring (Rupert... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Parker

#14

Cinderella (2015)
84%

#14
Adjusted Score: 93476%
Critics Consensus: Refreshingly traditional in a revisionist era, Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella proves Disney hasn't lost any of its old-fashioned magic.
Synopsis: After her father unexpectedly dies, young Ella (Lily James) finds herself at the mercy of her cruel stepmother (Cate Blanchett)... [More]
Directed By: Kenneth Branagh

#13

The Turning (2013)
86%

#13
Adjusted Score: 85254%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Eighteen of Australian author Tim Winton's short stories.... [More]

#12

The Aviator (2004)
86%

#12
Adjusted Score: 93426%
Critics Consensus: With a rich sense of period detail, The Aviator succeeds thanks to typically assured direction from Martin Scorsese and a strong performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, who charts Howard Hughes' descent from eccentric billionaire to reclusive madman.
Synopsis: Billionaire and aviation tycoon Howard Hughes (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a successful public figure: a director of big-budget Hollywood films such... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 94378%
Critics Consensus: In this sharp psychological thriller, Judi Dench and Cate Blanchett give fierce, memorable performances as two schoolteachers locked in a battle of wits.
Synopsis: Barbara Covett (Judi Dench), a veteran teacher at St. George's, senses a kindred spirit in Sheba Hart (Cate Blanchett), the... [More]
Directed By: Richard Eyre

#10

Little Fish (2005)
90%

#10
Adjusted Score: 89381%
Critics Consensus: Fueled by powerful work from a strong cast led by Cate Blanchett, Little Fish is a hard-hitting story worth watching -- and a major step forward for director Rowan Woods.
Synopsis: Four years clean, video store manager Tracy (Cate Blanchett) lives quietly, avoiding anything that might trigger a heroin relapse. Her... [More]
Directed By: Rowan Woods

#9
Adjusted Score: 100587%
Critics Consensus: Full of eye-popping special effects, and featuring a pitch-perfect cast, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring brings J.R.R. Tolkien's classic to vivid life.
Synopsis: The future of civilization rests in the fate of the One Ring, which has been lost for centuries. Powerful forces... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#8

Blue Jasmine (2013)
91%

#8
Adjusted Score: 99899%
Critics Consensus: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine finds the director in peak late-period form -- and benefiting from a superb cast led by Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: After her marriage to a wealthy businessman (Alec Baldwin) collapses, New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) flees to San Francisco... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#7
Adjusted Score: 105855%
Critics Consensus: The rare trilogy capper that really works, How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World brings its saga to a visually dazzling and emotionally affecting conclusion.
Synopsis: When the sudden appearance of a female Light Fury coincides with the darkest threat their village has ever faced, Hiccup... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois

#6

Ponyo (2008)
91%

#6
Adjusted Score: 96828%
Critics Consensus: While not Miyazaki's best film, Ponyo is a visually stunning fairy tale that's a sweetly poetic treat for children of all ages.
Synopsis: During a forbidden excursion to see the surface world, a goldfish princess encounters a human boy named Sosuke, who gives... [More]
Directed By: Hayao Miyazaki

#5
Adjusted Score: 98830%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, emotionally resonant, and beautifully animated, How to Train Your Dragon 2 builds on its predecessor's successes just the way a sequel should.
Synopsis: Five years have passed since Hiccup and Toothless united the dragons and Vikings of Berk. Now, they spend their time... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois, Tom Owens

#4
Adjusted Score: 102798%
Critics Consensus: Visually breathtaking and emotionally powerful, The Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King is a moving and satisfying conclusion to a great trilogy.
Synopsis: The culmination of nearly 10 years' work and conclusion to Peter Jackson's epic trilogy based on the timeless J.R.R. Tolkien... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#3

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
93%

#3
Adjusted Score: 126308%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, funny, and above all fun, Thor: Ragnarok is a colorful cosmic adventure that sets a new standard for its franchise -- and the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
Synopsis: Imprisoned on the other side of the universe, the mighty Thor finds himself in a deadly gladiatorial contest that pits... [More]
Directed By: Taika Waititi

#2

Carol (2015)
94%

#2
Adjusted Score: 106076%
Critics Consensus: Shaped by Todd Haynes' deft direction and powered by a strong cast led by Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, Carol lives up to its groundbreaking source material.
Synopsis: Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) spots the beautiful, elegant Carol (Cate Blanchett) perusing the doll displays in a 1950s Manhattan department... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#1
Adjusted Score: 103668%
Critics Consensus: The Two Towers balances spectacular action with emotional storytelling, leaving audiences both wholly satisfied and eager for the final chapter.
Synopsis: The sequel to the Golden Globe-nominated and AFI Award-winning "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," "The... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

This week, Chadwick Boseman stars in Marshall, a new drama chronicling an early case in the career of Thurgood Marshall, the man who would become the first African-American US Supreme Court Justice and preside over several milestone cases, including Brown v. Board of Education. To mark the occasion, we’ve put together a list of 10 more films about Americans whose monumental accomplishments and lasting legacies have impacted the country in immeasurable ways.

Director Oren Moverman worked as a screenwriter before making his feature debut with 2009’s The Messenger, a moving, well-received war drama that garnered Oscar nominations both for his screenplay and supporting actor Woody Harrelson. This week, Moverman reunites with Harrelson for Rampart, in which the actor plays an unstable Los Angeles cop whose life unravels after he’s caught on tape beating a suspect. Playing deliberately with audience expectations of the genre, Moverman and Harrelson (working from an original draft by James Ellroy) craft a character piece that begins as a crime drama and gradually dismantles the reality of its world as the paranoia escalates. We sat down with the director recently to talk about the film and his collaboration with Harrelson.


What drew you to this as your next project after The Messenger?

Oren Moverman: Well I was basically brought in to work on a James Ellroy first draft of Rampart, and my job was to prepare the script for somebody to direct it — not necessarily me; that wasn’t even talked about. He wrote a very ambitious, huge script, and I had to streamline it and make the leaner version of what he was doing. In the process I was offered the directing and so the writing process became more intense. It never really stopped through pre-production and production and post-production; we always kept working on it and changing it and making it better, hopefully — we treated it as something that was constantly evolving until we locked it into the structure that is the film.

There are certain things that carry through thematically from The Messenger. Did you write them into the script, or were they in the Ellroy draft?

Well, we didn’t really work together. Once I started working on the script he gave me notes and things like that, but we never really turned it back to him to write, because you have contracts and things that you have to take into consideration. I wasn’t aware of the things that were naturally continuing from The Messenger; I think that there was nothing intentional in it. There were certain themes and certain kinds of characters that sometimes had similar backgrounds, and of course there’s the military thing, though it was a smaller element this time; it’s another movie about a guy in uniform and the emotional whirlwind that he goes through. So there’s definitely a connection, whether I acknowledge it or not.

Were you looking to work with Woody Harrelson again after The Messenger?

Yeah. I mean, that wasn’t as planned, as well. Ben [Foster] and I have a company together and we were developing things and trying to get things going, and when this came around we talked about it and said this is a good project for our company to do. So there was definitely an intention of working with Ben again in any capacity. Woody was just a natural idea. The character just felt like a natural for him to get into and interpret. And obviously we’re all good friends and we have a way of communicating that’s shorthand, so it felt very natural to just keep going with this team.

Woody apparently expressed discomfort with playing a police officer. What was it about him made you think he could do it?

Well he wasn’t comfortable with the idea of playing a soldier either [in The Messenger] and I think that’s the most interesting thing for me — taking an actor who’s that talented out of his comfort zone, or what he perceives to be his comfort zone, and giving him a challenge in proving to himself that the can be that character. I think it gets a lot more out of him, and that’s been the process. I think if I had roles that read like “Woody Harrelson roles” off the page, whatever that means, it would be a lot less interesting.

What is it about your relationship that works so well?

I think it’s that we established a lot of trust. It wasn’t there from the beginning. When you start working with people for the first time, there’s always this period of testing each other and earning respect, and we earned each others’ respect. I think that once we learned, on The Messenger, to trust each other, it was very easy to translate that into a different kind of character and still very safe to experiment to get lost in the scenes, and to fail sometimes, and to come up with new ideas. It was just a very dynamic way of working together. And Woody, who claims to love rehearsing and all that kind of stuff, is actually a quick-thinking, great improviser, and we definitely used that in the movie.

The corrupt cop is one of movies’ more well-worn staples, and James Ellroy has written them before, but this sets out to be a different kind of take — a man imploding. Were you consciously trying to redefine the archetype?

Not redefine but deconstruct it and sort of reconfigure it for the purpose of this movie, by concentrating less on plot as something that needs to be resolved, and concentrating more on character and on observations of behavior, and his movements through these situations and who he is — really giving that the emphasis over a neatly packaged narrative that comes to a resolution and you walk away with that satisfaction of “It’s all figured out and it’s this guy’s fault or that guy’s fault.” By keeping it more abstract and by constructing a movie that hopefully surprises you. I do think that one of the goals we set out for ourselves was to have a movie that cuts to a place that you don’t see coming, and that it keeps you guessing and keeps you involved and keeps you seduced by a very complicated character. Hopefully by the time you’re done with it you have your thoughts and observations on this character and then he loses us, as the audience, and we lose him, and we’re just in his head. We walk away with that, and hopefully that will spark certain conversations that are not so much about “I didn’t see that coming,” “I didn’t believe that guy was the actual murderer” or anything like that; instead of that you’re forced to think about who he was, and whether you liked him or not, whether you felt compassion for it — the kind that becomes a human conversation, rather than about plot.

By the end he’s become almost a voyeur on his own life. With such a heightened, subjective angle to the film, how does that affect how you direct the performance on set?

It’s hard to describe. It’s setting the environment, you know — creating a space where you can be comfortable and present and be connected enough to the other characters to carry that through. It’s really kind of a mysterious thing. There’s no rulebook for it. We’d come up with certain ideas about how to choreograph scenes, and a lot of it has to do with the fact that we don?t choreograph them; that we understand the space and we understand what’s expected of the scenes. I don’t tell an actor where he needs to stand or what he needs to do while he’s standing there. There are things that evolve and things that come from the script. But overall the unrehearsed nature of it forces somebody who’s that good to be in the character throughout the entire scene, and to really find new things and keep evolving with them. So I think it’s just enriching every scene as much as possible — and then we pick the best takes. [Laughs]

Did you have discussions as to whether you thought the character was actually crazy? There was a point where I thought Ned Beatty’s character may have been a construct of Woody’s imagination, because you never really see him interact with anyone else.

Absolutely, yeah. We talked a lot about paranoia, and male fantasies, and we researched some of that stuff and spoke to a few people about it.

Did you speak to people on the police force?

Yeah.

And it’s a thing that genuinely happens?

Yeah. As you can imagine. There’s the paranoia. And then I spoke with a shrink about how that paranoia can manifest itself and the delusions and the fact that you start blaming everyone around you and the fact that you start seeing things that are not there; I think that’s very much how the movie is constructed. There’s a certain point in the movie where, to me, it feels like I can’t trust the movie anymore, because I’m so much in his point of view that I’m not sure what is really happening and what he’s imagining. And you’re absolutely right — the Ned character could be a total figment of his imagination. It’s a great way of looking at it. When you’re in tune with the character you can definitely imagine that these things are just all happening in his head and there’s nothing you can trust. That’s the thing about paranoia, or that mode of behavior, which is almost like a teenager — you lash out at everyone and blame everyone. It’s this kind of mad state of being and I think that’s where he’s at. And we talked about how to achieve that without going over the top or over-dramatizing it.

Did you develop an interest in the splintering of identity having written [Todd Haynes’ Bob Dylan “biopic”] I’m Not There?

[Laughs] It’s close to me as a person. I don’t think that we’re the same person all the time. I think that we’re different people in our reactions to other people and sometimes to ourselves, and I think that he definitely has two worlds that he defined in a very clear way — or what he thought were very clear definitions. He thought he was keeping them separate and there’s nothing to connect those two worlds, not really paying attention the fact that he’s the connection, and he carries one world into another until everything kind of collapses around him. I do think that I’m Not There, if there’s anything in it, it’s the idea of contradictions — people in general are a series of contradictions and they act out their contradictions, and that’s kind of what’s interesting for me to watch in a character like this.

How did the character’s crumbling identity inform your directing, editing and sound choices? Compared to The Messenger the style here is a lot more adventurous. Did you feel more confident as a director?

It’s not a matter of confidence, it’s a matter of taking your cues from the script. On The Messenger it was very clear to me, and I spoke about it at the beginning, that we had to get out of the way of the movie. Its subject matter was so delicate and so tied to reality that all we could do was show respect, and the respect that I was thinking about was just being very restrained and not showing off or doing anything that says “Hey, look what we can do with the camera” but rather capturing things in a very elegant — if that’s the word — way and not accentuating the filmmaking. And then you look at something like Rampart and the script is telling you that it’s an extreme story about an extreme character, and the first thing that comes to my mind is the thought of extremes: extreme angles and an extreme look and a sort of shooting style and saturation and color contrast and all those things. It felt like much more of a cut-up movie, because it was a cut-up character who was a lot of different things at the same time. So I try to respond to what the material is saying. I don’t try to impose a style onto what I think the material is. I try to learn from the material what style is appropriate.

The sound design in the film is very effective.

I could put a lot of work into the sound — thanks. Yeah, I worked with Leslie Shatz.

He does such great work on Gus van Sant’s stuff.

Yeah, he’s brilliant. We had a lot of fun with sound. I think sound is kind of like a separate script we write after we finish shooting the movie. There’s a whole world of sound that creates more texture and information in the move that just makes it better.

You’re writing the screenplay for the Brian Wilson biopic. Will it be anything like I’m Not There?

It won’t be a similar approach.

That has to be a tough life to take on.

Absolutely. But fascinating and full of interesting episodes and chapters. I often think about that genre and what’s an interesting way to subvert it, and find different ways into it — especially when you have music and you have that as your driving force. So all those things add up. Things that you try to use as an experience for the next time.


Rampart opens in theaters this week.


Microsoft comments on rumors that they’ll be putting Blu-Ray players in Xbox 360s and the MPAA’s best anti-piracy agents have bounties on their heads. Read more of this week’s DVD news, plus find out what’s new in stores!


This week in DVD news:

Format Wars: Episode II

Microsoft has denied a recent rumor that they’d be putting Blu-Ray players into their Xbox 360 consoles following Blu-Ray’s victory over HD-DVD in the format wars of 2008. Too bad, because the debunked rumor sparked the salivary glands of next-gen home entertainment nuts worldwide when it broke last week via the Chinese-language Economic Daily News. For now, Xbox 360 owners will have to make do with their in-console HD-DVD players — but hey, at least HD-DVDs will go on sale soon!

Then again, Blu-Ray releases are looking sweeter and sweeter as former HD-DVD supporters Paramount and Universal start catching up their slates. Coming soon from Paramount are catalog titles Face/Off, Next, and Bee Movie (all May 20), with recent releases Cloverfield and There Will be Blood following shortly (June 3). The Spiderwick Chronicles will be their first day-and-date Blu-Ray release on June 24.

Likewise, Universal has announced that their first day-and-date release will be Neil Marshall’s Doomsday, hitting shelves in DVD and Blu-Ray on July 29.

Format Wars: Episode III?

Perhaps the HD-DVD-Blu-Ray squabble was small potatoes compared to what’s on the horizon: downloadable viewing vs. DVD. (Duh-duh-duhhhhhhhhn!) Lobbying the first volley in a sure-to-be skirmish was Apple, who announced last week that new releases would now be available for purchase and download to iTunes, superseding the need for physical DVDs. Somewhere, Blockbuster execs are weeping, free microwaveable popcorn in hand.

In happier news for DVD executives, Malaysian forces “smashed” an illicit DVD-pirating ring last week, destroying an operation that could have yielded “seven million pirated discs, potentially generating criminal revenues of more than US$22 million,” and arresting all three (three!) men running the joint. Long live legitimate DVD production! In a separate article, such busts are credited to two crack MPAA agents in particular: a pair of black Labradors named Lucky and Flo. The two DVD-sniffing dogs are so good that they’ve had doggie hits put out on them to the tune of $30,000, reports the Houston Chronicle.

Newly Announced

South Park: The 11th Season hits DVD August 12 — you know the one. The season with Guitar Hero! In the spirit of the episode called “Guitar Queer-o,” the Comedy Central release will reportedly come with all-uncensored episodes and three downloadable Rock Band songs.


DigitalBits names the best titles of 2007, with the Blade Runner: 5-Disc Collector’s Edition taking top honors. (Watch it in Blu-Ray/HD for details remastered with pinpoint precision.)

— Mark your calendars for September’s release of the most so-wrong-it’s-hilarious show on TV: It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Season 3. The three-disc release with all 15 episodes will retail for $39.98 and include 3 featurettes, a gag reel, two episode commentaries, and more.

— In the market for DVDs of your favorite shows not yet released on DVD? LA Times Gold Derby blogger Tom O’Neill has taken time off of waging war against LA film critics to play consumer guide for shoppers. He’s got the skinny on Emmy screeners for sale on EBay for such hot television shows as Entourage, the complete TNT/TCM/TBS slate, and The Closer, which sold to the highest bidder for $7.49 in cool, hard, Paypal dollars. Read more here.

Finally, drool over this piece of DVD swag: a desktop-sized bust of Christian Bale as Batman to be packaged with the Blu-Ray version of Batman Begins…but only in Japan. (Via Gizmodo.)

Click for this week’s new releases!

I’m Not There


Tomatometer: 77%

Fans of the unusual should delight in Todd Haynes’ experimental casting of six different actors as American icon Bob Dylan; in the edgiest move of all, he cast a woman (Cate Blanchett) to play Dylan in his electric era, a performance so daring it earned her an Oscar nod. How audacious!

Bonus Features:

The Weinstein Co. has given us the gift of the 2-disc release, and we should all be very grateful. On the first disc, jump to select songs in the flick complete with on-screen lyrics (Dylan is, like, such a poet) and hear Haynes’ in-depth commentary. Then pop in disc #2 for an I’m Not There bonanza, including an unreleased 18-minute flashcard trailer, a la “Subterranean Homesick Blues”; a tribute to Heath Ledger; Ben Whishaw and Marcus Carl Franklin’s audition tapes; and the Dylanology guide to all things Bob Dylan.

Over Her Dead Body



Tomatometer: 13%

Eva Longoria’s first major jump from Desperate Housewives to the big screen was a critical and commercial dud in February — but hey, you can rent/buy it this week on DVD! After all, with summer blockbuster season kicking off (thanks, Iron Man!) you probably need a quiet night in, and a romantic comedy about a dead bridezilla haunting her ex on earth sounds like just the thing to hit the spot…

Bonus Features:

Over Her Dead Body boasts both a widescreen version and a full screen version. Silly me, you wanted bonus features — okay, first, you’ve got a widescreen version of the film… and then there’s also a full-screen version. Of the same film. And nothing else.


P.S. I Love You


Tomatometer: 20%

A romantic comedy starring Hilary Swank? Yeah, right. The former Next Karate Kid — and, yes, two-time Oscar-winner — makes for the genre’s perhaps most ill-suited lead as a widow getting motivational letters from her dead husband (Gerard Butler).

Bonus Features:

What could be worse than actually watching P.S. I Love You? Watching a music video by James Blunt (one of a few extras on the release).


First Sunday

Tomatometer: 15%

The man formerly known as O’Shea Jackson (rapper-turned-urban comedy fixture Ice Cube) here scores his fourth rotten movie in a row, to which we say, for shame, Mr. Cube. You can do better. Even with SNL’s Tracey Morgan and dapper-haired comedian Katt Williams in tow, the comedy about church-thieving losers earned too little laughs from critics. Then again, it also stars Flavor of Love‘s New York (Tiffany Pollard) in her first movie role…so it was good for something.

Bonus Features:

There’s actually a lot here, including outtakes, a pop-up trivia viewing option, and commentary from first-time writer-director David E. Talbert. Disc also includes the unusual treat of Talbert’s on-set wrap speech.


Teeth

Tomatometer: 79%

Daring in a way only indie films seem to be these days, Teeth brings the urban legend of the vagina dentata to the screen. What is vagina dentata? If you have to ask, maybe you shouldn’t watch this horror comedy — which if you haven’t guessed, is rated R. Pic stars newcomer Jess Weixler and the kid from Nip/Tuck.

Bonus Features:

Director Mitchell Lichtenstein’s commentary should prove most insightful. Fun fact: He’s also an actor (he played Simon, the gay boyfriend in The Wedding Banquet) and is the son of pop artist Roy Lichtenstein.


The Hottie & the Nottie

Tomatometer: 5%

Shocking as it is, the latest star vehicle for Paris Hilton did not strike gold with critics. We could count the number of critics who gave it a fresh review on, well, three fingers. The tale of a hot girl and her disgusting BFF made $1,301,176 to date — which leaves a little over $7.6 million to go if it’s going to make up its losses in home video sales.

Bonus Features:

In the disc’s most distinctive extra, Paris Hilton puts makeup on lead actor Joel David Moore. We’d rather eat paint chips for two hours.

Cate Blanchett in I'm Not ThereThe nominations for the 2008 Movie Extra FILMINK Awards, taking place in Sydney and televised nationally on Movie Extra on March 12th, have been announced.

The organisers have released the shortlist of good sorts, action-charged chases and the greatest hair from 2007 and have once again thrown the judging open to the general public.

Read on for the full list of nominations, or waste no time and click here to cast your vote.

Best Performance by an Aussie in an Overseas Movie
Cate BlanchettI’m Not There

Rose ByrneSunshine

Abbie CornishElizabeth: The Golden Age

Hugh JackmanThe Fountain

Naomi WattsEastern Promises

Best Blow-in
Brenda BlethynClubland
Joan ChenThe Home Song Stories
Ben Miller — Razzle Dazzle
Franka PotenteRomulus, My Father
Michael VartanRogue

Best Australian Newcomer

Emma Booth — Clubland
Matt Nable — The Final Winter
Kodi Smit-McPhee — Romulus, My Father
Andy Whitfield — Gabriel
Matthew Zeremes — Burke & Wills

Best Documentary

Bra Boys

Crazy Love
Forbidden Lies

Shut Up & Sing
Sicko

Best Sort
Jessica BielThe Illusionist
Gerard Butler300

Katherine HeiglKnocked Up
James McAvoyAtonement

Viggo MortensenEastern Promises

Best Chase Scene
Apocalypto
The Bourne Ultimatum

Death Proof
Die Hard 4.0

Superbad

Best Nude scene
Viggo Mortensen — Eastern Promises

Ray WinstoneBeowulf

Carice Van HoutenBlack Book

Malin AkermanThe Heartbreak Kid

Bart Simpson — The Simpsons Movie

Best Hair
Ashton Kutcher in Bobby

The entire cast of Dreamgirls

Jon Heder in Blades of Glory

Marge Simpson in The Simpsons Movie

John Travolta in Hairspray

Best Monster Movie
30 Days of Night

Beowulf

Black Sheep

The Host

Rogue

Best Musical
Across the Universe

Dreamgirls

Hairspray

Once

Tenacious D in:The Pick Of Destiny

It was missing the glitz and glitter of previous years, but the 65th annual Golden Globes were held via press conference yesterday, with Atonement, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, No Country for Old Men, and Sweeney Todd leading the crowd at two wins apiece.

Without cameras rolling, celebrities in attendance, or the winners on hand to collect their awards, the “ceremony” was over in 35 minutes (a length the producers might want to keep in mind for next year — we’re just saying). A list of the winners in the film categories follows below, with Tomatometers for each film in parentheses:

MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Atonement (83 percent)


American Gangster
(79 percent)

Eastern Promises
(88 percent)
The Great Debaters

Michael Clayton
(90 percent)
No Country
for Old Men
(95 percent)
There Will Be
Blood
(100 percent)

MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (86 percent)


Across the Universe
(52 percent)
Charlie
Wilson’s War
(92 percent)
Hairspray (92
percent)
Juno (92 percent)

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)


Cate Blanchett
,
Elizabeth: The Golden Age

(34 percent)
Jodie Foster,
The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie,
A Mighty Heart
(77 percent)
Keira
Knightley
, Atonement

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood (90 percent)


James McAvoy
, Atonement
Viggo
Mortensen
, Eastern Promises
Denzel
Washington
, American Gangster
George
Clooney
,
Michael Clayton

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Marion Cotillard, La Vie en rose (74 percent)


Ellen Page
, Juno
Amy Adams,
Enchanted (94
percent)
Nikki
Blonsky
, Hairspray
Helena
Bonham Carter
,
Sweeney Todd

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Johnny Depp,
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

Ryan Gosling
,
Lars
and the Real Girl
(78 percent)
Tom Hanks,
Charlie Wilson’s War

Philip
Seymour Hoffman
, The
Savages
(89 percent)
John C. Reilly,

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

Ratatouille (96 percent)

The
Simpsons Movie
(88 percent)
Bee Movie (52
percent)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

The Diving Bell And The Butterfly (94 percent)

The
Kite Runner
,
U.S. (65
percent)
Lust, Caution,
Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis,
France (100 percent)
4
Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
,
Romania (96 percent)

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE


Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)


Julia Roberts
, Charlie Wilson’s War
Saoirse Ronan,
Atonement
Amy Ryan,
Gone Baby Gone

(93 percent)
Tilda Swinton,
Michael Clayton

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE


Javier Bardem, No Country For Old Men (95 percent)

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War
John Travolta,
Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson,
Michael Clayton
Casey
Affleck
,

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
(75 percent)

DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

Julian Schnabel,
The Diving Bell And The Butterfly

Ridley Scott
, American Gangster
Joe Wright,
Atonement
Tim Burton,
Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and
Joel Coen,
No Country for Old Men

SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

Ethan Coen & Joel Coen,
No Country For Old Men

Christopher Hampton
, Atonement
Ronald Harwood,
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin,
Charlie Wilson’s War
Diablo
Cody
,
Juno

ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

Dario Marianelli,
Atonement

Howard Shore
, Eastern Promises
Michael
Brook
,
Kaki King
,
Eddie Vedder
,
Into the Wild
(82 percent)
Clint Eastwood,
Grace Is Gone
(70 percent)
Alberto
Iglesias
, The Kite Runner

ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE
“Guaranteed” from Into the Wild (82 percent), music & lyrics by Eddie Vedder
"That’s How You Know" from Enchanted
"Walk Hard" from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story
"Despedida"
from

Love in the Time of Cholera
(28 percent)
"Grace Is Gone" from
Grace Is Gone

Source: Variety

Just when you think awards season can’t get any awards-ier, here come two more sets of nominations!

First up, we have Film Independent’s Spirit Awards, which have earned the distinction of being granted a strike waiver from the Writers Guild of America. Rainn Wilson — otherwise known as Dwight Schrute on NBC’s The Office — will host and help write the ceremony, which airs on IFC February 23. As The Hollywood Reporter notes, this “raises the possibility that the informal Spirit ceremony, which takes place in a tent on the beach in Santa Monica, could upstage the 80th annual Academy Awards.” A partial list of the Spirit nominees follows, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Best Feature:
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (95 percent)
I’m Not There (81 percent)
Juno (94 percent)
A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Paranoid Park (62 percent)

Best Director:
Todd Haynes, I’m Not There (81 percent)
Tamara Jenkins, The Savages (89 percent)
Jason Reitman, Juno
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Gus Van Sant, Paranoid Park

Best Screenplay:
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Tamara Jenkins, The Savages
Fred Parnes & Andrew Wagner, Starting Out in the Evening (82 percent)
Adrienne Shelly, Waitress (89 percent)
Mike White, Year of the Dog (70 percent)

Best Female Lead:
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart
Sienna Miller, Interview (57 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno
Parker Posey, Broken English (63 percent)
Wei Tang, Lust, Caution (64 percent)

Best Supporting Female:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There
Anna Kendrick, Rocket Science (85 percent)
Jennifer Jason Leigh, Margot at the Wedding (56 percent)
Tamara Podemski, Four Sheets to the Wind (100 percent)
Marisa Tomei, Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (88 percent)

Best Male Lead:
Pedro Castaneda, August Evening
Don Cheadle, Talk to Me (81 percent)
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages
Tony Leung, Lust, Caution
Frank Langella, Starting Out in the Evening

Best Supporting Male:
Chiwetel Ejiofor, Talk to Me
Marcus Carl Franklin, I’m Not There
Kene Holliday, Great World of Sound (86 percent)
Irrfan Khan, The Namesake (85 percent)
Steve Zahn, Rescue Dawn (91 percent)

Best Cinematography:
Mott Hupfel, The Savages
Janusz Kaminski, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Milton Kam, Vanaja (81 percent)
Mihai Malaimare, Jr., Youth Without Youth (33 percent)
Rodrigo Prieto, Lust, Caution

Best Documentary:
Crazy Love (78 percent)
Lake of Fire (94 percent)
Manufactured Landscapes (83 percent)
The Monastery
The Prisoner Or: How I Planned to Kill Tony Blair (86 percent)

Best Foreign Film:
4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days (93 percent)
The Band’s Visit (100 percent)
Lady Chatterly (74 percent)
Once (98 percent)
Persepolis (97 percent)

Meanwhile, the nominees for the 14th annual SAG Awards — also granted a WGA waiver for its ceremony, set to take place January 27 at the Shrine Expo in Los Angeles — have been announced. Film nominees follow below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Male Actor in a Leading Role:
George Clooney, Michael Clayton (90 percent)
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood (93 percent)
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Emile Hirsch, Into The Wild (82 percent)
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises (88 percent)

Female Actor in a Leading Role:
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Julie Christie, Away From Her (94 percent)
Marion Cotillard, La Vie en Rose (74 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart
Ellen Page, Juno

Male Actor in a Supporting Role:
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
Hal Holbrook, Into the Wild
Tommy Lee Jones, No Country for Old Men
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

Female Actor in a Supprting Role:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There
Ruby Dee, American Gangster (79 percent)
Catherine Keener, Into the Wild
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

Ensemble Cast in a Motion Picture:
3:10 to Yuma (87 percent): Christian Bale, Russell Crowe, Peter Fonda, Gretchen Mol, Dallas Roberts, Vinessa Shaw, Ben Foster, Alan Tudyk, Logan Lerman

American Gangster: Armand Assante, Josh Brolin, Russell Crowe, Ruby Dee, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Idris Elba, Cuba Gooding Jr., Carla Gugino, John Hawkes, Ted Levine, Joe Morton, Lymari Nadal, John Ortiz, RZA, Yul Vasquez, Denzel Washington

Hairspray (92 percent): Nikki Blonsky, Amanda Bynes, Paul Dooley, Zac Efron, Allison Janney, Elijah Kelley, James Marsden, Michelle Pfeiffer, Queen Latifah, Brittany Snow, Jerry Stiller, John Travolta, Christopher Walken

Into the Wild: Brian Dierker, Marcia Gay Harden, Emile Hirsch, Hal Holbrook, William Hurt, Catherine Keener, Jena Malone, Kristen Stewart, Vince Vaughn

No Country for Old Men: Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, Garrett Dillahunt, Tess Harper, Woody Harrelson, Tommy Lee Jones, Kelly MacDonald

Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture:
300 (60 percent)
The Bourne Ultimatum (93 percent)
I Am Legend (63 percent)
The Kingdom (52 percent)
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (45 percent)

All the happy waiver vibes at the Spirits and SAGs stands in marked contrast to the budding panic surrounding the Golden Globes, where confusion over whether the ceremony will be attended by any stars — or whether it’ll even go on — is wreaking havoc on party planners’ year-end schedules.

As Variety reports, the growing consensus is that the ceremony won’t happen, but — in the words of an unnamed studio executive — “Nobody wants to be the first person to drop out.” From the article:

“Everyone is calling around trying to find out what everyone is doing,” one planner said.

“It’s all going to come down to: Can the Globes come up with a feasible plan that the talent is comfortable with and don’t have to cross a picket line?” another planner said. “And I don’t know what that is.”

Source: Spirit Awards
Source: Hollywood Reporter (Spirits waiver story)
Source: Hollywood Reporter (SAG Awards)
Source: Variety (Globes story)

The parade of critics’ year-end best-of lists continued yesterday, with panels in Toronto, San Diego, and Austin weighing in on their favorite films of 2007.

In Toronto, the clear winner was No Country for Old Men, which nabbed four prizes, including best film. A complete list of winners follows, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Best Film:
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)

Best Director:
Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men

Best Screenplay:
Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men

Best Actor:
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises (88 percent)

Best Actress:
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent) / Ellen Page, Juno (94 percent) (tie)

Best Supporting Actor:
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men

Best Supporting Actress:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)

Best Animated Feature:
Ratatouille (97 percent)

Best Foreign-Language Film:
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (96 percent)

Best Documentary:
No End in Sight (95 percent)

Not to be outdone, the San Diego Film Critics Society heaped its own stack o’ praise on No Country, but saved plenty of love for other films along the way:

Best Film:
No Country for Old Men

Best Director:
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood (96 percent)

Best Actor:
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood

Best Actress:
Julie Christie, Away From Her

Best Supporting Actor:
Tommy Lee Jones, No Country for Old Men

Best Supporting Actress:
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)

Best Original Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood

Best Foreign Language Film:
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)

Best Documentary:
(tie) No End in Sight and Deep Water (96 percent)

Best Animated Feature:
Ratatouille

Best Cinematography:
Roger Deakins, No Country for Old Men

Best Production Design:
Dante Ferretti, Sweeney Todd (86 percent)

Best Editor:
Paul Tothill, Atonement (84 percent)

Best Score:
Jonny Greenwood, There Will Be Blood

Best Ensemble Performance:
No Country for Old Men

And finally, last but not least, the Austin Film Critics Association gave big ups to There Will Be Blood, bestowing Best Film, Best Director, and Best Actor honors upon the P.T. Anderson drama. Read on:

Best Film:
There Will Be Blood

Best Director:
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood

Best Actor:
Daniel Day Lewis, There Will Be Blood

Best Actress:
Ellen Page, Juno

Best Supporting Actor:

Javier Bardem, No Country For Old Men

Best Supporting Actress:
Allison Janney, Juno

Best Foreign Film:
Black Book (76 percent)

Best Documentary:

The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters (96 percent)

Best Animated Film:
Ratatouille

Best First Film:
Ben Affleck, Gone Baby Gone

Best Original Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Ethan & Joel Coen, No Country For Old Men

Best Cinematography:
Robert Elswit, There Will Be Blood

Best Original Score:
Jonny Greenwood, There Will Be Blood

Breakthrough Artist:

Michael Cera, Superbad (87 percent), Juno

Source: Variety (Toronto)
Source: Variety (San Diego)
Source: Variety (Austin)

The nominations for the 65th annual Golden Globe Awards were announced this morning. Did your favorite films, stars, and songs make the cut?

The nominees were read at the Beverly Hilton by a surreal panel consisting of Dane Cook, Hayden Panettiere, Ryan Reynolds, and Quentin Tarantino. The film nominations follow below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Picture, Drama:

American Gangster (79 percent)
Atonement (85 percent)
Eastern Promises (88 percent)
The Great Debaters
Michael Clayton (90 percent)
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood (100 percent)

Actress, Drama:
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)
Jodie Foster, The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Keira Knightley, Atonement

Actor, Drama:
George Clooney, Michael Clayton
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood
James McAvoy, Atonement
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises
Denzel Washington, American Gangster

Picture, Musical or Comedy:
Across the Universe (52 percent)
Charlie Wilson’s War (92 percent)
Hairspray (92 percent)
Juno (92 percent)
Sweeney Todd (92 percent)

Actress, Musical or Comedy:

Amy Adams, Enchanted (94 percent)
Nikki Blonsky, Hairspray
Helena Bonham Carter, Sweeney Todd
Marion Cotillard, La Vie En Rose (74 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno

Actor, Musical or Comedy:

Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Tom Hanks, Charlie Wilson’s War
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages (89 percent)
John C. Reilly, Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Supporting Actress:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)
Julia Roberts, Charlie Wilson’s War
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

Supporting Actor:
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War
John Travolta, Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

Director:
Tim Burton, Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)
Ridley Scott, American Gangster
Joe Wright, Atonement

Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Christopher Hampton, Atonement
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin, Charlie Wilson’s War

Foreign Language:
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, Romania (96 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, France and U.S.
The Kite Runner, U.S. (65 percent)
Lust, Caution, Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis, France (100 percent)

Animated Film:
Bee Movie (52 percent)
Ratatouille (97 percent)
The Simpsons Movie (88 percent)

Original Score:
Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder, Into the Wild (82 percent)
Clint Eastwood, Grace Is Gone (70 percent)
Alberto Iglesias, The Kite Runner
Dario Marianelli, Atonement
Howard Shore, Eastern Promises

Original Song: Despedida from Love in the Time of Cholera (28 percent)
Grace Is Gone from Grace Is Gone
Guaranteed from Into the Wild
That’s How You Know from Enchanted

Walk Hard from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Source: Associated Press
Source: Golden Globes

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