It’s the first streaming column of the month, which means Netflix and Amazon Prime have released a ton of new releases. And, as usual, we’ve narrowed down the selection to just the Certified Fresh choices. See below for the full list, which includes a nice mix of classic Hollywood, recent hits, and beloved gems.


New on Netflix

 

Dear White People: Season 1 (2017) 95%

Netflix adapted Justin Simien’s provocative film into a TV series, focusing on various students of color at an Ivy League university as they navigate social issues and their collegiate lives.

Available now on: Netflix


Things to Come (2016) 99%

Isabelle Huppert delivers another powerhouse performance in Mia Hansen-Løve’s drama about a woman whose life is thrown into upheaval after her marriage falls apart.

Available now on: Netflix


Don't Think Twice (2016) 98%

Mike Birbiglia’s comedy focuses on the members of a New York improv group whose friendships are tested as they come to grips with individual success… or the lack thereof.

Available now on: Netflix


Anvil! The Story of Anvil (2008) 98%

Sacha Gervasi’s unique documentary charts the paths of Canadian metal band Anvil’s two founding members, who rose to prominence during the 1980s and then quickly faded into obscurity.

Available now on: Netflix


The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007) 94%

Mathieu Amalric and Emmanuelle Seigner star in Julian Schnabel’s true story of magazine editor Jean-Dominique Bauby, who was suddenly paralyzed by a stroke at age 43 but went on to write an astonishing memoir of his experience.

Available now on: Netflix


Southside With You (2016) 92%

Parker Sawyers and Tika Sumpter star as the young Barack Obama and Michelle Robinson in a romantic drama that follows the couple around Chicago on their first date.

Available now on: Netflix


Scream (1996) 79%

Horror icon Wes Craven’s subversive deconstruction of the genre is a sly, funny and surprisingly effective satire of slasher flicks that just happens to work pretty well as a slasher flick itself.

Available now on: Netflix


Trust (2010) 79%

Clive Owen and Catherine Keener star in David Schwimmer’s drama about a family torn apart when their teenage daughter falls victim to an internet predator.

Available now on: Netflix


Bridget Jones's Baby (2016) 78%

Renée Zellweger reprises her role as the titular singleton, who must figure out who the father of her child is after a pair of trysts results in a pregnancy.

Available now on: Netflix


The Daughter (2015) 77%

Geoffrey Rush and Paul Schneider star in this drama about the ripple effect that occurs within the community when a wealthy mill owner in rural Australia announces he’s shutting his business down.

Available now on: Netflix


Happy Feet (2006) 76%

Elijah Wood and Robin Williams lend their voices to this animated feature about an emperor penguin who overcomes his inability to sing by becoming a fantastic dancer instead.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Amazon Prime

 

The Wizard of Oz (1939) 98%

Judy Garland stars as Dorothy in this classic adaptation of the L. Frank Baum novel about a young girl who is transported to a magical land where some strange new friends help her to find her way home.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Gone With the Wind (1939) 90%

Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh star in Victor Fleming’s multiple Oscar-winning Civil War-set romance about a selfish Southern socialite who catches the eye of a roguish opportunist from a wealthy family.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Winter's Bone (2010) 94%

Jennifer Lawrence stars in Debra Granik’s drama about a teen living in the Ozarks who sets out to track her meth cook father after he skips out on the family.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


No Way Out (1987) 91%

Kevin Costner and Gene Hackman star in this thriller about a naval officer who is tasked with investigating the murder of the Secretary of Defense’s wife, with whom he had a brief affair.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


A Christmas Story (1983) 90%

Peter Billingsley stars in this holiday classic about a boy who holds out for the ultimate present — a Red Ryder BB gun — one Christmas in 1940.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Florence Foster Jenkins (2016) 88%

Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant star in this lighthearted true story about the woman who famously became an opera singer despite her less than angelic voice.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Life Is Beautiful (1997) 80%

Roberto Benigni and Nicoletta Braschi star in Benigni’s dramatic comedy about a Jewish father who concocts elaborate stories to prevent his young son from learning the truth when his family is imprisoned in a Nazi concentration camp during World War II.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


American Honey (2016) 79%

Sasha Lane delivers a breakout performance in Andrea Arnold’s drama about a girl who sets out across the midwest with a traveling sales crew.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on FandangoNOW

 

I Am Not Your Negro (2016) 99%

This Oscar-nominated documentary takes a look at influential African-American writer James Baldwin’s life and sociopolitical legacy, focusing on an unfinished, unpublished manuscript Baldwin left behind when he died in 1987.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


The Salesman (2016) 96%

Asghar Farhadi’s Oscar-winning drama centers on a young Iranian couple whose relationship is tested when they are forced to move out from their apartment to the center of Tehran.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


The Red Turtle (2016) 93%

Studio Ghibli co-produced this dialogue-free animated film about a shipwrecked man who wakes up on a deserted island and befriends a giant red turtle.

Available now on: FandangoNOW

Between enjoying his new status as America’s number one box-office draw, performing a promotional tour of Europe and acting as the resident celebrity authority on Rotten Tomatoes, Bradley Cooper’s been a very busy guy of late. (Insert NZT joke here.) With his techno-thriller Limitless still doing strong business across the US and opening in UK cinemas this week, the actor took time out for a chat, and to run through five of his favorite films.

“I’m over the moon that it did well,” Cooper says of the unexpected success of Limitless. “It really is a kind of an underdog movie in many ways — it’s a drama, a thriller, it cost 27 million; it’s taking a chance of putting me in a lead role. There’s a lot of factors that wouldn’t point to it being number one. I thought it was gonna be a festival movie, and when [studio] Relativity started to get excited and talk about it in a bigger way, I was nervous — I never saw this as that kind of shot.”

With Limitless proving he can open a hit movie and surefire comedy sequel The Hangover Part II just around the corner, Cooper’s really hitting his leading man stride. But, the actor admits, he’s not sure exactly what that means just yet. “I have no idea what I’m gonna do next,” he laughs. “I have no idea. It’s exciting and scary.”

Here, then, are Bradley Cooper’s five favorite films. (“They change all the time,” he qualifies.)

 


Life Lessons (New York Stories) (1989, 73% Tomatometer)

 

It’s part of New York Stories, with Nick Nolte and Rosanna Arquette. Nolte plays Lional Dobie, this Jackson Pollack-like artist. I love the subject matter of Life Lessons, it’s just great. Scorsese completely captures the obsession with women, visually and in the storyline. And Nick Nolte is never better — his performance is just f**king unbelievable. He’s on top of his game stylistically, Scorsese, melding heavy style with story without it ever feeling like you’re just watching a director, you know, show off. I never felt that. I’d be curious to see what he thinks of that movie, or how much time he spent doing it, but to me it just felt like kind of an effortless exercise in his talent.

The Celebration (1998, 92% Tomatometer)

 

The Celebration, the film by Thomas Vinterberg. It’s an example of innovative filmmaking and great storytelling. It’s just very moving. The subject matter, first of all, is incredible, you have this style of humour, and the acting’s insane. It was the idea of this Dogme-type style that I hadn’t really seen before — you know, you sort of feel it with Cassavetes, but I loved the strict adherence here to the principles of no artificial lighting, no artificial action, you can’t have any dolly tracking or crane shots at all; it’s all hand-held, it’s all video.

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007, 93% Tomatometer)

 

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly is just one of the best films ever made. The acting, the story, the conception visually. He’s just wonderful, the director, Julian Schnabel.

The Conversation (1974, 98% Tomatometer)

 

The Conversation is just, I think, a movie made by one of the best auteur directors of the ’70s and ’80s. To me, I think the reason that I would choose that one is the sound editing. Even though Hackman does play a sound guy, the sound of the movie is really innovative. You have conversations that are happening in the foreground that you can barely hear, and yet that’s the main conversation, so they play around a lot with where they put the microphone. It’s really awesome.

The Shop Around the Corner (1940, 100% Tomatometer)

 

I wanted to throw a comedy in there. I just remember seeing that movie, and Jimmy Stewart, and just the whole way Ernst Lubitsch tells his story comedically… I’m sure there were ones that came before that, but to me it felt innovative in the sense that it was a bunch of disparate storylines coming together in the end.

 


Limitless is in theaters now.

If you, like many others, opted out of The Golden Compass while it was in theaters, never fear; your chance to watch it at home has arrived. Then again, instead of picking up that or the underwhelming wedding rom-com 27 Dresses, you could go for the wondrous, Oscar-nominated Diving Bell and the Butterfly. More new releases inside.


The Golden Compass


Tomatometer:
41%

Set in a fantastical alterna-universe with talking bears and animal BFFs, The Golden Compass seemed so promising in its epic story of a young girl battling a sinister organization. And though it’s fun to label New Line’s costly adaptation of Philip Pullman’s series a major disappointment, it nearly doubled its $180 million budget in foreign sales — yet, who knows if any sequels will be made? Now’s your chance to catch the Brit fantasy adventure on DVD.

Bonus Features:

Go for the two-disc edition for writer/director Chris Weitz’s commentary track (is the Magesterium a stand-in for the Catholic Church?) and a whopping eleven featurettes.

27 Dresses



Tomatometer: 40%

“Always a bridesmaid, never a bride.” Whose bright idea was it to turn every single woman’s most hated saying into a romantic comedy? James Marsden — who almost never gets the girl — is a reporter who wants to write about the world’s busiest matron of honor (Katherine Heigl). Heigl, whose career lows include starring opposite Gerard Depardieu in My Father, the Hero and appearing in the lowest-grossing movie in recent memory (Zzyxx Road, which earned $30 at the box office. Yes, $30.) should have been able to turn her Knocked Up and Grey’s Anatomy successes into something more.

Bonus Features:

Four featurettes and deleted scenes come with the release.

Fun fact: 27 Dresses features tons of actually great songs from the likes of Justice, Regina Spektor, Feist, Bloc Party, and Amy Winehouse.

Not so fun fact: None of the above appear on the soundtrack, which is all instrumental.


The Diving Bell and the Butterfly


Tomatometer: 94%

Now here’s a must-see film. Katherine Heigl thinks being single is tough? Try being totally paralyzed, save for one eyeball, and blinking out your memoirs. Such is the real-life story of magazine editor Jean-Dominique Bauby, whose autobiography became the basis of artist Julian Schnabel’s incredibly haunting film of the same name.

Bonus Features:

An otherwise standard behind-the-scenes video is especially fascinating with Diving Bell, thanks to the inventive ways Schnabel chose to film from Bauby’s first-person perspective (for example, watching doctors sew Bauby’s eyelid shut — from the inside!). If you’re one to appreciate imaginative filmmaking and cinematography, the bonus menu should be fairly fascinating.


How She Move

Tomatometer: 68%

Unlike teen dancing flicks Step Up and You Got Served (and more like the excellent Stomp the Yard), this urban tale blends eye-popping choreography with some semblance of plot. Set in Toronto’s gritty immigrant ghetto (Who knew Canada had ghettos — or street dancing!) How She Move centers on a female step dancer (the ripped, American newbie Rutina Wesley) who joins a crew to pay for college.

Bonus Features:

Character and rehearsal featurettes are the most spectacular offerings on this release. What, no dance-along tutorial? Put in High School Musical 2 instead.


Diamond Dogs

Tomatometer: N/A

Oh, Dolph Lundgren; what hath time wrought? The heir-apparent to the Steven Seagal-Chuck Norris subgenre of low-budget cheesy action is back again with another direct-to-video film — which we wouldn’t normally cover here, but Lundgren is the man: a 6’5″ blonde Swedish blackbelt with a master’s degree in chemical engineering who chose a life of cheapo chopsocky stardom making flicks with titles like Hidden Agenda, Direct Action, and now, Diamond Dogs.

Bonus Features:

You can watch a making-of featurette (hey, it’s more than last week’s One Missed Call offered), but let’s get back to Lundgren. Diamond Dogs, besides sharing its name with David Bowie’s 1974 glam concept album, is Lundgren’s 18th straight direct-to-DVD movie. He hasn’t been in a theatrical release since 1996’s Silent Trigger. We may never see him on the big screen again.

Wire Image -- Kevin Mazur

The little teen pregnancy movie that could made a last-minute surge towards tomorrow’s Oscars as Juno won three of its four Independent Spirit Award categories during Saturday’s event.

As we noted while live-blogging the red carpet from Jiminy Glick’s Netflix living room, this year’s Film Independent Spirit Awards seemed to be all about Jason Reitman‘s Juno from the get-go. As Juno had become the buzzword of this awards season, earning critics circles’ and numerous Top Ten honors, one’s Oscar pool ballot might seem to be amiss without at least one or two Juno-related predictions.

And so it was when Hollywood came out Saturday afternoon for the Film Independent Spirit Awards. Held in a beachside tent in Santa Monica, the champagne-fueled party got A-listers and indie filmmakers alike out in droves to celebrate the best of the year’s independent, or at least independent in spirit, films. Leading the pack of winners was Juno, which won the day’s top prize for Best Feature. Twenty-year-old star Ellen Page won the trophy for Best Actress, and writer Diablo Cody won for the Best First Screenplay.

Cody faced a room full of press after her win. “To me having the film be made is the reward,” she said. “You never expect in a million years that [your screenplay] is even going to be produced…this is so cool!”





Diablo Cody with her Spirit trophy. (Kevin Mazur, WireImage) Click for more images from the 2008 Spirit Awards.

RT asked Cody if she, like the majority of Oscar pundits, sees Juno as the front runner for tomorrow’s event.

“No! The fact that people have embraced this movie the way they did continues to be a surprise. I still think of us as the ‘little pregnant girl movie’ that has somehow caught on. It doesn’t feel like an Oscar movie.”

Also nabbing multiple wins were the Oscar-nominated films The Savages (Philip Seymour Hoffman for Best Actor, writer-director Tamara Jenkins for Best Screenplay) and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (director Julian Schnabel for Best Director, Janusz Kaminski for Best Cinematography). Earlier, Jason Reitman had predicted that the directing award would go to his fellow nominee Schnabel; both are also up for Best Director in tomorrow’s Oscar race.

Rounding out the acting awards were wins by Chiwetel Ejiofor for his upporting role in Talk To Me, and Cate Blanchett, who received a supporting trophy for her role as Bob Dylan in Todd Haynes’ I’m Not There (for which she is also Oscar-nominated). Blanchett will be competing for a second award tomorrow night for her starring role in Elizabeth: The Golden Age.

Check out the full list of Indie Spirit Award winners below (winners in bold).

Best Feature

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
I’m Not There
Juno
A Mighty Heart
Paranoid Park

Best Director

Todd Haynes
I’m Not There

Tamara Jenkins
The Savages

Jason Reitman
Juno

Julian Schnabel
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

Gus Van Sant
Paranoid Park

Best Female Lead

Angelina Jolie
A Mighty Heart

Sienna Miller
Interview

Ellen Page
Juno

Parker Posey
Broken English

Tang Wei
Lust, Caution

Best Male Lead

Pedro Castaneda
August Evening

Don Cheadle
Talk to Me

Philip Seymour Hoffman
The Savages

Tony Leung
Lust, Caution

Frank Langella
Starting Out in the Evening

Best Supporting Female

Cate Blanchett
I’m Not There

Anna Kendrick
Rocket Science

Jennifer Jason Leigh
Margot at the Wedding

Tamara Podemski
Four Sheets to the Wind

Marisa Tomei
Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead

Best Supporting Male

Chiwetel Ejiofor
Talk to Me

Marcus Carl Franklin
I’m Not There

Kene Holliday
Great World of Sound

Irfan Khan
The Namesake

Steve Zahn
Rescue Dawn

Best Cinematography

Mott Hupful
The Savages

Janusz Kaminski
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

Milton Kam
Vanaja

Mihai Malaimare, Jr.
Youth Without Youth

Rodrigo Prieto
Lust, Caution

Best Screenplay

Ronald Harwood
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

Tamara Jenkins
The Savages

Fred Parnes & Andrew Wagner
Starting Out in the Evening

Adrienne Shelly
Waitress

Mike White
Year of the Dog

Best First Screenplay

Jeffrey Blitz
Rocket Science

Zoe Cassavetes
Broken English

Diablo Cody
Juno

Kelly Masterson
Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead

John Orloff
A Mighty Heart

Best First Feature

2 Days in Paris
Director: Julie Delpy
Producers: Julie Delpy, Christophe Mazodier, Thierry Potok

Great World of Sound
Director Craig Zobel
Producers: Melissa Palmer, David Gordon Green, Richard Wright, Craig Zobel

The Lookout
Director: Scott Frank
Producers: Roger Birnbaum, Gary Barber, Laurence Mark, Walter Parkes


Rocket Science
Director: Jeffrey Blitz
Producers: Effie T. Brown, Sean Welch

Vanaja
Director: Rajnesh Domalpalli
Producer Latha R. Domalapalli

Best Documentary

Crazy Love
Director: Dan Klores

Lake of Fire
Director: Tony Kaye

Manufactured Landscapes
Director: Jennifer Baichwal

The Monastery
Director: Pernille Rose Gronkjaer

The Prisoner Or: How I Planned To Kill Tony Blair
Directors: Petra Epperlein & Michael Tucker

Best Foreign Film

4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 3 Days (Romania)
Director: Cristian Mungiu

The Band’s Visit (Israel)
Director: Eran Koirin

Lady Chatterley (France)
Director: Pascale Ferran

Once (Ireland)
Director: John Carney

Persepolis (France)
Director: Vincent Paronnaud & Marjane Satrapi

Robert Altman Award

I’m Not There
Director: Todd Haynes
Casting Director Laura Rosenthal
Ensemble Cast: Cate Blanchett, Christian Bale, Richard Gere, Heath Ledger, Ben Whishaw, Marcus Carl Franklin, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Bruce Greenwood, David Cross, Julianne Moore, Michelle Williams


John Cassavetes Award

August Evening
Writer/Director: Chris Eska
Producers: Connie Hill, Jason Wehling

Owl and the Sparrow
Writer/Director: Stephane Gauger
Producers: Nguyen Van Quen, Doan Nhat Nam, Stephane Gauger

The Pool
Director: Chris Smith
Producer: Kate Noble
Writers: Chris Smith & Randy Russell

Quiet City
Director: Aaron Katz
Producers: Brendan McFadden, Ben Stambler
Writers: Aaron Katz, Erin Fisher, Cris Lankenau
Shotgun Stories
Writer/Director: Jeff Nichols
Producers: David Gordon Green, Lisa Muskat, Jeff Nichols

IFC/Acura Someone to Watch Award

Ramin Bahrani
Director of Chop Shop

Lee Isaac Chung
Director of Munyurangabo

Ronnie Bronstein
Director of Frownland

Piaget Producers Award

Anne Clements
Producer of Ping Pong Playa and Quinceañera

Alexis Ferris
Producer of Cthulhu and Police Beat

Neil Kopp
Producer of Paranoid Park and Old Joy

Read our red carpet report here, blogged from Jiminy Glick’s (Martin Short) celebrity living room.

Julian Schnabel - M. Caulfield/WireImage.comThe Diving Bell and The Butterfly is the title of a book written by Jean-Dominique Bauby, who at the age of 42 and while the editor of Elle in France suffered a massive stroke, which should have killed him. Instead it left him with a condition called Locked-In Syndrome, however his imagination remained intact, as did the ability to blink one eye and so he dictated his story.

Julian Schnabel‘s previous films Basquiat and Before Night Falls are tales of real lives dominated by trauma and tragedy. Schnabel is an artist in the truest sense; he makes art. He attracts like-minded individuals; Johnny Depp is not so much an admirer, more a kindred spirit. Transforming a heart-breaking story into an entertaining film needed an artist’s hand and eye and luckily this film got it. RT sat down with Schnabel to learn more.

Now it’s all done how do you view the film and the book?

Julian Schnabel: I think the book was a good place to begin. It’s a wonderful book and I think Jean-Dominique’s contribution was bigger than the battles between the women that were coveting his attention. Also for them there was a cloud and a lack of closure, which the movie settles. The children told me that they could get on with their lives and I think everybody was happy.

How did you react to the children saying that?

JS: I felt very good. His girlfriend told me they has seen me at a bullfight, and that’s how I knew that he went to the town of Nimes and so all of the images that came out of the bullfights were in there, so she was really helpful.

Many people who aren’t mentioned in the book or the film were really very helpful. But I needed to go to the hospital, see all those people and I figured that once I got there I would figure out how to start.

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

The opening sequence is extraordinary; we, the audience, become Bauby’s one working eye, which is how the book starts. Were you tempted to do it differently?

JS: No. Ron Harwood wrote it into his script, but it is the way of showing it, which is specific to the experience. For example, the opening credits are these X-Rays, so it puts you in the mood right away. Especially when the music comes in, and the sound of a bullfighting drinking song in his head, which is what he heard in his coma, which gradually fades away as he comes back to life. Most of the shot is done inside the camera, and we filmed in the actual hospital.

What I liked about it is that there is no prelude you just jump in and you are there. You get the picture as soon as the guy says to him, “Don’t worry, your speech will come back.” And then he realises nobody’s hearing him.

So there were a lot of different elements to what finally became the opening shot and the movie as a whole.

Tell me about the humour, because on the face of it this is an extremely sad and tragic tale but there is a lot of humour in the movie.

JS: Somebody told me the movie is funnier than the book. I think it’s a combination of Mathieu Amalric (the actor who plays Bauby) and me looking at what was in front of us, with me putting it there and him seeing it and saying whatever came into his mind. This is a collaborative effort remember; the book, Ron Harwood’s script and Mathieu who is in a sound proof box where he can see what the camera sees and he can say whatever he wants in response.

I think it was also important not to lose the poetic nature of Jean’s language, which I think could scare a writer, thinking it will be too flowery. But you have this other voice; the one of the jokes, the one of talking about what is happening as it’s going on. But the writer’s voice is important when Jean-Dominique asks of himself, “Had I been blind and deaf or did it take the harsh light of disaster for me to find my true nature?” Or, “My life was a string of misses and the women I was unable to love.” I thought these lines were brilliant and if you hear them next to those images – a glacier going into the sea for example – then you can get the meaning better, and accept the poetic nature. It’s important to get his different voices.

Remember a guy is writing a book and if he doesn’t write this book he is stuck in his diving bell and the only way to escape from there is to write this book, and while he is doing this he gets to imagine all these things every day so we get to see them.

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

You manage to reign in the maudlin feeling, through the home movies in Jean-Dominique’s head. Although it’s tragic and moving, the film isn’t a weepie.

JS: I can’t tell you how much going to the hospital informed this movie; Seeing and being surrounded by that compassion from the physiotherapist and the guys that pick up his wheelchair when he is on the beach. Witnessing the compassion within the actors themselves as people. Even hearing it in French seems to make the alphabet palatable.

Actors often say they enjoy the experience of working with directors who are also actors, Robert Redford or Sean Penn for example. Does it help being a director with an artist’s eye?

JS: I don’t know any other way. I’ve been a painter all my life. Every movie director is different; there isn’t a mould that they come from. I’m sure Paul Thomas Anderson approaches it one way and Sean Penn another way and everybody does it different. You could say look how great the actors are in Sean’s movies because he’s an actor; but I could say look how great the actors are in my films and I’m a painter! I think generalities about how this all works just numbs things and doesn’t really clarify anything. But being a painter and not having an education at film school probably informs what my movie looks like because I don’t have to unlearn anything.

Paul McCartney said he had to play guitar at least once a day, do you sketch or paint every day?

JS: No I don’t feel the need to. Why doesn’t he sketch every day?

Perhaps the ASC and DGA Awards aren’t the flashiest ceremonies of the season, but being honored by one’s peers is always a cause for celebration, so let’s take a moment to congratulate Robert Elswit and Joel and Ethan Coen, shall we?

Elswit’s work on Paul Thomas Anderson‘s There Will Be Blood netted him the feature trophy at the American Society of Cinematographers awards ceremony on Saturday, putting him at the top of a solid field that mirrored, for the first time in the ceremony’s history, the Academy Awards cinematography nominees. Elswit’s competitors included Seamus McGarvey for Atonement, Janusz Kaminski for The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, and Roger Deakins, for both No Country for Old Men and The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford. Accepting his award, Elswit was quoted as saying:

“I just think it’s impossible to pick these five films apart from one another. I’m really lucky that Janusz (Kaminki) did extraordinary work a year after he resigned from the ASC, and that Roger (Deakins) is competing with himself. To avoid this (from happening again) there should probably be a category called ‘best cinematography in a movie by Roger Deakins.”

Meanwhile, the Coen brothers took top honors at the DGA Awards, beating out Paul Thomas Anderson, Tony Gilroy (Michael Clayton), Sean Penn (Into the Wild), and Julian Schnabel (The Diving Bell and the Butterfly) with their work on No Country for Old Men. Celebrating the brothers’ first DGA win, Joel Coen told attendees:

“We have a bookshelf in our office where we keep all the things we’ve won — we call it our ego corner — and whenever Ethan has a really bad day, he takes out the Windex and silver polish and cleans them up. This is a big one — it’ll keep him busy.”

Source: Variety (ASC Awards)
Source: Variety (DGA Awards)

It was missing the glitz and glitter of previous years, but the 65th annual Golden Globes were held via press conference yesterday, with Atonement, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, No Country for Old Men, and Sweeney Todd leading the crowd at two wins apiece.

Without cameras rolling, celebrities in attendance, or the winners on hand to collect their awards, the “ceremony” was over in 35 minutes (a length the producers might want to keep in mind for next year — we’re just saying). A list of the winners in the film categories follows below, with Tomatometers for each film in parentheses:

MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Atonement (83 percent)


American Gangster
(79 percent)

Eastern Promises
(88 percent)
The Great Debaters

Michael Clayton
(90 percent)
No Country
for Old Men
(95 percent)
There Will Be
Blood
(100 percent)

MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (86 percent)


Across the Universe
(52 percent)
Charlie
Wilson’s War
(92 percent)
Hairspray (92
percent)
Juno (92 percent)

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)


Cate Blanchett
,
Elizabeth: The Golden Age

(34 percent)
Jodie Foster,
The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie,
A Mighty Heart
(77 percent)
Keira
Knightley
, Atonement

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – DRAMA

Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood (90 percent)


James McAvoy
, Atonement
Viggo
Mortensen
, Eastern Promises
Denzel
Washington
, American Gangster
George
Clooney
,
Michael Clayton

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Marion Cotillard, La Vie en rose (74 percent)


Ellen Page
, Juno
Amy Adams,
Enchanted (94
percent)
Nikki
Blonsky
, Hairspray
Helena
Bonham Carter
,
Sweeney Todd

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A MOTION PICTURE – COMEDY OR MUSICAL

Johnny Depp,
Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street

Ryan Gosling
,
Lars
and the Real Girl
(78 percent)
Tom Hanks,
Charlie Wilson’s War

Philip
Seymour Hoffman
, The
Savages
(89 percent)
John C. Reilly,

Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM

Ratatouille (96 percent)

The
Simpsons Movie
(88 percent)
Bee Movie (52
percent)

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

The Diving Bell And The Butterfly (94 percent)

The
Kite Runner
,
U.S. (65
percent)
Lust, Caution,
Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis,
France (100 percent)
4
Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
,
Romania (96 percent)

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE


Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)


Julia Roberts
, Charlie Wilson’s War
Saoirse Ronan,
Atonement
Amy Ryan,
Gone Baby Gone

(93 percent)
Tilda Swinton,
Michael Clayton

PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE IN A MOTION PICTURE


Javier Bardem, No Country For Old Men (95 percent)

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War
John Travolta,
Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson,
Michael Clayton
Casey
Affleck
,

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
(75 percent)

DIRECTOR – MOTION PICTURE

Julian Schnabel,
The Diving Bell And The Butterfly

Ridley Scott
, American Gangster
Joe Wright,
Atonement
Tim Burton,
Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and
Joel Coen,
No Country for Old Men

SCREENPLAY – MOTION PICTURE

Ethan Coen & Joel Coen,
No Country For Old Men

Christopher Hampton
, Atonement
Ronald Harwood,
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin,
Charlie Wilson’s War
Diablo
Cody
,
Juno

ORIGINAL SCORE – MOTION PICTURE

Dario Marianelli,
Atonement

Howard Shore
, Eastern Promises
Michael
Brook
,
Kaki King
,
Eddie Vedder
,
Into the Wild
(82 percent)
Clint Eastwood,
Grace Is Gone
(70 percent)
Alberto
Iglesias
, The Kite Runner

ORIGINAL SONG – MOTION PICTURE
“Guaranteed” from Into the Wild (82 percent), music & lyrics by Eddie Vedder
"That’s How You Know" from Enchanted
"Walk Hard" from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story
"Despedida"
from

Love in the Time of Cholera
(28 percent)
"Grace Is Gone" from
Grace Is Gone

Source: Variety

If there’s one Hollywood awards ceremony that you’d think would be able to go off without a hitch this year, it’d be the Writers Guild Awards — but you’d be wrong.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, the WGA “pooped its own party” Thursday when the western branch unilaterally canceled its awards banquet, “blindsiding” WGA East. West and East traded brief statements in the wake of the announcement, with WGAW saying “There will be no Writers Guild of America, West show until the strike is over,” and the WGAE responding with “We are exploring our options, and we will let you know when we have made a decision.”

Ah, creative types — they can never agree on anything. Anything, that is, except for nominations — the WGA at least got its stuff together long enough to come up with the following list of 2008 Writers Guild Award nominees. The list follows below, with Tomatometer percentages in parentheses:

Original screenplay
Juno, written by Diablo Cody (93 percent)
Michael Clayton, written by Tony Gilroy (90 percent)
The Savages, written by Tamara Jenkins (91 percent)
Knocked Up, written by Judd Apatow (90 percent)
Lars and the Real Girl, written by Nancy Oliver (79 percent)

Adapted screenplay
No Country for Old Men, screenplay by Ethan Coen & Joel Coen, based on the novel by Cormac McCarthy (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood, screenplay by Paul Thomas Anderson, based on the novel Oil by Upton Sinclair (89 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, screenplay by Ronald Harwood, based on the book by Jean-Dominique Bauby (93 percent)
Into the Wild, screenplay by Sean Penn, Based on the book by Jon Krakauer (82 percent)
Zodiac, screenplay by James Vanderbilt, Based on the book by Robert Graysmith (89 percent)

Documentary screenplay
The Camden 28, written by Anthony Giacchino (88 percent)
Nanking, screenplay by Bill Guttentag & Dan Sturman & Elisabeth Bentley, story by Bill Guttentag & Dan Sturman (96 percent)
No End in Sight, written by Charles Ferguson (94 percent)
The Rape of Europa, written by Richard Berge, Nicole Newnham and Bonni Cohen (76 percent)
Sicko, written by Michael Moore (93 percent)
Taxi to the Dark Side, written by Alex Gibney (100 percent)

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

In what seems destined to go down as one of the season’s few strike-free awards shows, the Critics’ Choice Awards were held on Monday.

No Country for Old Men was the evening’s big prizewinner at three awards, followed closely behind by Juno and There Will Be Blood at two apiece. Photographers were the biggest beneficiaries of the night, however; the lack of picket lines meant that the Santa Monica Civic Center was appropriately stuffed with celebrities. The strike wasn’t far from the attendees’ thoughts, however, and the mood of the evening was perhaps summed up best by George Clooney, who remarked:

“This is a one-industry town. And when a strike happens, it’s not just writers or actors, it’s restaurants and hotels and agencies. And our hope is that all of the players involved will lock themselves in a room and not come out until they finish. We want this to be done. That’s the most important thing. It matters to all of us.”

A list of winners follows below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Best picture: No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
Actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood (89 percent)
Actress: Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)
Supporting actor: Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men
Supporting actress: Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Ensemble: Hairspray (92 percent)
Director: Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men
Writer: Diablo Cody, Juno (93 percent)
Animated feature: Ratatouille (96 percent)
Young actor: Ahmad Khan Mahmoodzada, The Kite Runner (65 percent)
Young actress: Nikki Blonsky, Hairspray
Comedy movie: Juno
Family film (live action): Enchanted (93 percent)
Made-for-TV movie: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
Foreign language: The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (93 percent)
Song: Falling Slowly, Glen Hansard and Marketa Irglova, from Once (98 percent)
Composer: Jonny Greenwood, There Will Be Blood
Documentary: Sicko (93 percent)

Source: USA Today

Just when you think awards season can’t get any awards-ier, here come two more sets of nominations!

First up, we have Film Independent’s Spirit Awards, which have earned the distinction of being granted a strike waiver from the Writers Guild of America. Rainn Wilson — otherwise known as Dwight Schrute on NBC’s The Office — will host and help write the ceremony, which airs on IFC February 23. As The Hollywood Reporter notes, this “raises the possibility that the informal Spirit ceremony, which takes place in a tent on the beach in Santa Monica, could upstage the 80th annual Academy Awards.” A partial list of the Spirit nominees follows, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Best Feature:
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (95 percent)
I’m Not There (81 percent)
Juno (94 percent)
A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Paranoid Park (62 percent)

Best Director:
Todd Haynes, I’m Not There (81 percent)
Tamara Jenkins, The Savages (89 percent)
Jason Reitman, Juno
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Gus Van Sant, Paranoid Park

Best Screenplay:
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Tamara Jenkins, The Savages
Fred Parnes & Andrew Wagner, Starting Out in the Evening (82 percent)
Adrienne Shelly, Waitress (89 percent)
Mike White, Year of the Dog (70 percent)

Best Female Lead:
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart
Sienna Miller, Interview (57 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno
Parker Posey, Broken English (63 percent)
Wei Tang, Lust, Caution (64 percent)

Best Supporting Female:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There
Anna Kendrick, Rocket Science (85 percent)
Jennifer Jason Leigh, Margot at the Wedding (56 percent)
Tamara Podemski, Four Sheets to the Wind (100 percent)
Marisa Tomei, Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (88 percent)

Best Male Lead:
Pedro Castaneda, August Evening
Don Cheadle, Talk to Me (81 percent)
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages
Tony Leung, Lust, Caution
Frank Langella, Starting Out in the Evening

Best Supporting Male:
Chiwetel Ejiofor, Talk to Me
Marcus Carl Franklin, I’m Not There
Kene Holliday, Great World of Sound (86 percent)
Irrfan Khan, The Namesake (85 percent)
Steve Zahn, Rescue Dawn (91 percent)

Best Cinematography:
Mott Hupfel, The Savages
Janusz Kaminski, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Milton Kam, Vanaja (81 percent)
Mihai Malaimare, Jr., Youth Without Youth (33 percent)
Rodrigo Prieto, Lust, Caution

Best Documentary:
Crazy Love (78 percent)
Lake of Fire (94 percent)
Manufactured Landscapes (83 percent)
The Monastery
The Prisoner Or: How I Planned to Kill Tony Blair (86 percent)

Best Foreign Film:
4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days (93 percent)
The Band’s Visit (100 percent)
Lady Chatterly (74 percent)
Once (98 percent)
Persepolis (97 percent)

Meanwhile, the nominees for the 14th annual SAG Awards — also granted a WGA waiver for its ceremony, set to take place January 27 at the Shrine Expo in Los Angeles — have been announced. Film nominees follow below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Male Actor in a Leading Role:
George Clooney, Michael Clayton (90 percent)
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood (93 percent)
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Emile Hirsch, Into The Wild (82 percent)
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises (88 percent)

Female Actor in a Leading Role:
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Julie Christie, Away From Her (94 percent)
Marion Cotillard, La Vie en Rose (74 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart
Ellen Page, Juno

Male Actor in a Supporting Role:
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
Hal Holbrook, Into the Wild
Tommy Lee Jones, No Country for Old Men
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

Female Actor in a Supprting Role:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There
Ruby Dee, American Gangster (79 percent)
Catherine Keener, Into the Wild
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

Ensemble Cast in a Motion Picture:
3:10 to Yuma (87 percent): Christian Bale, Russell Crowe, Peter Fonda, Gretchen Mol, Dallas Roberts, Vinessa Shaw, Ben Foster, Alan Tudyk, Logan Lerman

American Gangster: Armand Assante, Josh Brolin, Russell Crowe, Ruby Dee, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Idris Elba, Cuba Gooding Jr., Carla Gugino, John Hawkes, Ted Levine, Joe Morton, Lymari Nadal, John Ortiz, RZA, Yul Vasquez, Denzel Washington

Hairspray (92 percent): Nikki Blonsky, Amanda Bynes, Paul Dooley, Zac Efron, Allison Janney, Elijah Kelley, James Marsden, Michelle Pfeiffer, Queen Latifah, Brittany Snow, Jerry Stiller, John Travolta, Christopher Walken

Into the Wild: Brian Dierker, Marcia Gay Harden, Emile Hirsch, Hal Holbrook, William Hurt, Catherine Keener, Jena Malone, Kristen Stewart, Vince Vaughn

No Country for Old Men: Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, Garrett Dillahunt, Tess Harper, Woody Harrelson, Tommy Lee Jones, Kelly MacDonald

Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture:
300 (60 percent)
The Bourne Ultimatum (93 percent)
I Am Legend (63 percent)
The Kingdom (52 percent)
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (45 percent)

All the happy waiver vibes at the Spirits and SAGs stands in marked contrast to the budding panic surrounding the Golden Globes, where confusion over whether the ceremony will be attended by any stars — or whether it’ll even go on — is wreaking havoc on party planners’ year-end schedules.

As Variety reports, the growing consensus is that the ceremony won’t happen, but — in the words of an unnamed studio executive — “Nobody wants to be the first person to drop out.” From the article:

“Everyone is calling around trying to find out what everyone is doing,” one planner said.

“It’s all going to come down to: Can the Globes come up with a feasible plan that the talent is comfortable with and don’t have to cross a picket line?” another planner said. “And I don’t know what that is.”

Source: Spirit Awards
Source: Hollywood Reporter (Spirits waiver story)
Source: Hollywood Reporter (SAG Awards)
Source: Variety (Globes story)

The parade of critics’ year-end best-of lists continued yesterday, with panels in Toronto, San Diego, and Austin weighing in on their favorite films of 2007.

In Toronto, the clear winner was No Country for Old Men, which nabbed four prizes, including best film. A complete list of winners follows, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Best Film:
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)

Best Director:
Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men

Best Screenplay:
Joel and Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men

Best Actor:
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises (88 percent)

Best Actress:
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent) / Ellen Page, Juno (94 percent) (tie)

Best Supporting Actor:
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men

Best Supporting Actress:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)

Best Animated Feature:
Ratatouille (97 percent)

Best Foreign-Language Film:
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (96 percent)

Best Documentary:
No End in Sight (95 percent)

Not to be outdone, the San Diego Film Critics Society heaped its own stack o’ praise on No Country, but saved plenty of love for other films along the way:

Best Film:
No Country for Old Men

Best Director:
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood (96 percent)

Best Actor:
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood

Best Actress:
Julie Christie, Away From Her

Best Supporting Actor:
Tommy Lee Jones, No Country for Old Men

Best Supporting Actress:
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)

Best Original Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood

Best Foreign Language Film:
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)

Best Documentary:
(tie) No End in Sight and Deep Water (96 percent)

Best Animated Feature:
Ratatouille

Best Cinematography:
Roger Deakins, No Country for Old Men

Best Production Design:
Dante Ferretti, Sweeney Todd (86 percent)

Best Editor:
Paul Tothill, Atonement (84 percent)

Best Score:
Jonny Greenwood, There Will Be Blood

Best Ensemble Performance:
No Country for Old Men

And finally, last but not least, the Austin Film Critics Association gave big ups to There Will Be Blood, bestowing Best Film, Best Director, and Best Actor honors upon the P.T. Anderson drama. Read on:

Best Film:
There Will Be Blood

Best Director:
Paul Thomas Anderson, There Will Be Blood

Best Actor:
Daniel Day Lewis, There Will Be Blood

Best Actress:
Ellen Page, Juno

Best Supporting Actor:

Javier Bardem, No Country For Old Men

Best Supporting Actress:
Allison Janney, Juno

Best Foreign Film:
Black Book (76 percent)

Best Documentary:

The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters (96 percent)

Best Animated Film:
Ratatouille

Best First Film:
Ben Affleck, Gone Baby Gone

Best Original Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno

Best Adapted Screenplay:
Ethan & Joel Coen, No Country For Old Men

Best Cinematography:
Robert Elswit, There Will Be Blood

Best Original Score:
Jonny Greenwood, There Will Be Blood

Breakthrough Artist:

Michael Cera, Superbad (87 percent), Juno

Source: Variety (Toronto)
Source: Variety (San Diego)
Source: Variety (Austin)

If there’s one thing the American Film Institute loves, it’s a list — and with the end of 2007 rapidly approaching, you know what that means: It’s time to run down the AFI’s favorite films and TV shows of the last year.

Variety published the list yesterday, as well as the date and location of the AFI Awards. If you’re going to be at the Four Seasons on January 11…well, you probably won’t be able to just stop on by, but at least you can say you were in the neighborhood when the following honors were being handed down:

FILM
Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead (88 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)
Into the Wild (82 percent)
Juno (94 percent)
Knocked Up (90 percent)
Michael Clayton (90 percent)
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
Ratatouille (97 percent)
The Savages (89 percent)
There Will Be Blood (95 percent)

TV
Dexter
Everybody Hates Chris
Friday Night Lights
Longford
Mad Men
Pushing Daisies
The Sopranos
Tell Me You Love Me
30 Rock
Ugly Betty

Source: Variety

The London Critics Circle has announced the nominees for its year-end awards, with Anton Corbijn‘s Control and Joe Wright‘s Atonement leading the pack at eight nominations apiece.

A full list of the nominees follows below, with Tomatometers in parentheses. Let the nitpicking begin!

FILM OF THE YEAR
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
There Will Be Blood (94 percent)
Zodiac (89 percent)
The Bourne Ultimatum (93 percent)

ATTENBOROUGH AWARD FOR BRITISH FILM OF THE YEAR
Once (98 percent)
Control (89 percent)
Atonement (85 percent)
Eastern Promises (88 percent)
This Is England (93 percent)

DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR

Florian Henckel von DonnersmarckThe Lives of Others (93 percent)
Paul Thomas AndersonThere Will Be Blood
Joel and Ethan CoenNo Country for Old Men
David FincherZodiac
Cristian Mungui4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days (96 percent)

BRITISH DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR
Anton Corbijn — Control
Paul GreengrassThe Bourne Ultimatum
Shane MeadowsThis Is England
Joe Wright — Atonement
Danny BoyleSunshine (75 percent)

ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Ulrich MuheThe Lives of Others
Casey AffleckThe Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford
George ClooneyMichael Clayton (90 percent)
Tommy Lee JonesIn the Valley of Elah (69 percent)
Daniel Day-LewisThere Will Be Blood

ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Laura LinneyThe Savages (89 percent)
Marion CotillardLa Vie en rose (74 percent)
Maggie GyllenhaalSherrybaby (72 percent)
Angelina JolieA Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Anamaria Marinca4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days

BRITISH ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Sam RileyControl
James McAvoyAtonement
Christian Bale3:10 to Yuma (87 percent)
Jim BroadbentAnd When Did You Last See Your Father (81 percent)
Jonny Lee MillerThe Flying Scotsman (51 percent)

BRITISH ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Samantha MortonControl
Julie ChristieAway From Her (95 percent)
Keira KnightleyAtonement
Helena Bonham CarterSweeney Todd (92 percent)
Sienna MillerInterview (57 percent)

BRITISH ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE

Tom WilkinsonMichael Clayton
Toby JonesThe Painted Veil (75 percent)
Alfred MolinaThe Hoax (86 percent)
Tobey Kebell — Control
Albert FinneyBefore the Devil Knows You’re Dead (87 percent)

BRITISH ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Saoirse RonanAtonement
Imelda StauntonHarry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (77 percent)
Tilda SwintonMichael Clayton
Kelly MacdonaldNo Country for Old Men
Vanessa RedgraveAtonement

SCREENWRITER OF THE YEAR
Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck — The Lives of Others
Joel and Ethan Coen — No Country for Old Men
Paul Thomas Anderson — There Will Be Blood
Ronald HarwoodThe Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)
Christopher HamptonAtonement

BRITISH BREAKTHROUGH — ACTING
Saoirse Ronan — Atonement
Sam Riley — Control
Thomas TurgooseThis Is England
Benedict CumberbatchAmazing Grace (71 percent)
Dakota Blue RichardsThe Golden Compass

BRITISH BREAKTHROUGH — FILMMAKING
John Carney, writer and director — Once
Sarah Gavron, director — Brick Lane (68 percent)
Anton Corbijn, director — Control
Matt Greenhalgh, writer — Control
Stevan Riley, writer, director, producer — Blue Blood

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
4 Months, 3 Weeks & 2 Days
The Lives of Others
Letters From Iwo Jima (91 percent)
Tell No One (93 percent)

Source: Variety

The nominations for the 65th annual Golden Globe Awards were announced this morning. Did your favorite films, stars, and songs make the cut?

The nominees were read at the Beverly Hilton by a surreal panel consisting of Dane Cook, Hayden Panettiere, Ryan Reynolds, and Quentin Tarantino. The film nominations follow below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Picture, Drama:

American Gangster (79 percent)
Atonement (85 percent)
Eastern Promises (88 percent)
The Great Debaters
Michael Clayton (90 percent)
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood (100 percent)

Actress, Drama:
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)
Jodie Foster, The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Keira Knightley, Atonement

Actor, Drama:
George Clooney, Michael Clayton
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood
James McAvoy, Atonement
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises
Denzel Washington, American Gangster

Picture, Musical or Comedy:
Across the Universe (52 percent)
Charlie Wilson’s War (92 percent)
Hairspray (92 percent)
Juno (92 percent)
Sweeney Todd (92 percent)

Actress, Musical or Comedy:

Amy Adams, Enchanted (94 percent)
Nikki Blonsky, Hairspray
Helena Bonham Carter, Sweeney Todd
Marion Cotillard, La Vie En Rose (74 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno

Actor, Musical or Comedy:

Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Tom Hanks, Charlie Wilson’s War
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages (89 percent)
John C. Reilly, Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Supporting Actress:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)
Julia Roberts, Charlie Wilson’s War
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

Supporting Actor:
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War
John Travolta, Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

Director:
Tim Burton, Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)
Ridley Scott, American Gangster
Joe Wright, Atonement

Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Christopher Hampton, Atonement
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin, Charlie Wilson’s War

Foreign Language:
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, Romania (96 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, France and U.S.
The Kite Runner, U.S. (65 percent)
Lust, Caution, Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis, France (100 percent)

Animated Film:
Bee Movie (52 percent)
Ratatouille (97 percent)
The Simpsons Movie (88 percent)

Original Score:
Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder, Into the Wild (82 percent)
Clint Eastwood, Grace Is Gone (70 percent)
Alberto Iglesias, The Kite Runner
Dario Marianelli, Atonement
Howard Shore, Eastern Promises

Original Song: Despedida from Love in the Time of Cholera (28 percent)
Grace Is Gone from Grace Is Gone
Guaranteed from Into the Wild
That’s How You Know from Enchanted

Walk Hard from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Source: Associated Press
Source: Golden Globes

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