The Marvel Cinematic Universe is a wonder for many reasons, not least of which is the way it wove together an intricate continuity across all of its movies. Throughout 23 films (and counting), there are crossover characters, intersecting storylines, and resonant names, locations, and even brands. Of course, when you step back, you realize that the MCU was only doing what comic books have been doing in print for decades. Take another step back, and you’ll notice that what they’ve done isn’t all that unique to movies, either. Because Quentin Tarantino, for one, has been doing it for decades, too.

From his earliest days as a struggling screenwriter to his iconic and era-defining films, Tarantino has built his own world of interconnected characters and original brands. In honor of the 25th anniversary of his legendary opus Pulp Fiction (released October 14, 1994), let’s take a look at the QTCU — the Quentin Tarantino Cinematic Universe.


()

A short film co-written, directed, and starring Tarantino while he was famously working at Video Archives in Manhattan Beach, California (it’s no longer there, so don’t plan a visit), My Best Friend’s Birthday only exists in a truncated 36-minute cut because large parts of it were destroyed in a fire. Still, the seeds of the QTCU are there. For one, Quentin plays a character named Clarence who, early on, discusses his love of Rockabilly music and Elvis’ acting ability. This would, of course, foreshadow Christian Slater’s character in True Romance, a script written by Tarantino but directed by the late Tony Scott. In Birthday, Tarantino’s Clarence hires a call girl to show his friend a good time on his special day — a sequence of events that would be flipped in True Romance, when Slater’s Clarence finds himself on the receiving end of a birthday call girl surprise.


Reservoir Dogs (1992) 92%

Tarantino’s signature work, the movie that launched him as a filmmaker. In this tale of a jewel heist gone wrong, the audience is treated to flashbacks that fill in the stories of each of the movie’s black clad, code-named criminals. We find out that Mr. White (Harvey Keitel) used to run with a partner named Alabama. Of course, a woman named Alabama Whitman (later, Worley) is seen getting a taste for a life of crime in True Romance, the Tony Scott film that Tarantino wrote (see below). We also learn that Mr. Blonde (Michael Madsen) is named Vic Vega, as in the brother of John Travolta’s Vincent Vega in Pulp Fiction.


True Romance (1993) 93%

Warner Bros. courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by Warner Bros. courtesy Everett Collection)

Apart from the obvious connections to earlier films — the Rockabilly-loving Clarence and call girl-turned-crook Alabama — there is a more subtle cinematic link in Tony Scott’s Tarantino-penned action adventure. The movie climaxes with a drug deal in the hotel suite of big time movie producer Lee Donowitz (Saul Rubinek, channeling real life producer Joel Silver). Donowitz is a producer of war movies — fitting because his father, Donny Donowitz, fought in WWII as part of the Inglourious Basterds. You might remember him as the baseball bat-wielding avenger known as “The Bear Jew” (played by Eli Roth).


Pulp Fiction (1994) 92%

Miramax Films

(Photo by Miramax Films)

Pulp Fiction, which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, is arguably the Iron Man of the QTCU, because it’s really the one that takes the threads and begins to weave them together. The film introduces us to several brand names that would become central players in Tarantino’s world, starting with “that Hawaiian burger joint” Big Kahuna Burger — Samuel L. Jackson’s Jules takes the world’s most intimidating bite of one of these burgers and washes it down with “a tasty beverage” from the place early in the movie. Later, Bruce Willis’ Butch Coolidge orders a pack of Red Apple cigarettes, a brand that shows up in just about every subsequent QT movie. Finally, Christopher Walken’s Captain Koons — he of the legendary “gold watch” speech — is also a descendant of “Crazy” Craig Koons, one of Django’s bounties in Django Unchained.


Natural Born Killers (1994) 49%

Warner Bros. Pictures

(Photo by Warner Bros. Pictures)

Although Natural Born Killers was directed by Oliver Stone, the script was pure Tarantino. We mentioned earlier the brother connection between Vic and Vincent Vega, but there is another set of brothers that was first introduced in Reservoir Dogs, too. In Dogs, Vic complains about a pain-in-the-ass parole officer named Seymour Scagnetti (we never actually see him), whose own brother, Jack, would show up in Natural Born Killers (played by Tom Sizemore).


Four Rooms (1995) 14%

In the Tarantino-written and -directed segment of this anthology film, the characters are seen smoking Red Apple cigarettes. Tarantino’s character also refers to his drink as a “tasty beverage,” which echoes the same colorful turn of phrase Jules used in Pulp Fiction.


From Dusk Till Dawn (1996) 62%

Tarantino wrote the script for this Robert Rodriguez-directed horror film and peppered in some of his signature touches. There are Red Apple cigarettes present and accounted for, and George Clooney’s Seth Gecko at one point makes a run for Big Kahuna Burgers. The movie also introduces gravelly-voiced, no-nonsense Texas Ranger Earl McGraw (played by Michael Parks), who would become a key player in the QTCU. It’s also worth noting that the movie features yet another pair of brothers (Seth and his brother, Richie, played by Tarantino) who have a thing for black suits.


Jackie Brown (1997) 87%

Miramax Films

(Photo by Miramax Films)

Beware of people who claim that, because it was based on an Elmore Leonard novel and not an original Tarantino idea, there are no overt connections to the QTCU in Jackie Brown. They’re just not paying attention. Midway through the film, we see Jackie in the Del Amo Mall food court, enjoying a meal from Teriyaki Donut — the same fictional fast food franchise whose food Ving Rhames’ Marcellus Wallace is carrying when Butch Coolidge runs him down in Pulp Fiction. In a second food court scene not long after, we not only see Jackie indulging in Teriyaki Donut again, but her accomplice Sheronda (LisaGay Hamilton) sits down at her table with a tray full of food from Acuña Boys, which would later be referenced in Kill Bill Vol. 2 and appear a couple of times in Grindhouse.


Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) 85% and Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004) 84%

Miramax Films

(Photo by Miramax Films)

We’ll treat this kung fu-inspired magnum opus as one film, with plenty of easter eggs to link it to the larger QTCU. For one, if you look at The Bride’s (Uma Thurman) old gang, the Deadly Viper Assassination Squad, you’ll notice that they all fit a little too easily into Mia Wallace’s description of her failed TV pilot, Fox Force Five – the blonde leader, the Japanese kung fu master, the black demolition expert, the French seductress, and Mia’s. character, the deadliest woman in the world with a knife (or sword?). The first cop on the scene after the Bride’s wedding day massacre is, of course, Earl McGraw, and Red Apple and Big Kahuna also make appearances. And remember Acuña Boys from Jackie Brown? In Vol. 2, they happen to be the name of the gang that Michael Parks’ Esteban Vihaio runs.


Grindhouse (2007) 84%

The Weinstein Co./Dimension

(Photo by The Weinstein Co./Dimension)

In both the Tarantino portion of this double feature homage, Death Proof, and the Rodriguez portion, Planet Terror, there are connections to the QTCU. Big Kahuna burgers are mentioned, and Red Apple cigarettes are smoked. On top of that, an ad for Acuña Boys “Authentic Tex-Mex Food” — first glimpsed in Jackie Brown — pops up during intermission, and one of Stuntman Mike’s early victims, Vanessa Ferlito’s Arlene, can be seen sipping from an Acuña Boys cup. Texas lawman Earl McGraw also reappears, along with his son, Ed, and we learn there is a sister named Dakota, too, who features in Planet Terror. As kind of a bonus, Rosario Dawson’s Abernathy has a familiar ringtone on her phone  — it’s the same melody whistled by Elle Driver (Darryl Hannah) in Kill Bill Vol. 1.


Inglourious Basterds (2009) 89%

Francois Duhamel/©Weinstein Company

(Photo by Francois Duhamel/©Weinstein Company)

In addition to Donny Donowitz, Michael Fassbender’s English soldier-turned-spy Archie Hicox has deep ties to the QTCU, it turns out. Late in the old west-set Hateful Eight, it is revealed that Tim Roth’s Oswaldo Mobray is actually a wanted man named “English Pete” Hicox, Archie’s great-great-grandfather.


Django Unchained (2012) 86%

The Weinstein Co.

(Photo by The Weinstein Co.)

We’ve already mentioned “Crazy” Craig Koons, but there is another deep cut reference to Django hidden in an earlier Tarantino movie. In Kill Bill Vol. 2, Bill’s brother Budd (played by Michael Madsen – also another pair of QT brothers!) buries the Bride alive in the grave of Paula Schultz. This is the lonely final resting place for the wife of bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz) in Django.


The Hateful Eight (2015) 74%

The Weinstein Company

(Photo by The Weinstein Company)

In addition to the Hicox family tree, Red Apple tobacco — the early version of the soon-to-be ubiquitous (in the QTCU, anyway) cigarette brand — makes a couple of appearances here. Demián Bichir’s Bob smokes a “Manzana Roja” right after the intermission, and Channing Tatum gets a custom-rolled Red Apple cigarette — his “favorite” — from Dana Gourrier’s Miss Minnie.


Once Upon a Time... In Hollywood (2019) 85%

Columbia Pictures

(Photo by Columbia Pictures)

At one point in Kill Bill Vol. 2, The Bride drives a blue Volkswagen Karmann Ghia. That same car shows up (driven by Brad Pitt’s Cliff Booth) in Hollywood. And not only do Booth and Leonardo DiCaprio’s Rick Dalton smoke Red Apples (of course), but there’s an end-credits scene in the movie that shows Dalton doing a TV commercial for the cigarette brand.


Pulp Fiction was released in theaters on October 14, 1994.

#1

Pulp Fiction (1994)
92%

#1
Adjusted Score: 98832%
Critics Consensus: One of the most influential films of the 1990s, Pulp Fiction is a delirious post-modern mix of neo-noir thrills, pitch-black humor, and pop-culture touchstones.
Synopsis: Vincent Vega (John Travolta) and Jules Winnfield (Samuel L. Jackson) are hitmen with a penchant for philosophical discussions. In this... [More]
Directed By: Quentin Tarantino

Like this? Subscribe to our newsletter and get more features, news, and guides in your inbox every week.

Rich Fury/Getty Images

(Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images)

Australian pop singer Troye Sivan appears this month in Joel Edgerton’s Boy Erased, the star-studded awards contender that goes behind the scenes of the controversial and mystery-shrouded practice of conversion therapy. The film is an adaptation of Garrard Conley’s memoir of the same name, which reflects on the time that the author’s religious parents – played by Nicole Kidman and Russell Crowe – forced him into conversation therapy after he came out to them. Sivan plays Gary, a teenager in therapy with Jared (the Conley character, played by Lucas Hedges), and who is one of the few kids to see through the practice and the man in charge of it.

Sivan, who came out in a YouTube video in his late teens, told Rotten Tomatoes he hopes parents see the movie – “like every parent in the world.” He added, “What’s so nice about this movie is that no one is a villain in it, and it’s a real genuine conversation and exploration of parents who love their kids and who are worried for their kids and do what they think is right for their kids – the movie explores how wrong that can go. I think the thing that’s missing is education. I’m hoping that the movie really is a part of that education for parents to kind of guide them in what I think is the right way to handle an LGBT child.”

Ahead of the film’s opening in limited release, Sivan shared his Five Favorite Films with Rotten Tomatoes.


Moulin Rouge (2001) 76%

The first film is Moulin Rouge! — weird because I’m seeing Nicole Kidman later today, not to brag. I’m pretty stoked about that. I first saw it at a family friend’s house and they put it on for me because they thought I’d like it, they knew that I liked music. But the first 10 minutes of that movie are absolute chaos, like full-fledged chaos. So, I was like, I hate this, I don’t know what this is. I gave it a second try and watched it through the first 10 minutes and then the story started to come together and it became my favorite movie.

I love that movie so much. I love the visuals, love the music in it, and just yeah, it spoke to my little gay heart when I was a kid.

Inglourious Basterds (2009) 89%

For me it’s a classic, and any time that I get to kind of live a fantasy of – it sounds awful – but of Nazis getting what they deserve, I am down with it.

Are you a big Tarantino fan?

I’m not not a fan. I just haven’t seen all of his movies, but I should because I love that movie so much. It’s just one of those movies that I feel like I can watch any time and enjoy it. And it’s weird as well, because I’m Jewish and really sensitive to a lot of Holocaust [material] and World War II stuff, and so I try to steer clear of those movies. But I think maybe because it’s fantastical enough and because of the alternative ending, that movie has always been okay for me to watch and doesn’t upset me too much.

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014) 92%

Grand Budapest Hotel is probably my favorite movie ever. I don’t know why, but it makes me feel so safe, and anytime I’m even remotely stressed, I’ll put on that movie and I feel like it transports me to another universe. It was the first Wes Anderson movie that I ever saw.

The thing that sticks out to me the most is the humor. I find the movie really, really, really funny. And then of course the set design and the way that it’s shot – everything is so gorgeous. But for me it’s just one of those movies that keeps you on your toes. You never really know [what’s going to happen]. It’s a simple, classic, good story that’s just told so beautifully, that it feels so artful and considered, and I just really appreciate that.

This list makes me realize that I really appreciate a director with real perspective, and the films are very stylized. That’s my vibe, and I think the Grand Budapest is an impeccable example of that.

Juno (2007) 94%

That movie for me was quirky done right. I feel like a lot of the time for me quirky is cringe-y, and it’s easy to mess up; Juno felt genuinely quirky and just cute, and the soundtrack is really inspiring to me because it’s got such a vision and perspective and such a sound to it. I love that movie. I think it’s really heartwarming.

Up in the Air (2009) 90%

I used to be really homesick as a kid. I never had sleepovers or anything like that with my friends ever, because I would have panic attacks and wanna go home. And then I watched Up In the Air, and watching George Clooney pack his suitcase so neatly and hop on the plane and just be so organized made me wanna travel by myself and made me love hotels and stuff like that. And I just love the movie as well. It gave me the courage to travel by myself for the first time and leave home.

The thing that kinda sucks is that I have a feeling that if I was to rewatch it now, it would be depressing. At the time that I watched it for the first time, it was ambitious – I wanted to travel all the time like that and I thought it was so cool. And then, as you know, the movie gets kind of dark and sad and it’s like, “What are you running from?” At the time that didn’t apply to me, but now I wonder if I would watch it back and be like, “Oh god, this is really too real.”


Boy Erased is in limited release Friday November 2. 

(Photo by Neilson Barnard/Getty Images)

Fans of basketball have known about Blake Griffin since at least 2009, when the University of Oklahoma star was drafted #1 overall by the Los Angeles Clippers, then missed his entire first season due to injury. When Griffin finally made his debut during 2010-2011 season, he won Rookie of the Year honors, and he ultimately helped lead the team to six straight playoff appearances. He was the face of the franchise… up until he was unexpectedly traded to the Detroit Pistons a little over a week ago.

For those who don’t normally follow the NBA, though, it was Griffin’s flashy dunk over the hood of a Kia Optima to win the 2010 Slam Dunk contest that really announced him to the world. An official NBA sponsor, Kia then inked an endorsement deal with Griffin that culminated in a series of popular TV ads highlighting his surprising knack for deadpan comedy. Griffin took that further by popping up in cameos on TV, filming sketches with Funny or Die, dabbling in improv and stand-up, and gradually building his reputation as a funny, likable off-court personality.

This week, he makes his feature film acting debut in a comedy called The Female Brain, a tongue-in-cheek look at the differences between men and women in relationships. The film was directed and co-written by Whitney Cummings, who also stars, and Griffin plays a pro basketball player (natch) married to a woman (SNL‘s Cecily Strong) struggling for career independence. RT got the chance to speak with him, and he gave us his Five Favorite Films, then talked about The Female Brain, his love of comedy, and a little bit of basketball.


Superbad (2007) 88%

It’s probably gonna be a very comedy-heavy list, but, one of my favorite movies is Superbad. Big Judd Apatow fan. I kinda always have been, still am, and that movie actually came out, like, my senior year of high school, so it was kinda like the perfect timing for me. It was right before me going to college, and if you remember Superbad, that’s what their whole quest was. Jonah Hill, Judd Apatow, Michael Cera, all those guys, Seth Rogen, Bill Hader — those are all still, to this day, some of my favorite comedians and actors to watch. That’s a big one for me.

Old School (2003) 60%

Next, I would go Old School. Again, I think I was in high school when that came out, early in high school, and it was just one of those movies that I remember… I still very vividly remember the theater I was in and where I was sitting and who I was with, and I remember going back to see it in theaters, like, two more times, and then watching it over and over and over. Just one of those movies that I have memorized from front to back. Obviously being a huge Will Ferrell fan, and have now got a chance to meet him and work with him too, so it’s been pretty awesome.

The Dark Knight (2008) 94%

Probably my favorite role of all time was Heath Ledger as the Joker in The Dark Knight. That’s one of my favorites to this day. Just watching his performance in that is like… It never gets old to me. Sometimes I’ll just watch the movie, and I’ll fast forward, and I know exactly where his scenes are, and I’ll just fast forward to every scene and just watch them. So that’s another one.

Inglourious Basterds (2009) 89%

I was having a hard time between — I’m a Big Quentin Tarantino fan — having a hard time between Inglorious Basterds and Django Unchained. I really like Django. Inglorious I can watch, like, pretty much all the way through. Just something about the way Quentin Tarantino writes and films his movies that I love, so it’s hard to pick one, but I definitely… I have Inglorious Basterds written down here first so I have to go with that.

Moonlight (2016) 98%

My last one is actually Moonlight. Kinda mix it up. That was one that I was super excited to watch, and I heard such good things about it. A friend of mine had a screener and he gave it to me, and I just… I probably watched it, I would say, like five times within two weeks. I just thought everybody’s performance in that was awesome, and it was shot so beautifully. From top to bottom, I really, really liked it.


Ryan Fujitani for Rotten Tomatoes: You’ve done cameos on TV shows, you’ve done shorts and Funny or Die, and obviously everyone knows about all the hilarious commercials, but this is the first feature film role you’ve tackled. Were you nervous at all, or worried about it? Was it daunting to take on a bigger role like this?

Blake Griffin: Yeah, it was definitely all of those things. I feel like, whenever I do things like this… I’ve done some improv, and I’ve done some stand-up, and especially doing this — not so much commercials or stuff that I’m just cameoing in — with stuff like this, I’m always very nervous, and it’s always very daunting, and I’m always a little insecure in terms of just thinking these people are… This is their professional career, this is their job, they’ve done this their whole life, and I’m kinda just coming in here and trying to keep up.

But every time I’ve been in those situations, I’ve been surrounded with awesome, awesome people, and this movie was really no different. Working with Whitney [Cummings] and Cecily [Strong] and Will Sasso and all these people, they literally just put you at so much ease, like as soon as I got on set, so it all ends up kinda going away. I would even kinda talk to Whitney, like, “I’m not feeling too great about this,” and she’d be like, “Why?” She was a key player in really putting my mind at ease before every scene. I would get a little confident at the end of each scene, after it started to click and I found the rhythm and all that, but then it would almost start all right back over again when I was onto the next scene. But it definitely got easier and easier as it went on.

RT: Your character, Greg, is a professional basketball player, but there aren’t actually any scenes of you playing ball in the movie, so it wasn’t absolutely necessary that your character needed to be a ball player, or that an NBA player had to be cast in the role. Was that part written specifically with you in mind?

Griffin: Yeah, you know, I’m close with [co-writer] Neal Brennan. I’d known Whitney — didn’t know Whitney super well at the time, but I had met her before and got a chance to talk to her, and I believe that they did have me in mind, but like you said, I think that role could’ve been several athletes. It was probably pretty easy to switch up to another sport or anything like that. That was kind of a big reason for me deciding to do this, was that it was a chance for me to not have to play myself, but at the same time I was still kind of playing myself. It was a nice little stepping stone for me, going to maybe that next level of playing somebody completely different.

(Photo by IFC Films)

RT: I don’t know if it was the case for all of the cast, but my understanding is that you were allowed to improvise your scenes quite a bit. How much of that were you actually able to do?

Griffin: Yeah, we were actually able to a lot. I would say pretty much every scene, once we got down what we really needed to get down, we were able to just kinda go and have fun with it, and I think some of the cuts that made it in the film are actually in there. But that’s always one of my favorite parts, is being able to play with a scene and just see where it goes. Sometimes it works out, and sometimes it doesn’t, but that’s always a lot of fun for me.

RT: Have you had a chance to see the completed movie yet?

Griffin: I actually have not. I haven’t seen it completely. You know, going in for ADR and all that, I’ve seen cut up stuff, but I haven’t had a chance to just because… I was supposed to be at the premiere but, you know, I had to pack up in the middle and move. [laughs]

RT: You’ve said in the past that if you weren’t playing basketball, you might have tried your hand at stand-up comedy. At what point do you think you sort of realized you had this ability to make people laugh?

Griffin: I mean, I don’t really know. I don’t really claim to be a funny guy, I just claim to enjoy funny things. I mean, just as a kid in high school and middle school, trying to make your friends laugh and all that — it’s obviously much different than stand-up comedy. I’ve just been such a huge fan of stand-up comedy for a long time. I’ve always had little jokes here and there. Once I started kinda meeting different comedians — once I met like Neal Brennan, actually; he was the first real person in comedy that I became close with — I just started writing ’em down and started keeping notes, you know, for whatever situation. I don’t know, some of them I’ll probably never use, and they’ll get scrapped, but I know that I always have them, and some have ended up turning into jokes. I don’t know, I’m always very hesitant to just jump on it and do different stuff, just because I know people have spent their lives crafting this skill, and I don’t ever want to use my, I guess platform, for lack of a better word, to just jump ahead and do these things. I always want to try to bring other people with me or do something where I’m hosting and have other people who I’m fans of to come do shows.

RT: I saw that stand-up set that you did in Montreal, and you had a bit in there about being traded, and now, this is the first time you’re playing for a team other than the Clippers. With this trade to the Pistons, does it feel like it’s expected of you to step immediately into a team leadership role there?

Griffin: Yeah, you know, this is a much younger team. Most of my career, I’ve played with guys who’ve had a lot of years in the league, and I was always kinda one of the younger guys, and this year… Even on the Clippers, early on, I was like the third oldest, I think, at one point, and now I think I’m second oldest, so having these younger guys on the team, I think it’s kind of a natural thing, but it’s definitely something that I’ve been prepared for my whole career up until this point. It’s definitely something that I’ve really embraced, and I look to be a leader and to help out some of these younger guys.

(Photo by Chris Schwegler/Getty Images)

RT: You know, the Pistons are this close to a playoff spot right now, and it’s realistic to expect you guys will make it. How tough will it be to make a playoff run while you’re trying to adjust to a new system, new teammates, etc., or do you feel like you will have settled in by the time the postseason comes around?

Griffin: Hopefully I’ll be much more settled in for that last push. It’s been nice to play some games here before the All-Star break, and then get a break and get to come back and have some practices and get going. But, you know, we gotta be healthy. Reggie Jackson is a big part of our team; we need him to come back. Ish Smith has been doing a great job for him, but in order to really make a run, teams have to be healthy, and once we get there, I think, down the stretch, we’ll have enough to do what it takes.

RT: As you mentioned, All-Star Weekend’s coming up. Who do you think has the stronger team, Steph or LeBron? Who’s going to win?

Griffin: Oh, man. After the draft, I thought LeBron had a really, really strong team. I still do. It’s just crazy that he’s had so many of his guys get hurt. I think every single guy on his team’s gotten hurt, right? I mean, not every guy, but all the All-Stars that have gotten hurt were Team LeBron. So I don’t know. I honestly need to sit down and look at the roster again. I remember thinking after the draft, after I saw the list, I thought Team LeBron was really well put together, but… I’ll still go Team LeBron, since Andre’s on that team, so I’ll keep pulling for my guy.

RT: Tell me that LeBron has talked to you about Space Jam.

Griffin: Ah, no… [laughs] We haven’t really had a real conversation about it. I’m not sure what they’re gonna do with that, but it’ll be interesting to see. That’s another one of my favorite movies from my childhood.

RT: Would you do it if he asked you?

Griffin: Yeah, one hundred percent. For sure.


The Female Brain opens in limited release this Friday, February 9. Read reviews for it here.

From critically acclaimed indie flicks to Oscar-nominated dramas and superhero blockbusters, Michael Fassbender has put together an enviably eclectic filmography — one that adds a chilly murder mystery this weekend with Tomas Alfredson’s adaptation of the Jo Nesbø bestseller The Snowman. We’re taking the opportunity to look back at Fassbender’s career and pay tribute to some of the movies that best exemplify his talents, and whether your tastes run to period pictures, quirky dramedies, or even blockbuster action films, we think you’ll find something here worth adding to your queue. It’s time for Total Recall!


Use the up and down arrows to rank the movies, or click here to see them ranked by Tomatometer!

100 Best War Movies of All Time

From peacetime to frontlines, from coming home to left behind: Rotten Tomatoes presents the 100 best-reviewed war movies of all time, ranked by Adjusted Tomatometer with at least 20 reviews each.

#100

Che: Part Two (2008)
79%

#100
Adjusted Score: 80412%
Critics Consensus: The second part of Soderbergh's biopic is a dark, hypnotic and sometimes frustrating portrait of a warrior in decline, with a terrific central performance from Del Toro.
Synopsis: Seven years after his triumph in Cuba, Che (Benicio Del Toro) winds up in Bolivia, where he tries to ignite... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#99
Adjusted Score: 77158%
Critics Consensus: Worthy themes and strong performances across the board make Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence an impactful story about bridging cultural divides.
Synopsis: During World War II, British soldier Jack Celliers (David Bowie) is captured by Japanese forces and held in a prison... [More]
Directed By: Nagisa Ôshima

#98

Black Hawk Down (2001)
76%

#98
Adjusted Score: 83896%
Critics Consensus: Though it's light on character development and cultural empathy, Black Hawk Down is a visceral, pulse-pounding portrait of war, elevated by Ridley Scott's superb technical skill.
Synopsis: The film takes place in 1993 when the U.S. sent special forces into Somalia to destabilize the government and bring... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#97

The Tin Drum (1979)
84%

#97
Adjusted Score: 85759%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Oskar Matzerath (David Bennent) is a very unusual boy. Refusing to leave the womb until promised a tin drum by... [More]
Directed By: Volker Schlöndorff

#96
#96
Adjusted Score: 84342%
Critics Consensus: A well-crafted and visually arresting drama with a touch of whimsy.
Synopsis: Mathilde (Audrey Tautou) is told that her fiancé (Gaspard Ulliel) has been killed in World War I. She refuses to... [More]
Directed By: Jean-Pierre Jeunet

#95

American Sniper (2014)
72%

#95
Adjusted Score: 84391%
Critics Consensus: Powered by Clint Eastwood's sure-handed direction and a gripping central performance from Bradley Cooper, American Sniper delivers a tense, vivid tribute to its real-life subject.
Synopsis: U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle (Bradley Cooper) takes his sole mission -- protect his comrades -- to heart and becomes... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#94

Kelly's Heroes (1970)
78%

#94
Adjusted Score: 79773%
Critics Consensus: Kelly's Heroes subverts its World War II setting with pointed satirical commentary on modern military efforts, offering an entertaining hybrid of heist caper and battlefield action.
Synopsis: In the midst of World War II, an array of colorful American soldiers gets inside information from a drunk German... [More]
Directed By: Brian G. Hutton

#93

Braveheart (1995)
79%

#93
Adjusted Score: 84166%
Critics Consensus: Distractingly violent and historically dodgy, Mel Gibson's Braveheart justifies its epic length by delivering enough sweeping action, drama, and romance to match its ambition.
Synopsis: Tells the story of the legendary thirteenth century Scottish hero named William Wallace (Mel Gibson). Wallace rallies the Scottish against... [More]
Directed By: Mel Gibson

#92

War Horse (2011)
74%

#92
Adjusted Score: 84027%
Critics Consensus: Technically superb, proudly sentimental, and unabashedly old-fashioned, War Horse is an emotional drama that tugs the heartstrings with Spielberg's customary flair.
Synopsis: Albert (Jeremy Irvine) and his beloved horse, Joey, live on a farm in the British countryside. At the outbreak of... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#91

Coming Home (1978)
85%

#91
Adjusted Score: 87324%
Critics Consensus: Coming Home's stellar cast elevates the love triangle in the center of its story - and adds a necessary human component to its none-too-subtle political message.
Synopsis: The wife of a Marine serving in Vietnam, Sally Hyde (Jane Fonda) decides to volunteer at a local veterans hospital... [More]
Directed By: Hal Ashby

#90
#90
Adjusted Score: 85725%
Critics Consensus: The Thin Red Line is a daringly philosophical World War II film with an enormous cast of eager stars.
Synopsis: In 1942, Private Witt (Jim Caviezel) is a U.S. Army absconder living peacefully with the locals of a small South... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#89

Lone Survivor (2013)
75%

#89
Adjusted Score: 83703%
Critics Consensus: A true account of military courage and survival, Lone Survivor wields enough visceral power to mitigate its heavy-handed jingoism.
Synopsis: In 2005 Afghanistan, Navy SEALs Marcus Luttrell (Mark Wahlberg), Michael Murphy (Taylor Kitsch), Danny Dietz (Emile Hirsch) and Matthew "Axe"... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#88

Private Benjamin (1980)
82%

#88
Adjusted Score: 84635%
Critics Consensus: Private Benjamin proves a potent showcase for its Oscar-nominated star, with Hawn making the most of a story that rests almost completely on her daffily irresistible charm.
Synopsis: A Jewish-American princess, Judy Benjamin (Goldie Hawn), is devastated when her husband (Albert Brooks) drops dead on their wedding night.... [More]
Directed By: Howard Zieff

#87
#87
Adjusted Score: 84626%
Critics Consensus: Benigni's earnest charm, when not overstepping its bounds into the unnecessarily treacly, offers the possibility of hope in the face of unflinching horror.
Synopsis: A gentle Jewish-Italian waiter, Guido Orefice (Roberto Benigni), meets Dora (Nicoletta Braschi), a pretty schoolteacher, and wins her over with... [More]
Directed By: Roberto Benigni

#86

Fury (2014)
76%

#86
Adjusted Score: 87221%
Critics Consensus: Overall, Fury is a well-acted, suitably raw depiction of the horrors of war that offers visceral battle scenes but doesn't quite live up to its larger ambitions.
Synopsis: In April 1945, the Allies are making their final push in the European theater. A battle-hardened Army sergeant named Don... [More]
Directed By: David Ayer

As we celebrate America’s 241st birthday, this special 24 Frames gallery highlights Fresh and Certified Fresh patriotic movies for our long weekend of good food, family, and fireworks!

The major streaming services added bunch of great stuff this week, including this year’s Best Picture winner, an acclaimed new TV series from the CW, Quentin Tarantino’s Oscar-winning WWII thriller, and everything ranging from a fact-based psychodrama to a horror film to popular shows from Netflix and HBO. Read on for the full list.


New on Netflix

 

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt: Season 3 (2017) 97%

Ellie Kemper stars in this Tina Fey-produced original Netflix comedy series about a woman trying to adjust to life in the city after being held captive in a bunker for 15 years. Season 3 is now available to stream in its entirety.

Available now on: Netflix


Inglourious Basterds (2009) 89%

Brad Pitt and Christoph Waltz headline an all-star cast in Quentin Tarantino’s revisionist WWII thriller about a clever Nazi colonel who specializes in locating Jews in hiding and a team of Jewish soldiers with a ruthless reputation for exacting vengeance on the Nazis.

Available now on: Netflix


Riverdale: Season 1 (2017) 88%

The CW’s dark, winking modern-day interpretation of the classic Archie comics follows high-schooler Archie Andrews (KJ Apa) and his friends as they navigate the harsh realities of life.

Available now on: Netflix


Christine (2016) 88%

Rebecca Hall stars in this fact-based drama as Christine Chubbuck, the Florida news reporter who committed suicide on live TV in 1974.

Available now on: Netflix


The Place Beyond the Pines (2012) 78%

Ryan Gosling and Bradley Cooper star in a drama with three interconnected stories about the fates of two families over the course of 15 years.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Amazon Prime

 

Moonlight (2016) 98%

Barry Jenkins’ multiple Oscar-winning (including Best Picture) drama follows a young man’s search for meaning as he grapples with love and comes to terms with his sexuality over three stages of his life.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Appropriate Behavior (2014) 95%

This indie comedy written and directed by (and starring) Desiree Akhavan centers on a Persian-American bixesual woman in Brooklyn trying to pick up the pieces after she’s dumped by her girlfriend.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Boardwalk Empire: Season 5 (2014) 88%

It’s been a while since HBO’s period crime drama ended, but if you never caught up with the final days of Nucky Thompson (Steve Buscemi) — or if you never watched at all — you can catch up on all five seasons on Amazon Prime now.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Blackcoat's Daughter (2015) 74%

Kiernan Shipka and Emma Roberts star in this horror film about a pair of girls who encounter a malevolent presence during a winter holiday they’re forced to spend alone at their boarding school.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on FandangoNOW

 

John Wick: Chapter 2 (2017) 89%

Keanu Reeves returns as the headshot-happy hitman, who is forced to honor an oath from his past and finds himself targeted by every other assassin in the process.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Raw (2016) 92%

This acclaimed French horror/dark comedy/coming-of-age film centers on a lifelong vegetarian who discovers a taste for raw meat during her first year of veterinary school.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


A United Kingdom (2016) 84%

David Oyelowo and Rosamund Pike star in this fact-based drama about the international outcry that erupted after the king of Botswana married a British citizen.

Available now on: FandangoNOW

Mel Gibson is getting the best reviews of his directorial career for Hacksaw Ridge, the World War II true story of conscientious objector Desmond Doss, who received the Medal of Honor for saving 75 men without ever carrying a gun or weapon. The legend of Doss inspires this week’s gallery: 24 Certified Fresh WWII movies!

(And before you ask, Grave of the Fireflies is Fresh but not Certified Fresh.)

550StarWarsFA2

This weekend, Star Wars: The Force Awakens came within a hair of becoming the top grossing film of all-time, leading the pack easily for a third straight weekend while the latest film from Quentin Tarantino expanded nationwide and made some noise of its own.

Coming within only $20M of the all-time domestic box office record in only 17(!) days, Star Wars: The Force Awakens remained at number one for a third consecutive weekend taking in an estimated $88.3M bringing its out-of-this-galaxy total to $740M, again in only 17 days. Current champ Avatar should be moving into the center lane to let The Force Awakens pass it on the left as early as tomorrow, no later than Tuesday. Since Avatar‘s ascent to the throne in 2010 (including a Special Edition re-release) there have been a couple of films where people thought, will this be the one to topple James Cameron’s stranglehold on the charts? But neither Batman nor The Avengers could put up a fight, though they valiantly tried. Jurassic World shocked the world with its $652M take from this summer, which eclipsed the initial release of Titanic ($600M) but even Chris Pratt fell just a little short. I think, however, that when the rumblings started that there would be a new Star Wars film on the horizon, people starting thinking that this could be it. And then the first trailer came out and fanboys everywhere wet their pants in anticipation. And when the opening night/day/weekend records came crashing down, it was a forgone conclusion that Avatar would fall too, but in less than three weeks? After its third weekend, Avatar wasn’t even halfway to its final total ($352M of $750M). Titanic was barely a quarter of the way to its final total ($157M of $600M). Yes, those two films were anomalies, having extremely slim declines week-to-week and sometimes even increasing after being in theaters for weeks on end (let’s not forget, Titanic was number one for about 4 months straight) so it’s unlikely The Force Awakens is only halfway to its ultimate final gross, but hitting a billion dollars is nowhere near out of the equation at this point. Internationally, The Force Awakens made another $96M this weekend bringing its foreign total up to $770M and its worldwide cume up to $1.51B with China still to come. For reference sake, the highest grossing U.S. film released in China is Furious 7 which made around $370M earlier this year.

What’s even more fascinating is if you look at the all-time chart adjusted for inflation, where Gone With the Wind has ruled the roost for decades with a current adjusted $1.7B gross. The Force Awakens could end up on the top 10 of that list if it ends up making over $938M, which is what Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs made over its many releases since 1937. Any way you want to look at it, we’re living through a momentous box office/pop culture moment. And I think, it’s a moment unlike any other we’ll see in at least my lifetime. Anticipation for The Force Awakens was unlike any other I’ve seen and even looking ahead at the release schedule for the next 10-15 years I’m hard pressed to come up with another movie (including the new Star Wars films) that will reach this level of box office domination. I can only hope right now James Cameron is putting the final touches on the artwork of the Na’vi waving at the Millennium Falcon as it flies by his records. With the domestic record set to fall within the next 48 hours, the next one we’re looking at is worldwide box office where The Force Awakens is currently number six all time with Furious 7 ($1.515B), The Avengers ($1.519B) and Jurassic World ($1.669B) set to fall as well. Which would leave only Titanic (2.186B) and Avatar ($2.788B) left to go, though those final two could take a little time.

The new dream team of Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg held up nicely in second place for a second straight weekend with their comedy Daddy’s Home slipping 25% to $29M, bringing its total up to $93.7M. I have to imagine Daddy’s Home Again is already in the works – let’s hope it doesn’t end up like Ted 2 or any number of comedy sequels that should have never been made. Why can we never just appreciate what we have?

It’s pretty amazing to me how every Quentin Tarantino films feels like an event when it comes out. Ever since he burst onto the scene with Reservoir Dogs in 1992 ($2.8M final gross) and then took the world by storm with his Oscar-winning Pulp Fiction ($108M in 1994), every 2-3 years Tarantino releases another film that is completely different from his last one, yet feels like a natural progression, like somehow all his films are within the same universe, just in different parts of it. This weekend his latest film, The Hateful Eight shot up an estimated $16.2M in its first full weekend nationwide (after a 100 theater opening last week), bringing its total up to $29.5M. It has a chance of becoming his third straight $100M film after 2012’s Django Unchained ($162M in 2012/2013 – his highest grossing film to date) and 2009’s Inglourious Basterds which made $120M. Both of those films grossed north of $30M in their opening weekends so The Hateful Eight may need some help to get to $100M, and a B CinemaScore isn’t promising, but the film looks like it might be a player during this awards season so it could get there.

There were no other new or expanding films this first weekend of 2016, so the rest of the top 10 looks a lot like last week. Fourth place belonged to Sisters which slipped a slim 11% in its third weekend to an estimated $12.6M bringing its total up to $61.7M. It’s no Daddy’s Home but I’d much rather see Tina Fey and Amy Poehler get back together for another film. Also holding up well over New Year’s weekend was Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip which fell only 10% to $11.8M, according to estimates, bringing its total up to $67M after three weeks. There can be no doubt there will be another Alvin film coming out soon… The Chipmunk Awakens perhaps?

There was less joy for Joy which fell 39% in its second weekend, falling to number six with an estimated $10.4M, bringing its total to $38.7M. A stronger hold in its second weekend would have been nice for this awards hopeful, but that seems to be the trend for prestige pics so far this year. On the other hand, you have The Big Short which fell only 14.5% in its fourth weekend to an estimated $9M bringing the ensemble film up to $33M. Eighth place belonged to Will Smith’s Concussion which held up reasonably well in its second weekend, taking in an estimated $8M, a drop of 24% from last weekend, bringing its total up to $25M. In ninth place was the unnecessary remake Point Break which dropped 30% from its opening weekend to an estimated $6.8M, bringing its cume to $22M. And rounding out the top 10 in its seventh weekend is the final chapter in the Hunger Games saga, The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2 which took in an additional $4.6M, according to estimates, bringing it’s total to $274M.

Outside of the top 10 saw The Revenant dip only 5% from last weekend while remaining in only 4 theaters, taking in an additional $450,000 this weekend, bringing its cume up to $1.3M so far. It expands nationwide next weekend. And opening in limited release was the stop-motion animated Anomalisa which took in a decent $140,000, according to estimates, from only 4 theaters for a per screen average of $35,000.

The top ten films grossed $196.8M which was up 56% from last year when The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies remained at number one for a third straight weekend with $21.7; and up 66% from 2013 when Frozen reclaimed the top spot in its seventh weekend $19.6M.

Follow Gitesh on Twitter!

Since making his debut with Reservoir Dogs more than 20 years ago, Quentin Tarantino has enjoyed one of the most consistently critically lauded careers of any director in modern Hollywood, and he’s back this weekend with the grim ‘n’ gritty Western ensemble piece The Hateful Eight. Once again, early reviews are solid — which means now is the perfect time to dedicate a feature to taking a fond look back at his earlier efforts. Cover the kids’ ears and keep an eye on Marvin in the back seat, because this week, we’re serving up Total Recall, Tarantino style!


Four Rooms (1995) 14%

FourRooms

The appeal of anthology films — that audiences can see the work of multiple directors under one narrative umbrella — can also be one of their major drawbacks: The results, as in 1995’s Four Rooms, often strike some viewers as wildly, painfully uneven. As this particular outing proved, success isn’t guaranteed even if you bring together a handful of the industry’s most critically beloved and/or commercially ascendant filmmakers; although Four Rooms united Tarantino, Robert Rodriguez, Allison Anders, and Alexandre Rockwell to tell the promise-rich tale of a beleaguered bellhop (Tim Roth) making his way through a series of progressively weirder hotel rooms on New Year’s Eve, only Rodriguez’s segment escaped heaps of withering critical scorn, and the film barely eked out $4 million at the box office. But a 14 percent Tomatometer rating means that a few critics liked it — such as Boxoffice Magazine’s Shlomo Schwartzberg, who shrugged and said, “As a whole, Four Rooms is only diverting, and pretty mindless, but at its best it’s a lot of fun.”

Watch Trailer


Grindhouse Presents: Death Proof (2007) 65%

DeathProof2

Forged by the bond of friendship between Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez — as well as their shared love of sloppy, bloody, low-budget exploitation flicks — 2007’s Grindhouse found the two directors splitting a three-hour double bill that took audiences from cheeky zombie terror (Rodriguez’s Planet Terror) to seethingly violent high-octane action (Tarantino’s Death Proof). At 67 percent, Tarantino’s half of Grindhouse got the short end of the Tomatometer stick, but plenty of critics still enjoyed his gleefully depraved look at a homicidal stuntman (Kurt Russell) with a fondness for murdering young ladies. “I’ve rarely seen a filmmaker, in current Hollywood at least, expose his sexual and sadistic kinks on screen with such shameless glee,” observed an admiring Kevin N. Laforest for the Montreal Film Journal.

Watch Trailer


The Hateful Eight (2015) 74%

Hateful8

What if Quentin Tarantino tried his hand at an Agatha Christie mystery? Filmgoers got their answer to that question — sort of — with 2015’s The Hateful Eight, in which a rogue’s gallery of typically Tarantino-esque characters find themselves bound up in lethally close quarters while a murder mystery inexorably tightens its way toward a gleefully violent conclusion. It’s a setup rich with possibilities for the director’s signature style of filmmaking, and in a fair number of respects, critics said Hateful didn’t disappoint: Tarantino assembled a stellar ensemble cast, including Samuel L. Jackson, Kurt Russell, and Jennifer Jason Leigh, and fed them heaping servings of the sort of pungently knotty dialogue fans have come to expect. Yet while Tarantino’s films have often benefited from an approach to violence that could be charitably described as “enthusiastic,” some scribes admitted to a certain amount of discomfort with the particular brand of bloodshed he unleashed here, identifying a darker, meaner strain that explored racism and misogyny without necessarily offering illumination. “The Hateful Eight is a movie about the worst aspects of human nature, which is why the film can’t be quite described as ‘fun,’ at least in the traditional sense,” wrote the Miami Herald’s Rene Rodriguez. “But Tarantino isn’t glorifying the ugliness; he’s condemning it.”

Watch Trailer


Kill Bill: Vol. 2 (2004) 84%

Kill Bill 2

Six months after kicking off his Kill Bill revenge saga with Volume 1, Tarantino returned to theaters with its conclusion. Part kung fu brawl, part origin story, Kill Bill: Volume 2 fills in the blanks of its katana-wielding protagonist’s (Uma Thurman) past while she slices and dices her way to whatever passes for redemption. Clocking in at over four hours between the two installments, it’s a pretty hefty cinematic experience for something that boils down to a fairly simple tale, but most critics didn’t mind at all — in fact, Volume 2 performed nearly as well as its predecessor on the Tomatometer. As Jeremy Heilman of MovieMartyr argued, “The massive combination of the first and second Kill Bill movies stands as a testament to both Tarantino’s exceptional skill as a filmmaker and the possibilities of pop cinema.”

Watch Trailer


Kill Bill: Vol. 1 (2003) 85%

KillBillVol1

After a seemingly interminable six-year wait following Jackie Brown, Tarantino re-emerged with a blood-spattered martial arts epic so sprawling it needed to be chopped in half. Enter 2003’s Kill Bill: Volume 1, starring Uma Thurman as an assassin whose plans to leave the fold for a life of wedded bliss hit a snag when her mentor (David Carradine) decides he’d rather have her dead than retired, and sends her fellow killers-for-hire (played by Lucy Liu, Vivica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, and Michael Madsen) to put a permanent stop to the nuptials. After watching Thurman’s take-no-prisoners performance, the New York Observer’s Andrew Sarris couldn’t help but say, “I would argue that, in a bizarre way, Mr. Tarantino empowers women as no action-genre director before him ever has.”

Watch Trailer


Jackie Brown (1997) 87%

JackieBrown

Three years after achieving “young Hollywood genius” status with Pulp Fiction, Quentin Tarantino re-emerged with Jackie Brown, a 154-minute adaptation of the Elmore Leonard novel Rum Punch that served as Tarantino’s homage to 1970s blaxploitation while resurrecting the career of one of the genre’s biggest stars: Pam Grier. Hitherto known for playing the title role in 1974’s Foxy Brown, Grier returned to the big screen in pretty good company, including Bridget Fonda, Robert Forster, Michael Keaton, Chris Tucker, Robert De Niro, and Pulp Fiction star Samuel L. Jackson. While it was ultimately a bit of a critical and commercial letdown after the raging success of Pulp Fiction, Jackie still proved a favorite for scribes like Chuck Rudolph of Matinee Magazine, who wrote that it “Achieves the soulful edge lacking from Tarantino’s previous efforts. Forster and Grier’s performances deserve to join the short-list of all-time greats.”

Watch Trailer


Django Unchained (2012) 86%

DjangoUnchained

Having entered the realm of social justice revenge fantasy with Inglourious Basterds, Tarantino basically remained there for Django Unchained, a pre-Civil War Western about a slave (Jamie Foxx) in an unorthodox partnership with a bounty hunter (Christoph Waltz) who needs his assistance to apprehend of a trio of outlaws — and is willing to not only grant his freedom in exchange, but help Django find and free his wife (Kerry Washington) from the clutches of a sadistic plantation owner (Leonardo DiCaprio). It’s the perfect setup for two hours and change of profane, gleefully violent action, and Tarantino more than delivers with a star-studded excoriation of systematic injustice that manages to treat its subject with something approaching the proper respect without sacrificing an ounce of momentum. The end result, wrote the Wall Street Journal’s Joe Morgenstern, is “Wildly extravagant, ferociously violent, ludicrously lurid and outrageously entertaining, yet also, remarkably, very much about the pernicious lunacy of racism and, yes, slavery’s singular horrors.”

Watch Trailer


Inglourious Basterds (2009) 89%

InglouriousBasterds

Any film fan worth his or her salt has seen plenty of World War II movies, but Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds added a little something special to the mix — an eminently well-cast revenge fantasy, starring a motley crew of solid actors (including Brad Pitt, Christoph Waltz, and Michael Fassbender) as soldiers in a parallel reality where the evil of the Third Reich is met full force with an Allied squadron whose members are hungry for Nazi blood (and/or scalps). Boasting a uniquely cathartic flavor of Tarantino-brewed violence to go with its taut drama and dark wit, Basterds proved powerfully compelling for critics like Salon’s Stephanie Zacharek, who had to concede, “Quentin Tarantino seems to be hanging on to a lost world of moviemaking. He may be nuts. But he’s a nut who cares.”

Watch Trailer


Reservoir Dogs (1992) 92%

ReservoirDogs

Debuts don’t come much more auspicious than Reservoir Dogs. Yes, it’s a profane, blood-splattered heist flick — and goodness knows we have more than enough of those — but this one’s noteworthy for a number of things, including its hyper-literate script, its killer soundtrack, and a cast stuffed with tremendously talented character actors (including Harvey Keitel, Tim Roth, Steve Buscemi, and Michael Madsen). While it didn’t exactly set the world on fire during its small theatrical run, it did offer cineastes an early look at one of modern filmmaking’s most exciting, fully formed talents — and it definitely drew the notice of critics like Jonathan Rosenbaum of the Chicago Reader, who wrote, “It’s unclear whether this macho thriller does anything to improve the state of the world or our understanding of it, but it certainly sets off enough rockets to hold and shake us for every one of its 99 minutes.”

Watch Trailer


Pulp Fiction (1994) 92%

PulpFiction

Some careers take a while to get going — and then there’s Quentin Tarantino, who drew almost universal critical praise for Reservoir Dogs before skyrocketing into the Hollywood stratosphere with his second film, 1994’s Pulp Fiction. A $214 million box office smash and seven-time Academy Award nominee (as well as Best Original Screenplay winner), Fiction offered a blend of pop culture smarts, laugh-out-loud humor, and shocking violence so potent (and massively influential) that it even managed to revitalize John Travolta’s long-moribund acting career — and left Dusty Springfield’s “Son of a Preacher Man” blasting out of countless college dorm rooms along the way. It was also, as Janet Maslin of the New York Times noted, “A triumphant, cleverly disorienting journey through a demimonde that springs entirely from Mr. Tarantino’s ripe imagination, a landscape of danger, shock, hilarity and vibrant local color.”

From critically acclaimed indie flicks to Oscar-nominated dramas and superhero blockbusters, Michael Fassbender has been on a roll lately — and given that we’re entering a cinematic season in which he’s starring in not one but two awards contenders, it seems safe to predict he’s really only just hitting his stride. Fassbender returns to theaters this weekend in Steve Jobs, so we’re taking the opportunity to look back at his filmography and pay tribute to some of the movies that best exemplify his talents, and whether your tastes run to period pictures, quirky dramedies, or even horror, we think you’ll find something here worth adding to your queue. Without further ado, here’s the Definitive Michael Fassbender!


Eden Lake (2008) 80%

01EdenLake

Plenty of actors have horror movies lurking in the far corners of their filmographies, but unlike most, Fassbender can actually claim to have starred in one that earned a fair amount of critical acclaim: 2008’s Eden Lake, a twisted little British thriller about a pair of young lovers whose camping trip is ruined by the arrival of a pack of violently aggressive teens. It’s the type of story we’ve seen unfold plenty of times, with extremely variable results, but happily — which is to say very, very uncomfortably — this excursion into grisly backwoods territory hews closer to classics like Straw Dogs and Deliverance than the dozens of klutzy imitators they left in their wake. It definitely impressed the Guardian’s Peter Bradshaw, who wrote, “This looks to me like the best British horror film in years: nasty, scary and tight as a drum.”

Watch Trailer


Hunger (2008) 90%

02Hunger

Fassbender and writer-director Steve McQueen make great films together, but they aren’t necessarily fun, and their first collaboration, the hard-hitting historical drama Hunger, is a perfect example. To dramatize the last months of Bobby Sands, a soldier in the Provisional Irish Republican Army who led a hunger strike while imprisoned in Northern Ireland in the early ‘80s, Fassbenderdropped an alarming amount of weight by subjecting himself to a 600-calorie-a-day diet — yet still managed to bring an incredible amount of energy to bear on a performance that earned him a British Independent Film Award for Best Actor. Although Hunger wasn’t Fassbender’s first film, it was the first to really demonstrate what he could do if given the chance, and after the closing credits rolled, plenty of casting directors were willing to do just that. “Imagine how most filmmakers would tell this story and then see Hunger,” challenged Time Out’s Dave Calhoun. “The differences are bold and powerful and restore faith in cinema’s ability to cover history free from the bounds of texts and personalities.”

Watch Trailer


Inglourious Basterds (2009) 89%

03InglouriousBasterds

American filmgoers received their first real exposure to Fassbender in Quentin Tarantino’s Inglourious Basterds, a gleefully violent and profane World War II revenge fantasy in which a squadron of Jewish-American soldiers (led by Brad Pitt, natch) plow through Nazis behind enemy lines while plotting the fiery assassination of Adolf Hitler. Appearing as Lieutenant Archie Hicox, a British film critic with a background in German cinema, Fassbender is the focus of a brief but memorable sequence in which the Basterds meet up at a tavern and draw an inordinate — and eventually rather explosive — amount of suspicion from the Gestapo. While he certainly isn’t the star of the show, Fassbender’s Inglourious turn offered proof that he didn’t need a ton of screentime, or shocking weight loss, to exert a commanding presence, and helped move the Independent’s Jonathan Romney to decree, “Personally, I wearied of Tarantino’s breathless shtick long ago, but I must admit I enjoyed Inglourious Basterds more than anything he’s done in years.”

Watch Trailer


Fish Tank (2009) 91%

04FishTank

As he’s demonstrated repeatedly throughout his career, Fassbender is gifted when it comes to making audiences identify with irredeemably skeevy characters — and it doesn’t get much skeevier than starting a sexual relationship with your girlfriend’s teenage daughter, which is exactly what he does as Conor O’Reily in writer-director Andrea Arnold’s 2009 Cannes Jury Prize winner Fish Tank. Not content to settle for exploitation, Arnold effectively sets the stage for how and why her young protagonist (brilliantly played by newcomer Katie Jarvis) might be drawn to O’Reily; Fassbender, meanwhile, invests a potentially two-dimensional part with a fascinating blend of danger and allure, putting the audience in Jarvis’ shoes even as they’re urging her to run away. “Fish Tank digs around in its protagonist’s psyche, unafraid to explore,” wrote Steven Rea for the Philadelphia Inquirer. “It’s oppressive and claustrophobic, confused and scary in there. But it’s also compellingly real.”

Watch Trailer


X-Men: First Class (2011) 86%X-Men: Days of Future Past (2014) 90%

05X-MenFirstClass

After the sour taste left by 2006’s X-Men: The Last Stand and 2009’s standalone Wolverine movie, many filmgoers were rightfully cynical about Fox’s decision to reboot the franchise with 2011’s X-Men: First Class, an origin story that sent filmgoers back in time to the superpowered team’s early ‘60s beginnings. But whatever the original X-Men trilogy’s problems might have been, casting was rarely one of them, and with First Class, director Matthew Vaughn found himself wielding an impressive collection of top-shelf talent that included Fassbender as Erik “Magneto” Lehnsherr and James McAvoy as his lifelong frenemy, Charles “Professor X” Xavier. Following the warm critical and commercial reception afforded First Class, the team stepped up its game with 2014’s X-Men: Days of Future Past, which managed to take an impossibly convoluted time-travel story and use it as an effective means of bringing back original cast members while definitively rebooting the canon established with The Last Stand and still offering the new trilogy’s stars plenty of time to shine. Unless things go horribly awry with X-Men: Apocalypse in 2016, Fassbender will have been an important component in one of the most successful cinematic overhauls in recent memory.

Watch Trailer


Shame (2011) 79%

06Shame

He received plenty of prurient interest for his full frontal nudity in the film, but it was Fassbender’s nakedly emotional performance in Shame that truly mattered — and landed the movie on a stack of critics’ year-end Top 10 lists while earning him another British Independent Film Award. While definitely not a movie for everyone, Shame was 100 percent for Fassbender; in fact, director/co-writer Steve McQueen considered no one else for the part of the protagonist, the emotionally twisted sex addict Brandon Sullivan, after working with Fassbender on Shame. Paired with Carey Mulligan in a decidedly dark drama about secrets, lies and addiction with overtones of implied incest, Fassbender let it all hang out in more ways than one, and was rewarded with some of the best reviews of his career — including a few from critics who didn’t even like the film. “There’s a misery in Fassbender that’s spellbinding,” wrote the Boston Globe’s Wesley Morris. “I rolled my eyes for most of Shame. But never at him.”

Watch Trailer


Jane Eyre (2011) 84%

07JaneEyre

In between blockbusting with X-Men: First Class and reaping critical acclaim for Shame, Fassbender also visited cineplexes in 2011 as Edward Rochester in Cary Fukunaga’s critically acclaimed adaptation of the Charlotte Brontë classic Jane Eyre. A perennial filmmaker favorite dating back to the silent era, Eyre wasn’t exactly crying out for another trip to the big screen, but Fukunaga’s version managed to set itself apart with loads of dark, artfully composed atmosphere that emphasized the darker elements of the story and draped a layer of gloom over a story often treated as a gauzy period romance — and with a tremendous cast that also included Judi Dench, Sally Hawkins, and Mia Wasikowska in the title role. “True aficionados will doubtless wish the film etched every aspect of the Brontë experience,” warned the San Jose Mercury News’ Karen D’Souza, “but that’s a quibble in light of the movie’s intoxicating charms. It’s impossible not to fall in love with this Jane.”

Watch Trailer


12 Years a Slave (2013) 95%

0812YearsASlave

Fassbender reunited with his Hunger and Shame director Steve McQueen for 2013’s 12 Years a Slave, a harrowing adaptation of memoirs written by former slave Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor). Playing Edwin Epps, the brutal and none-too-bright master of the plantation where Northup ends up, Fassbender could easily have slipped into horrific caricature, but he instead strove to locate the humanity buried beneath Epps’ depraved actions; in the process, he helped elevate one of the year’s most important films into even more of a gripping, well-rounded drama than it otherwise might have been — and earned himself a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination along the way. “12 Years a Slave is likely the most painful, clear-eyed feature ever made about American slavery,” wrote the Atlantic’s Christopher Orr. “In that light, it almost seems faint praise to add that it will also likely prove to be the best film of the year.”

Watch Trailer


Frank (2014) 92%

09Frank

It takes a special kind of actor to be able to shoulder the burden of leading a movie even under ordinary circumstances, so it’s really saying something that Fassbender managed to exert his unique influence over Frank even while spending most of his screen time under a giant papier-mâché mask. An artful blend of comedy and drama loosely inspired by outsider artists like Chris Sievey (who really did wear a giant head while performing as a character he dubbed Frank Sidebottom), Frank dabbles in themes that might have sent a less disciplined filmmaker tumbling headlong into indie quirk, but in director Lenny Abrahamson’s hands (and with a cast that also includes Domhnall Gleeson, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Scoot McNairy), it’s as affecting as it is refreshingly offbeat. “That Fassbender plays the role of the disguised rocker fits well with the movie’s tone,” pointed out NPR’s Tomas Hachard. “Putting one of the biggest actors in Hollywood behind a mask lends a further rebellious streak to an already sardonic film.”

Watch Trailer


Slow West (2015) 92%

10SlowWest

He’s made indie favorites, superhero blockbusters, award-winning prestige pictures — and with 2015’s Slow West, MichaelFassbender even got to make a well-reviewed Western. Starring alongside Kodi Smit-McPhee as a mysterious bounty hunter who aids a young man (for a price) on his quest across the 19th-century American frontier, Fassbender got to saddle up as the strong, silent type while sharing screen time with a talented posse of supporting actors that included future Star Wars spinoff headliner Ben Mendelsohn — all in service of a strong script and confidently mounted picture from debuting writer-director John Maclean. “It’s the rare western that invites you to imagine what life then and there might actually have felt like, sight gags and all,” mused the Village Voice’s Alan Scherstuhl. “Maclean is a supremely promising talent.”

Watch Trailer

75 Best Summer Blockbusters of All Time

In defense of the blockbuster, Rotten Tomatoes offers you Best Summer Movies, a countdown of the highest-rated wide releases to hit theaters during the hot season since the release of Jaws in 1975. We’re using a weighted formula that takes the Tomatometer, the number of reviews, and the year of release into account. In order to qualify, each movie needs at least 20 reviews, and to have been released wide in the months between May and August. Enough talk: grab an extra large soda and a bucket of popcorn and dive into RT’s Best Summer Movies!

 

 

Brad Pitt
Today he’s one of the most bankable movie stars in Hollywood, and one of the few actors audiences will pay to see no matter what sort of role he’s playing — whether it’s action, drama, or comedy the script calls for, having Brad Pitt‘s name above the title is about as close as anyone can come to a guarantee for a hit film. Not so long ago, however, Pitt was just another good-looking dude with enough gumption to work his way into a steady stream of TV shows and bit parts in movies. He’s come a long way, for sure, and to celebrate his latest starring role — in David Ayer’s Fury, opening this weekend — we decided the time was right for a brand new Brad Pitt edition of Total Recall.

 


82%

10. Se7en

On the surface, it looks like just another buddy cop movie — in fact, with its “retiring detective partnered with unorthodox rookie” setup, it could have been a Lethal Weapon ripoff. Of course, as we all now know, David Fincher’s Seven brought its own dark twist to the genre, plunging the viewer into a bottomless pit of sorrow, rage, and moral decay — and ultimately refusing to help them climb out at the end. With Fincher’s amped-up direction, Darius Khondji’s gripping cinematography, and mesmerizing performances from Morgan Freeman and Kevin Spacey, Pitt could conceivably just shown up to take a paycheck without damaging Seven too much, but instead, he helped take it to another level, using his youthful good looks — and his character’s mounting horror and confusion — as a painful visual analogy for the brutal loss of innocence and compassion suffered by everyone in the film. Though some critics took issue with Seven‘s constant gloom and grisly violence, most scribes echoed the sentiments of Netflix’s James Rocchi, who called it “a harrowingly bleak vision that haunted me in the theatres and made my flesh slick with fear even on this recent re-viewing.”


79%

9. Fight Club

He started the 1990s on a hot streak, but by the end of the decade, Pitt was suffering through a bit of a slump, appearing in a string of critical dogs (Seven Years in Tibet, The Devil’s Own, Meet Joe Black) whose box office tallies reflected their disappointing reviews. But just when the naysayers were ready to write him off as an expensive hair model who couldn’t break a movie, Pitt rebounded with Fight Club, a reunion with Seven director David Fincher that paired Pitt with Edward Norton in an adaptation of Chuck Palahniuk’s hit novel. Though some critics found the film’s overpowering violence and homoerotic overtones repugnant (New York Magazine’s Peter Rainer, for one, dismissed it as “the squall of a whiny and essentially white-male generation that feels ruined by the privileges of women and a booming economy”), most writers responded to Fight Club‘s social criticism and thought-provoking themes. In the words of ReelViews’ James Berardinelli, it’s “a memorable and superior motion picture — a rare movie that does not abandon insight in its quest to jolt the viewer.”


83%

8. Ocean’s Eleven

Critics have a reputation for turning up their noses at escapist fare, but when it’s done right, most scribes have no problem saying so — as they did in 2001, with the Certified Fresh Ocean’s Eleven. A loose remake of the 1960 Rat Pack feature of the same name, Eleven blended the original with the nod-and-a-wink light touch of The Sting, giving its high-wattage cast free rein to essentially goof off for 116 minutes — and audiences, who hadn’t been treated to a real all-star caper since 1984’s woeful Cannonball Run II, turned out in droves. Pitt’s turn as the food-obsessed Rusty Ryan gave him an opportunity to flash the pearly whites and old-fashioned Hollywood cool that he’d played down in recent projects such as Seven Years in Tibet or Fight Club, and helped charm critics like Rolling Stone’s Peter Travers, who wrote, “forget Oscar, Ocean’s Eleven is the coolest damned thing around.”


80%

7. A River Runs Through It

An adaptation of Norman Maclean’s semi-autobiographical book of the same name, A River Runs Through It arrived on screens with a pretty stellar pedigree — director Robert Redford had won an Academy Award for his first effort, 1980’s Ordinary People, cinematographer Philippe Rousselot (who would win his own Oscar for River) was highly regarded for his work in French cinema, and musician Mark Isham brought his Grammy-winning talents to the Oscar-nominated score. The result, as you might imagine, was a visually sumptuous film — one whose stunning vistas bowled critics over even as they yawned through its languid pace and shrugged at its simple presentation of a Montana family’s multi-generational dynamic (as TV Guide wrote, “it’s hard to get excited by fisherman casting their lines into the water”). Still, in spite of its lack of flash, River afforded Pitt an early opportunity to work with some tremendously talented individuals, and proved he was more than just the cowboy-hatted hunk he portrayed in Thelma & Louise. Caryn James of the New York Times was suitably impressed, writing, “here are two things I never thought I’d say: I like a movie about fly fishing, and Robert Redford has directed one of the most ambitious, accomplished films of the year.”


88%

6. Thelma & Louise

By the time Thelma & Louise was released in 1991, Brad Pitt had been around for a few years, notching roles on the big screen (blink-and-you’ll-miss-him appearances in No Way Out and Less Than Zero, as well as topline billing in the low-budget horror flick Cutting Class) and surfacing repeatedly on television (most notably via recurring gigs on Dallas, Growing Pains, and Fox’s quickly canceled Glory Days). However, it was his turn as J.D., the impeccably coiffed, frequently shirtless con man who fleeces Thelma and Louise, that put Pitt over the edge, turning him from a somewhat familiar face into a bona fide sex symbol. It was a performance so well-regarded — albeit mainly by Pitt’s solidly female target demographic — that not even Johnny Suede and Cool World could keep him from imminent superstardom. Of course, it didn’t hurt that Pitt’s breakout role came as part of a movie that inspired waves of praise from critics like Matt Brunson of Creative Loafing, who wrote, “this beautifully realized picture remains a trenchant, almost mystical slice of Americana.”


84%

5. The Tree of Life

Nothing gets a cineaste’s anticipation humming like news of a new Terrence Malick film — and since Malick is nothing if not deliberate, we had plenty of time to hum over Tree of Life. Originally announced in the wake of Malick’s 2005 effort The New World, it tumbled down the release schedule throughout 2009 and 2010 before finally bowing in May 2011 — all 139 inscrutable minutes of it. The product of Malick’s progressively harder-to-contain ambition, Life took viewers from the dawn of life to the 21st century, leaving plenty of room for solid acting from Pitt and Jessica Chastain — as well as hosannas from critics like Salon’s Andrew O’Hehir, who deemed it “a noble crazy, a miraculous William Butler Yeats kind of crazy, alive with passion for art and the world, for all that is lost and not lost and still to come.”


89%

4. 12 Monkeys

Though his film roles to that point had, for the most part, required him to do little more than look good, Pitt’s turn in the Terry Gilliam-directed 12 Monkeys — coming on the heels of his eye-opening appearance in Seven earlier in the year — proved that he not only had good taste in scripts, but the talent to back it up. As the institutionalized activist Jeffrey Goines, Pitt tapped into a nervous energy he’d never been asked to draw on, holding his own against Bruce Willis and helping the twisty dystopian sci-fi thriller become one of 1995’s biggest surprise hits. Though it would be some time before Pitt starred in another movie that earned this kind of critical affection, after 12 Monkeys, the critics knew he wasn’t just another pretty face. As Desson Thomson of the Washington Post wrote, “Willis and Pitts’s performances, Gilliam’s atmospherics and an exhilarating momentum easily outweigh [its] trifling flaws.”


89%

3. Inglourious Basterds

Generally speaking, an actor doesn’t get many chances to play a character named Aldo — and an actor also doesn’t have many opportunities to work with Quentin Tarantino. So when Tarantino came to Pitt with the role of the cheerfully violent Nazi-hunting Lieutenant Aldo Raine in Inglourious Basterds, he clearly knew better than to say no. The result was a tense, colorful, funny, and terribly bloody World War II revenge fantasy that set loose a terrific ensemble cast (including Christoph Waltz and Michael Fassbender) in a spellbinding parallel dimension. Argued the Miami Herald’s Rene Rodriguez: “Inglourious Basterds transcends the war genre to become its own kind of unique picture: A bloody blast of pure movie bliss.”


93%

2. True Romance

Take Christian Slater, an Arquette, and the guy who directed Beverly Hills Cop II, and nine times out of 10, you probably aren’t going to get a film that tops any sort of critically themed list, let alone one that inspires a writer like Peter Canavese to crown it “a hall of fame guy’s movie” — but the exception proves the rule, and 1993’s True Romance is that exception. Slater and Patricia Arquette are the stars of this cult classic action flick, which boasts a Tarantino script and noteworthy supporting turns from (among others) Dennis Hopper, Val Kilmer, Gary Oldman, Christopher Walken, and Bronson Pinchot; it’s Brad Pitt’s few minutes as the epically stoned Floyd, however, that steal the show, sprinkling a few much-needed belly laughs between the bursts of gunfire. Such was Floyd’s influence that he served as the inspiration for 2008’s Pineapple Express. And for good reason: Not only was he industrious enough to figure out an exciting new use for an empty honey container, he was cool enough to threaten a room full of shotgun-wielding Mafia henchmen with death. (We never said he was smart.)


94%

1. Moneyball

As a (freakishly entertaining) by-the-numbers account of how the Oakland A’s used newly adapted metrics to turn conventional baseball wisdom on its head, Michael Lewis’ Moneyball seemed like one of the least cinematic bestsellers to have its film rights optioned by a major studio — and after directors David Frankel and Steven Soderbergh departed the project, it looked like it might be destined for the scrap heap. But with Bennett Miller behind the cameras and Pitt lending his rumpled charisma to the role of A’s GM Billy Beane — not to mention an Aaron Sorkin screenplay — it ended up being not only a six-time Academy Awards nominee, but a $110 million box office hit. “Baseball fans know this story,” admitted USA Today’s Claudia Puig, “but Miller puts it all in fascinating context. This is a thinking person’s baseball movie, a more complex version of the inspirational sports story.”


In case you were wondering, here are Pitt’s top 10 movies according RT users’ scores:

1. Fight Club — 96%
2. Se7en — 95%
3. Snatch — 94%
4. True Romance — 93%
5. Twelve Monkeys — 88%
6. Inglourious Basterds — 87%
7. Legends of the Fall — 87%
8. Interview with the Vampire — 86%
9. Moneyball — 86%
10. A River Runs Through It — 84%


Take a look through Pitt’s complete filmography, as well as the rest of our Total Recall archives. And don’t forget to check out the reviews for Fury.

Tag Cloud

YA batman Video Games Stephen King TCA Awards Awards dramedy sitcom Cartoon Network VICE Dark Horse Comics Apple TV Plus movies Travel Channel PBS CBS CBS All Access miniseries police drama new star wars movies Marathons dogs Universal Pictures TCA Winter 2020 2021 2020 child's play Mystery documentaries Mary poppins foreign Marvel Studios Pride Month 99% ABC Signature CW Seed Lifetime versus Alien video on demand slashers Superheroe venice Ellie Kemper Baby Yoda french Fox News crime drama gangster Amazon Studios Cannes remakes Christmas Sci-Fi marvel comics hispanic halloween tv Pixar Martial Arts scary movies TV Logo target Family high school ITV Tarantino Acorn TV mockumentary political drama canceled legend Marvel comic book movies series breaking bad Arrowverse nfl Extras Disney Channel Fantasy blaxploitation A24 cars Elton John facebook true crime Chernobyl 2017 Lifetime Christmas movies Amazon Prime Video Nat Geo Sneak Peek crossover RT21 Opinion fresh Britbox video Hollywood Foreign Press Association ID Tumblr Warner Bros. what to watch TCM X-Men Nominations witnail nature classics SundanceTV unscripted space cartoon Character Guide ESPN game show talk show independent SDCC Sony Pictures wonder woman CMT war Writers Guild of America Classic Film festival hist Neflix renewed TV shows TV One zero dark thirty golden globes HBO Max Premiere Dates Pop Netflix DC Comics FX Chilling Adventures of Sabrina rom-coms Funimation dark PaleyFest parents dexter biography 90s TCA 2017 Super Bowl indiana jones richard e. Grant Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt sopranos stop motion YouTube Premium Television Academy nbcuniversal zombies ratings Tomatazos indie Legendary The CW stoner NBC Best and Worst The Purge 24 frames IMDb TV dreamworks laika Mudbound Ghostbusters social media TV renewals 4/20 Calendar USA Network RT History italian Comic Book President kong Paramount Network doctor who USA television Cosplay Set visit crime TruTV live action DGA BBC America Awards Tour screenings Election Musicals spanish name the review Freeform Television Critics Association Comic-Con@Home 2021 The Academy Paramount HFPA Tags: Comedy fast and furious Amazon genre royal family deadpool marvel cinematic universe 93rd Oscars Hallmark Christmas movies strong female leads Trophy Talk thriller cats young adult Adult Swim Ovation YouTube Red Universal science fiction casting robots Prime Video DirecTV comics cooking Shondaland TCA Watching Series Kids & Family Podcast Countdown 72 Emmy Awards finale ABC Family prank 21st Century Fox rt labs critics edition dc Trailer Crunchyroll natural history Oscars archives LGBT new york TBS Interview japan aapi Disney streaming service PlayStation History 45 scene in color San Diego Comic-Con rotten movies we love revenge worst movies Box Office kids Grammys Showtime international The Witch GLAAD mutant Drama Bravo Emmy Nominations Sundance Now reboot Peacock asian-american Trivia Discovery Channel heist movie hispanic heritage month anime theme song Apple TV+ Summer trophy Holidays Rom-Com Columbia Pictures sequels psychological thriller Lionsgate screen actors guild Shudder halloween Valentine's Day australia mission: impossible pirates of the caribbean docudrama movie Marvel Television National Geographic boxoffice Winners trailers SXSW romantic comedy universal monsters Infographic 20th Century Fox Hulu mcc christmas movies Country BBC One toronto Brie Larson Rocketman japanese Emmys 2018 Pop TV E! diversity Avengers Mary Poppins Returns streaming cops period drama discovery women Mary Tyler Moore OWN Holiday james bond films Rock Film Festival dragons tv talk NBA critics Lucasfilm Pet Sematary south america composers Black History Month 007 Biopics FOX WGN Esquire docuseries BET New York Comic Con black comedy A&E MSNBC TNT cancelled TV series hidden camera The Arrangement BET Awards See It Skip It Tokyo Olympics Horror Fox Searchlight Captain marvel superhero slasher news Starz Polls and Games 71st Emmy Awards book adaptation Animation comiccon Mindy Kaling spy thriller scary Western 1990s zombie leaderboard cults criterion E3 sports anthology joker MCU award winner 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards Creative Arts Emmys HBO Go binge Heroines Paramount Plus latino Fall TV AMC Plus BBC comedies Exclusive Video TV Land 2015 all-time boxing adenture saw king arthur vampires franchise singing competition spain know your critic Syfy travel animated quibi children's TV APB Comedy Pirates disaster Binge Guide streaming movies rotten Tubi based on movie adventure Film toy story Reality Vudu First Look Disney+ Disney Plus godzilla olympics TIFF art house VOD sag awards DC streaming service cancelled Walt Disney Pictures Turner game of thrones DC Universe TLC The Walking Dead Crackle green book spinoff American Society of Cinematographers Academy Awards First Reviews directors crime thriller vs. supernatural IFC Films WarnerMedia Sundance TV Endgame biopic Hear Us Out Spring TV YouTube romance festivals book blockbuster justice league HBO Superheroes basketball Photos Epix jamie lee curtis Hallmark Schedule Music Certified Fresh teaser FXX scorecard Fargo The Walt Disney Company Year in Review superman a nightmare on elm street NYCC mob Disney telelvision MTV harry potter documentary elevated horror ghosts IFC comic books technology adaptation Amazon Prime Wes Anderson Spectrum Originals cancelled TV shows rt labs politics Thanksgiving spanish language Teen TV movies Musical CNN GIFs debate comic book movie 73rd Emmy Awards Masterpiece Action Toys BAFTA Broadway razzies ViacomCBS Disney Plus action-comedy Winter TV OneApp golden globe awards Nickelodeon football Star Trek Song of Ice and Fire spider-man Image Comics Star Wars feel good Turner Classic Movies aliens chucky dceu comic Sundance best Black Mirror VH1 FX on Hulu kaiju AMC critic resources blockbusters rt archives Comics on TV king kong emmy awards worst medical drama Apple Quiz transformers Rocky Food Network concert canceled TV shows monster movies cancelled television Instagram Live spider-verse new zealand Red Carpet black Comedy Central lord of the rings live event free movies posters twilight hollywood jurassic park Anna Paquin Women's History Month El Rey cinemax Reality Competition ABC 79th Golden Globes Awards 2016 popular LGBTQ Pacific Islander die hard historical drama obituary Netflix Christmas movies psycho serial killer stand-up comedy werewolf suspense GoT sequel Spike satire 2019 reviews