(Photo by Universal/courtesy Everett Collection)

All 43 Universal Classic Monster Movies Ranked

Before your cinematic universes and extended galaxies and interconnected constellations, there were the Universal Classic Monster movies. A loose confederation of sequels and spinoffs, they were the biggest motion picture events in the early life of cinema. The 1920s kicked things off with The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The Phantom of the Opera before the franchise moved into its 1930s golden era. Dracula, Frankenstein, The Mummy, and The Invisible Man all released between 1931 and 1933, and they remain masterpiece staples of the horror genre.

In the 1940s, Universal ramped up production, frequently outpacing quality control. Among the sequels was the introduction of The Wolf Man in 1941, as well as Universal’s turn to self-parody with the arrival of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello. The comedy duo would Meet Frankenstein in 1948, carrying well into the mid-’50s. Creature from the Black Lagoon was the final hurrah for the original line of Universal monster movies.

In 1999, The Mummy was revived in the summer blockbuster era, bringing in enough fans young and old to encourage two sequels. Van Helsing and The Wolfman also arrived in the decade or so after the Mummy relaunch, though the lackluster returns on those meant Universal was ready to try something new (read: what Marvel was doing).

2014’s Dracula Untold was to be the start of a so-called Dark Universe of connected monster movies. After that movie failed to draw much blood out of the box office, 2017’s The Mummy was going to be the “new” new start of the Dark Universe. Until that movie also bombed spectacularly.

And so we arrive at 2020’s The Invisible Man, which reportedly cost 30 times less than The Mummy to make, and with no aspirations to be tied to any larger universe. Now, we rank all Universal Classic Monster movies by Tomatometer!

#43
Adjusted Score: 18936%
Critics Consensus: With middling CG effects and a distinct lack of fun, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor finds the series past its prime.
Synopsis: Cursed by a devious sorceress, China's ruthless Dragon Emperor (Jet Li) and his vast army lie buried in clay for... [More]
Directed By: Rob Cohen

#42
#42
Adjusted Score: 11470%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Florida aquarium workers (John Agar, Lori Nelson, John Bromfield) communicate by cattle prod with a captured gill-man.... [More]
Directed By: Jack Arnold

#41

The Mummy (2017)
16%

#41
Adjusted Score: 38654%
Critics Consensus: Lacking the campy fun of the franchise's most recent entries and failing to deliver many monster-movie thrills, The Mummy suggests a speedy unraveling for the Dark Universe.
Synopsis: Nick Morton is a soldier of fortune who plunders ancient sites for timeless artifacts and sells them to the highest... [More]
Directed By: Alex Kurtzman

#40
#40
Adjusted Score: 4511%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Grisly murders convince a turn-of-the-century Londoner that she is the latest in a long line of werewolves.... [More]
Directed By: Jean Yarbrough

#39

Van Helsing (2004)
24%

#39
Adjusted Score: 31343%
Critics Consensus: A hollow creature feature that suffers from CGI overload.
Synopsis: Famed monster slayer Gabriel Van Helsing (Hugh Jackman) is dispatched to Transylvania to assist the last of the Valerious bloodline... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#38
Adjusted Score: 25434%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Two guys (Bud Abbott, Lou Costello) stuck in Egypt follow a medallion to the crypt of Kharis.... [More]
Directed By: Charles Lamont

#37
Adjusted Score: 26030%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Lawrence Stewart Talbot (Lon Chaney Jr.) is plagued by a physical oddity that turns him into a crazed werewolf after... [More]
Directed By: Roy William Neill

#36

Dracula Untold (2014)
25%

#36
Adjusted Score: 30485%
Critics Consensus: Neither awful enough to suck nor sharp enough to bite, Dracula Untold misses the point of its iconic character's deathless appeal.
Synopsis: In 15th-century Transylvania, Vlad III (Luke Evans), prince of Wallachia, is known as a just ruler. With his beloved wife,... [More]
Directed By: Gary Shore

#35

The Mummy's Tomb (1942)
29%

#35
Adjusted Score: 26313%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An old archaeologist (Dick Foran) recalls the mummy Kharis (Lon Chaney), now at large in New England.... [More]
Directed By: Harold Young

#34
#34
Adjusted Score: 31112%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A 3000-year-old limping mummy (Lon Chaney) seeks his reincarnated princess (Ramsay Ames) in a Midwestern college town.... [More]
Directed By: Reginald LeBorg

#33

The Wolfman (2010)
34%

#33
Adjusted Score: 41436%
Critics Consensus: Suitably grand and special effects-laden, The Wolfman suffers from a suspense-deficient script and a surprising lack of genuine chills.
Synopsis: Though absent from his ancestral home of Blackmoor for many years, aristocrat Lawrence Talbot (Benicio Del Toro) returns to find... [More]
Directed By: Joe Johnston

#32
Adjusted Score: 8268%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A criminal (Jon Hall) haunts his enemies' mansion after a mad scientist (John Carradine) makes him invisible.... [More]
Directed By: Ford Beebe

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 40573%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Shipped to Louisiana, mummy Kharis (Lon Chaney Jr.) and his princess (Virginia Christine) roam the bayou.... [More]
Directed By: Leslie Goodwins

#30
Adjusted Score: 12154%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Scientists (Jeff Morrow, Rex Reason) capture the creature from the black lagoon and turn him into an air breather.... [More]
Directed By: John Sherwood

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 51325%
Critics Consensus: In The Mummy Returns, the special effects are impressive, but the characters seem secondary to the computer generated imagery.
Synopsis: Ten years after the events of the first film, Rick (Brendan Fraser) and Evelyn (Rachel Weisz) O'Connell are settled in... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 54730%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After escaping from prison, the evil Dr. Niemann (Boris Karloff) and his hunchbacked assistant, Daniel (J. Carrol Naish), plot their... [More]
Directed By: Erle C. Kenton

#27

House of Dracula (1945)
56%

#27
Adjusted Score: 55182%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: This monster movie focuses on the iconic vampire, Count Dracula (John Carradine), and Lawrence Talbot (Lon Chaney), better known as... [More]
Directed By: Erle C. Kenton

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 63102%
Critics Consensus: Dracula's Daughter extends the Universal horror myth in an interesting direction, but the talky script and mild atmosphere undermine its ambition.
Synopsis: Although Count Dracula was destroyed by Van Helsing (Edward Van Sloan), who is now being tried for his murder, Dracula's... [More]
Directed By: Lambert Hillyer

#25

Dracula (1979)
59%

#25
Adjusted Score: 58730%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A man washes ashore in England after a shipwreck and is found by Mina Van Helsing (Jan Francis). The man... [More]
Directed By: John Badham

#24

Son of Dracula (1943)
60%

#24
Adjusted Score: 61538%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Count Alucard (Lon Chaney) comes out of a lake in his coffin and makes a Southern belle (Louise Allbritton) his... [More]
Directed By: Robert Siodmak

#23

The Mummy (1999)
61%

#23
Adjusted Score: 65193%
Critics Consensus: It's difficult to make a persuasive argument for The Mummy as any kind of meaningful cinematic achievement, but it's undeniably fun to watch.
Synopsis: The Mummy is a rousing, suspenseful and horrifying epic about an expedition of treasure-seeking explorers in the Sahara Desert in... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#22
Adjusted Score: 61136%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Policemen Slim (Bud Abbott) and Tubby (Lou Costello) go to London and meet a doctor (Boris Karloff) and his evil... [More]
Directed By: Charles Lamont

#21

Invisible Agent (1942)
67%

#21
Adjusted Score: 53162%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An Allied spy (Jon Hall) made invisible by chemistry outwits Axis agents with his blond-braided lover (Ilona Massey).... [More]
Directed By: Edwin L. Marin

#20

The Mummy's Hand (1940)
67%

#20
Adjusted Score: 66152%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In Cairo, archaeologist Steve Banning (Dick Foran) unearths a vase that he believes could lead him to the ancient tomb... [More]
Directed By: Christy Cabanne

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 24556%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A screwy professor's experiments with a gorgeous model attract the attentions of a gangster and a handsome millionaire.... [More]
Directed By: A. Edward Sutherland

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 75611%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Shepherd Ygor (Bela Lugosi) rescues the monster (Lon Chaney) from a sulfur pit and brings him to Dr. Frankenstein's other... [More]
Directed By: Erle C. Kenton

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 78553%
Critics Consensus: Though it lives beneath the 1925 version, Claude Rains plays title character well in this landmark color version of the classic tragedy.
Synopsis: Talented Christine (Susanna Foster) is unaware that her singing lessons are being funded by a secret admirer, Enrique (Claude Rains),... [More]
Directed By: Arthur Lubin

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 77463%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: While in Tibet researching a mysterious flower that purportedly takes its strength from the moon, botanist Wilfred Glendon (Henry Hull)... [More]
Directed By: Stuart Walker

#15
Adjusted Score: 83128%
Critics Consensus: A solid, atmospheric creature feature that entertains without attempting to be deeper than it needs.
Synopsis: Remnants of a mysterious animal have come to light in a remote jungle, and a group of scientists intends to... [More]
Directed By: Jack Arnold

#14
Adjusted Score: 80360%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Two detective-school graduates (Bud Abbott, Lou Costello) help a framed boxer who can make himself disappear.... [More]
Directed By: Charles Lamont

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 88842%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Wrongly accused of murdering his brother, Geoffrey Radcliffe (Vincent Price) is found guilty and sentenced to die. But when sympathetic... [More]
Directed By: Joe May

#12

The Mummy (1932)
88%

#12
Adjusted Score: 94211%
Critics Consensus: Relying more on mood and atmosphere than the thrills typical of modern horror fare, Universal's The Mummy sets a masterful template for mummy-themed films to follow.
Synopsis: A team of British archaeologists led by Sir Joseph Whemple (Arthur Byron) discover the mummified remains of the ancient Egyptian... [More]
Directed By: Karl Freund

#11
Adjusted Score: 92019%
Critics Consensus: A zany horror spoof that plays up and then plays into the best of Universal horror cliches.
Synopsis: In the first of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello's horror vehicles for Universal Pictures, the inimitable comic duo star as... [More]
Directed By: Charles Barton

#10

The Wolf Man (1941)
90%

#10
Adjusted Score: 94981%
Critics Consensus: A handsomely told tale with an affecting performance from Lon Chaney, Jr., The Wolf Man remains one of the classics of the Universal horror stable.
Synopsis: When his brother dies, Larry Talbot (Lon Chaney) returns to Wales and reconciles with his father (Claude Rains). While there,... [More]
Directed By: George Waggner

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 98698%
Critics Consensus: Decades later, it still retains its ability to scare -- and Lon Chaney's performance remains one of the benchmarks of the horror genre.
Synopsis: In this silent horror classic, aspiring young opera singer Christine Daaé (Mary Philbin) discovers that she has a mysterious admirer... [More]
Directed By: Rupert Julian

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 120582%
Critics Consensus: Smart, well-acted, and above all scary, The Invisible Man proves that sometimes, the classic source material for a fresh reboot can be hiding in plain sight.
Synopsis: After staging his own suicide, a crazed scientist uses his power to become invisible to stalk and terrorize his ex-girlfriend.... [More]
Directed By: Leigh Whannell

#7
Adjusted Score: 95753%
Critics Consensus: A heart-rending take on the classic book, with a legendary performance by Lon Chaney.
Synopsis: In 15th-century Paris, Jehan (Brandon Hurst), the evil brother of the archdeacon, lusts after a Gypsy named Esmeralda (Patsy Ruth... [More]
Directed By: Wallace Worsley

#6

Dracula (1931)
94%

#6
Adjusted Score: 99077%
Critics Consensus: Bela Lugosi's timeless portrayal of Dracula in this creepy and atmospheric 1931 film has set the standard for major vampiric roles since.
Synopsis: The dashing, mysterious Count Dracula (Bela Lugosi), after hypnotizing a British soldier, Renfield (Dwight Frye), into his mindless slave, travels... [More]
Directed By: Tod Browning

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 101643%
Critics Consensus: James Whale's classic The Invisible Man features still-sharp special effects, loads of tension, a goofy sense of humor, and a memorable debut from Claude Rains.
Synopsis: While researching a new drug, Dr. Jack Griffin (Claude Rains) stumbles on a potion that can make him invisible. When... [More]
Directed By: James Whale

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 97205%
Critics Consensus: Boris Karloff's final appearance as the Monster is a fitting farewell before the series descended into self-parody.
Synopsis: Baron Wolf von Frankenstein (Basil Rathbone) is determined to prove the legitimacy of his father's scientific work, thus rescuing the... [More]
Directed By: Rowland V. Lee

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 104904%
Critics Consensus: An eccentric, campy, technically impressive, and frightening picture, James Whale's Bride of Frankenstein has aged remarkably well.
Synopsis: After recovering from injuries sustained in the mob attack upon himself and his creation, Dr. Frankenstein (Colin Clive) falls under... [More]
Directed By: James Whale

#2

Dracula (1931)
100%

#2
Adjusted Score: 88462%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Soon after beginning work for Conde Dracula (Carlos Villarias), the clerk Renfield (Pablo Alvarez Rubio) learns that his employer is,... [More]
Directed By: George Melford

#1

Frankenstein (1931)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 106667%
Critics Consensus: Still unnerving to this day, Frankenstein adroitly explores the fine line between genius and madness, and features Boris Karloff's legendary, frightening performance as the monster.
Synopsis: This iconic horror film follows the obsessed scientist Dr. Henry Frankenstein (Colin Clive) as he attempts to create life by... [More]
Directed By: James Whale

(Photo by Universal / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Brendan Fraser Movies, Ranked by Tomatometer

Like a defrosted caveman, Brendan Fraser arrived out of nowhere when he starred as the titular Encino Man in 1992. The Paleolithic cult movie is a prototypical ’90s comedy: It’s broad, goofy, and Pauly Shore is never more than 10 feet away off-camera. Airheads and George of the Jungle were more in that ’90s style, while 1998’s Gods and Monsters showed off Fraser’s range. (Though School Ties, released the same year as Encino Man, had already proven some dramatic chops.) The Mummy turned Fraser into an international star, with the 1999 blockbuster remembered fondly today.

But flops began to mount (Monkeybone, Dudley Do-Right, Looney Tunes: Back in Action), and though Fraser was in Best Picture-winner Crash, so was half of Hollywood. Even The Mummy unraveled: The box office returns for Returns were good, but the Rachel Weisz-less Tomb of the Dragon Emperor bombed, killing the franchise in 2008. By 2010, we were witnessing Fraser getting blasted by skunks in Furry Vengeance and yelling ‘Miley Cyrus!’ as an expletive. After 2013’s Gimme Shelter, Fraser seemed to be no longer cast in movies.

At the end of the decade, Fraser’s voice was being heard again. He was Robotman in DC Comics’ series Titans. Well-received by fans, Robotman got upgraded to main status in spin-off Doom Patrol. Along with a recurring role in The Affair‘s third season, Fraser’s re-appearance made audiences wonder about the likable, genial actor’s long absence. The question was answered in a 2018 GQ interview, where Fraser alleges he was sexually assaulted in 2003 by Philip Berk, president of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, and was subsequently blacklisted by the industry for speaking out.

From this revelation (and more, like a contentious divorce, surgeries from doing stunt work, and the death of his mother), Fraser has emerged as a populist figure in the celebrity world, one whose fans are drawn to because of his survival through mistreatment and struggle. Like Britney Spears (whose conservatorship battle is documented in Framing Britney Spears), Fraser was once mocked and laughed at, but is now generating easy and eager goodwill after cultural re-examination of victimhood and predatory showbiz behavior. Directors seem glad Fraser’s around again: Steven Soderbergh put him on-screen in No Sudden Move, Fraser’s first Certified Fresh movie in 17 years. And the comeback continues with his casting in Darren Aronofsky’s The Whale and Martin Scorsese’s Killers of the Flower Moon.

Now, we’re ranking all Brendan Fraser movies by Tomatometer!

#34

The Poison Rose (2019)
0%

#34
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A hard-drinking detective takes on what looks to be a routine missing person case, only to be drawn into a... [More]

#33

Furry Vengeance (2010)
7%

#33
Adjusted Score: 10031%
Critics Consensus: A thin premise stretched far beyond serviceable length, Furry Vengeance subjects Brendan Fraser -- and the audience -- to 92 minutes of abuse.
Synopsis: When Dan Sanders (Brendan Fraser) takes a job overseeing the construction of a supposedly "green" housing development in the Oregon... [More]
Directed By: Roger Kumble

#32
#32
Adjusted Score: 10217%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Connie (Ricki Lake), unwed and pregnant, is heading to Boston by train when she meets wealthy newlyweds Hugh (Brendan Fraser)... [More]
Directed By: Richard Benjamin

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 10793%
Critics Consensus: The Air I Breathe is a jumbled indie production that accomplishes little save for the squandering of a talented cast.
Synopsis: Four stories are linked by a Chinese proverb and overlapping characters. A usually unadventurous man (Forest Whitaker) loses big on... [More]
Directed By: Jieho Lee

#30
Adjusted Score: 18936%
Critics Consensus: With middling CG effects and a distinct lack of fun, The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor finds the series past its prime.
Synopsis: Cursed by a devious sorceress, China's ruthless Dragon Emperor (Jet Li) and his vast army lie buried in clay for... [More]
Directed By: Rob Cohen

#29

The Nut Job (2014)
13%

#29
Adjusted Score: 16603%
Critics Consensus: Hampered by an unlikable central character and source material stretched too thin to cover its brief running time, The Nut Job will provoke an allergic reaction in all but the least demanding moviegoers.
Synopsis: After he accidentally destroys the winter food supply of his fellow Liberty Park residents, Surly (Will Arnett), a squirrel, is... [More]
Directed By: Peter Lepeniotis

#28

Dudley Do-Right (1999)
16%

#28
Adjusted Score: 16314%
Critics Consensus: Gags aren't that funny.
Synopsis: Based on the cartoon, this live-action comedy follows the adventures of Dudley Do-Right (Brendan Fraser), an enthusiastic, if somewhat dim,... [More]
Directed By: Hugh Wilson

#27

With Honors (1994)
16%

#27
Adjusted Score: 16979%
Critics Consensus: While it's admittedly well-meaning, With Honors handles its themes in strictly remedial fashion.
Synopsis: Academia meets street smarts when Monty Kessler (Brendan Fraser), a graduate student struggling to finish his program, loses his thesis... [More]
Directed By: Alek Keshishian

#26

Encino Man (1992)
17%

#26
Adjusted Score: 19393%
Critics Consensus: Encino Man isn't the first unabashedly silly comedy to embrace its stupidity and amass a cult following, but whether or not it works for you will largely be determined by your tolerance for Pauly Shore.
Synopsis: California teen Dave Morgan (Sean Astin) is digging a pit for a pool in his backyard when he happens upon... [More]
Directed By: Les Mayfield

#25

Monkeybone (2001)
19%

#25
Adjusted Score: 23114%
Critics Consensus: Though original and full of bizarre visuals, Monkeybone is too shapeless a movie, with unengaging characters and random situations that fail to build up laughs.
Synopsis: Slipping into a coma following a freakish accident, cartoonist Stu Miley (Brendan Fraser) finds himself in an incredible fantasy world... [More]
Directed By: Henry Selick

#24

The Scout (1994)
22%

#24
Adjusted Score: 21821%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Al Percolo (Albert Brooks), a scout for the New York Yankees, is sent to Mexico after his latest prospect (Michael... [More]
Directed By: Michael Ritchie

#23

HairBrained (2013)
22%

#23
Adjusted Score: 18609%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A brilliant teen (Alex Wolff) and a 41-year-old gambling addict (Brendan Fraser) become unlikely buddies at college.... [More]
Directed By: Billy Kent

#22

Airheads (1994)
25%

#22
Adjusted Score: 26851%
Critics Consensus: There's a biting satire that keeps threatening to burst out of the well-cast Airheads, but unfortunately, the end result lives down to its title in the most unfortunate ways.
Synopsis: Three aspiring rock musicians -- Chazz (Brendan Fraser), Pip (Adam Sandler) and Rex (Steve Buscemi) -- are determined to have... [More]
Directed By: Michael Lehmann

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 33113%
Critics Consensus: Despite a timely topic and a pair of heavyweight leads, Extraordinary Measures never feels like much more than a made-for-TV tearjerker.
Synopsis: John Crowley (Brendan Fraser) is a man on the corporate fast-track, with a beautiful wife (Keri Russell) and three children.... [More]
Directed By: Tom Vaughan

#20

Gimme Shelter (2014)
28%

#20
Adjusted Score: 30664%
Critics Consensus: In spite of its obvious good intentions -- and the compelling true story that inspired it -- the heavy-handed Gimme Shelter can't overcome its cliche-riddled script.
Synopsis: A pregnant teen (Vanessa Hudgens) learns to break the bonds of her past and embrace her future after taking refuge... [More]
Directed By: Ron Krauss

#19

The Last Time (2006)
35%

#19
Adjusted Score: 28486%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Ted Riker (Michael Keaton), a hard-driving high-tech salesman, mentors the less experienced Jamie Bashant (Brendan Fraser) in the art of... [More]
Directed By: Michael Caleo

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 34925%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: On the planet Baab, dashing astronaut Scorch Supernova (Brendan Fraser) is a national hero and master of daring rescues. However,... [More]
Directed By: Cal Brunker

#17

Inkheart (2008)
39%

#17
Adjusted Score: 43599%
Critics Consensus: Heavy on cliches and light on charm, this kid-lit fantasy-adventure doesn't quite get off the ground.
Synopsis: Mo (Brendan Fraser) and his daughter, Meggie, have the ability to bring storybook characters to life just by reading aloud.... [More]
Directed By: Iain Softley

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 21982%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A family wrestles with doubts after tests determine a daughter's (Jennifer Beals) unborn child will probably be homosexual.... [More]
Directed By: Ross Marks

#15
Adjusted Score: 30754%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Desire torments a former cultist (Brendan Fraser) taking refuge at the home of a scantily clad woman (Ashley Judd) whose... [More]
Directed By: Philip Ridley

#14

A Case of You (2013)
47%

#14
Adjusted Score: 41944%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Rejected by the girl of his dreams, a writer (Justin Long) creates an online alter ego that makes her fall... [More]
Directed By: Kat Coiro

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 51325%
Critics Consensus: In The Mummy Returns, the special effects are impressive, but the characters seem secondary to the computer generated imagery.
Synopsis: Ten years after the events of the first film, Rick (Brendan Fraser) and Evelyn (Rachel Weisz) O'Connell are settled in... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#12

Bedazzled (2000)
50%

#12
Adjusted Score: 54140%
Critics Consensus: Though it has its funny moments, this remake is essentially a one-joke movie with too many flat spots.
Synopsis: Desperate to gain the affection of a beautiful co-worker, Elliot (Brendan Fraser) strikes a deal with the Devil (Elizabeth Hurley)... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#11
Adjusted Score: 60458%
Critics Consensus: The plot is a nonsensical, hyperactive jumble and the gags are relatively uninspired compared to the classic Looney Tunes cartoons.
Synopsis: Sick of ceding the spotlight to Bugs Bunny (Joe Alaskey), Daffy Duck is unceremoniously fired by studio boss Kate Houghton... [More]
Directed By: Joe Dante

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 56232%
Critics Consensus: George of the Jungle is faithful to its source material -- which, unfortunately, makes it a less-than-compelling feature film.
Synopsis: George (Brendan Fraser) has raised himself since since he was a baby and a plane crash stranded him in an... [More]
Directed By: Sam Weisman

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 61165%
Critics Consensus: Cute idea, but not consistently funny.
Synopsis: Adam Webber (Brendan Fraser) has lived his entire life in confinement in a fallout shelter in Pasadena, Calif. When the... [More]
Directed By: Hugh Wilson

#8

School Ties (1992)
60%

#8
Adjusted Score: 62876%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: When David Greene (Brendan Fraser) receives a football scholarship to a prestigious prep school in the 1950s, he feels pressure... [More]
Directed By: Robert Mandel

#7
Adjusted Score: 66219%
Critics Consensus: Modern visuals and an old fasioned storyline make this family adventure/comedy a fast-paced, kitschy ride.
Synopsis: During an expedition to Iceland, professor Trevor Anderson (Brendan Fraser), his nephew Sean (Josh Hutcherson) and their guide, Hannah (Anita... [More]
Directed By: Eric Brevig

#6

The Mummy (1999)
61%

#6
Adjusted Score: 65193%
Critics Consensus: It's difficult to make a persuasive argument for The Mummy as any kind of meaningful cinematic achievement, but it's undeniably fun to watch.
Synopsis: The Mummy is a rousing, suspenseful and horrifying epic about an expedition of treasure-seeking explorers in the Sahara Desert in... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#5

Still Breathing (1997)
62%

#5
Adjusted Score: 51280%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A Texas street performer (Brendan Fraser) has visions of his future wife (Joanna Going), a Los Angeles con artist.... [More]
Directed By: James F. Robinson

#4

Crash (2004)
74%

#4
Adjusted Score: 82816%
Critics Consensus: A raw and unsettling morality piece on modern angst and urban disconnect, Crash examines the dangers of bigotry and xenophobia in the lives of interconnected Angelenos.
Synopsis: Writer-director Paul Haggis interweaves several connected stories about race, class, family and gender in Los Angeles in the aftermath of... [More]
Directed By: Paul Haggis

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 90914%
Critics Consensus: Thoughtful and wonderfully acted, The Quiet American manages to capture the spirit of Green's novel.
Synopsis: From the classic novel by Graham Greene comes a murder mystery centered on a love triangle set against the French... [More]
Directed By: Phillip Noyce

#2

No Sudden Move (2021)
92%

#2
Adjusted Score: 98089%
Critics Consensus: While it may not be on par with his best crime capers, No Sudden Move finds Soderbergh on entertainingly familiar ground -- and making the most of an excellent cast.
Synopsis: Set in 1954 Detroit, NO SUDDEN MOVE centers on a group of small-time criminals who are hired to steal what... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 98333%
Critics Consensus: Gods and Monsters is a spellbinding, confusing piece of semi-fiction, featuring fine performances; McKellen leads the way, but Redgrave and Fraser don't lag far behind.
Synopsis: Once a powerful Hollywood director best known for "Frankenstein" and "The Bride of Frankenstein," James Whale (Ian McKellen) is long... [More]
Directed By: Bill Condon

We kick off our series of “Peacock presents” recommendations with 10 movies perfect for when it’s the kids’ time to choose what to watch on family night. You’ll find beloved Fresh throwbacks (1933’s Alice In Wonderland), delightful animal features, a documentary that the kiddos will love, and even a Wes Anderson flick. You’ll also discover a couple of Rotten flicks here, movies that may not have won critics over but which the RT staff love watching with their kids – or remember loving when we were little ones ourselves. So, hand your littlest the remote and settle in for a fun-for-all-the-family night with one of these titles, available now on Peacock.

TO SIGN UP FOR PEACOCK, GO TO PEACOCKTV.COM


The Little Rascals (1994)

23%

Mischievous youngsters Spanky (Travis Tedford) and Buckwheat (Ross Elliot Bagley) lead an anti-girl organization, and they pick their buddy Alfalfa (Bug Hall) to represent them in an all-important soapbox car rally. When the boys then find their driver canoodling with schoolmate Darla (Brittany Ashton Holmes), they decide they must break up the couple. Unfortunately, while Spanky and his pals are busy meddling in Alfalfa’s affairs, their prized race car is nabbed by two young toughs.

Critics Consensus: No Critics Consensus as yet.


Spellbound (2002)

97%

Eight youthful competitors, sponsored by their hometown newspapers, travel with their families to Washington, D.C., to compete in the 1999 Scripps National Spelling Bee. Now in the national spotlight and under heavy pressure to perform from parents, teachers and their audience, the children struggle to advance toward the championship – and its accompanying scholarships and cash prizes – while approaching competitive spelling with the focus and intensity of Olympic athletes.

Critics Consensus: A suspenseful, gripping documentary that features an engaging cross section of American children.


Kicking & Screaming (2005)

41%

As a child, Phil Weston (Will Ferrell) was never able to live up to the demands of his overbearing father, Buck (Robert Duvall), who wanted Phil to be an athlete. Now a parent himself, Phil has inherited his father’s competitive nature, while his son, Sam (Dylan McLaughlin), has inherited Phil’s lack of athletic talent. Serving as Sam’s soccer coach, Phil hopes to turn his last-place team of losers into champions, so they can beat the rival team coached by Buck.

Critics Consensus: The script is mediocre and fails to give Ferrell a proper comedic showcase.


Beethoven (1992)

30%

When the family of George Newton (Charles Grodin) decides to adopt a cute St. Bernard puppy, the patriarch soon feels displaced by the dog. Before long, the adorable canine, dubbed Beethoven, has grown considerably, leading to household mishaps. While George’s wife and kids dote on Beethoven, it takes time for him to see the pooch’s finer qualities. However, Beethoven’s life with the Newton family is jeopardized when a scheming vet (Dean Jones) tries to nab the dog for a deadly experiment.

Critics Consensus: Fluffy and incorrigible, Beethoven is a good boy who deserves a better movie.


Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

93%

The year is 1965, and the residents of New Penzance, an island off the coast of New England, inhabit a community that seems untouched by some of the bad things going on in the rest of the world. Twelve-year-olds Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward) have fallen in love and decide to run away. But a violent storm is approaching the island, forcing a group of quirky adults (Bruce Willis, Edward Norton, Bill Murray) to mobilize a search party and find the youths before calamity strikes.

Critics Consensus: Warm, whimsical, and poignant, the immaculately framed and beautifully acted Moonrise Kingdom presents writer/director Wes Anderson at his idiosyncratic best.


Mystery Men (1999)

61%

Champion City already has a superhero, the appropriately named Captain Amazing (Greg Kinnear), but that doesn’t deter the city’s seven quirky amateur crime-fighters, who use the Captain’s capture at the hands of villain Casanova Frankenstein (Geoffrey Rush) as motivation to prove themselves. The only problem is that their strange powers – silverware hurling, bowling, shovel skills, incompetent invisibility and deadly flatulence – aren’t doing them any favors.

Critics Consensus: Absurd characters and quirky gags are brought to life by a talented cast, providing this superhero spoof with lots of laughs.


Alice in Wonderland (1933)

67%

In this version of the Lewis Carroll classic, Alice (Charlotte Henry) discovers that an ordinary library mirror is actually a portal into another world. As she adjusts to her constantly changing size, thanks to some mysterious cookies, she follows a rabbit with a pocket watch, stumbles upon a deranged tea party and seeks advice from the shadowy Cheshire Cat (Richard Arlen). Later, Alice runs into Humpty Dumpty (W.C. Fields), whose unfortunate tumble sets even stranger events in motion.

Critics Consensus: No Critics Consensus as yet.


Nessie & Me (2016)

- -

A 9-year-old boy moves to a quiet lakeside village and befriends an elderly sailor who claims that a mythical creature named Nessie lives in their peaceful waters.

Critics Consensus: No Critics Consensus as yet.


Kindergarten Cop 2 (2016)

29%

A gruff FBI agent goes under cover as a kindergarten teacher. He’s there to recover stolen data, but first he’ll have to learn to survive in the politically correct world of elementary education.

Critics Consensus: No Critics Consensus as yet.


Dudley Do-Right (1999)

16%

Based on the cartoon, this live-action comedy follows the adventures of Dudley Do-Right (Brendan Fraser), an enthusiastic, if somewhat dim, Canadian Mountie. When Dudley’s childhood crush, Nell Fenwick (Sarah Jessica Parker), returns to their hometown in the mountains, he is eager to spend time with her, but his attempts at courting her are foiled by the villainous Snidely Whiplash (Alfred Molina), who is up to his usual schemes. Can Dudley win Nell’s heart and curtail Snidely’s wicked ways?

Critics Consensus: No Critics Consensus as yet.

Thumbnail: © Warner Brothers, © Focus Features, © Universal

While there would’ve been a certain amusement in watching a surly, 75-year-old Harrison Ford pretending to meet Lando for the first time and winning the Millennium Falcon, Disney went with the age-correct Alden Ehrenreich for Solo: A Star Wars Story. Though a few were up-in-blasters over casting someone besides Ford in the Han Solo role, that fervor has died down now that the reviews are out claiming the movie to be moderately neat-o. And that makes it the right time to look at 24 more movie characters replaced and recast with new actors, and how that turned out on the Tomatometer.

Universal Studios may be chasing contemporary trends in launching its Dark Universe with the Tom Cruise-starring Mummy reboot, but Universal Monsters have been around for long before all this MCU, DCEU, DDS stuff…near 100 years, in fact! In this week’s gallery, we’re sorting every Universal Monster movie that has at least 20 reviews (qualifying it for a Critics Consensus, included with each image), ranked worst to best by Tomatometer!

At 48% on the Tomatometer, Snow White and The Huntsman didn’t clear many critical benchmarks in the fantasy genre back in 2012. But The Huntsman: Winter’s War, its Kristen Stewart-less prequel, looks like it’ll fall even shorter, inspiring this week’s 24 Frames gallery: 24 worst fantasy movie sequels (or prequels, or sidequels, or spinoffs, or…) by Tomatometer!

This week we’ve got CG spectacles (Mummy 3: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor), Meryl Streep letting loose (Mamma Mia!), Joss Whedon’s online superhero musical (Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog), and High Def Grinding (Death Proof and Planet Terror on Blu-ray), so dig in!

1. The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor — 14%

Sometimes, the third time is not the charm – even when Jet Lit is juggling magic glowing balls in the air. Critics and audiences learned that this summer when the third film in the popular Mummy franchise — adventures that were vibrant, old-fashioned action romps with tongue firmly in cheek — opened to dismal reviews and an underwhelming North American debut. But despite a 14 percent Tomatometer, The Mummy 3: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor raked in the dough worldwide and by all accounts can be notched as a success. (At least in dollars.) And hey, it starred two of our favorite Asian movie stars, Jet Li and Michelle Yeoh, in a fantastical, mythological, action spectacular, which might just be reason enough to give Mummy 3 a shot — at least, maybe as a rental.

Below, watch a DVD-only exclusive clip featuring stars Luke Ford and Michelle Yeoh from The Mummy 3: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor.

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Next: Meryl lets loose in Mamma Mia!

2. Mamma Mia! — 53%

ABBA fans, you’re in for a treat! (ABBA haters, you might want to skip ahead.) The Broadway hit show featuring the songs of Agnetha, Bjorn, Benny, and Anni-Frid came to the big screen this summer and arrives on DVD this week, just in time for the holidays. Meryl Streep, who earned a Golden Globe nomination this week for Mamma Mia, stars as Donna Sheridan, a former pop singer living in Greece with her daughter, Sophie; Sophie, on the eve of her own wedding, issues invitations to three of her mother’s exes in hopes of discovering which man is her father, and hilarity, singing and dancing ensue.

Word of warning: your enjoyment, much like that of the critics, may depend largely on how much you enjoy the music of ABBA (one of my favorites, “Super Trouper,” is performed), how much you enjoy watching erstwhile serious thespian Streep jump on beds and let her hair down, and how horrified you might be at hearing former 007 Pierce Brosnan screech out a tune or two.

The 2-Disc Special Edition includes a digital copy of the film and tons of behind-the-scenes and making-of featurettes. Intrigued by newcomer star Amanda Seyfried? Watch an exclusive clip below to hear her in the recording studio and learn how she was cast as Meryl Streep’s daughter.

Next: Joss Whedon + NPH + Writer’s Strike = an Internet musical phenomenon!

3. Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog

It’s the winter of 2007 and the Writer’s Strike has begun; what’s a filmmaker to do? If you’re Joss Whedon (Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly), you get a few friends together and create an internet-only “supervillain musical” starring Neil Patrick Harris and Nathan Fillion in a superpowered love triangle for the Facebook generation, and call it Dr. Horrible’s Sing Along Blog!

Dr. Horrible (played by NPH) is a mad scientist by profession who makes various kinds of ray guns (Freeze Ray, Death Ray) and aspires to join the ranks of the Evil League of Evil. Terribly shy in public, he’s got a crush on a local gal named Penny — only Penny’s being courted by Horrible’s nemesis, the shallow, ego-centric superhero Captain Hammer (Nathan Fillion). Angst, romance, musical numbers, video blogs and evil plots abound in this delightful tragicomedy, which debuted on iTunes and Hulu and come to DVD this week with a host of fun extras for fans; special features include “Commentary! The Musical,” a sing along musical commentary track to the sing along musical feature.

Next: Anna Faris goes centerfold in The House Bunny

4. The House Bunny — 40% (Dec. 19)

Despite the best efforts of star Anna Faris, who’s quickly becoming the Lucille Ball of her generation, the femme-driven comedy The House Bunny garnered middling reviews. Much of that critical ennui came thanks to a confused grrrl power plot in which Playboy bunny Shelley (Faris) finds herself kicked out of Hef’s pad once she turns 27, then becomes house mother to a sorority full of nerdy girls who teach her to embrace her inner intelligence while she teaches them push-up bras and make-up strategy. To which this 27-year-old nerdy girl says, pfft! The answers to life’s struggles aren’t underwires and eye shadows and a soundtrack full of The Pussycat Dolls, Ashlee Simpson and Avril Levigne. The answer, obviously, is Botox. (Duh.)

The House Bunny on DVD includes features entitled “House Bunny Style” and “Getting Ready for a Party,” a bit on the film’s “nice guy,” Colin Hanks, deleted scenes, and the music video for co-star and former American Idol Katharine McPhee’s cover of “I Know What Boys Like.”

Next: Is Don Cheadle a Traitor?

5. Traitor – 56% (Dec. 19)

The coolest thing about Traitor isn’t that it features Don Cheadle in a well-deserved starring role, that he plays a sort of Bourne-ish action hero, or that his character, a Sudanese-American Muslim accused of terrorism named Samir, may not, in fact, be a bad guy; the coolest part is that this timely tale of political spy intrigue and post-9/11 paranoia came from the wild and crazy Steve Martin. Yup, that Steve Martin.

Featurettes, behind-the-scenes video, and a commentary track by Cheadle and writer-director Jeffrey Nachmanoff accompany the film.

Next: The latest from Master Shake, Meatwad and Frylock

6. Aqua Teen Hunger Force, Vol. 6

If you get delighted at the sight of giant food products living the suburban life in New Jersey, then you probably already watch Adult Swim’s Aqua Teen Hunger Force and own volumes 1-5 on DVD. Get ready to add another set to your ATHF collection with Volume 6, which hits shelves this week.

In Volume 6 (which contains nine episodes from Season 5), Meatwad, Shake and Frylock battle with their landlord, join the Marines, and explore MySpace with the help of special guests like Neko Case, David Cross, T-Pain, and John Kruk; special features include Carl’s sports-related blog rants, a 15-minute “Terrorphone” short, and more.

Next: Embed yourself with HBO’s Generation Kill

7. Generation Kill

If HBO knows one thing, it’s how to craft a great mini-series; pick up the seven-part Generation Kill, which first aired this summer and should find a wider audience on home video. Based on Rolling Stone writer Evan Wright’s own experience as an embedded journalist in the Iraq War, Generation Kill follows Wright (played by Lee Terguson) as he joins the Marines of the First Recon Battalion’s Bravo Company at the start of the invasion of Iraq in 2003, bearing witness to the daily lives of US soldiers whose days waver from actual engagement to Jarhead-like monotony.

The three-disc set includes cast and crew commentaries on six of the episodes, video diaries, making-of featurettes, a guide to military slang, and a video in which the real Evan Wright catches up with some of the actual soldiers portrayed in Generation Kill.

Next: Whose-its and whats-its galore!

8. The Little Mermaid Trilogy

Audiences of a certain age may remember Disney’s 1989 film The Little Mermaid as one of the more memorable Disney fairytale flicks of the past few decades; now they can share Ariel’s story (and sequel and prequel) with their kids with The Little Mermaid Trilogy box set!

To catch you up: in The Little Mermaid, rebellious teen mermaid Ariel trades her voice to an evil sea witch in return for a pair of human legs, which help her walk, dance, and nab the man of her dreams…but at what cost? In the 2000 sequel, The Little Mermaid II, Ariel’s human daughter Melody finds herself banned from the sea — cruel irony! — yet gets lured into a trap by another evil witch. Finally, in The Little Mermaid: Ariel’s Beginning, we find out where she got her lifelong love for whosits and whatsits and that she first met her shellfish buddy Sebastian when he was singing at an underground (underwater?) music club…which actually explains a lot.

Next: Grindhouse comes to Blu-ray!

9. Death Proof/Planet Terror Blu-ray

At long last, Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez’s cinematic one-two punch, Grindhouse (or as they’re individually known and sold, Death Proof and Planet Terror), comes to Blu-ray — which means two things: Vanessa Ferlito’s entire lap dance AND Zoe Bell’s high speed game of Ship’s Mast in glorious HD!

Unfortunately, these twin releases are virtually identical to the Uncut and Unrated standard disc issues that previously debuted. We guess the Death Proof and Planet Terror Uber Editions are in production purgatory along with Kill Bill: The Whole Bloody Affair (which, in fairness to QT, is supposedly in the works.)

Next: “Nobody puts Baby in a corner!”

10. Dirty Dancing – Official Dance Workout

Finally, we end this edition of RT on DVD with a home video title for everyone on your Christmas list: Dirty Dancing — The Official Dance Workout!

Tired of Billy Blanks yelling at you with that drill sergeant smile on his face? Can’t follow N*SYNC choreographer-turned-Stomp the Yarder Darrin Henson’s Dance Grooves? Just grab a partner, turn up The Contours, and pretend your name is Baby and that nobody puts you in a corner.

Until next week, happy renting!

Rotten Tomatoes is excited to announce that the first winner of the MySpace Black Curtain review competition is Coops.

Black Curtain gives MySpace users the chance to see the biggest blockbusters before anyone else in Australia for free. All you have to do to attend is become a friend of Black Curtain and get in quick.

Coops went along to see The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor and flexed his critic muscles with the below review.

Become a friend of Black Curtain, write a review and you too could become one of Rotten Tomatoes’ movie critics and win a Rotten Tomatoes DVD pack!

The Black Curtain Review

The Mummy first burst onto our screens as a new take on an old premise, with state of the art special effects and a vibrant, young cast. Nine years later and we have The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor.

Set in 1946, Rick O’Connell (Brendan Fraser) and wife Evelyn (Maria Bello) have settled into a rather dull retirement. When approached by a government agent for ‘one last job’, they journey to China to return a mystical gem known as the Eye of Shangri-La. Of course their son Alex (Luke Ford) happens to be there, having just unearthed an army of terracotta soldiers along with the cursed statue that was Emperor Han (Jet Li).




The third in the series, this film falls short of the original on several grounds. First, it’s the same old take on that old premise. The film only ventures into new territory in terms of geography, and like The Mummy Returns, the storyline mirrors the first, down to the mummy being cursed as a result of infidelity.

Secondly, there is the sudden jump in time. Like Indiana Jones & The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, there is a significant time difference from the previous film, with the characters having experienced all manner of adventures and learning new skills ‘during the war’. The rough and ready Egyptian look has been replaced by 40’s glamour, with the characters looking more appropriately attired to attend a Hollywood premiere than take on a rampaging clay mummy.




Also lacking is the fresh-faced cast. Brendan Fraser in particular borders on parodying the dashing figure of the original, while Maria Bello takes over the role of Evie from Rachel Wiesz, albeit with a faltering accent and lack lustre chemistry with Fraser. Jet Li has minimal screen time in the flesh as the villain of the piece, and spends the majority of it stalking and glaring. His martial arts ability aside, he lacks the menace that Arnold Vosloo’s Imhotep brought to the first film.




However, John Hannah is solid as ever, providing comedy relief as Evie’s brother Jonathan, while Australian Luke Ford is a predictable but serviceable as Alex.

The film is best described as a mildly entertaining piece of fluff. There are some entertaining action sequences, with some quality special effects and occasional comedy, but it struggles to hold a candle to the original film.




Moviegoers found almost nothing worth paying money for at North American multiplexes as the top ten films at the box office slumped to their lowest gross in five years giving the new fall movie season a disastrous start. Nicolas Cage’s latest thriller Bangkok Dangerous suffered one of the worst action openings ever for the Oscar-winning actor, but thanks to a sluggish marketplace it was good enough to claim first place. Summer holdovers performed relatively well with five pics in the top ten dropping by less than 40%, but most wide releases crawled to averages of less than $2,300 as theaters struggled to find ticket buyers.

Bowing to only $7.8M, according to estimates, Bangkok Dangerous enjoyed a less-than-spectacular number one debut with a lackluster $2,943 average from 2,650 locations. The R-rated hitman pic gave Cage his second worst opening for an action film since becoming a major player in that genre with 1996’s The Rock. Over that twelve-year span, only last year’s Next posted a weaker debut for an action film with just $7.1M and a $2,618 average. Reviews were poor and Lionsgate’s marketing push was moderate at best.




The weekend after Labor Day is typically one of the slowest frames of the year. With students back in school and a new football season starting, studios generally avoid opening any strong films at this time which in turns helps the box office slow down. But this year with a major tropical storm hitting the east coast and election hoopla getting bigger after the political conventions, moviegoing just was not a priority for people. The top ten films grossed a dismal $47.6M making it the worst showing since this very same weekend in 2003 when the top ten stumbled to $46.2M. The Top 20 grossed $59.7M that year and is estimated to reach $61M this weekend. Factor in ticket price increases and less stubs were definitely sold this time around. Final grosses to be reported on Monday will show if this entire frame will come in lower than that sluggish session from five years ago when David Spade’s Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star led the chart with only $6.7M in its debut weekend. Bangkok also delivered the smallest gross for a number one film since Dickie.

Following its three-week rule of the box office, the war comedy Tropic Thunder retreated back to a close second place finish with an estimated $7.5M dipping only 35%. After its fourth weekend, the Paramount release has collected a solid $96.8M and should cross the century mark next weekend. Sony’s comedy The House Bunny climbed up one notch to third with an estimated $5.9M in its third session dipping only 29%. Total stands at $37M.




The Dark Knight dropped only 34% to an estimated $5.7M and raised its amazing North American cume to $512.2M. Overseas, the Warner Bros. sensation raked in an estimated $11.8M boosting the international tally to $437.2M which allowed the worldwide gross to soar to a staggering $949.4M. The Christian Bale-Heath Ledger showdown now sits at number six among all-time global blockbusters sandwiched right between last summer’s megahits Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End ($961M) and Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix ($938M).

Don Cheadle’s political thriller Traitor held up well in its second weekend dropping 41% to an estimated $4.7M to push the 12-day tally to $17.7M. The Overture Films release should finish off in the vicinity of $30M. The Vin Diesel actioner Babylon A.D. fell 58% to an estimated $4M for Fox putting the ten-day total at $17.2M. A $25M final should result.

Another macho action pic Death Race followed with an estimated $3.6M, off 43%, giving Universal $29.8M to date. The spoof comedy Disaster Movie slipped 44% in its sophomore session to an estimated $3.3M. Lionsgate has seen just $10.9M in sales and should conclude its run with a mere $19M or so.




Two successful summer comedy leftovers rounded out the top ten. Mamma Mia! eased 36% to an estimated $2.7M boosting the stellar domestic cume to $136.3M allowing it to enter the top ten list of summer blockbusters. Universal’s singing sensation smashed through the $400M worldwide mark this weekend thanks to a stellar international frame that saw an estimated $15M. That was enough to push the overseas sum to $280.1M and the global gross to an eye-popping $416M. Mamma is now Universal’s top-grossing film of the year both domestically and worldwide beating out the studio’s many action offerings like The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor, Wanted, and The Incredible Hulk which all cost more to produce.




Sony’s stoner comedy Pineapple Express took in an estimated $2.4M, down 32%, and has grossed $84.2M thus far.

The top ten films grossed a pathetic estimate of $47.6M over the weekend which was down 23% from last year when 3:10 to Yuma opened in the top spot with $14M; and off 3% from 2006 when The Covenant debuted at number one with $9M in its opening frame.


The summer movie season of 2008 ended last weekend, and boy, was it a good one. Led by box office smashes like Iron Man, Wall-E, and The Dark Knight, Hollywood raked in the dough week after week — and, surprisingly, scored major Freshness on the Tomatometer in the process. Rotten Tomatoes takes a look at the Summer in Review to revisit the critical and commercial hits and misses of the summer.

Inside find out which movies fared the best and the worst with critics, which films made box office magic and which earned less than enchanting returns, and how each of the major studios measured up over the course of the season. Also, see which films Rotten Tomatoes’ own editors picked as their favorites of the summer! Chime in below with your thoughts on Hollywood’s summer of ’08.


The Top 10 Tomatometers of the Summer




more info…

10.
Wanted

Tomatometer: 73%

Summer comic book movies are usually based on established heroes — as Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, and Batman can attest — but Universal wanted something out of the ordinary. Their first step? Hire upstart Russian director Timur Bekmambetov (Night Watch), who infused the film, about a new inductee into a super-powered ring of assassins, with his signature visual flair. Combined with a script loosely adapted from the comic of the same name, uber geek elements like “bullet bending,” physics-defying set pieces, and Angelina Jolie as a sultry killer, Wanted turned out to be one of the more unabashedly entertaining — and simultaneously critically approved — popcorn flicks of the summer.




more info…

9.
Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

Tomatometer: 77%

Say what you will about the long-awaited return of Indiana Jones, but even almost two decades after his last crusade, critics decided that the fedora still fit. Director Steven Spielberg and producer George Lucas seemed to revisit a lot of familiar ground in the fourth big-screen franchise outing, but their 1950s Area 51-esque plotline — and the sheer coolness of seeing Harrison Ford reprise his trademark role — provided enough thrills to delight longtime fans. Could Indy’s newly introduced son (Shia La Beouf) don the fedora in further sequels? $780 million in worldwide returns point to “yes.”




more info…

8.
Vicky Cristina Barcelona

Tomatometer: 80%

Woody Allen’s latest effort opened quietly in limited release before expanding into theaters nationwide, allowing the ebullient enthusiasm of critics to spread. Considering the mixed results of Allen’s work of late (going from the Oscar-nominated Match Point to the uneven Melinda & Melinda, to the disappointing Scoop, to the middling Cassandra’s Dream), critics discovered that watching the Spanish-set Vicky Cristina Barcelona was like unearthing a gem. At 80 percent, Vicky Cristina Barcelona is Allen’s best reviewed film since 1997’s Everyone Says I Love You (83 percent).




more info…

7.
Kit Kittredge: An American Girl

Tomatometer: 80%

Critics (and parents) often groan inwardly when they sit down to watch a family film, but Kit Kittredge: An American Girl Mystery proved a surprisingly good watch for all ages. Credit for much of the film’s success goes to Little Miss Sunshine Abigail Breslin, but we can also thank director Patricia Rozema (Mansfield Park) and scribe Ann Peacock (The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe) for infusing the kid mystery with wholesome smarts.




more info…

6.
Tropic Thunder

Tomatometer: 83%

Ben Stiller’s Vietnam-set Hollywood satire brought up the rear of this summer’s line up, opening mid-August as (arguably) the last event movie of the season. And it surely did pay off. Audiences loved Tropic Thunder; critics made it Certified Fresh. Even protests over its controversial “Simple Jack” and blackface plot devices couldn’t get this war comedy down. Tropic Thunder also notably became the best-reviewed summer film to open since The Dark Knight debuted a month prior, and the first film to topple The Bat’s stronghold on the box office.




more info…

5.
Kung Fu Panda

Tomatometer: 88%

Let it not be said that Pixar has a stronghold on doing animation well; DreamWorks SKG proved otherwise with Kung Fu Panda, starring Jack Black as a rotund bear destined for martial arts greatness. Prior to release, DreamWorks honcho Jeffrey Katzenberg hinted at the possibility of five or six Kung Fu Panda films, a la Shrek; one 88 percent Tomatometer and $577 million later, we’d say a Kung Fu Panda franchise looks very likely, indeed.




more info…

4.
Hellboy II: The Golden Army

Tomatometer: 88%

While previous summers saw sequelized blockbusters rake in the dough but fall far below Fresh on the Tomatometer (see last year’s Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End), this summer boasted sequels aplenty that were also critically loved. Guillermo del Toro’s Hellboy II: The Golden Army was one such movie, not only returning its beloved cigar-chomping hero to the screen, but improving on the first film in the process (Hellboy, 80 percent).




more info…

3.
Iron Man

Tomatometer: 93%

While the summer of 2008 will be remembered for the domination of The Dark Knight, let’s not forget another comic book superhero that made his mark on critics and audiences: Iron Man. The Marvel character sprang to life in May, thanks to Robert Downey Jr.’s witty star turn and Jon Favreau’s glossy direction. Just one point and about 40 reviews shy of The Dark Knight, Iron Man could even potentially catch up and surpass Batman on the Tomatometer…




more info…

2.
The Dark Knight

Tomatometer: 94%

When Christopher Nolan rescued the oft-silly Batman franchise from campy irrelevance in 2005, critics took note: Batman Begins introduced a gloomier dark knight and went Certified Fresh at 85 percent on the Tomatometer. This summer’s eagerly anticipated The Dark Knight followed suit, and then some; it scored an impressive 94 percent on the Tomatometer and dominated the summer box office for weeks, breaking records — and expectations — left and right. Not bad for a comic book movie!




more info…

1.
Wall-E

Tomatometer: 97%

In grand Pixar tradition, Wall-E not only charmed the pants off of critics and audiences alike, it blasted its way to the top of the Tomatometer to become the best-reviewed film of the year so far. (Recent Pixar movies Ratatouille and The Incredibles also opened to critical acclaim and went on to become the best-reviewed wide releases of their respective years.) The tale of a lonely little robot is well positioned to win this year’s Golden Tomato Award…and if the Academy follows suit, Pixar might just have a few more of those gold statuettes to put on their mantle.

Next: The 10 Worst Tomatometers of the Summer


The 10 Worst Tomatometers of the Summer




more info…

10.
Meet Dave

Tomatometer: 20%

Oh, how the mighty have fallen. Critics and audiences alike have been mourning the apparent passing of classic Eddie Murphy for several years now, citing the likes of The Adventures of Pluto Nash and Norbit as examples of the dismal turns his career has taken. Unfortunately, Meet Dave isn’t the movie that’s going to change that trend. Settling in at 20 percent on the Tomatometer, it sadly doesn’t qualify as the lowest-rated film in Murphy’s career, but most assert that the clever premise (devised by a Mystery Science Theater 3000 alumnus, Bill Corbett) gets bogged down by stale writing and sitcom-level humor. Meet Dave has its handful of moments, but they just weren’t enough to propel the movie out of our worst-reviewed list.




more info…

9.
Clone Wars

Tomatometer: 20%

Intended to be an introduction to the TV series of the same name that will debut later this year, The Clone Wars might just have been the least anticipated “Star Wars film” ever released. After disappointing many a fan with the prequel trilogy, George Lucas came right back with this animated feature and failed to rally anyone but his most faithful of followers. To be fair, the movie does suffer from the fact that it was originally supposed to air as the first three episodes of the TV show, and as far as animation goes, The Clone Wars looks great for television but subpar for the big screen. Many critics seem to agree that it will do much better when it transitions to its half-hour episodes, but for now, the feature film debut sits at 20 percent on the Tomatometer, making it #7 in our list.




more info…

8.
The Happening

Tomatometer: 19%

We were already becoming a little skeptical of M. Night Shyamalan after The Village underperformed and Lady in the Water downright flopped, but even as audiences grew disillusioned about the suspense director, few could have expected the depths to which he would fall with his latest, The Happening. The trailers were intriguing, especially considering this was Shyamalan’s first R-rated feature, but the overall premise of the film was kept secret fairly effectively, and with a couple of hits under Shyamalan’s belt, the hope was that this would be a return to form. Unfortunately, while it offered some of his trademark chills, Happening mostly fell flat, due to a poorly crafted script, some wooden acting, and what some ultimately deemed to be a silly premise. If this downward trend continues, Shyamalan may earn himself the title of “one-trick pony.”




more info…

7.
Mirrors

Tomatometer: 16%

Asian horror remakes are a dime a dozen in Hollywood these days, but that doesn’t stop enterprising directors and studios from consistently making them happen. Mirrors, originally a Korean film, is the latest of the appropriated imports, but with a respectable cast (Kiefer Sutherland, Amy Smart, Paula Patton) and an experienced horror director (Alexandre Aja — High Tension, The Hills Have Eyes) at the helm, it wouldn’t have been unreasonable to expect a halfway decent frightfest. Unfortunately, the movie was dull, with few scares and an overly convoluted plot, thus earning it a 16 percent on the Tomatometer and a #6 spot on our Worst Reviewed list.




more info…

6.
The Love Guru

Tomatometer: 14%

After doing mostly voice work as Shrek and appearing in a few film cameos, Mike Myers came back in The Love Guru with his first starring vehicle since The Cat in the Hat in ’03. Unfortunately, critics weren’t feeling the Love in his latest feature, complaining that the character didn’t work, that the writing was lazy, and that the jokes were juvenile and, even worse, simply not funny. All things considered, The Love Guru still performed better overall than the aforementioned Cat in the Hat, earning a 14 percent Tomatometer score to Cat‘s 12 percent, but it was enough to place it as the fifth worst-reviewed film of the summer.




more info…

5.
College

Tomatometer: 14%

Last summer’s Superbad was such a breakout hit, MGM decided to remake it for this summer season…only by “remake” we mean cop a poor imitation of that flick and just about every other college-set comedy ever made. Teen idol Drake Bell (of Nickelodeon’s Drake and Josh fame), whose attempt at crossing over into “mature” roles began with this year’s inane Superhero Movie, dug himself even deeper into Rotten territory in College, which opened last week, the dumping ground of the summer season. Gross-out humor in the vein of Porky’s failed to impress critics, who found the teen buddy comedy to be overly vulgar, homophobic, and sexist — all of which might have been more acceptable if it were only funny.




more info…

4.
Made of Honor

Tomatometer: 12%

After achieving big-screen success with 2007’s widely acclaimed Enchanted, Patrick Dempsey tried again to bank on his “McDreamy” persona in Made of Honor. Unfortunately, the movie felt just a little too familiar (My Best Friend’s Wedding, anyone?) to most of its viewers, and with nothing particularly unique or interesting to set it apart from its recycled plot, stale humor, and romantic comedy clichés, Made of Honor found its way to our worst-reviewed list for the summer. Scoring a dismal 12 percent on the Tomatometer and prompting such criticisms as “cookie-cutter” and “stew of mediocrity,” the movie is notable for, if nothing else, being the final film appearance of the late Sydney Pollack.




more info…

3.
The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor

Tomatometer: 11%

Seven years after its first sequel was released, the Mummy franchise returned this year with its third installment. While neither of the first two movies could be considered critical darlings themselves, Dragon Emperor brought the series to a new low, earning a paltry 11 percent on the Tomatometer, compared to 54 percent and 47 percent for its predecessors. Many cited the formulaic, poorly written script and the heavy use of CGI as reasons why Dragon Emperor ultimately fell flat. It’s difficult to go wrong when you’ve got Jet Li, Michelle Yeoh, dragons, and abominable snowmen, but Tomb of the Dragon Emperor somehow managed to secure one of the lowest Tomatometers of any movie this summer.




more info…

2.
Babylon A.D.

Tomatometer: 4%

You know you’re in for a bumpy ride when a director publicly denounces his own film, as Babylon A.D. helmer Mathieu Kassovitz did a week before its release. Once the world took a gander at the sci-fi actioner, it seemed to agree wholeheartedly. With unintentionally cheesy dialogue, poorly staged set pieces, and a silly, muddled plot, the Vin Diesel vehicle played exactly as many people expected — which might be good enough for Diesel fans, but certainly not for critics. Just how bad is Babylon A.D.? Were it not for two lone positive reviews — U.K. critics James Christopher of The Times and Xan Brooks of The Guardian — the flick would be looking at double zeroes on the Tomatometer.




more info…

1.
Disaster Movie

Tomatometer: 0%

Speaking of zero percent Tomatometers…we’ve got Jason Friedberg and Aaron Seltzer, quite possibly the most reviled cinematic duo since Hitler and Riefenstahl. (Though Triumph of the Will would probably be Certified Fresh given enough reviews.) Friedberg’s and Seltzer’s long-standing assault on spoof comedy (and cinema, in general) appears to be hitting its stride with Disaster Movie, a film so hastily thrown together that it spoofs trailers, which currently holds a zero percent Tomatometer. This year has been rife with the goose eggs (Witless Protection, Deal, Strange Wilderness, One Missed Call), but this Tomatometer is especially important for Friedberg and Seltzer: after getting single-digit percentages on their previous movies, they’ve finally hit the coveted rock-bottom. Enjoy, guys, you’ve earned it.

Next: The Best and Worst Box Office Earners of the Summer

The Best and Worst Box Office Earners of the Summer

While capturing both critical and commercial success seems to be as difficult an achievement as capturing lightning in a bottle (moreso for a summer blockbuster), the summer of 2008 saw an unusually high number of well-reviewed hit movies. Christopher Nolan’s grown-up superhero movie The Dark Knight struck that rare confluence of art and commerce, driving Bat-fans the world over into a ticket-buying Bat-frenzy, but it also earned raves and Oscar-buzz, and could end up one of the best-reviewed films of the year. Furthermore, The Dark Knight was in good company with its fellow top money-makers, as only two Top Ten films — the femme-driven event flick, Sex and the City: The Movie and Will Smith’s Hancock — earned a rotten Tomatometer rating.

Top 10 Box Office Earners (Gross)

1. The Dark Knight $493,671,047
2. Iron Man $317,570,520
3.


Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the


Crystal Skull

$315,337,154
4. Hancock $226,547,044
5. Wall-E $216,798,080
6. Kung Fu Panda $212,958,340
7. Sex and the City $152,440,062
8.

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

$141,550,527
9. The Incredible Hulk $134,426,930
10. Wanted $133,822,865

Bottom 10 Box Office Earners (Gross)

*Films released prior to the week of August 29, 2008

1. The Rocker $4,664,559
2. Fly Me to the Moon $4,733,063
3. The Longshots $5,149,624
4. Vicky Cristina Barcelona $9,783,911
5. Meet Dave $11,662,184
6. Swing Vote $15,555,204
7. Death Race $16,849,530
8. Kit Kittredge: An American Girl $17,408,308
9. The House Bunny $19,551,243
10. The X-Files: I Want to Believe $20,750,074

Next: Which Studio Came Out on Top?

Which Studio Came Out on Top?




1. Paramount
Average Tomatometer: 71%
Box office: $966 million

Summer’s winner! Paramount is the only major studio to achieve more than one
$200 million hit leading to the highest box office total, and it did so with
the highest Tomatometer average (four of its five movies hit Certified Fresh
status). The critics’ influence may be diminished during opening weekend, but
here we see good
reviews are indicating what summer movies will have positive
word-of-mouth and staying power.

Movie

B.O.

Tomatometer

Iron Man

$318m


93%

Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull

$316m


77%

Kung Fu Panda

$213m


88%

Tropic Thunder

$87m


83%

The Love Guru

$32m


14%





2. Disney
Average Tomatometer: 67%
Box office: $376 million

Disney has the least amount of movies, with two of them vastly underperforming
(Swing Vote was a blip and Prince Caspian‘s gross is only half of The Lion,
The Witch, and the Wardrobe
‘s). The silver lining: Wall-E is this year’s
best-reviewed movie and has a strong chance of remaining so if Pixar’s past
performance record is any indication.

Movie

B.O.

Tomatometer

Wall-E

$218m


97%

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

$142m

66%

Swing Vote

$16m


40%





3. Warner Bros.
Average Tomatometer: 56%
Box office: $1.02 billion

The fact that Warner Bros. put out the summer’s most notorious bomb (Speed
Racer)
is easily offset by the enormous success of The Dark Knight. It’s
become second-highest grossing movie off all time (and Certified Fresh to
boot!), pushing WB over the $1 billion mark for the summer.

Movie

B.O.

Tomatometer

The Dark Knight

$504m


94%

Sex and the City

$153m


51%

Get Smart

$129m


52%

Journey to the Center of the Earth 3D (New Line)

$96m


61%

Speed Racer

$43m


36%

The Sisterhood of Traveling Pants 2

$41m


63%

Kit Kittredge: An American Girl (Picturehouse)

$32m


80%

Star Wars: The Clone Wars

$30m


18%





4. Universal
Average Tomatometer: 53%
Box office: $655 million

Wanted gave Universal a surprise critical and commercial hit and Mamma Mia!
has quietly become the highest grossing musical ever. Surprisingly, it was the
superheroes that let the studio down, with both The Incredible Hulk and
Hellboy falling shy of recovering their reported costs.

Movie

B.O.

Tomatometer

Wanted

$134m


73%

The Incredible Hulk

$134m


67%

Mamma Mia!

$133m


54%

The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor

$98m


11%

Hellboy II: The Golden Army

$76m


88%

The Strangers

$52m


42%

Death Race

$25m


40%

Hamlet 2

$3m


61%





5. Sony
Average Tomatometer: 40%
Box office: $581 million

Sony was in classic Hollywood mode this summer, relying on the stars like Will
Smith, Adam Sandler, Will Ferrell to draw crowds in. Behind the scenes, Judd Apatow proved
reliable once more, producing the studio’s sole fresh movie.

Movie

B.O.

Tomatometer

Hancock

$227m


38%

You Don’t Mess With the Zohan

$100m


34%

Step Brothers

$98m


51%

Pineapple Express

$80m


68%

Made of Honor

$47m


12%

The House Bunny

$29m


40%





6. Fox
Average Tomatometer: 26%
Box office: $250 million

It was a brutal summer for Fox, which lacked a single fresh movie or $100
million success. If Paramount is keeping its audience around with fresh movies,
Fox proves the vice versa: resoundingly rotten ones can repel audiences.

Movie

B.O.

Tomatometer

What Happens in Vegas

$80m


27%

The Happening

$65m


19%

Space Chimps

$29m


33%

Mirrors

$25m


21%

The X-Files: I Want to Believe

$21m


33%


Babylon A.D.

$12m


04%

Meet Dave

$12m


20%

The Rocker

$6m


36%

Next: RT’s Editors Pick Their Favorite Films of the Summer


RT Editors’ Favorite Films of the Summer

Here in the RT office we all had our favorite films this summer. And we didn’t always agree with the Tomatometer. But hey, that’s what favorite means — rhyme or reason aside, these movies spoke to us. Below, our editors share their picks!

Join in below and let us know what you think were the best and worst films of the summer season.

The Dark Knight, picked by Editor in Chief Matt Atchity

My pick for best movie of the summer? I’m going to have to go with The Dark Knight. It’s not perfect; Bale’s Bat-voice is a bit much after a while, and it runs perilously close to overstaying its welcome, but those (very minor) complaints aside, it’s a fantastic film. As with Batman Begins, this film is as much a psychological crime drama as it is a comic book movie, and continues to take a sort of realistic look at the idea of a costumed vigilante. And if Batman Begins showed us a plausible scenario that could result in the creation of the Batman, then The Dark Knight shows us how the world would respond; the citizens of Gotham both embrace and condemn him. But if the Batman represents the extreme avatar of order amidst chaos, then it’s inevitable that someone will rise to Batman’s challenge. Which brings me of course to the Joker. Heath Ledger‘s Joker is simply the best comic book villain ever to menace the screen. In fact, I’ll go so far as to say that Ledger’s Joker is going to stick with us as an iconic villain, along the lines of Hannibal Lecter, Darth Vader, and Norman Bates. It’s truly a tragedy that Ledger isn’t with us anymore, if for no other reason than that he’ll never experience the acclaim he so richly deserves.

Iron Man, picked by RT Australia Editor Joanna Cohen

I first loved Robert Downey Jr. in Less than Zero as a spoiled new romantic with deep, glassy eyes and a pastel blazer. Since 1987 I have remained devoted through every dive of his cardiac-like celebrity Tomatometer graph. Iron Man is Robert Downey Jr. and vice versa. The flawed genius, the troubled vulnerability…I adored every misogynistic, world-dominating, politically incorrect moment. He shone. And someone should give Gwyneth an award for best acting of a pencil skirt.

Gonzo, picked by Editor Sara Schieron

Telling you it inspired my summer reading list will make Alex Gibney‘s Gonzo: The Life and Work of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson sound a lot less hot than it is. A doc about Hunter S. Thompson, the miserable genius, self-titled “Dr.” and inventor of Gonzo Journalism, Gonzo paints a crystal portrait of an era and a man that in some light looks golden and in others looks leaden. Thompson and his stories teeter between snark and melancholy, fascinating always, by page or by screen.

Mongol, picked by
Community Manager Ryan Fujitani

This summer brought us several wildly entertaining blockbusters, but the one movie that got me hitting up Wikipedia and updating my “countries to visit” list was Mongol, a moderately successful indie biopic chronicling the life and times of Genghis Khan. It may have had something to do with my fascination for ancient cultures and fallen empires, but Mongol grabbed me from the start and wrapped me up in its epic story until the credits rolled. While the movie isn’t without its problems (questionable editing choices, a somewhat abrupt ending), the cinematography was appropriately gorgeous, the action was visceral and cathartic, and Mr. Khan himself was fascinating to watch. Oh, and it inspired me to grow a beard and move every three months.

Pineapple Express, picked by Editor Alex Vo

The Dark Knight‘s better-crafted, and WALL-E got me a little teary, but I haven’t had as much plain ol’ movie fun all year than watching Pineapple Express the first two times. (Yeah, here’s that rare movie that’s beckoned me back to the theater multiple times.) The movie’s alternately breezy and intense, while director David Gordon Green‘s loving care towards fringe characters makes Pineapple Express feel earthy and organic, a rarity for so-called stoner flicks.

Wall-E, picked by Senior Editor Tim Ryan

Is WALL-E more poignant than City Lights? Is it a more potent allegory than Metropolis? Is it as powerful a reflection on what it is to be a cognizant being than 2001? Time will tell if Pixar’s latest marvel is mentioned alongside those classics in the cinematic canon, but let the debate begin here. Achingly romantic, darkly funny, and blessed with some of the most remarkable visuals ever committed to celluloid, WALL-E is one for the ages — and great summer fun to boot.

Speed Racer, picked by Senior Editor Jen Yamato

This particular pick is bound to stir some controversy (bring it on, haters!), but so be it: Speed Racer was my favorite summer flick of 2008. Inventive, innovative, intriguing, spectacular — the Wachowski brothers’ live-action, anime-based adventure is everything I hoped it would be, and more. It’s a “kid flick” I’d have enjoyed as much as a tyke as I do today, a film that transcends the medium as we’ve known it, bursting through traditional boundaries of moviemaking to create an entirely absorbing, eye-popping, immersive alternate reality. It is the movie equivalent of mixing Coca Cola and Pop Rocks. Or like BeDazzling your cerebral cortex. Which would be awesome, were it only possible…

Want to browse more features? We’ve got tons archived right here!

The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor is the latest instalment of the ridiculously successful Mummy franchise and this time around the action has switched from ancient Egypt to slightly-less-ancient China, with the O’Connell family accidently re-awakening Jet Li‘s villainous Chinese emperor who is, naturally, bent on world domination. RT spoke to the stars of the film – Brendan Fraser, Maria Bello, Jet Li, Michelle Yeoh, Luke Ford & Isabella Leong – and director Rob Cohen to find out more. Check out the video interviews below!

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