Josh Gad

(Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney)

Josh Gad is fast becoming Disney’s go-to man when the Mouse House finds itself in need of a hilarious sidekick. He’s played everyone’s favorite sun-loving snowman, Olaf, in the Frozen films, and stole the live-action Beauty and the Beast as Gaston’s bumbling buddy, LeFou. Now, he’s back to steal more scenes as kleptomaniac, over-gown dwarf Mulch Duggins in Disney’s adaptation of Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl, an action-packed fantasy about a child criminal mastermind, a world of fairies, and the bond between a father and his son.

The movie was supposed to hit theaters this year but is going straight to streaming service Disney+ following disruptions to the release schedule on the back of COVID-19, something Gad has mixed feelings about: on the one hand, this spectacle-filled family flick will bring some joy to people at a time when they need it, but on the other hand, “nothing will ever replace the cinema,” he told Rotten Tomatoes.

Ahead of the movie’s digital release, Gad shared his five favorite films, with a big caveat. “I want to preface this by saying I have my five favorite movies to watch of all time, which are Back to the Future, The Goonies, Groundhog Day, The Wizard of Oz, and probably Ratatouille,” he said. “Those are the five movies that I watch over and over again.” He says the movies below are the ones that opened his mind about film: “These are the movies that I think really gave me a perspective on what cinema can be.”

There Will Be Blood (2007) 91%

Number five, I would say is There Will Be Blood. I was in a SAG [Screen Actors Guild] screening. The movie had gotten no attention at that point. I saw it before it had come out. I was a massive fan of [writer-director] P.T. Anderson. Obviously, anybody who goes to conservatory – like, Daniel Day-Lewis is core curriculum. I sat there and I watched as this movie began with 20 minutes of silence, basically. And I have never, in the modern era, I have never felt so mesmerized watching a contemporary film in my life. It was so unbelievably daring and brave and phenomenal, and the performances were so bizarre that I couldn’t understand what I was watching. So I would say that would be number five for me.

Pulp Fiction (1994) 92%

Number four would be – it’s almost cliché to say this now – but Pulp Fiction. So 1994 was an insane year for cinema. As a kid, I probably saw Lion King six times in the theater that year; as a son, I probably saw Forrest Gump five times in the theater, because my parents kept taking me to it. But as a person coming into my own and realizing what moviemaking could be, that movie was a movie I snuck into and it was called Pulp Fiction. I had never seen anything like it before. It just completely blew my mind wide open with the possibilities of storytelling and introduced me to a filmmaker that wasn’t yet on my radar because, frankly, my parents never allowed me to watch Reservoir Dogs at that time. I remember walking through the looking glass and just having this jaw-dropping experience.

You mentioned you snuck in to see Pulp Fiction. Was that because you were underage? And how did you get in?

Oh yeah, I was under age, and I was with a couple of friends of mine and we were at the AMC theater in Hollywood, Florida, where I grew up, and we bought tickets to another movie and we snuck in. We were bad; we did that a couple of times. I actually got kicked out of Demolition Man for doing that, but Pulp Fiction, somehow I didn’t get kicked out. And I think I did it twice, because I was just so like, “What the hell did I just see? This is incredible.” So that definitely rocked my world.

The Wizard of Oz (1939) 98%

Number three is a movie that I think is a perfect film and it’s a film that it doesn’t matter whether I saw it for the first time at 2, or revisited again at 10, or 22, or 32, or this past year when I took my kids to see it on the big screen. And that’s The Wizard of Oz.

The word “timeless” is thrown around a lot, and very rarely does it actually feel like it applies to as many motion pictures as are branded with that title. But The Wizard of Oz is one of those films that it truly doesn’t matter when you see it, it’s still timeless. It remains timeless. And that experience is proven by the fact that my own children, seeing it in a movie theater after seeing it on the small screen when they were very young, are still as awestruck by every single moment of that film as they were the first time they saw it. And it’s a movie that was made during the Great Depression. So that is a testament to great cinema. That’s a testament to the power of film.

Have you done The Wizard of Oz on stage yourself?

I’ve never done The Wizard of Oz on stage. Man, wouldn’t that be great? No, never had that opportunity.

We’ll just put that out there into the universe for now.

We’ll put that out there. We’ll will that into the universe. I don’t know that I’m going to be doing any stage anytime soon, but one day.

The Godfather (1972) 97%

The Godfather and The Godfather: Part II

So, then you get into the top two, which is just so damn hard to pick two movies that you can share to be the most perfect films of all time, but I’m going to do my best. I was 12 years old. and I had only been told in passing about this “saga,” these films that had been described as perfect. Then I went to Blockbuster Video and took a deep breath and grabbed a large case of two VHS tapes called The Godfather. And I took it home and I watched it and I was so unbelievably mesmerized that I made my mother drive me to the Blockbuster the next morning and I got Godfather II. And I put that in and watched it and then went and got Godfather III, which I wish I hadn’t gotten because I would have loved to have just kept it at those two films.

But it was this moment of, again, an awakening where you realize the power of cinema – you realize what true moviemaking is. I’m going to cheat and say that Godfather 1 and II are in my number two spot together because they are just so absolutely perfect and brilliant and almost act as one piece. And the level of filmmaking, the level of acting, the level of craftsmanship is just on another level that I don’t know will ever be surpassed. It really is just something to behold.

Lawrence of Arabia (1962) 94%

Up until recently, I would have told you that Godfather I and Godfather II would probably be number one for me. And I have to go back and revisit them because frankly, it’s been about five years since I’ve done so. But I had an experience right before COVID that was pretty remarkable.

It was a movie that I’d seen plenty of times, in all the wrong ways. And frankly, it wasn’t even in my top 10. I found it a little boring, I found it a little hard to muster through, and I found it difficult at best. And then I went to the ArcLight Cinerama Dome, and I sat down, and for the next four hours I watched Lawrence of Arabia with an audience, the way that it was meant to be seen. And I’ve got to tell you in this moment right now, that movie is the movie that I would probably put number one on my list of most influential films for me as an artist.

It’s haunting. It’s absolutely crazy to think that it came out when it came out, and that it takes the kind of risks it takes with its lead character. It was so unbelievably complicated and not easily digestible in terms of some of the choices that are made. And the complexities of his character are stripped away in real time, against the backdrop of some of the most incredible cinematography to ever be captured on a lens. It just really slayed me.


Joel Meares for Rotten Tomatoes: You mentioned seeing Lawrence on the big screen… What are your feelings about the fact that Artemis Fowl, because of what’s happening, isn’t going to premiere on the big screen, but is going direct to Disney+? 

Josh Gad: My feeling is that it is rising to the moment and I couldn’t be more grateful. I would so much rather the audience get to experience this movie than sit at home and wish that they could have the opportunity to see something right now. I think, frankly, the fact that we get to share it with people at a time that is so difficult to find any joy, to find any light, to find any hope… There are millions and millions of families that are stuck between four walls right now, trying to not lose their minds, and if we can give them a two-hour respite from that, a break, then I absolutely support this decision to give a movie like this to families who so desperately need it.

Does it hurt that I can’t celebrate this film with others on the big screen? Absolutely. Nothing will ever replace the cinema – nothing. Movie theaters have been a part of our collective experience for so long, and it binds us together. And it’s why even in this most desperate time, people are still making a trek to drive-in theaters, because they want that communal experience. So yes, it is, to some extent, a mixed bag, but I’m eternally grateful that we have an opportunity to share what I think people need most.


Artemis Fowl is available to stream on Disney+ on June, 12 2020. 

#1

Artemis Fowl (2020)
8%

#1
Adjusted Score: 19729%
Critics Consensus: A would-be franchise-starter that will anger fans of the source material and leave newcomers befuddled, Artemis Fowl is frustratingly flightless.
Synopsis: Young Artemis Fowl finds himself in an epic battle against a race of powerful underground fairies.... [More]
Directed By: Kenneth Branagh

Thumbnail image: Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for Disney, ©Paramount Vantage/courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by Paramount Vantage, 20th Century Fox, Universal Pictures)

“Know Your Critic” is a new column in which we interview Tomatometer-approved critics about their screening and reviewing habits, pet peeves, and personal favorites.

When David Fear moved to New York 16 years ago, he was intending to continue freelance writing and keep his “day job.” Fate had other plans.

He decided to move from California on a Friday, and on the following Monday, a position opened up at entertainment and “things-to-do” magazine, Time Out New York. When it came time for his move across the country, things fell right into place: By the time he got the call for an interview, he could already tell them his new address in the city.

“You can be a film critic anywhere,” he told Rotten Tomatoes, “but there really is something about being in New York and being at the Film Forum, seeing a recently restored version or our print of Army of Shadows that you really just kind of feel like, Oh, I’m in Film Nerd Heaven.”

David Fear is now a Senior Editor and critic at Rolling Stone, and the former Film Editor of Time Out New York.


What’s your personal record for most movies seen in a day?

When I was younger and much, much more full of piss and vinegar, I think I did a six-film day at Sundance once. It might have been my first or second Sundance back in 2004, 2005. I don’t recommend it.

If you ate six meals in a day, they could be the greatest meals in the world. They could be five-star chef meals. But you’ve stopped tasting it after a while and it just becomes shoveling food into your mouth and going, “Oh my God, when is this going to end?”

I found that when I would start doing more than three, maybe four movies a day at a festival, I would stop tasting the food.

Do you prefer 3-D or non–3-D screenings?

Do you even have to ask that? I’ve actually gone out of my way to see to 2-D screenings because, here’s the thing, with very rare exceptions, there’s only really three movies that you absolutely, positively need to see in 3-D.

There’s really no point to seeing Avatar unless you’re seeing it in 3-D. It’s a bad movie, but how he uses 3-D to really immerse you in a bad movie that he’s made is remarkably impressive.

Are you pro– or anti–note-taking?

I don’t understand how you can do this gig and not take notes. If you’re really serious about potentially wanting to do this, practice writing stuff in a notebook without looking at your notebook. I’m very, very pro-note taking – so long as it’s not with one of those light pens. Man, f–k those light pens.

You’re sitting down to write. Would you prefer a shot of espresso or alcohol? What’s your spirit of choice?

Espresso for writing and then bourbon for transcribing. It makes the activity of transcribing so much less painful.


(Photo by Paramount Vantage)

What’s the hardest review you’ve ever written?

If I still had a chance to work on and revise my There Will Be Blood review, I would still be doing it. Not only because it’s just one of my favorite films ever, but there’s so much going on and it’s such a slippery film for me to try and really grasp and write about in a way that feels articulate and as close to complete as possible.

I still have nightmares about writing that review and really feeling like I hadn’t quite gotten it yet. Not that I hadn’t got the movie – I knew exactly how I felt about the movie – but to try and translate that into a piece, and explain why I think it’s one of the great artworks of the 21st century to date was… I still have nightmares about it.

Someone that everyone should follow on Twitter?

I’m biased because I know him, but Justin Chang [of the Los Angeles Times]. To my money, there’s just not a better film critic working today than Justin. You should follow him on Twitter for the puns – not just the fact that he’s one of the smartest, funniest film writers today, but he is like a God-level pun maker. His punny games, his punny business is just absolutely insane.

Up-and-coming critic that you think people should read?

There are two young critics that I hope people are paying attention to.

I hope people are reading Kameron Austin Collins, he’s one of the film critics for Vanity Fair. I ended up meeting him and found out he was only in late 20s. I was just like, “Oh my God. If you’re writing at this level in your late 20s, you’re going to be a f–king monster in the next 10 years.”

I would say the same about Monica Castillo. She’s all over the place byline-wise, but she’s one of those people I feel she’s maturing really beautifully as a writer.


(Photo by Paramount Pictures)

Do you have a favorite classic film?

I could watch The Lady Eve every single day for the rest of my life and never get tired of it. There are a handful of films that I feel are as close to perfect as humanly possible, and The Lady Eve is one of them.

It’s such a cliché answer, but I’ve probably seen The Godfather close to a hundred times and that’s barely an exaggeration. Between that and the second Godfather film, I almost feel like I can quote most of them off the top of my head.

Is that the movie you’ve watched more than any other?

Yeah, that would have to be it. There’s a couple of movies that I’ve definitely gotten into the double digits with. I’ve seen Dazed and Confused a lot because it’s a comfort movie. I can sink into that movie.

Is there an actor, director, or screenwriter whose work you always love?

The closest thing I would say I have to a favorite filmmaker – and take that phrase with a huge grain of salt – would be Yasujirō Ozu. I feel the movies he makes were reverse-engineered for me.


Star Wars: Episode IV - A New Hope, 1977 (20th Century Fox Film Corp.)

(Photo by 20th Century Fox)

Do you have a favorite movie from your childhood?

I remember seeing Monty Python and the Holy Grail on PBS one night… I watched that constantly as a kid. You know when you found something that’s your sense of humor?

And then, because I’m a child of the ‘70s, Star Wars. My parents actually took me out of school to go see a matinee of it the first week that it was open. I had no idea what I was going into and as a six-year-old kid and then walked out of it a changed human being.

Is there anything that you consider “required viewing”?

Yeah. Actually, I think it’s out of print now… Visions of Light. It’s a documentary about cinematography and covers the gamut, talks a lot about cinematographers in the ’30s and ’40s, talks a lot about the new Hollywood guys, talks a lot about British cinematographers. It really is this incredible primer that not only is just a beautiful film, obviously, because it’s talking about people who’ve shot movies beautifully. It’s an extraordinary gateway drug.


(Photo by Universal Pictures)

You recently wrote a piece on the 20-year resonance of Fight Club. I’m wondering if there’s a movie released this decade that you think in 10 or 20 years we’re going to look back and think, “That was the 2010s.”

If I had to be honest, I think the movie would be Get Out. It feels like it’s very much a movie for the end of the Obama era and very, very much a movie for the beginning of the Trump era. Never mind that it’s also a really great move and it’s a movie that keeps giving the more you see it, and it’s so beautifully constructed. It works well as a horror film, works well as a satire, works well as social commentary, and worked well as a personal expression of the sensibility of the person who made it.

What’s the biggest misconception you hear about critics?

That we hate movies. It’s really the opposite. I think a lot of us love the art form enough that when we see it used badly, we feel we need to call it out. I don’t trust the critic that doesn’t live, breathe, eat, and s–t movies.

What are you most proud of in your career so far?

As an editor, I’m not a religious person but, I think blessed is really the only word I can think of… When I get something from a good writer and think like, “Oh, this is good but there’s a great piece in here. Let’s find this great piece.”

In a way, it’s like you’re not the mother, you’re the midwife – being able to help a really beautiful baby be born into the world by trying to be a good editor. Getting back a second, or a third, or sometimes a fourth draft and finally having the moment where you’re like, “Yes! Holy s–t! You found it.”


David Fear is a Senior Editor and critic at Rolling Stone. Find him on Twitter: @davidlfear.

(Photo by Slaven Vlasic/Getty Images)

Phillip Youmans‘ debut film has many likening him to another talented African American filmmaker that burst on to the stage at a young age: John Singleton. Like Singleton did with his debut film Boyz n the Hood, the 19-year-old Youmans, while still in high school, has crafted a deeply personal tale about the Black experience that has audiences, critics, and the industry taking note. Burning Cane uses its story to explore the relationship between the church and African American communities, exposing hypocrisies, tensions, and complexities against the fog-filled swampy backdrop of the New Orleans bayou. The film is led by Treme star Wendell Pierce, who plays a troubled yet undeniably charismatic Southern Baptist minister and personifies a character all too familiar in the Black community: a dynamic leader who preaches “the good word” on Sunday but bathes in sin the rest of the week. With modest resources and limited time, Youmans displayed incredible skill behind the camera of a film that he shot, edited, and wrote.

After winning Best Narrative Feature at the Tribeca Film Festival, the film was picked up for distribution by Ava DuVernay’s Array productions and is streaming now on Netflix. Recently snagging a couple of Independent Spirit and Gotham Award nominations, Burning Cane looks to be this year’s low budget indie with enough legs to break through to the mainstream. When we sat down with Youmans to discuss the feature and his Five Favorite Films, he was unaffected by the hype, quick to give thanks to those who helped him make the film, and eager to pass along his advice to aspiring young filmmakers looking to follow in his footsteps.


Journey of the Hyena (1973) 86%

First up, Touki Bouki. It’s such a raw experimental work. I love its visual honesty and color palette. It also speaks to such an interesting experience within the diaspora – the idea of feeling sort of alienated by your own home. By Djibril Diop Mambéty, it speaks on a ton of things: cultural domination, neocolonialism, how you can feel alienated from your own culture. A visceral and brutal film made in the ’70s in Senegal. It starts with this beautiful wide static shot. We [the audience] are on sticks looking out as this herd starts to approach, and the color palette is insane. Like I said, it was made in the early ’70s, and they don’t shy away from showing anything. I don’t want to go too deep into what they don’t shy away from, because it’s a lot.

There Will Be Blood (2007) 91%

Next up is There Will Be Blood. I gotta say, Paul Thomas Anderson might be the best working director alive. There Will Be Blood was such an interesting balance of showing why Daniel Plainview prospered in the oil rush of California. But it also shows how he’s essentially decrepit as a human being. He’s almost rotting away. He’s losing sight of his own humanity. It’s about dehumanization. Even outside of how gorgeous it looks, especially when the fire ignites the oil derrick and then the camera is rushing in. It’s a low angle tracking shot following Plainview as he’s rushing toward the fire. The colors in that scene are literally just dumbfounding. But the biggest thing is performance, performance, performance, performance, performance! Daniel Day-Lewis is amazing, and Paul Dano as the pastor is freaking insane. Insane! And his dynamic with Daniel Plainview is some of the most compelling s–t I’ve seen on film. The fact that Plainview views Paul Dano’s character as a necessary mechanism to control the people in the town, but he doesn’t give him any bit of respect; Plainview doesn’t believe a lick of what Dano is saying in those church services. But he feels it’s important for the people in the town that are working day in and day out for him to believe it. It’s such an interesting dynamic.

Dog Day Afternoon (1975) 96%

Dog Day Afternoon is next because Al Pacino’s performance is bomb! So is John Cazale‘s performance. Dog Day Afternoon has such a dope condensed chronology, and Sidney Lumet is dope – Serpico, Network, 12 Angry Men – just so dope. But Dog Day Afternoon is probably easily the piece that I would ride with the most.  The biggest hallmark of it is, again, performances, performances, performances. From Al Pacino to the guy who plays the cop. Having the need to sort of harmonize with each other on an experience level. It’s so interesting because some of that was improv by Al Pacino and John Cazale. You can tell that they have such a close relationship. They’re so comfortable with each other as actors – it’s organic, and it shows on screen.

Apocalypse Now (1979) 98%

Apocalypse Now was one of the first films that I saw that showed film could be a malleable art form, something that could exist outside of a super-traditional three-act structure. Martin Sheen and his character are sort of wrestling with more than just trying to find courage, but also trying to find some reason for why he was there in the first place. Speaking to a lot of Vietnam vets, I know it’s especially prominent in the Black experience. Soldiers felt incredibly disenfranchised about Vietnam because they weren’t being respected back home, but expected to have the motivation to fight for their country. But looking at it even from Martin Sheen’s case, his character is white, but that was part of his motivation.

City of God (2002) 91%

City of God is kinetic and visceral. The active camerawork is gorgeous. City of God really did try to find those moments where we can pause and view these characters without any judgment. No character in City of God is black-and-white. There are moments when, even though we know some of these dudes are ruthless killers, they show us little hints that showcase their youth and make it clear to us that they’re still 16-, 17-, 18-years-old at the end of the day. One scene in particular I remember is Li’l Zé. He was this ruthless overlord, but he gets turned down at that dance party. And you just see his face where he’s smiling at first, and then you just see the embarrassment wash over him. Oh my God! Literally everyone in the world knows that moment; everyone in the world knows what it’s like to get rejected. But considering that we’ve seen this man brutally kill people at this point, I think it’s so interesting how the filmmaker also never intended for you to judge those characters. But he also never wanted to give a romanticized view of their life. He wanted you to fully understand how difficult and horrifying some of those realities can be. City of God is a masterpiece.

Really quick though, I also want to take the time, and give a special mention to Ava DuVernay’s work. Ava makes the most culturally important work of our time as a filmmaker. 13th is what taught the entire world that we’re essentially living in a re-engineered version of slavery. Ava is committed to promoting awareness. Outside of her being an extraordinarily talented filmmaker, she makes incredibly formative and culturally impactful work. I just want to shout her out as well.


Jacqueline Coley for Rotten Tomatoes: Let’s start with the obvious: How did you make this while you were in high school?

Phillip Youmans: I made this film while I was in high school with the help of my best friends and grassroots community outreach. It was definitely a grassroots production, through and through. Our resources were so limited, in terms of finances, so everything had to be sourced either through my friends or people in Laurel Valley or New Orleans, like free locations. I mean, craft food services were our parents! It took a vision; it took an intention. But in terms of making the film, you need help. You need an army. You need people who can help you make something. Considering the logistical demands that come with making a film, Mose Mayer and Ojo Akinlana were the best producers I could have ever asked for, and they are literally my best friends in the world.

The film acutely examines the African American community and its relationship with faith. I know this is from personal experience, but explain the impetus to put it on screen.

Youmans: Yeah, it’s something that I’ve personally been wrestling with for a long time. I grew up in the church, and I’ve since separated from the church and religion as a whole. I didn’t want to approach this film or any of the characters in it from any sort of judgmental lens, or holier-than-thou perspective. Burning Cane, in a lot of ways, is a cautionary tale. It’s talking about the dangers of fundamentalist religions, the dangers of the Baptist church, and not just the Baptist church but the church in general in our community. We talk about how that can perpetuate a lot of really antiquated traditionalist values. And all of those things are active conversations alongside cyclical vices and toxic masculinity. I knew Burning Cane could help me build a more nuanced perspective about those hypocrisies and fallacies that I recognize. You can’t come at something like this from a judgmental lens, and that’s not the intention of this piece at all.

How did you cast Wendell Pierce? 

Youmans: It was a dream from the jump; having him attached to the film felt like something that was completely impossible before it happened. And the way it happened was so random. Wendell added such an interesting element to the piece, in terms of motivating you to want to expand the role of the pastor. He’s a phenomenal actor, and still such a student of the craft. He also taught me something about how I should approach my work as well. Always be inquisitive. Learning never stops. Wendell is a consummate professional. Him being involved in the production just sort of upped the ante for all of us. We had to be accountable to everything that happened on set, for good reason, considering that we had him for only a couple of days. Everything had to run smoothly, because if we didn’t get what we needed, Wendell literally had to go shoot another show the next day. It was kinetic. It was fast-paced. It was so incredibly fruitful. I was connected with Wendell at Morning Call Coffee Stand [a cafe in Louisiana]. I was working in City Park in New Orleans leading up to production. I was waiting on a woman named Lula Elzy, and then I was telling her about my film, and that the Reverend hadn’t been cast yet. She said, “What do you think of Wendell Pierce playing it?” I was kind of taken aback. I said, “That’d be amazing, but I have no way to get in touch with him.” Then she texted him, and it went from there.

It seems strange to ask this given everything you’ve accomplished already, but what’s next? 

Youmans: Look, it’s so interesting. The thing that I’m most focused on, this point forward, is making this next movie. I don’t want to say too much, but the next movie is about the New Orleans Black Panthers, and it’s a story that’s very personal to me. I’m so excited about the story. I actually wanted to make that film before Burning Cane, but Burning Cane was the right film to make, emotionally, and in consideration of the resources that I had. It’s crazy because it’s come full circle. I said if Burning Cane works out, then I’ll definitely be able to make that Panther Story with the resources that I need to see it to fruition. And that’s been the case.

What advice would you give another teenager looking to make their first feature?

Youmans: Find people who want to be there with you, regardless of whether or not they can be paid. And don’t be afraid to reach out to people like Benh Zeitlin, a filmmaker that I admired. You also need to fall back into your friends, because they’re the only people at that age that are going to really ride for you regardless. They’re the only people that are going to be there with you and not complain about a 16-hour day. The best resource that we have is the people that you’re closest to, because everyone that was working on the set, outside of my actors, were people that I damn-near grew up with. Also, you don’t have to be in New York or LA to make something happen. I used to be so convinced that I had to go to LA or New York to make anything. But it’s so interesting how falling back into your roots works. When you have a real rooted connection to the material you’re addressing, that authenticity shines through every aspect of production.


Burning Cane is streaming now on Netflix.

Thumbnail images by Miramax Films, ©Paramount Vantage courtesy Everett Collection, Criterion Collection


Like this? Subscribe to our newsletter and get more features, news, and guides in your inbox every week.

Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images

(Photo by Stefanie Keenan/Getty Images)

In his short, albeit impressive filmography, up-and-coming director Trey Edward Shults has made his mark on the indie landscape. With his twisted take on the traditional Thanksgiving drama, Krisha, and his atmospheric horror follow-up It Comes At Night, he has shown himself to be a filmmaker unbeholden to traditional genre limitations. Shults’ deeply personal third feature, Waves, features Kelvin Harrison Jr.Sterling K. Brown, and newcomer Taylor Russell, and all have Oscar pundits buzzing, as does Shults’ gripping and original screenplay. With all three of his films to date Certified Fresh, the 31-year-old writer/director has joined some illustrious company, including the Coen brothers, Steve McQueen, Jason Reitman, and Ryan Coogler, all of whom also earned the distinction for their first three features.

We chatted with Shults just hours before the Waves premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival, about the love story at the heart of Waves and how he convinced the notoriously selective musician Frank Ocean to license songs for the movie soundtrack. He also gave us his Five Favorite Films, and like many subjects of this column, was quick to point out that the list could change depending on what day of the week it is.

There Will Be Blood (2007) 91%

The first one is Paul Thomas Anderson and There Will Be Blood. I had seen that movie at a very crucial point in my life. I had just torn my shoulder in wrestling, and it was like the world had fallen away from me. Like a lot in the movie is autobiographical. So yeah, I was really kind of lost. And then I saw There Will Be Blood in the theater, and it rocked my world. It blew my mind. The first Paul Thomas Anderson movie I saw was Boogie Nights at a really young age, and it was perfect for an adolescent. But it also made me realize there’s a creator behind all this. I was transported and inspired. That was when I started getting back into filmmaking and loving movies again. Because I couldn’t do sports. That movie was really huge for that.

The Tree of Life (2011) 84%

Next, I’ll go with The Tree of Life. Terry Malick – I’ve had the pleasure to work for him on a few things, and that changed the course of my life. But seeing The Tree of Life in a cinema was like one of the most humbling and beautiful experiences I’ve had. It’s cosmic, you know? It’s intimate but cosmic. It’s family but everything bigger. I had a religious experience in the theater watching that. There are shots in it that I worked on, and I know where we were for that, but it was bizarre to be having this religious experience and think, “Oh my God. I was involved, in a small capacity, with making it.” That movie, it’s just one of my favorite movies of all time. I loved working with Terrence Malick. I love his other films in that I don’t even know how to talk about him. Honestly.

Barry Lyndon (1975) 91%

Next, I’m going to go with Barry Lyndon. It’s next-level filmmaking. It blows me away what he’s doing with narrative in his camera, the curated detail, and look of that story. Also with the intermission in the half, it becomes this two-part epic. When I watch it again, I’m transported in awe. And I do feel like that’s an underrated [Stanley] Kubrick film.

Raging Bull (1980) 94%

I’m going to go with Raging Bull. I love Raging Bull. That’s another one I saw at a young age, and I didn’t love it at first. I didn’t know what to think of it. I was like, “This isn’t Rocky.” [Laughs] I was compelled and disturbed by what it was doing, stuff I didn’t get at the time. But that movie struck me at my core. I didn’t know if I liked it, but then I had to come back to it, and then I became obsessed with it and his whole career. It’s very hard to pick a favorite movie of his. Raging Bull is one I go back to, and there’s something between the expressionistic filmmaking of those boxing matches. There’s just a neo-realism in the dynamic between him, his brother, and his wife. It’s really powerful and incredibly inspiring.

Persona (1966) 91%

One more. Let me say Persona, one of my favorite movies of all time. That’s another one that I saw later. I saw it in my twenties, like 20 to 21 or something. It feels like it wasn’t made by a human being, because what it does is like magic. I could never imagine making something of that level. It’s just a beautiful thing of its own, and it blew me away. I don’t know how to talk about it. I love a lot of his stuff, but that one – man – it’s one of the greatest movies of all time.


Jacqueline Coley for Rotten Tomatoes: We chatted about Waves while you promoted It Comes At Night, and you said it was a love story. Having seen the film, I’ve got to ask, how is this a “love story?”

Trey Edward Shults: It is a love story. I mean, there are love stories in it, no?

Yes, but it’s certainly not a rom-com or a romantic drama. 

Yes, but familial love is a kind of love, no? Love is the thing connecting everything in the movie. It’s romantic love. It’s the love of a brother and sister. It’s the love of your partner. It’s the love of parents and children. I think, too, with the last movie, like you said, it was so brooding. If anything, death was the center of that, and then this movie, it was like life and love. It was about the positive. I know the movie gets very dark, but I wanted to show the end of a relationship and the beginning of one, but then link it through familial love. That’s what’s running through it. It’s all very broad, abstract stuff. I don’t know if I can be more specific. It’s also a hard movie to talk about without spoiling.

Agreed. So let’s talk about the casting, particularly Sterling K. Brown, because he’s kind of got the world at his feet, right?

Honestly, regarding Sterling, it was literally a dream come true to have him in this movie. I can’t imagine anyone else besides Sterling playing this part. I didn’t know Sterling’s work until The People v. O.J. Simpson and he blew my mind. I’ve been following him ever since, but following him as a human being – his interviews, the way he talks. He’s a magical human being and a magical presence. It was also crazy when he came on [to the film]. It started with Kelvin and then came Lucas [Hedges], then Alexa [Demie] and Taylor, and then it kept going. The hardest thing was working out Sterling’s schedule with This Is Us. We set it up to where we shifted our whole work week. We worked Saturday to Thursday. So he was doing the show in LA during the week, and then he’d take a red-eye and fly to Florida to be on set the next day. I remember one day, he was lifting weights, then fighting with his son [Kelvin] that night, and then having this incredibly heavy, emotional scene with his daughter [Taylor] later that day. I don’t know how he had the stamina, physical strength, or capacity to do it. He blew my mind. He just showed up as this beautiful man, but then he would get in the zone with his headphones, study the script all day, and then it was like “Take one. Done. Call it.” He just delivered.

This film is semi-autobiographical, but when you cast Kelvin, you had to make adjustments to make it feel authentic. Talk about how you did that.

Well, I hope it does feel authentic. I’m a freakin’ white dude, so I can’t speak to its authenticity. All I know is there’s stuff in it from my past, but I think the larger credit goes to the actors, especially Kelvin. He’s like a brother to me, and I wanted to work with him again [after It Comes at Night], and I wanted to give him a great role, because I cut some amazing acting out of the last one. So I sent him the script, and he wanted to be Tyler, so we sort of rebuilt Tyler, Ronald [Brown], and the family from the ground up. I can’t speak for Kelvin because he’s not here, but it almost feels like a combination of both of us. And a lot of the depth – the father and son stuff – is from Kelvin and his father. His father pushed him like that, but with music. That’s why they’re my collaborators. I just tried to listen, understand, and talk about it with him, Taylor, Renée [Elise Goldsberry], and Sterling. It was really was a collaboration. That made it what it is, and hopefully, if it feels special, it’s because we all came together to built it that way.

We also have to talk about Taylor, who plays the sister. She’s an incredible discovery. 

I’m so, so, so lucky. We saw an audition tape from our amazing casting director, Avy Kaufman, and it was her. They just got scenes. The first one was like the diner scene, and you couldn’t take your eyes off her. There’s so much going on internally. She doesn’t have to say anything, and I’m so compelled. There’s a beautiful subtlety in her performance that’s an inherent natural thing that an actor either has or they don’t. I saw her audition, and she blew my mind. And then she met Lucas, they hit it off, and then that was it. We became a great, big, messy family. But I love that girl. I just hope she shoots off from this, because she deserves it.

Let’s talk about the awkward love story you gave her. 

It’s just sort of where it naturally went with the writing. I still see the first half as a love story, but it’s a relationship at its end. That couple had magnetic energy like combustible balls of fire. They love hard and they fight hard. Then the movie shifts, and it’s all about rebirth. In my mind, the greatest tragedy that could happen happens midway through the film. I was crying like a baby writing, shooting, and editing it. It’s just sheer devastation. And then, when everyone’s at rock bottom, they go through a rebirth and evolve again. I wanted the movie to give you a hug with that second love story. You’ve gone through some of the worst stuff in the world, and then it’s like, “what a difference a day makes.” Because love can be the hardest thing in the world and it can be the most beautiful thing.

How did you get Frank Ocean to let you use two of his songs? He’s very particular about where he licenses his music.

I just feel incredibly, incredibly blessed. Frank’s one of my favorite living artists. His music, especially Channel Orange, Blonde, and Endless, they kind of changed my life. It’s a bit intense. So I wrote a letter, and we sent him the movie, but it’s not like I ever talked to Frank. Like, my people sent stuff to his people, so I’m assuming he got that stuff. But it was funny because it was going on like a month or two, and I was still editing. I sent him a rough cut of the movie because I edited for a long time, and then his people were like, “Yeah, it’s not looking good. There are so many songs he won’t just sign off on. Maybe you can reduce it to one song.” But they came back, “You’re approved for all the music. You’re good.” And that’s it. Like, I don’t know if he watched the movie, read my letter. I don’t know anything. I’m just so blessed and grateful. I don’t know how, but it happened.

Finally, you must be the king of the ambiguous title. Krisha, It Comes At Night, now Waves; the narratives of each film are carefully hidden within the titles. So what do you want people to think about when they hear Waves, because the film is not about surfing. 

[Laughs] No, it’s definitely not about surfing. It sounds cheesy, but it’s really about highs and lows, the highs and lows of life and of love. There’s some ocean stuff in it, but it’s really more about the spirit of what the movie is. And that’s what I hope people connect with.


Waves opens in select theaters this Friday.

Like this? Subscribe to our newsletter and get more features, news, and guides in your inbox every week.

In 2019, Rotten Tomatoes turns 21, and to mark the occasion we’re celebrating with a series of features that look back at the brightest moments on screen of the past two decades – and one year – and the things that have us excited for the future. 

They’re the lines you’ve worn on T-shirts and Photoshopped into memes. They’re the lines you’re maybe a little sick of, but can’t stop loving. Before they were famous, though – before they were parodied on SNL and printed onto ironic mugs – they were words on a page and then words in a movie you were hearing for the first time, and they stuck. Maybe they were hilarious (poor Gretchen, “fetch” never happened), or maybe they were chilling (“I see dead people”). Maybe they were delivered just right (“Why… so… serious?”). Here, we’re looking back at the 21 most memorable lines from the movies since August 1998, the year that Rotten Tomatoes came into this world. If we missed a favorite of yours, let us know in the comments.


The Sixth Sense (1999)

Neither M. Night Shyamalan nor Haley Joel Osment knew that the intensely whispered “I see dead people” would become the center of Disney’s marketing push for The Sixth Sense – and the subject of parodies for decades. Talking recently to Rotten Tomatoes, Osment said he was just thankful Twitter hadn’t been invented at the time the film came out, when he was 11.


Notting Hill (1999)

When you pair America’s sweetheart with Britain’s reigning rom-com king, you have to bring your A-game, and writer Richard Curtis did just that for Notting Hill. With this heartbreaking line, he manages to somehow get us rooting for one of the world’s richest and most glamorous movie stars, and screaming with frustration at the regular “fairly level-headed bloke” whose love she’s asking for.


American Pie (1999)

Paul and Chris Weitz’s surprisingly sweet teen sex comedy gave us one of the late ’90s most indelible movie images (the pie!), and chased that up with one of the decade’s most memorable movie lines. And one that’s got a sex-positive ring: “What?” asks Alyson Hannigan’s Michelle flatly after revealing where she sometimes puts her flute. “You don’t think I know how to get myself off?”


Fight Club (1999)

From Chuck Pahalniuk’s pen to Brad Pitt’s mouth and into the minds of college students all over the country…


Galaxy Quest (1999)

It was only appropriate that this cult spoof of Star Trek and its legion of Trekkie fans would have its own live-long-and-prosper–style catchphrase. It is delivered with Shatnerian levels of cheese and determination by Tim Allen, playing Jason Nesmith, who’s playing Commander Quincy Peter Taggart.


Office Space (1999)

We could run through an entire stack of Post-Its writing down our favorite lines from Mike Judge’s cult favorite, but this chipper, grating, morning greeting wins out – an encapsulation of the deep, smiley rage suppression that gives Office Space its kick.


Erin Brockovich (2000)

When Ed (Albert Finney) asks Julia Roberts’ Erin Brockovich, “What makes you think you can just walk in there and find what we need?”, she fires off this line and a look that says, Seriously, you need to ask? The resourceful real-life Erin Brockovich has said she did use the line with the real-life Ed – probably more than once.


The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001)

Some consider it blasphemy that Peter Jackson added this line as a climax to Gandalf’s defiant verbal smackdown of the fiery Balrog; in the original Tolkien book, Gandalf only says “you cannot pass” (which he also says, though less iconically, as he starts his speech in the film). Jackson’s addition became one of the best “f—k yeah!” moments in the original movie trilogy and went on to spawn thousands of memes.


Training Day (2001)

Denzel Washington won an Oscar for playing corrupt narcotics cop Alonzo in Atonine Fuqua’s Training Day, and it might have been his delivery this line – puffed-up and chest-pounding as he realizes power is slipping away – that got any hesitant Academy voters across the line.


The Incredibles (2004)

It’s unfair to say that Edna Mode (voiced by Incredibles writer-director Brad Bird) steals Pixar’s superhero smash – there are too many awesome elements and characters for one to dominate – but she comes very, very close. She’s full of one-liners and shady zingers, but it’s her golden rule (“No capes!”), and the various anecdotes that led to it (R.I.P. Thunderhead), that people remember most fondly.


Mean Girls (2004)

Mean Girls’ Regina George (Rachel McAdams) is the queen bee of her group, and this was perhaps her sharpest stinger. Irony is, while “fetch” didn’t happen, this line caught on in a big way.


300 (2006)

On paper, there’s nothing particularly special about this line – it’s kinda just a statement of fact (it is Sparta, after all – not Athens or Thermopylae, and definitely not madness, nor blasphemy). But coming out of Peak Gerard Butler’s mouth as a kind of gravelly scream for the ages, and accompanied by that iconic slow-mo kick, it’s gone down in film history. Watching this moment, we are all Sparta (even those of us without six packs).


Black Panther (2018)

This greeting of the Wakandan people, and the accompanying gesture, infiltrated popular culture following the release of mega-hit Black Panther in February 2018. (The film’s stars were asked to do the gesture so frequently on red carpets and during interviews, memes began to circulate showing a bored-looking Chadwick Boseman – who plays the titular hero – giving a perfunctory version of the cross-armed symbol.) Interestingly, the most memorable use of the phrase might come in Infinity War, and not Black Panther, when T’Challa shouts the phrase as he leads his Wakandans into battle against Thanos’s forces.


Brokeback Mountain (2005)

When Jake Gyllenhaal said these words to Heath Ledger while shooting Brokeback Mountain, he probably had no idea what a life they would go on to have: first as a wrenching moment between their characters, Jack Twist and Ennis Del Mar; then as a source of parody and a meme (mostly among those too immature to cope with the film); finally, and most recently, as a shorthand for the film itself, and what it meant to the LGBTQ community to see a gay couple portrayed authentically and without judgment in a major release.


The Hunger Games (2012)

There are plenty of action-packed, effects-enhanced, and completely thrilling moments throughout the Hunger Games franchise, but few are as simultaneously inspiring and terrifying as the quiet scene in which Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) steps forward to take her young sister’s place in the Games. The line is lifted directly from the same scene in first book of Susanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy.


Snakes on a Plane (2006)

You may not recall the insane hype around Snakes on a Plane in the lead up to its release – an irony-fueled internet buzz-wave that stemmed, essentially, from the absurdity of its premise-capturing title. You may not even remember much of the film itself. But there is no way you forgot this line, spoken by profanity wizard Samuel L. Jackson in one of those legendary B-movie inspiration speeches he’s so masterful at delivering. (Fun fact: The line has aired on FX as the more-safe-for-work “monkey-flying snakes on this Monday-to-Friday plane.”)


Taken (2008)

It was in 2009, while in his mid 50s, that Liam Neeson discovered a very particular set of skills – gravelly line-readings, a death-stare for the ages, and a capacity for rapid-fire action – that would launch a whole new chapter of his career: Liam Neeson, Action Star! And while the past decade has been littered with Neeson action programmers (right up to 2019’s Cold Pursuit), none have matched Taken for its intensity, impact, and the power of that oft-quoted bedroom scene.


The Dark Knight (2008)

Heath Ledger’s Oscar-winning turn as the Joker in Christopher Nolan’s second Batman film might well have given us the best comic-book movie villain ever. The character’s most famous line – “Why so serious?” – became iconic even before the film’s release, centering one of the most effective marketing campaigns of recent decades.


There Will Be Blood (2007)

Speaking of Oscar winners… This rather surprising analogy for oil drainage, spoken by Daniel Day-Lewis as Daniel Plainview, was inspired by real-life words to congress from then Secretary of the Interior, Albert Fall, spoken during a 1920s Congressional investigation. Or so Paul Thomas Anderson has said – the original quote has not been found.


Zoolander (2001)

The best stupid movie of the past 21 years? Maybe. (Step Brothers would give it a definite run for its money.) But Zoolander is probably the most quotable, thanks to brilliant bites of silliness like this.


The Fast and the Furious (2001)

The Furious franchise has evolved greatly over the years, shifting gears (sorry!) from smallish-scale Point Break-alike to globe-trotting stunt spectacular, each entry one-upping the other in terms of scale and ludicrousness. What keeps the whole thing grounded, and provides the through-line from 2001 right through to this year’s Hobbs and Shaw? Family, of course, but also the dedication to awesome cheese perfectly encapsulated by this line/mantra/religion. Us too, Dom, us too.

Photos courtesy of Buena Vista, Universal, Twentieth Century Fox, DreamWorks, Warner Bros., Walt Disney, Paramount, Marvel Studios, Focus Films, Lionsgate, Paramount Vantage.


Like this? Subscribe to our newsletter and get more features, news, and guides in your inbox every week.

For decades, Daniel Day-Lewis has been one of Hollywood’s most widely respected working actors — and with this weekend’s Phantom Thread, he’s taking what he says will be his final bow, bringing an end to a remarkable career that includes some of the best-reviewed movies of the last quarter century. In honor of it all, we’re dedicating this feature to a fond look back at some of his brightest critical highlights while inviting you to create your own rankings. It’s time for Total Recall!


Use the arrows to rank the movies, or click here to see them ranked by Tomatometer!

As usual, the big streaming subscription services unloaded a ton of new titles for the beginning of April, and as usual, we’ve gone through and selected the best-reviewed of the bunch. Read on to find out where to watch ’80s classics like GremlinsA Nightmare on Elm Street, and Escape from New York; beloved hits from the ’90s like Boogie Nights and The Legend of Drunken Master; and contemporary winners like There Will Be BloodTropic ThunderThe Love Witch, and A Man Called Ove.


New on Netflix

 

Schindler's List (1993) 98%

Liam Neeson, Ben Kingsley, and Ralph Fiennes star in Steven Spielberg’s historical drama about a German businessman who helped save hundreds of Jews by employing them in his factory during World War II.

Available now on: Netflix


A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) 95%

Iconic horror villain Freddy Krueger (Robert Englund) makes his debut in Wes Craven’s classic film about a group of teens who are tormented by an evil spirit who visits them in their dreams.

Available now on: Netflix


13 Reasons Why: Season 1 (2017) 77%

Based on the novel by Jay Asher, this Netflix original series stars Dylan Minnette as a high schooler who strives to understand the reasons behind a classmate’s suicide.

Available now on: Netflix


Whale Rider (2002) 91%

Keisha Castle-Hughes earned a Best Actress Oscar nomination for her work in Niki Caro’s family drama, based on a novel by Witi Ihimaera, about a young Maori girl in New Zealand who wants to become the chief of her tribe, upending a generations-old patriarchal tradition.

Available now on: Netflix


The Clan (2015) 84%

Based on true events, this crime drama from Argentina about a normal-seeming family who kidnapped wealthy citizens and held them for ransom during the 1980s.

Available now on: Netflix


Gremlins (1984) 85%

Joe Dante’s beloved horror-comedy stars Zach Galligan as an unsuspecting office drone who adopts a strange creature in Chinatown, names him Gizmo, and promptly discovers that his new pet — as cute as he is — is plagued by some horrific allergic reactions.

Available now on: Netflix


Escape From New York (1981) 86%

Kurt Russell stars in John Carpenter’s cult classic sci-fi action film set in a dystopian future, where New York is now a giant prison, and a mercenary is tasked with rescuing the President from within its confines after Air Force One crashes there.

Available now on: Netflix


Drunken Master II (1994) 84%

In one of his most celebrated martial arts films, Jackie Chan stars as folk hero Wong Fei-hung, who utilizes his unorthodox fighting style to take down a ring of smugglers in early 20th century China.

Available now on: Netflix


Tropic Thunder (2008) 82%

Ben Stiller, Robert Downey Jr., and Jack Black star in Stiller’s hilarious Hollywood satire about a group of unprepared actors filming a Vietnam War movie who encounter a heroin operation in the jungle and fail to realize they’re the real deal.

Available now on: Netflix


The Manchurian Candidate (2004) 80%

Denzel Washington and Meryl Streep star in Jonathan Demme’s remake of John Frankenheimer’s classic thriller, which shifts the focus from the military to the world of multinational conglomerates.

Available now on: Netflix


Good Kill (2014) 75%

Ethan Hawke and January Jones star in this Certified Fresh drama about a drone pilot whose work begins to tear at his conscience.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Amazon Prime

 

The Love Witch (2016) 95%

This curious thriller with a retro vibe centers on a beautiful but lonely witch whose efforts to seduce men with her potions results in a string of dead bodies.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Boogie Nights (1997) 93%

Paul Thomas Anderson’s ensemble opus about life in the porn industry made a movie star out of Mark Wahlberg and benefited immeasurably from great performances by Burt Reynolds, Julianne Moore, John C. Reilly, Don Cheadle, Heather Graham, Luis Guzman, Philip Seymour Hoffman, and William H. Macy.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


There Will Be Blood (2007) 91%

Paul Thomas Anderson’s epic drama stars Daniel Day-Lewis as pioneering oil man Daniel Plainview, who strikes oil in southern California at the turn of the 20th century and promptly begins to build an empire.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


A Man Called Ove (2015) 91%

Based on the novel of the same name, this Swedish dramedy centers on an elderly man whose plans for suicide are foiled by unwanted friendships.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


A History of Violence (2005) 88%

Viggo Mortensen and Ed Harris star in David Cronenberg’s mystery thriller about a small-town diner owner who attracts the attention of a dangerous man after he thwarts an attempted robbery and makes national news.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Hello, My Name Is Doris (2015) 85%

Sally Field and Max Greenfield star in this Certified Fresh dramedy about a woman who falls for a much younger man and starts hanging with a new crowd.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Opposite of Sex (1998) 80%

Christina Ricci and Martin Donovan star in this dark comedy about a rebellious 16-year-old who, after the death of her stepfather, travels to visit her half-brother in Indiana and proceeds to cause all sorts of trouble.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Puffy Chair (2005) 77%

Mark Duplass and Katie Aselton star in Jay Duplass’ indie comedy about a man who embarks on a road trip with his demanding girlfriend and his brother to deliver a vintage recliner to his father.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on FandangoNOW

 

Split (2016) 77%

James McAvoy and Anya Taylor-Joy star in M. Night Shyamalan’s psychological thriller about a young woman who is captured and held captive by a man with 23 different personalities.

Available now on: FandangoNOW

Netflix usually adds a lot of new titles at the beginning of each month, and this May is no different, so here are all the Certified Fresh selections, just to narrow down your choices a bit. Whether you’re looking for a lighthearted comedy, a heavy drama, some dark intrigue, or a little romance, there’s a good chance something here will spark your interest. Read on for the full list.


New on Netflix

 

To Catch a Thief (1955) 94%

Cary Grant and Grace Kelly star in Alfred Hitchcock’s classic romantic mystery about a retired thief who sets out to clear his name when a copycat begins preying on tourists in the French Riviera.

Available now on: Netflix


The Truman Show (1998) 95%

Jim Carrey and Ed Harris star in this dramedy about a man who understandably freaks out when he discovers his entire life has been the center of a television production.

Available now on: Netflix


There Will Be Blood (2007) 91%

Paul Thomas Anderson’s epic drama stars Daniel Day-Lewis as pioneering oil man Daniel Plainview, who strikes oil in southern California at the turn of the 20th century and promptly begins to build an empire.

Available now on: Netflix


Almost Famous (2000) 89%

Cameron Crowe’s idealized self-portrait of his time as a young Rolling Stone correspondent is a funny, insightful look at the excitement and chaos surrounding a successful rock band.

Available now on: Netflix


Meek's Cutoff (2010) 86%

Michelle Williams stars in this Western about a group of wagon families who struggle to survive perilous terrain during the early days of the Oregon Trail.

Available now on: Netflix


Pleasantville (1998) 85%

Tobey Maguire and Reese Witherspoon star in this satirical comedy about a pair of siblings who are transported into a 1950s-era TV show, where they help the residents of a small town break free from their repressed lifestyles.

Available now on: Netflix


Begin Again (2013) 83%

John Carney’s second musical romance stars Keira Knightley as a newly single songwriter who begins an unlikely friendship with the record exec who volunteers to help record her album independently.

Available now on: Netflix


Into the Wild (2007) 83%

Emile Hirsch stars in Sean Penn’s Oscar-nominated account of Christopher McCandless, a college grad who abandoned a privileged life to embark on a cross-country adventure in search of personal enlightenment.

Available now on: Netflix


While You Were Sleeping (1995) 81%

Sandra Bullock stars in this romantic comedy about a lonely toll booth operator who falls in love with one of her customers and is mistaken for his fiancee when she intervenes in a tragic accident that leaves him comatose.

Available now on: Netflix


Braveheart (1995) 79%

Mel Gibson directs and stars in this multiple Oscar-winner as William Wallace, a Scottish folk hero from the 13th century who led his people against the English in the First War of Scottish Independence.

Available now on: Netflix


The Machinist (2004) 77%

Christian Bale stars in this psychological thriller about a factory worker with an acute case of insomnia who begins to suspect he might be losing his mind.

Available now on: Netflix

pierce feat img

Getty Images / Craig Barritt / Stringer

 

Pierce Brosnan has a long history of breaking hearts and taking names. Remington Steele and James Bond are two household names brought to life by Mr. Suave-and-Debonair himself. He’s charmed his way onto screens large and small, not only as those two impressive guys, but also in films like Mrs. DoubtfireThe Thomas Crown Affair and The Matador.  His latest film, No Escape, is out tomorrow on Blu-Ray, DVD, and On Demand. His thoughts on the films that most inspired him, though, are right here:

 


The Wizard of Oz (1939) 98%

I did it as a musical when I left drama school. Back in ’76, I did it as a Christmas pantomime [laughing] and so the  movie is kind of indelible in my head. I wish I could say I played one of the main roles. I was just a chocolate tree.

RT: That’s inspiring for the rest of us, just so you know.

[laughing] Yeah, I made the props for the cast and I made cups of tea and I put the posters up and I watched the movie endlessly because I’d been trained as a method actor — deep in the method, you know — I was deep into my chocolate tree. I was a chocolate tree, a dancing skeleton, and a jitterbug. I don’t know, the movie just kind of stuck with me. And it was a movie that I skated over when it would come on Sunday afternoons after the Sunday roast in England. But somehow it connected with me and I just think it’s a magnificent film — brilliantly orchestrated and performed by them all. And “If I Were King of the Forest” is one of my favorite songs. Just the magic of it, and it’s a bit terrifying as well — flying monkeys — it’s pretty scary.

RT: That’s true; it’s one of the scarier moments of many films. You don’t realize how scary that movie can be because of how grotesque films have gotten lately. That was truly terrifying, especially for kids.

Yeah, back then, that was a big jolt to the system to see those little f—ers come down and try to grab your dog.

The Godfather (1972) 97%

Huge fan of Marlon Brando. For this man to come out of the shadows playing Don Corleone was just captivating. And it never disappoints; to this day it doesn’t disappoint. That movie is still a spectacle of Americana storytelling with a performance by him which is just inspiring. And he was an inspiring actor, he was certainly somebody who I still go back and watch and… the music, the story, the whole trilogy — It was very much connected to my youth as a young man about to go off to drama school.

RT: So that inspired you to do what you do?

Yes. I mean, Brando was one of many — Montgomery Clift, Spencer Tracy, Cary Grant, Paul Newman, Warren Beatty, Robert De Niro. When you’re moved emotionally by an actor, you want to be like them, you want to be up there, just that innocent dream that I had as a young man to make movies, to be a part of movies, never in my wildest dreams thinking I was going to come close to it. And it still has that allure. You still — you know, how it goes as an older man, you see young… I saw Brooklyn the other day with Saoirse Ronan and Emory Cohen, this young fellow — the two of them together were just breathtaking, brilliantly real. [laughs] Same with Michael Shannon in 99 Homes, and Andrew Garfield. It’s good, it’s great.

The English Patient (1996) 85%

Ralph [Fiennes] is a spectacular actor. I just love the romance of the film. The soundtrack — when you have great acting and great story and a soundtrack, it just always cuts to the marrow of your senses, so to speak. And you know both those films — well actually, those three films have soundtracks which are very memorable.

There Will Be Blood (2007) 91%

What other great films are there? Ah, for God’s sake, There Will Be Blood and No Country For Old Men. I saw those films that year, back to back. Just outstanding work by director, writer, producers, actors. Captivating, both men: Javier Bardem and Daniel Day Lewis — just iconic. Every time he steps on the stage, you know, you can’t take your eyes off the guy. And both films sit on the bookshelf as bookends, really, to that special year of film making.

No Country for Old Men (2007) 93%

RT: Is there one that you think ranks a little bit higher?

I can’t really say one ranks higher than the other because they’re on par with each other. I mean the Coen brothers’ unique landscape of film-making — they have such a versatile touch, and such a unique way of telling their stories. I wouldn’t want to rank one above the other because they’re both impressive movies and movie experiences.


 

Kerr Lordygan for Rotten Tomatoes: What can you talk about that you’re working on next?

Brosnan: I’m about to go off and do a movie with Martin Campbell here and the end of the week in London. And Jackie Chan. It’s a piece called The Foreigner, and it’s a thriller, and it’s — for Jackie — a wonderful part. A man whose life is torn apart by the IRA and a bombing. I play the Northern Irish Minister who’s trying to keep the peace accord together.

RT: So you’re a good guy.

Brosnan: Yeah, I believe I’m a good guy. So that’s where you’ll find me right now, just pulling that together.


No Escape will be available on Blu-Ray, DVD and On Demand Nov. 24th.

Requiring legendary levels of bravery, artistry, and intellect, being knighted by the British monarchy is no laughing matter. Some of the 20th century’s finest British talents of film, television, and stage have been honored as a Knight Bachelor for their contributions to the arts, but don’t you just love it when the good knights go bad? Their chivalry aside, many have proven keen to royally misbehaving now and again.

Look no further than Sir Patrick Stewart’s latest leading man gig: Walter Blunt in the Seth MacFarlane-produced Starz series, Blunt Talk. The trailer alone shows the British newsman indulging in sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll, so the sky’s truly the limit for where this bad boy’s antics will take him upon the series’ August 22 premiere.

Below, we break down 10 knights who’ve taken a walk on the wild side as womanizers, mutants, dictators, and more.


SIR BOOZE-A-LOT

Knight: Sir Patrick Stewart

Year Knighted: Stewart was first honored by the British monarchy in 2001 when appointed as Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE). He was again honored at the 2010 New Year Honours when made a Knight Bachelor for his services to drama.

Royal Misbehavior: While Stewart’s 50-year stage and film career has seen him play any number of roles, he’s become best known for playing the virtuous leader (hat tip to Captain Jean-Luc Picard and Professor Xavier). That’s what makes his most recent outing as Walter Blunt on Blunt Talk such a thrill. As an English newscaster fresh to L.A., he plays a Brit-out-of-water with a penchant for booze, cocaine, and ladies of the night. It’s our fearless leader like we’ve never seen him before.

Where to see him next: Blunt Talk premieres on Starz this Saturday, August 22, at 9 p.m.


SIR LADIES MAN

Knight: Sir Michael Caine

Year Knighted: Queen Elizabeth II appointed Caine a Knight Bachelor in 2000 for his services to drama.

Royal Misbehavior: You can’t just go around ripping women’s hearts out like that! As the title character and unapologetic womanizer in Alfie, Caine jumps from one relationship — and bed — to the next, fathering children and ransacking the battlefield of love along the way. And when it all catches up to him and he decides to man-up and settle down, the good-looking Brit gets a dose of his own cold-hearted medicine. It doesn’t go down easy.

Where to see him next: The latter half of Caine’s career has seen him become a mainstay in Christopher Nolan’s epics, but he stars next in Youth, an aged buddy dramedy costarring Harvey Keitel and Jane Fonda.


SIR PRISON BREAK

Knight: Sir Sean Connery

Year Knighted: After being nominated and then vetoed for knighthood in both 1997 and 1998, Connery was appointed Knight Bachelor in 2000 for his services to drama. He also holds to his name such distinctions as “Sexiest Man Alive” and “The Greatest Living Scot.”

Royal Misbehavior: Connery is criminally sexy as the historic James Bond, but in director Michael Bay’s 1996 blockbuster, The Rock, he plays a convicted baddie who’s turning over a new leaf. His character, John Mason, is the only prisoner to ever escape Alcatraz, and the FBI — led by Nicolas Cage’s Dr. Stanley Goodspeed — needs his help to infiltrate and terminate rogue Marines who’ve taken over the island.

Where to see him next: Connery, who turned 85 this week, has been largely inactive in Hollywood since his starring role in 2003’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. Might be time for a Bond marathon when Spectre hits this fall.


SIR MILKSHAKE-DRINKER

Knight: Sir Daniel Day-Lewis

Year Knighted: The three-time Academy Award winner was officially knighted by Prince William, Duke of Cambridge in 2014 — one year after Dame Helen Mirren jokingly bestowed the honor at the 2013 Oscars.

Royal Misbehavior: As sociopathic antihero Daniel Plainview in Paul Thomas Anderson’s 2007 masterpiece, There Will Be Blood, Day-Lewis is utterly unforgettable. Inspired by Upton Sinclair’s Oil!, Plainview is a soulless oil man warped by greed, rage, and lust. And Day-Lewis’ Oscar-winning turn is an undeniable tour de force. You’ll never look at milkshakes (or bowling pins) the same way again.

Where to see him next: Day-Lewis has been on hiatus since snagging his third Oscar for portraying Abraham Lincoln in Steven Spielberg’s 2012 release, Lincoln. Another of his Oscar performances, My Left Foot, is currently streaming on Netflix.


SIR HANNIBAL

Knight: Sir Anthony Hopkins

Year Knighted: Queen Elizabeth II appointed Hopkins as a Knight Bachelor in 1993 for his contributions to the arts.

Royal Misbehavior: Few villains are as immediately memorable — or quotable — as Dr. Hannibal Lecter. Hopkins took home the 1991 Oscar for his Silence of the Lambs role. To this day, he sends chills down our spine with his master intellect and observational prowess — and, of course, his unyielding insistence on snacking on human flesh. No matter how decadent the wine and accompanying hors d’oeuvres, when he says he’s having a friend for dinner, run for it.

Where to see him next: Hopkins has a pair of action-thrillers in the wings: Collide with costars Nicholas Hoult and Felicity Jones, and Solace with Colin Farrell — and will star in the upcoming HBO series Westworld, premiering in 2016. 


SIR VICIOUS

Knight: Sir Derek Jacobi

Year Knighted: Jacobi’s royally representing more than just the United Kingdom as a Knight of the arts. He was appointed as Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1985, and a Knight Bachelor for services to drama in 1994. Between these distinctions, however, Denmark scooped him up to honor him as a Knight First Class of the Order of Dannebrog in 1989.

Royal Misbehavior: His role as Alexander Corvinus in Underworld: Evolution may have him fraternizing with the undead, but as Stuart Bixby in the British sitcom Vicious, Jacobi goes for Ian McKellen’s throat with the practiced grace of a vampire. Witnessing these two long-time partners get catty and queeny with each other is a schadenfreude-fueled delight, but we’d never want to get caught in the crossfire.

Where to see him next: Season two of Vicious premieres this Sunday on PBS. Also, see Sir Jacobi’s kingly turn in the Certified Fresh film Cinderella when it comes to DVD on September 15.


SIR SARUMAN

Knight: Sir Christopher Lee

Year Knighted: Lee was made a Knight Bachelor in 2009 for his services to drama and charity. Thoughtfully enough, Prince Charles allowed Lee to remain standing when knighted due to the difficulty the 87-year-old had kneeling.

Royal Misbehavior: The late, great Lee made a livelihood out of playing the villain — he is perhaps the most famous Count Dracula ever, bringing him to the big screen a whopping nine times. But audiences today will likely recognize him for his work later on in both the Star Wars and Lord of the Rings franchises. As Saruman in the latter, he aligned himself with Sauron and waged war on Middle Earth, betraying his old friend, Gandalf, and eventually paying the ultimate price.

Where to see him next: Sir Christopher Lee died at age 93 on June 7, 2015. Look for his final film, the U.K. indie Angels in Notting Hill, coming soon to a film festival near you.


SIR V FOR VILLAIN

Knight: Sir John Hurt

Year Knighted: Surprisingly, the longtime actor was just appointed a Bachelor Knight this year in the 2015 New Year Honours for his service to drama. In 2004, he was made Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE).

Royal Misbehavior: No stranger to futuristic dystopias, Hurt played protagonist Winston Smith in the 1984 adaptation of George Orwell’s 1984. In tackling the genre again in 2005, he opted for the dark side. As Adam Sutler in James McTeigue’s adaptation of V for Vendetta, he played a Hitler-inspired fascist dictator and the direct antagonist to our unlikely heroes, Evey and V.

Where to see him next: You can catch Hurt later this year as Tom, the boss-man in Sky Atlantic’s The Last Panthers, a TV biopic of famed heist masters The Pink Panthers.


SIR MIND-F#@%

Knight: Sir Ben Kingsley

Year Knighted: Kingsley was appointed a Knight Bachelor in 2002. Rumor has it, he insists on “Sir” preceding his name ever since.

Royal Misbehavior: Kingsley has proven over the years that he can dabble with both the good and the bad (performances don’t get more benevolent than his Academy Award-winning take on Mohandas Gandhi). But as Dr. Cawley in Martin Scorsese’s 2010 psychological thriller, Shutter Island, he oozes malice. Cawley’s icy demeanor with his patients is less about professional boundaries and more indicative of his heartlessness towards their well-being. It’s a calculated, slow-burning performance, and one that stands out in this Leonardo DiCaprio-starrer.

Where to see him next: Kingsley always has a stacked slate of projects. He just starred as Ay in Tut, a new miniseries on Spike TV, and can be seen in the film Learning to Drive, which opens in limited release this weekend.


SIR MAGNETO

Knight: Sir Ian McKellen

Year Knighted: The list of British honors for McKellen have been stacking up for the better part of three decades. In 1979, he was appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire. In 1991, he was appointed a Knight Bachelor for services to the performing arts. And McKellen followed that up with an appointment as Companion of Honour for services to drama in 2008.

Royal Misbehavior: Sure, he’s famed for bringing J. R. R. Tolkien’s beloved Gandalf to life in Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit trilogies, but the indomitable voice and presence needed for Gandalf also served McKellen well when tackling Erik Lehnsherr (A.K.A. Magneto) for the live-action X-Men franchise. His ability to wreck havoc with the wave of his hand — remember that bridge scene in X-Men: The Last Stand? — is simply terrifying. And that Mystique-assisted prison break from X2 is still bait to make any fanboy geek-out.

Where to see him next: McKellen can be caught in theaters now as Sherlock Holmes in Bill Condon’s Mr. Holmes. He also plays the comically snide Freddie Thornhill alongside another knight, Sir Derek Jacobi (who once played Hitler, no less), in showrunner Gary Janetti’s Viciouswhich returns for a second season on PBS this Sunday.

This week in streaming video, we’ve got an action-packed zombie flick, a silent film from Spain, and a timely documentary available as brand new releases. Then, Netflix has rolled out a few choice films, including a Brian DePalma horror classic, a blockbuster crowd-pleaser, a dark drama from Darren Aronofsky, and acclaimed films from P.T. Anderson and Francis Ford Coppola. Read on to find out what’s available to watch right now.


World War Z
66%

When mankind is threatened by a global zombie outbreak, it’s up to ex-United Nations operative Gerry Lane (Brad Pitt) to scour the planet to find the source of the pandemic.

Available on: Amazon, Vudu


Blancanieves
95%

This silent take on Snow White set in 1920s Spain is a visually resplendent black and white drama that won oodles awards in its native land.

Available now on: Amazon, Vudu


Terms and Conditions May Apply
84%

This documentary about how corporations and government agencies access data from internet searches seems particularly relevant given recent headlines.

Available now on: Amazon, Vudu


Men in Black
92%

Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones star in this sci-fi comedy about a sunglass-wearing team of extraterrestrial investigators.

Available now on: Netflix


Requiem for a Dream
79%

Darren Aronofsky’s bleak film, starring Jared Leto, Marlon Wayans, and Jennifer Connelly, explores the nature and consequences of drug addiction.

Available now on: Netflix


The Conversation
97%

Gene Hackman stars in Francis Ford Coppola’s masterful drama about a lonely surveillance expert who becomes haunted by the implications of a maddeningly ambiguous conversation.

Available now on: Netflix


There Will Be Blood
91%

Daniel Day-Lewis stars in Paul Thomas Anderson’s epic about a bootstrapping oilman and his twisted relationship with a frontier pastor (Paul Dano).

Available now on: Netflix


Carrie
93%

Brian De Palma’s horror classic stars Sissy Spacek as a high school outcast with supernatural powers; catch it now before the remake hits theaters.

Available now on: Netflix



There Will Be Blood (2007)

91%

With his fourth film, Punch-Drunk Love, P.T. Anderson took a step back from the large ensemble casts, grand statements, and inflated running times of Magnolia and Boogie Nights — but that didn’t mean he was content to keep serving up 90-minute love stories, as he’d emphatically prove with his next outing, 2007’s There Will Be Blood.

Vast and dark, Blood begins in near-total silence — in fact, for the first 20 minutes, there isn’t any dialogue at all, just shots of an impressively hirsute prospector whacking away at a mountain in search of minerals.

That prospector, we soon learn, is Daniel Plainview (Daniel Day-Lewis), and he’s a bootstrapper’s dream — shrewd and driven, and as cunningly hostile to his fellow human beings as he is to the earth. In Magnolia, Anderson winked at Nietzsche’s “will to power” by having Tom Cruise’s character take the stage to the strains of “Also Sprach Zarathustra”; here, he uses Plainview to pretty much embody the concept, using everything and everyone as a tool or an object of conquest. As he says at one point early in the film, “Can everything around here be got?”

Plainview eventually begins to accrue wealth as an oilman, and when one of his workers dies in an accident, he makes what seems at the time to be a humanizing gesture, adopting the fallen man’s infant son. Over time, he molds the boy, who he names H.W., into a miniature business partner who travels with him on land-purchasing expeditions — such as his fateful trip to the oil-rich homestead of an old farmer named Abel Sunday (David Willis).

Their acquisition of the Sunday farm (and basically all of the available land in the area) sets up the movie’s driving conflict — between the power-hungry Plainview and Sunday’s son Eli (Paul Dano), a pastor whose church becomes the cudgel in a long and nasty war.

Of course, Anderson being Anderson, the viewer can (and probably should) read more into all this than just a couple of bossy Old West frontiersmen who can’t get along. Viewed from another perspective, There Will Be Blood is really a sprawling depiction of a battle that’s preoccupied America for decades: Implacable faith versus unquenchable greed; the laying on of hands versus pie-in-the-sky promises of business “progress”; religious fervor versus cold commerce.

What’s sneaky about Anderson’s approach is that he forces you to take sides in a battle where there really isn’t any good guy. For a filmmaker who’s always treated his characters with warmth and affection, Blood is a shockingly cold appraisal of fatally flawed protagonists — you have Plainview the brutal, weaselly capitalist on one side, and Sunday the obnoxiously pious preacher on the other, both of them abusive and cruel in their own way.

The movie also finds Anderson’s preoccupation with daddy issues returning to the fore; There Will Be Blood could just as easily have been titled The Sins of the Father. It pits those who expect to exert their will upon the world against those who merely hope to survive, with the weak and the young damaged and crushed — sometimes quite literally — along the way.



It’s a ruthless view of the world, but one that Anderson still frames beautifully. While his camera is far less antsy here than it has been since Hard Eight, his restraint makes sense in the context of the sweeping mountain vistas where the movie largely takes place. And as always, his shots express a point of view. He’s still fond of shooting his characters from behind, so we see what they see — as in a pivotal sequence where Plainview commits a heart-wrenching act of betrayal, and the focus lingers on what he’s leaving behind.

He’s also always been adept at building an atmosphere of mounting dread and punctuating it with shocking bursts of violence — and that’s a pretty good nutshell description of this film, which forges a chain of humiliation and death into a final act that presents its putative hero as a reclusive, embittered madman, engorged on wealth but starved for love, and his nemesis as a craven fraud. The viewer gets a milkshake, an appalling act of violence, and then — as the movie’s last lines put it — “I’m finished.”

We all know what happened next: Critics fell all over themselves to praise There Will Be Blood, Oscars were won, and many end-of-year lists were topped. It’s easy to see why — this is a visually gorgeous film, acted with finely calibrated abandon by Day-Lewis and Dano, and it certainly lingers long after the final frame is unspooled. But it’s possible to appreciate the technical skill that’s been brought to bear on a work of art without actually embracing the work itself, and that’s the position I find myself in with Blood. It isn’t just that I find its point of view repugnant, it’s that I don’t think Anderson backs up his arguments about the human condition — or maybe, even more disconcertingly, he isn’t even trying to. At times, the movie feels like nothing more than an elaborately staged battle between a pair of unthinking creatures — like putting two betta fish in the same bowl, only with great cinematography and a lot of senseless collateral damage.

Am I thinking too much here? Is Anderson fatigue starting to set in? Or am I just not sophisticated enough to hang on for the ride with a director who’s clearly lost his taste for good old-fashioned catharsis in the final act? Something tells me The Master will answer at least some of those questions.


See more:

Monday: Hard Eight

Tuesday: Boogie Nights

Wednesday: Magnolia

Thursday: Punch-Drunk Love

Friday: There Will Be Blood

Saturday: The Master

Tag Cloud

APB franchise Funimation Heroines YouTube Red zombie TNT dramedy 007 jurassic park Pop Marvel natural history prank Wes Anderson ratings Extras Mystery Binge Guide video cats Sony Pictures Elton John black comedy Crackle Lionsgate Superheroe IFC DC streaming service royal family 2016 Film Festival children's TV marvel comics ID Infographic lord of the rings Fantasy adventure 2017 popular trailers olympics San Diego Comic-Con sequel Summer live event asian-american Alien Television Academy television Avengers 99% facebook OneApp Showtime RT History Music rt labs critics edition Masterpiece batman comedies award winner mission: impossible The Walt Disney Company TV Land Walt Disney Pictures 72 Emmy Awards dceu streaming movies cancelled TV shows game show Red Carpet sitcom Adult Swim justice league kaiju what to watch HBO binge posters Rock Western HBO Go First Reviews 20th Century Fox TBS football Trophy Talk christmas movies Star Wars Mary poppins The Purge travel Academy Awards gangster indiana jones Character Guide video on demand ABC Family name the review Sci-Fi zombies rom-coms Chernobyl Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Polls and Games Cosplay OWN Sundance romance 2015 Nat Geo E3 universal monsters GIFs series zero dark thirty science fiction Paramount Plus CBS All Access remakes FOX IMDb TV Freeform films El Rey teaser ViacomCBS YouTube Premium ESPN japan Certified Fresh nfl canceled TV shows Watching Series DGA new star wars movies YA Neflix indie a nightmare on elm street 45 free movies aliens SDCC hispanic AMC Ovation The Academy FX Trivia diversity NBA Disney+ Disney Plus Action witnail Rocky Fall TV President Sundance TV spanish telelvision Superheroes TCA Winter 2020 IFC Films streaming Classic Film Turner book adaptation legend Amazon Prime Video Box Office Pixar women archives Lifetime Christmas movies directors TV renewals toronto Election Rocketman ITV Premiere Dates Shondaland basketball 93rd Oscars rt archives dogs singing competition scary Tarantino TCA 2017 MTV dreamworks king arthur 71st Emmy Awards spinoff ABC Signature cars TV PBS First Look rotten Legendary twilight Podcast Broadway National Geographic leaderboard based on movie Vudu cooking Netflix MCU Arrowverse The Walking Dead Black History Month Set visit Instagram Live Stephen King Marvel Television worst elevated horror Captain marvel Apple finale kids vs. Rom-Com Esquire Shudder Universal Pictures Fargo festival pirates of the caribbean Sneak Peek Awards Tour Spring TV scary movies reviews politics international halloween 21st Century Fox casting festivals Travel Channel deadpool Kids & Family wonder woman crossover historical drama Paramount strong female leads Starz parents Thanksgiving versus The CW sag awards sequels hollywood Awards docudrama Fox News docuseries comics A24 Holiday nature japanese Schedule BET Reality Competition Mindy Kaling Drama movies Emmys USA worst movies Super Bowl composers comic Spike BBC One art house die hard WarnerMedia GLAAD BBC slashers Amazon Studios latino NBC stand-up comedy A&E italian TV movies Cannes Hallmark Christmas movies hidden camera Comedy Central cartoon game of thrones child's play sports spy thriller space Tumblr werewolf black hispanic heritage month AMC Plus Mary Poppins Returns boxoffice DirecTV golden globe awards Warner Bros. high school TV One Comics on TV NYCC DC Comics thriller spider-man scene in color scorecard Image Comics Creative Arts Emmys australia sopranos Hulu Baby Yoda 1990s adaptation discovery Lucasfilm Video Games crime Animation Apple TV+ USA Network 2019 Country PlayStation Television Critics Association 24 frames political drama Crunchyroll razzies 4/20 Paramount Network Year in Review comic books Amazon Prime Logo X-Men Marvel Studios SXSW crime thriller suspense Turner Classic Movies Disney CW Seed Ghostbusters Anna Paquin feel good BET Awards anthology American Society of Cinematographers blaxploitation Endgame Syfy Comic Book documentary Columbia Pictures action-comedy ABC TruTV aapi Musicals period drama mcc Winter TV cults Pop TV venice biography Nominations new york 2021 fast and furious Sundance Now quibi Britbox golden globes mob classics ghosts romantic comedy dark vampires HFPA Film Comedy Pet Sematary criterion satire FXX Women's History Month unscripted HBO Max comic book movies revenge Family Discovery Channel Martial Arts debate New York Comic Con 2020 LGBT richard e. Grant emmy awards renewed TV shows Prime Video king kong BAFTA Fox Searchlight monster movies joker blockbuster young adult war VOD Valentine's Day genre laika Toys See It Skip It History PaleyFest Food Network book WGN DC Universe disaster saw foreign Hallmark 90s rt labs Comic-Con@Home 2021 TLC serial killer Hear Us Out miniseries french mockumentary nbcuniversal crime drama doctor who VICE slasher Teen CNN adenture screenings Brie Larson Mary Tyler Moore spanish language Christmas psychological thriller spain dc critics stop motion Oscars Netflix Christmas movies comic book movie Epix live action theme song 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards green book screen actors guild medical drama boxing Photos Horror Peacock best chucky Holidays know your critic TCM YouTube blockbusters Quiz CBS Tomatazos true crime Opinion Writers Guild of America documentaries canceled independent E! Tubi Exclusive Video Universal Pirates Lifetime robots james bond cancelled television 2018 TCA Awards Disney Plus Bravo biopic Biopics Grammys Pride Month Calendar comiccon new zealand rotten movies we love news Reality Musical breaking bad jamie lee curtis transformers Song of Ice and Fire FX on Hulu cops Cartoon Network Spectrum Originals psycho LGBTQ stoner Disney Channel Dark Horse Comics Best and Worst hist south america heist movie cancelled Black Mirror SundanceTV Interview cancelled TV series 79th Golden Globes Awards superhero halloween tv Pacific Islander Tokyo Olympics superman anime CMT fresh Ellie Kemper MSNBC technology cinemax obituary Star Trek Apple TV Plus Emmy Nominations harry potter dragons GoT mutant talk show social media BBC America godzilla The Witch reboot concert Disney streaming service Chilling Adventures of Sabrina critic resources toy story Tags: Comedy trophy Winners Mudbound animated marvel cinematic universe Acorn TV Nickelodeon tv talk VH1 spider-verse movie all-time Countdown The Arrangement Hollywood Foreign Press Association dexter Marathons Amazon 73rd Emmy Awards RT21 target police drama Trailer kong supernatural TCA TIFF