(Photo by Sony Pictures Classics)

Every Cate Blanchett Movie Ranked by Tomatometer

There isn’t a whole lot that can be consistently counted on to deliver in this crazy modern world, but Cate Blanchett movies come pretty close. From Elizabeth to Carol, the Lord of the Rings franchise to Blue Jasmine (for which she won the Best Actress Oscar), she’s tackled a preposterously eclectic list of roles — and she’s nailed pretty much all of them, consistently imbuing her characters with enough inner life to elevate even subpar material and earning a mantel full of awards along the way.

By just about any criteria, Blanchett has put together one of the most widely acclaimed careers enjoyed by any actor working today — which makes it only natural for us to celebrate all that success by taking a fond look back at all the steps she took along the way. From her first major role to her most recent release, here’s Cate Blanchett’s complete filmography, ranked from worst to best.

#48
#48
Adjusted Score: 40977%
Critics Consensus: Its intentions are noble and its cast is impressive, but neither can compensate for The Monuments Men's stiffly nostalgic tone and curiously slack narrative.
Synopsis: During World War II, the Nazis steal countless pieces of art and hide them away. Some over-the-hill art scholars, historians,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#47

Charlotte Gray (2001)
33%

#47
Adjusted Score: 34993%
Critics Consensus: A dull adaptation of Sebastian Faulk's novel despite gorgeous cinematography and Cate Blanchett's best efforts.
Synopsis: This is a drama set in Nazi-occupied France at the height of World War II. Charlotte Gray tells the compelling... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#46

The Good German (2006)
34%

#46
Adjusted Score: 39243%
Critics Consensus: Though Steven Soderbergh succeeds in emulating the glossy look of 1940s noirs, The Good German ultimately ends up as a self-conscious exercise in style that forgets to develop compelling characters.
Synopsis: Jake Geismar (George Clooney), an Army correspondent, helps his former lover, Lena Brandt (Cate Blanchett), comb post-World War II Berlin... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A Russian Jewish girl (Christina Ricci) is separated from her father in 1927 and escapes to England, where she's rechristened... [More]
Directed By: Sally Potter

#44
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Queen Elizabeth I (Cate Blanchett) faces threats to her rule from abroad and at home. Determined to restore England to... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#43

Robin Hood (2010)
43%

#43
Adjusted Score: 51693%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott's revisionist take on this oft-told tale offers some fine acting and a few gripping action sequences, but it's missing the thrill of adventure that made Robin Hood a legend in the first place.
Synopsis: After the death of Richard the Lion-Hearted, a skilled archer named Robin Longstride (Russell Crowe) travels to Nottingham, where villagers... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#42

Song to Song (2017)
44%

#42
Adjusted Score: 52287%
Critics Consensus: As visually sumptuous as it is narratively spartan, Terrence Malick's Song to Song echoes elements of the writer-director's recent work -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Set against the Austin, Texas, music scene, two entangled couples -- struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling),... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#41

Paradise Road (1997)
45%

#41
Adjusted Score: 45645%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A group of foreign women -- including an educated British musician (Glenn Close), an Australian nurse (Cate Blanchett) and an... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#40

Knight of Cups (2015)
47%

#40
Adjusted Score: 57170%
Critics Consensus: Knight of Cups finds Terrence Malick delving deeper into the painterly visual milieu he's explored in recent efforts, but even hardcore fans may struggle with the diminishing narrative returns.
Synopsis: A Los Angeles screenwriter (Christian Bale) indulges his wild side with a stripper (Teresa Palmer), a model (Freida Pinto) and... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#39

Pushing Tin (1999)
48%

#39
Adjusted Score: 49445%
Critics Consensus: Solid performances by the leads, but the generic ending needs help.
Synopsis: Two air traffic controllers (John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton) who thrive on living dangerously compete to outdo each other on... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#38
Adjusted Score: 60537%
Critics Consensus: Where'd You Go, Bernadette offers dispiriting proof that a talented director, bestselling source material, and terrific cast can add up to far less than the sum of their parts.
Synopsis: Former architect Bernadette Fox seems to have it all -- a beautiful home in Seattle, a successful and loving husband,... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#37

Veronica Guerin (2003)
53%

#37
Adjusted Score: 56576%
Critics Consensus: Cate Blanchett gives another great performance in a movie that doesn't shed much light on its title character.
Synopsis: In this true story, Veronica Guerin (Cate Blanchett) is an investigative reporter for an Irish newspaper. As the drug trade... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: 58924%
Critics Consensus: Though solidly made and acted, The Shipping News is rather heavy-handed and dull, especially given the nature of its protagonist.
Synopsis: Traces one man's extraordinary journey toward self -discovery when he returns to his ancestral home on the coast of Newfoundland.... [More]
Directed By: Lasse Hallström

#35
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Renowned oceanographer Steve Zissou (Bill Murray) has sworn vengeance upon the rare shark that devoured a member of his crew.... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#34

The Gift (2000)
57%

#34
Adjusted Score: 62132%
Critics Consensus: With a reported budget of around 10 million, The Gift is obviously a labor of love for those involved. Unfortunately, the A-list cast can't prevent the movie from becoming a by-the-numbers whodunit with an ending that's all but unsatisfactory.
Synopsis: In the tiny town of Brixton, Georgia where nothing is private, a woman with supernatural clairvoyance, a young beautiful socialite... [More]
Directed By: Sam Raimi

#33

The Missing (2003)
58%

#33
Adjusted Score: 63835%
Critics Consensus: An expertly acted and directed Western. But like other Ron Howard features, the movie is hardly subtle.
Synopsis: When rancher and single mother of two Maggie Gilkeson (Cate Blanchett) sees her teenage daughter, Lily (Evan Rachel Wood), kidnapped... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#32
Adjusted Score: 70523%
Critics Consensus: Though somewhat overwhelmed by its own spectacle, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies ends Peter Jackson's second Middle-earth trilogy on a reasonably satisfying note.
Synopsis: Having reclaimed Erebor and vast treasure from the dragon Smaug, Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) sacrifices friendship and honor in seeking... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#31

Truth (2015)
63%

#31
Adjusted Score: 69111%
Critics Consensus: Truth's terrific cast and compelling message are often enough to overcome its occasionally didactic and facile dramatization of a nuanced real-life tale.
Synopsis: Controversy surrounds CBS anchor Dan Rather (Robert Redford) and "60 Minutes" producer Mary Mapes (Cate Blanchett) after the network broadcasts... [More]
Directed By: James Vanderbilt

#30

Bandits (2001)
64%

#30
Adjusted Score: 69236%
Critics Consensus: The story may not warrant its lengthy running time, but the cast of Bandits makes it an enjoyable ride.
Synopsis: Joe (Bruce Willis) and Terry (Billy Bob Thornton) have escaped from prison. Cutting a swath from Oregon through California, these... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 67949%
Critics Consensus: Episodes vary in quality, but overall this talky film is quirkily engaging.
Synopsis: This 11-vignette film focuses on the human interactions that happen while partaking in the everyday indulgence of coffee and cigarettes.... [More]
Directed By: Jim Jarmusch

#28
Adjusted Score: 77602%
Critics Consensus: Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is an earnest, visually resplendent trip, but the film's deliberate pace robs the material of some of its majesty.
Synopsis: Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) lives a simple life with his fellow hobbits in the shire, until the wizard Gandalf (Ian... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#27
Adjusted Score: 78135%
Critics Consensus: An entertaining PG detour for gore maestro Eli Roth, The House with a Clock in Its Walls is a family-friendly blend of humor and horror with an infectious sense of fun.
Synopsis: Ten-year-old Lewis goes to live with his oddball uncle in a creaky old house that contains a mysterious ticktock noise.... [More]
Directed By: Eli Roth

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After a childhood of abuse by his evangelistic father, misfit Oscar Hopkins (Ralph Fiennes) becomes an Anglican minister and develops... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#25

Babel (2006)
69%

#25
Adjusted Score: 78528%
Critics Consensus: In Babel, there are no villains, only victims of fate and circumstance. Director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu weaves four of their woeful stories into this mature and multidimensional film.
Synopsis: An accident connects four groups of people on three different continents: two young Moroccan goatherds, a vacationing American couple (Brad... [More]

#24

Ocean's 8 (2018)
69%

#24
Adjusted Score: 90326%
Critics Consensus: Ocean's 8 isn't quite as smooth as its predecessors, but still has enough cast chemistry and flair to lift the price of a ticket from filmgoers up for an undemanding caper.
Synopsis: Five years, eight months, 12 days and counting -- that's how long Debbie Ocean has been devising the biggest heist... [More]
Directed By: Gary Ross

#23
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Born under unusual circumstances, Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) springs into being as an elderly man in a New Orleans nursing... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#22

Hanna (2011)
71%

#22
Adjusted Score: 82398%
Critics Consensus: Fantastic acting and crisply choreographed action sequences propel this unique, cool take on the revenge thriller.
Synopsis: Raised by her father (Eric Bana) in the Finnish wilderness, teenage Hanna (Saoirse Ronan) has trained all her life to... [More]
Directed By: Joe Wright

#21
Adjusted Score: 83225%
Critics Consensus: While still slightly hamstrung by "middle chapter" narrative problems and its formidable length, The Desolation of Smaug represents a more confident, exciting second chapter for the Hobbit series.
Synopsis: Having survived the first part of their unsettling journey, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) and his companions (Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage)... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#20

I'm Not There (2007)
77%

#20
Adjusted Score: 84364%
Critics Consensus: I'm Not There's unique editing, visuals, and multiple talented actors portraying Bob Dylan make for a deliciously unconventional experience. Each segment brings a new and fresh take on Dylan's life.
Synopsis: Several actors portray legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan at different stages in his personal life and career. In 1959 a guitar-strumming... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#19
Adjusted Score: 88411%
Critics Consensus: Though the plot elements are certainly familiar, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull still delivers the thrills and Harrison Ford's return in the title role is more than welcome.
Synopsis: It's the height of the Cold War, and famous archaeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), returning from his latest adventure, finds... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#18

Elizabeth (1998)
83%

#18
Adjusted Score: 85074%
Critics Consensus: No mere historical drama, Elizabeth is a rich, suspenseful journey into the heart of British Royal politics, and features a typically outstanding performance from Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: Elizabeth Tudor (Cate Blanchett) becomes queen of a divided and dangerous England in 1558. She is roundly perceived as weak... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#17
Adjusted Score: 84536%
Critics Consensus: It doesn't quite live up to its marvelously lurid premise, but The Galapagos Affair is still stranger than fiction in a very entertaining way.
Synopsis: Dr. Fredrich Ritter and his lover Dore Strauch have their idyllic lives on an island invaded by a baroness and... [More]
Directed By: Dan Geller, Dayna Goldfine

#16

Cinderella (2015)
84%

#16
Adjusted Score: 93473%
Critics Consensus: Refreshingly traditional in a revisionist era, Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella proves Disney hasn't lost any of its old-fashioned magic.
Synopsis: After her father unexpectedly dies, young Ella (Lily James) finds herself at the mercy of her cruel stepmother (Cate Blanchett)... [More]
Directed By: Kenneth Branagh

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 88838%
Critics Consensus: With Matt Damon's unsettling performance offering a darkly twisted counterpoint to Anthony Minghella's glossy direction, The Talented Mr. Ripley is a suspense thriller that lingers.
Synopsis: To be young and carefree amid the blue waters and idyllic landscape of sun-drenched Italy in the late 1950s; that's... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Minghella

#14

An Ideal Husband (1999)
85%

#14
Adjusted Score: 85880%
Critics Consensus: Brevity is the soul of wit, eh? This adaptation gets to the nitty gritty of Wilde's stage piece and plays on eternal human foibles.
Synopsis: Sir Robert Chiltern (Jeremy Northam) is a respected government official and a loving husband. His friend, Lord Arthur Goring (Rupert... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Parker

#13

The Turning (2013)
86%

#13
Adjusted Score: 85255%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Eighteen of Australian author Tim Winton's short stories.... [More]

#12

The Aviator (2004)
86%

#12
Adjusted Score: 93425%
Critics Consensus: With a rich sense of period detail, The Aviator succeeds thanks to typically assured direction from Martin Scorsese and a strong performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, who charts Howard Hughes' descent from eccentric billionaire to reclusive madman.
Synopsis: Billionaire and aviation tycoon Howard Hughes (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a successful public figure: a director of big-budget Hollywood films such... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 94373%
Critics Consensus: In this sharp psychological thriller, Judi Dench and Cate Blanchett give fierce, memorable performances as two schoolteachers locked in a battle of wits.
Synopsis: Barbara Covett (Judi Dench), a veteran teacher at St. George's, senses a kindred spirit in Sheba Hart (Cate Blanchett), the... [More]
Directed By: Richard Eyre

#10

Little Fish (2005)

#10
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Four years clean, video store manager Tracy (Cate Blanchett) lives quietly, avoiding anything that might trigger a heroin relapse. Her... [More]
Directed By: Rowan Woods

#9
Adjusted Score: 105855%
Critics Consensus: The rare trilogy capper that really works, How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World brings its saga to a visually dazzling and emotionally affecting conclusion.
Synopsis: When the sudden appearance of a female Light Fury coincides with the darkest threat their village has ever faced, Hiccup... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois

#8
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: The future of civilization rests in the fate of the One Ring, which has been lost for centuries. Powerful forces... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#7

Blue Jasmine (2013)
91%

#7
Adjusted Score: 99897%
Critics Consensus: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine finds the director in peak late-period form -- and benefiting from a superb cast led by Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: After her marriage to a wealthy businessman (Alec Baldwin) collapses, New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) flees to San Francisco... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#6

Ponyo (2008)

#6
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: During a forbidden excursion to see the surface world, a goldfish princess encounters a human boy named Sosuke, who gives... [More]
Directed By: Hayao Miyazaki

#5
Adjusted Score: 98822%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, emotionally resonant, and beautifully animated, How to Train Your Dragon 2 builds on its predecessor's successes just the way a sequel should.
Synopsis: Five years have passed since Hiccup and Toothless united the dragons and Vikings of Berk. Now, they spend their time... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois, Tom Owens

#4
Adjusted Score: 102798%
Critics Consensus: Visually breathtaking and emotionally powerful, The Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King is a moving and satisfying conclusion to a great trilogy.
Synopsis: The culmination of nearly 10 years' work and conclusion to Peter Jackson's epic trilogy based on the timeless J.R.R. Tolkien... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#3

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
93%

#3
Adjusted Score: 126308%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, funny, and above all fun, Thor: Ragnarok is a colorful cosmic adventure that sets a new standard for its franchise -- and the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
Synopsis: Imprisoned on the other side of the universe, the mighty Thor finds himself in a deadly gladiatorial contest that pits... [More]
Directed By: Taika Waititi

#2

Carol (2015)
94%

#2
Adjusted Score: 106072%
Critics Consensus: Shaped by Todd Haynes' deft direction and powered by a strong cast led by Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, Carol lives up to its groundbreaking source material.
Synopsis: Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) spots the beautiful, elegant Carol (Cate Blanchett) perusing the doll displays in a 1950s Manhattan department... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#1
Adjusted Score: 103668%
Critics Consensus: The Two Towers balances spectacular action with emotional storytelling, leaving audiences both wholly satisfied and eager for the final chapter.
Synopsis: The sequel to the Golden Globe-nominated and AFI Award-winning "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," "The... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

(Photo by Wilson Webb / © The Weinstein Company / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Cate Blanchett Movies Ranked

It’s been a few years since Cate Blanchett’s had an Oscar nomination — don’t you think it’s time again? Ever since Blanchett’s international breakthrough — 1998’s Elizabeth, which got her nominated for her first Best Actress nod — she’s been a regular fixture at the Dolby Theater for the Oscar ceremonies, where she’s frequently recognized for the good-humored elegance she brings to her most iconic roles. She was double-nominated in 2008 for I’m Not There and Elizabeth: The Golden Age, while 2005 and 2014 got her Oscar wins for The Aviator and Blue Jasmine, respectively.

Blanchett got her start in native Australia, where steady stage and television roles eventually landed her in films Paradise Road and Oscar and Lucinda, both 1997 releases. It was only a year later that Elizabeth put her on the road to household name status, which was followed up with a mix of comedies (Pushing Tin), literary thrillers (Talented Mr. Ripley), and dramas (Charlotte Gray). Blanchett’s brief but highly memorable appearances as Galadriel in Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy meant fanboy cineaste goodwill for decades to come. Roles in the likes of Indiana Jones, Thor: Ragnarok, and The Aviator are just more on top.

Blanchett teams up with director Richard Linklater for Where’d You Go, Bernadette, based on the best-seller about an agoraphobic woman who goes missing. Is another awards contender imminent? Or is this something to show up on an “underrated gems” list on the internet somewhere in the future? Before we find out, we’re ranking Cate Blanchett’s best movies (and her worst) by Tomatometer!

#48
#48
Adjusted Score: 40977%
Critics Consensus: Its intentions are noble and its cast is impressive, but neither can compensate for The Monuments Men's stiffly nostalgic tone and curiously slack narrative.
Synopsis: During World War II, the Nazis steal countless pieces of art and hide them away. Some over-the-hill art scholars, historians,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#47

Charlotte Gray (2001)
33%

#47
Adjusted Score: 34993%
Critics Consensus: A dull adaptation of Sebastian Faulk's novel despite gorgeous cinematography and Cate Blanchett's best efforts.
Synopsis: This is a drama set in Nazi-occupied France at the height of World War II. Charlotte Gray tells the compelling... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#46

The Good German (2006)
34%

#46
Adjusted Score: 39243%
Critics Consensus: Though Steven Soderbergh succeeds in emulating the glossy look of 1940s noirs, The Good German ultimately ends up as a self-conscious exercise in style that forgets to develop compelling characters.
Synopsis: Jake Geismar (George Clooney), an Army correspondent, helps his former lover, Lena Brandt (Cate Blanchett), comb post-World War II Berlin... [More]
Directed By: Steven Soderbergh

#45
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Queen Elizabeth I (Cate Blanchett) faces threats to her rule from abroad and at home. Determined to restore England to... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A Russian Jewish girl (Christina Ricci) is separated from her father in 1927 and escapes to England, where she's rechristened... [More]
Directed By: Sally Potter

#43

Robin Hood (2010)
43%

#43
Adjusted Score: 51693%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott's revisionist take on this oft-told tale offers some fine acting and a few gripping action sequences, but it's missing the thrill of adventure that made Robin Hood a legend in the first place.
Synopsis: After the death of Richard the Lion-Hearted, a skilled archer named Robin Longstride (Russell Crowe) travels to Nottingham, where villagers... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#42

Song to Song (2017)
44%

#42
Adjusted Score: 52287%
Critics Consensus: As visually sumptuous as it is narratively spartan, Terrence Malick's Song to Song echoes elements of the writer-director's recent work -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Set against the Austin, Texas, music scene, two entangled couples -- struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling),... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#41
Adjusted Score: 60537%
Critics Consensus: Where'd You Go, Bernadette offers dispiriting proof that a talented director, bestselling source material, and terrific cast can add up to far less than the sum of their parts.
Synopsis: Former architect Bernadette Fox seems to have it all -- a beautiful home in Seattle, a successful and loving husband,... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#40

Knight of Cups (2015)
47%

#40
Adjusted Score: 57170%
Critics Consensus: Knight of Cups finds Terrence Malick delving deeper into the painterly visual milieu he's explored in recent efforts, but even hardcore fans may struggle with the diminishing narrative returns.
Synopsis: A Los Angeles screenwriter (Christian Bale) indulges his wild side with a stripper (Teresa Palmer), a model (Freida Pinto) and... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#39

Paradise Road (1997)
45%

#39
Adjusted Score: 45645%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A group of foreign women -- including an educated British musician (Glenn Close), an Australian nurse (Cate Blanchett) and an... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#38

Pushing Tin (1999)
48%

#38
Adjusted Score: 49445%
Critics Consensus: Solid performances by the leads, but the generic ending needs help.
Synopsis: Two air traffic controllers (John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton) who thrive on living dangerously compete to outdo each other on... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#37

Veronica Guerin (2003)
53%

#37
Adjusted Score: 56576%
Critics Consensus: Cate Blanchett gives another great performance in a movie that doesn't shed much light on its title character.
Synopsis: In this true story, Veronica Guerin (Cate Blanchett) is an investigative reporter for an Irish newspaper. As the drug trade... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: 58924%
Critics Consensus: Though solidly made and acted, The Shipping News is rather heavy-handed and dull, especially given the nature of its protagonist.
Synopsis: Traces one man's extraordinary journey toward self -discovery when he returns to his ancestral home on the coast of Newfoundland.... [More]
Directed By: Lasse Hallström

#35
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Renowned oceanographer Steve Zissou (Bill Murray) has sworn vengeance upon the rare shark that devoured a member of his crew.... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#34

The Gift (2000)
57%

#34
Adjusted Score: 62132%
Critics Consensus: With a reported budget of around 10 million, The Gift is obviously a labor of love for those involved. Unfortunately, the A-list cast can't prevent the movie from becoming a by-the-numbers whodunit with an ending that's all but unsatisfactory.
Synopsis: In the tiny town of Brixton, Georgia where nothing is private, a woman with supernatural clairvoyance, a young beautiful socialite... [More]
Directed By: Sam Raimi

#33

The Missing (2003)
58%

#33
Adjusted Score: 63835%
Critics Consensus: An expertly acted and directed Western. But like other Ron Howard features, the movie is hardly subtle.
Synopsis: When rancher and single mother of two Maggie Gilkeson (Cate Blanchett) sees her teenage daughter, Lily (Evan Rachel Wood), kidnapped... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#32
Adjusted Score: 70523%
Critics Consensus: Though somewhat overwhelmed by its own spectacle, The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies ends Peter Jackson's second Middle-earth trilogy on a reasonably satisfying note.
Synopsis: Having reclaimed Erebor and vast treasure from the dragon Smaug, Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage) sacrifices friendship and honor in seeking... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#31

Truth (2015)
63%

#31
Adjusted Score: 69111%
Critics Consensus: Truth's terrific cast and compelling message are often enough to overcome its occasionally didactic and facile dramatization of a nuanced real-life tale.
Synopsis: Controversy surrounds CBS anchor Dan Rather (Robert Redford) and "60 Minutes" producer Mary Mapes (Cate Blanchett) after the network broadcasts... [More]
Directed By: James Vanderbilt

#30

Bandits (2001)
64%

#30
Adjusted Score: 69236%
Critics Consensus: The story may not warrant its lengthy running time, but the cast of Bandits makes it an enjoyable ride.
Synopsis: Joe (Bruce Willis) and Terry (Billy Bob Thornton) have escaped from prison. Cutting a swath from Oregon through California, these... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 67949%
Critics Consensus: Episodes vary in quality, but overall this talky film is quirkily engaging.
Synopsis: This 11-vignette film focuses on the human interactions that happen while partaking in the everyday indulgence of coffee and cigarettes.... [More]
Directed By: Jim Jarmusch

#28
Adjusted Score: 77602%
Critics Consensus: Peter Jackson's return to Middle-earth is an earnest, visually resplendent trip, but the film's deliberate pace robs the material of some of its majesty.
Synopsis: Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) lives a simple life with his fellow hobbits in the shire, until the wizard Gandalf (Ian... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After a childhood of abuse by his evangelistic father, misfit Oscar Hopkins (Ralph Fiennes) becomes an Anglican minister and develops... [More]
Directed By: Gillian Armstrong

#26
Adjusted Score: 78135%
Critics Consensus: An entertaining PG detour for gore maestro Eli Roth, The House with a Clock in Its Walls is a family-friendly blend of humor and horror with an infectious sense of fun.
Synopsis: Ten-year-old Lewis goes to live with his oddball uncle in a creaky old house that contains a mysterious ticktock noise.... [More]
Directed By: Eli Roth

#25

Babel (2006)
69%

#25
Adjusted Score: 78528%
Critics Consensus: In Babel, there are no villains, only victims of fate and circumstance. Director Alejandro Gonzalez Iñarritu weaves four of their woeful stories into this mature and multidimensional film.
Synopsis: An accident connects four groups of people on three different continents: two young Moroccan goatherds, a vacationing American couple (Brad... [More]

#24

Ocean's 8 (2018)
69%

#24
Adjusted Score: 90326%
Critics Consensus: Ocean's 8 isn't quite as smooth as its predecessors, but still has enough cast chemistry and flair to lift the price of a ticket from filmgoers up for an undemanding caper.
Synopsis: Five years, eight months, 12 days and counting -- that's how long Debbie Ocean has been devising the biggest heist... [More]
Directed By: Gary Ross

#23
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Born under unusual circumstances, Benjamin Button (Brad Pitt) springs into being as an elderly man in a New Orleans nursing... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#22

Hanna (2011)
71%

#22
Adjusted Score: 82398%
Critics Consensus: Fantastic acting and crisply choreographed action sequences propel this unique, cool take on the revenge thriller.
Synopsis: Raised by her father (Eric Bana) in the Finnish wilderness, teenage Hanna (Saoirse Ronan) has trained all her life to... [More]
Directed By: Joe Wright

#21
Adjusted Score: 83225%
Critics Consensus: While still slightly hamstrung by "middle chapter" narrative problems and its formidable length, The Desolation of Smaug represents a more confident, exciting second chapter for the Hobbit series.
Synopsis: Having survived the first part of their unsettling journey, Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman) and his companions (Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage)... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#20

I'm Not There (2007)
77%

#20
Adjusted Score: 84364%
Critics Consensus: I'm Not There's unique editing, visuals, and multiple talented actors portraying Bob Dylan make for a deliciously unconventional experience. Each segment brings a new and fresh take on Dylan's life.
Synopsis: Several actors portray legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan at different stages in his personal life and career. In 1959 a guitar-strumming... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#19
Adjusted Score: 88411%
Critics Consensus: Though the plot elements are certainly familiar, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull still delivers the thrills and Harrison Ford's return in the title role is more than welcome.
Synopsis: It's the height of the Cold War, and famous archaeologist Indiana Jones (Harrison Ford), returning from his latest adventure, finds... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#18

Elizabeth (1998)
83%

#18
Adjusted Score: 85074%
Critics Consensus: No mere historical drama, Elizabeth is a rich, suspenseful journey into the heart of British Royal politics, and features a typically outstanding performance from Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: Elizabeth Tudor (Cate Blanchett) becomes queen of a divided and dangerous England in 1558. She is roundly perceived as weak... [More]
Directed By: Shekhar Kapur

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 88838%
Critics Consensus: With Matt Damon's unsettling performance offering a darkly twisted counterpoint to Anthony Minghella's glossy direction, The Talented Mr. Ripley is a suspense thriller that lingers.
Synopsis: To be young and carefree amid the blue waters and idyllic landscape of sun-drenched Italy in the late 1950s; that's... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Minghella

#16
Adjusted Score: 84536%
Critics Consensus: It doesn't quite live up to its marvelously lurid premise, but The Galapagos Affair is still stranger than fiction in a very entertaining way.
Synopsis: Dr. Fredrich Ritter and his lover Dore Strauch have their idyllic lives on an island invaded by a baroness and... [More]
Directed By: Dan Geller, Dayna Goldfine

#15

An Ideal Husband (1999)
85%

#15
Adjusted Score: 85880%
Critics Consensus: Brevity is the soul of wit, eh? This adaptation gets to the nitty gritty of Wilde's stage piece and plays on eternal human foibles.
Synopsis: Sir Robert Chiltern (Jeremy Northam) is a respected government official and a loving husband. His friend, Lord Arthur Goring (Rupert... [More]
Directed By: Oliver Parker

#14

Cinderella (2015)
84%

#14
Adjusted Score: 93473%
Critics Consensus: Refreshingly traditional in a revisionist era, Kenneth Branagh's Cinderella proves Disney hasn't lost any of its old-fashioned magic.
Synopsis: After her father unexpectedly dies, young Ella (Lily James) finds herself at the mercy of her cruel stepmother (Cate Blanchett)... [More]
Directed By: Kenneth Branagh

#13

The Turning (2013)
86%

#13
Adjusted Score: 85255%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Eighteen of Australian author Tim Winton's short stories.... [More]

#12

The Aviator (2004)
86%

#12
Adjusted Score: 93425%
Critics Consensus: With a rich sense of period detail, The Aviator succeeds thanks to typically assured direction from Martin Scorsese and a strong performance from Leonardo DiCaprio, who charts Howard Hughes' descent from eccentric billionaire to reclusive madman.
Synopsis: Billionaire and aviation tycoon Howard Hughes (Leonardo DiCaprio) is a successful public figure: a director of big-budget Hollywood films such... [More]
Directed By: Martin Scorsese

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 94373%
Critics Consensus: In this sharp psychological thriller, Judi Dench and Cate Blanchett give fierce, memorable performances as two schoolteachers locked in a battle of wits.
Synopsis: Barbara Covett (Judi Dench), a veteran teacher at St. George's, senses a kindred spirit in Sheba Hart (Cate Blanchett), the... [More]
Directed By: Richard Eyre

#10

Little Fish (2005)

#10
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Four years clean, video store manager Tracy (Cate Blanchett) lives quietly, avoiding anything that might trigger a heroin relapse. Her... [More]
Directed By: Rowan Woods

#9
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: The future of civilization rests in the fate of the One Ring, which has been lost for centuries. Powerful forces... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#8

Blue Jasmine (2013)
91%

#8
Adjusted Score: 99897%
Critics Consensus: Woody Allen's Blue Jasmine finds the director in peak late-period form -- and benefiting from a superb cast led by Cate Blanchett.
Synopsis: After her marriage to a wealthy businessman (Alec Baldwin) collapses, New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) flees to San Francisco... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#7
Adjusted Score: 105855%
Critics Consensus: The rare trilogy capper that really works, How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World brings its saga to a visually dazzling and emotionally affecting conclusion.
Synopsis: When the sudden appearance of a female Light Fury coincides with the darkest threat their village has ever faced, Hiccup... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois

#6

Ponyo (2008)

#6
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: During a forbidden excursion to see the surface world, a goldfish princess encounters a human boy named Sosuke, who gives... [More]
Directed By: Hayao Miyazaki

#5
Adjusted Score: 98822%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, emotionally resonant, and beautifully animated, How to Train Your Dragon 2 builds on its predecessor's successes just the way a sequel should.
Synopsis: Five years have passed since Hiccup and Toothless united the dragons and Vikings of Berk. Now, they spend their time... [More]
Directed By: Dean DeBlois, Tom Owens

#4
Adjusted Score: 102798%
Critics Consensus: Visually breathtaking and emotionally powerful, The Lord of the Rings - The Return of the King is a moving and satisfying conclusion to a great trilogy.
Synopsis: The culmination of nearly 10 years' work and conclusion to Peter Jackson's epic trilogy based on the timeless J.R.R. Tolkien... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

#3

Thor: Ragnarok (2017)
93%

#3
Adjusted Score: 126308%
Critics Consensus: Exciting, funny, and above all fun, Thor: Ragnarok is a colorful cosmic adventure that sets a new standard for its franchise -- and the rest of the Marvel Cinematic Universe.
Synopsis: Imprisoned on the other side of the universe, the mighty Thor finds himself in a deadly gladiatorial contest that pits... [More]
Directed By: Taika Waititi

#2

Carol (2015)
94%

#2
Adjusted Score: 106072%
Critics Consensus: Shaped by Todd Haynes' deft direction and powered by a strong cast led by Cate Blanchett and Rooney Mara, Carol lives up to its groundbreaking source material.
Synopsis: Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) spots the beautiful, elegant Carol (Cate Blanchett) perusing the doll displays in a 1950s Manhattan department... [More]
Directed By: Todd Haynes

#1
Adjusted Score: 103668%
Critics Consensus: The Two Towers balances spectacular action with emotional storytelling, leaving audiences both wholly satisfied and eager for the final chapter.
Synopsis: The sequel to the Golden Globe-nominated and AFI Award-winning "The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring," "The... [More]
Directed By: Peter Jackson

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Every year, the BAFTA film awards present a trophy for Outstanding British Contribution to Cinema. Introduced in 1978, the award recognises an organisation or a person’s career and influence on the British Film Industry. This year’s recipient, announced today, is Pinewood/Shepperton, two of the British industry’s most important film studios whose contribution to filmmaking has resulted in some of the greatest movies of all time. Under strict instruction not to let anyone working at the studios know about the award, RT spent a day last week touring Pinewood and Shepperton and learning a little more about these stalwarts of film.

The Orange British Academy Film Awards begin on British TV on BBC Two from 8pm, continuing on BBC One from 9pm on Sunday 8 February. A preview show featuring interviews from the red carpet will be broadcast on BBC Three from 7pm.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Our tour begins at Pinewood, and the first thing that catches your eye as you head through the main gates is 007 stage. All but two of the official Bond films have featured scenes shot at Pinewood, and the franchise is a regular cash cow for the studio.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

007 stage was built in 1976 for The Spy Who Loved Me, after the production was unable to find a stage big enough to contain the Liparus Supertanker set. At 59,000 square feet it’s the largest sound stage in Europe, and has burnt to the ground twice — most recently after filming had wrapped on Casino Royale in 2006. It’s been the Louvre for The Da Vinci Code, the Chocolate River Room for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and most recently played host to desert scenes and a Persian fort for videogame adaptation Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

One of the more exciting stages on the Pinewood lot is U-Stage, built in 2005 to provide a safe, permanent and controlled environment in which to shoot underwater. Managed by a permanent team of divers and specialists who assist productions shooting underwater footage on the stage, it holds 1.2 million litres of water which is maintained at a temperature of 30 degrees Celsius, 87 Fahrenheit.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Windows provide easy views underwater allowing RT to stay suitably dry for these shots as the team demonstrate their underwater camera. They wouldn’t tell us which production the boat belonged to, but we’ll know when the first of the Ant Pirates trilogy is announced any day now (probably).

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

From the surface, the team are able to feed into the camera from the video village. Scenes shot since the stage was built include the closing scene from The Bourne Ultimatum, Keira Knightley drowning in Atonement and the armada sequences from Elizabeth: The Golden Age.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Pinewood’s city street, which can be dressed to look like just about any urban backdrop, is a familiar sight for RT. We were here just a few weeks ago visiting the set of Kick-Ass and the production had dressed the street as New York. The two storefronts in the middle of the picture here were dressed as Atomic Comics, the comic book shop featured in the movie. The interior set was built here too.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Providing a giant blue-screen backdrop, this outdoor tank (empty in the picture, obviously) is an ideal location for any shooting designed to look like it was filmed at sea. As comedienne Dawn French sank to the bottom at the end of the French and Saunders Titanic spoof she complained of a foul taste. Jennifer Saunders explained why: “It’s the old Bond tank. Three Bonds and George Lazenby have peed in this.”

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

The walls of Pinewood’s main offices are festooned with production art from the many films that have passed through the studio. Icons include the Carry On series, David Lean‘s Great Expectations, Superman, The Shining, Batman and Mission: Impossible. Over the last couple of years Mamma Mia!, Quantum of Solace, Sweeney Todd, The Bourne Ultimatum and Stardust, to name a few, were shot here.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

And so to Shepperton, where we’re quickly informed to keep quiet on the two big projects on the go at the studios. Signs for both litter the lot, but announcements haven’t gone out and the management team are keen to respect their tenants’ privacy. Opened in 1931 as Sound Lighting Studios, Shepperton has changed hands many times, with former owners including Ridley and Tony Scott and The Who.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Slightly smaller than Pinewood, Shepperton has played host to a slew of movies including The African Queen, The Third Man, Dr. Strangelove, the Pink Panther movies and Batman Begins. Sir John Mills worked at the studio on Great Expectations and The Colditz Story. “What has always remained with me about working at Shepperton has been the sheer professionalism of everyone, both in front of and behind the camera,” he said.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Aside from being a former owner of the studios, Ridley Scott has returned to Shepperton many times over the years, having shot Alien, Legend, Thelma and Louise and Gladiator here. “From the moment I entered Shepperton, I knew the place was special,” he says. “Anywhere that had had within its walls Carol Reed directing Orson Welles in The Third Man, was going to mean a great deal to me.”

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

H-Stage at Shepperton was moved from Isleworth Studios in 1948 and has played host to many of the most ambitious sets built on site. A full-scale reproduction of Sir Walter Raleigh’s ship the Tyger was built on hydraulic rams on this stage for Elizabeth: The Golden Age, and just a few years ago H-Stage housed the Batcave from Batman Begins. Built over 9 weeks, the set was 250ft long, 120ft wide and 40ft high and 12,000 gallons of water flowed through it every minute, serving a waterfall, a river and the dripping cave walls.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

If you have a spare £300,000 hidden down the back of the sofa, you could spend it on your very own version of the Korda Theatre, a state-of-the-art facility for sound mixing. Named after Hungarian producer/director Alexander Korda, whose contribution to British cinema in the 40s and 50s was vast, features mixed here include Shakespeare in Love, Gosford Park and Troy.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Shepperton’s Littleton Manor, known as the Old House, dates back to the 13th Century and houses production offices and facilities. Its corridors doubled for interior shots of the hospital where Damian was born in The Omen while the grounds served as a backdrop for an encounter between Father Brennan and Damian’s father.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

It may look like any other overgrown British stream, but this is a fully-fledged river that runs through Shepperton’s backlot. As hard as it may be to believe, this scene doubled as Africa for the Bogart/Hepburn classic The African Queen. One of the studios’ popular legends goes that there’s an unusually large number of parakeets in the area because they were released during the production of that movie.

Inside Pinewood/Shepperton

Built for The Golden Compass, Shepperton now has its very own Western street on the backlot, which marks the last spot on our tour. We’re not entirely convinced the British weather is going to help to complete the Wild West look, but it seemed to be pretty convincing as part of the His Dark Materials adaptation.

It’s a week of bravura performances among new releases, so pick your favorite headliner and go: Jodie Foster going vigilante (The Brave One), Casey Affleck turning traitor (The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford), or Cate Blanchett reigning supreme (Elizabeth: The Golden Age).


The Brave One

Tomatometer: 43%

Vigilante justice has a petite new heroine in Jodie Foster, who stars in and executive produced The Brave One. The victim of a random act of violence, nighttime radio host Erica Bain (Foster) survives but loses her fiancé (Lost‘s Naveen Andrews); arming herself with a gun, she finds her bloodlust increasing as she becomes the city’s mysterious dark angel while a cop (Terrence Howard) begins to piece together the puzzle. But despite a Golden Globes-nominated performance by Foster, critics were split; whether you’ll enjoy it may depend on your preference for exploitation films or intellectual character studies.

 

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

Tomatometer: 75%

Turning in his second stellar performance of the year (after starring in brother Ben Affleck‘s Gone Baby Gone) is Casey Affleck, who plays titular gunman Robert Ford to Brad Pitt‘s outlaw Jesse James in Andrew Dominik‘s poetic Western. The true story of James’ death is fascinating in itself — James, famous for leading a gang of bank robbers with his brother Frank, was shot in the back by a member of his own inner circle. Dominik’s adaptation of Ron Hansen’s novel applies a dual focus to both Jesse James and his killer, “Bob” Ford, allowing the film to become not only a historical retelling but a meditation on self-destruction and celebrity. If you love the visual daring of Terrence Malick, and wonder what the heck happened to Britney Spears, this should make for an intriguing time.

 

Elizabeth: The Golden Age

Tomatometer: 34%

Proving that critics can overwhelmingly scold a film but the Academy of Motion Picture and Sciences will still deem it Oscar-worthy, Shekhar Kapur‘s follow-up to 1998’s Elizabeth finds the Virgin Queen (double-Oscar nominee Cate Blanchett) on the brink of war with Spain and dealing with her own forbidden attraction to the roguish Walter Raleigh (Clive Owen). Viewers hungry for the film’s sumptuous production design and costumes will enjoy a bonus menu of behind-the-scenes featurettes, deleted scenes, and Kapur’s feature-length commentary.


 

Across the Universe


Tomatometer: 53%

The music catalog of the Fab Four has been used before to illustrate a storyline — we’ll forgive Peter Frampton and the Bee Gees their abuse of the Beatles’ songbook in Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band — but writer-director Julie Taymor makes magnificently poppy use of it in this splashy, epic musical. Evan Rachel Wood and Jim Sturgess star as young lovers who along with their friends get swept along with pivotal events of the 1960s (race riots, bohemia, Vietnam) via song, every number inventively designed to borrow meaning from the lyrics of John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

2 Days in Paris


Tomatometer: 87%

Julie Delpy stars in her writing and directing debut about a dysfunctional couple (Delpy and Adam Goldberg) at the tail end of a vacation, and possibly their relationship, spending the titular time in the City of Love. Critics found the comedy of relationship errors sharply observed and charming; also of interest on the DVD release is a 16-minute interview with Delpy, who not only wrote and directed the film, but served as composer and producer.

Fierce People


Tomatometer: 23%

Teenager Finn (Anton Yelchin) would rather spend his summer studying the “fierce people” of South America with his anthropologist father, but must accompany his mother (Diane Lane) to live among the country club set with her former client (Donald Sutherland), based on the novel by Dirk Wittenborn.

Descent


Tomatometer: 24%

Rosario Dawson plays a co-ed rape victim who overcomes her subsequent social and psychological withdrawal to seek revenge upon her attacker; despite Dawson’s noble performance, critics can’t forgive the story its artful pretension or its degrading conclusion.

The Ten Commandments


Tomatometer: 16%

This week’s pick of CG offerings is also the number one choice for camp value: an all-new cartoon version of The Ten Commandments, featuring Christian Slater as Moses! Unfortunately (rather, even more unfortunately) the familiar tale of Red Sea-parting and tablets from God is poorly animated…giving voice actors Slater, Alfred Molina (Rameses), Elliott Gould (God) and Ben Kingsley (Narrator) an even harder sell.

‘Til next week, happy renting!

The nominations for the 65th annual Golden Globe Awards were announced this morning. Did your favorite films, stars, and songs make the cut?

The nominees were read at the Beverly Hilton by a surreal panel consisting of Dane Cook, Hayden Panettiere, Ryan Reynolds, and Quentin Tarantino. The film nominations follow below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Picture, Drama:

American Gangster (79 percent)
Atonement (85 percent)
Eastern Promises (88 percent)
The Great Debaters
Michael Clayton (90 percent)
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood (100 percent)

Actress, Drama:
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)
Jodie Foster, The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Keira Knightley, Atonement

Actor, Drama:
George Clooney, Michael Clayton
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood
James McAvoy, Atonement
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises
Denzel Washington, American Gangster

Picture, Musical or Comedy:
Across the Universe (52 percent)
Charlie Wilson’s War (92 percent)
Hairspray (92 percent)
Juno (92 percent)
Sweeney Todd (92 percent)

Actress, Musical or Comedy:

Amy Adams, Enchanted (94 percent)
Nikki Blonsky, Hairspray
Helena Bonham Carter, Sweeney Todd
Marion Cotillard, La Vie En Rose (74 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno

Actor, Musical or Comedy:

Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Tom Hanks, Charlie Wilson’s War
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages (89 percent)
John C. Reilly, Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Supporting Actress:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)
Julia Roberts, Charlie Wilson’s War
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

Supporting Actor:
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War
John Travolta, Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

Director:
Tim Burton, Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)
Ridley Scott, American Gangster
Joe Wright, Atonement

Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Christopher Hampton, Atonement
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin, Charlie Wilson’s War

Foreign Language:
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, Romania (96 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, France and U.S.
The Kite Runner, U.S. (65 percent)
Lust, Caution, Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis, France (100 percent)

Animated Film:
Bee Movie (52 percent)
Ratatouille (97 percent)
The Simpsons Movie (88 percent)

Original Score:
Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder, Into the Wild (82 percent)
Clint Eastwood, Grace Is Gone (70 percent)
Alberto Iglesias, The Kite Runner
Dario Marianelli, Atonement
Howard Shore, Eastern Promises

Original Song: Despedida from Love in the Time of Cholera (28 percent)
Grace Is Gone from Grace Is Gone
Guaranteed from Into the Wild
That’s How You Know from Enchanted

Walk Hard from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Source: Associated Press
Source: Golden Globes

Just when we thought we’d seen all the year-end kudos we can handle, along come the San Francisco Film Critics Circle Awards — and the Critics Choice Awards nominations — to prove us wrong.

Nominees for the Critics Choice Awards were announced Tuesday morning, with Into the Wild leading the pack at seven nominations, including picture, director, writer, actor, supporting actor, supporting actress, and best song. Close behind, with six nominations, is Juno; Atonement, Michael Clayton, No Country for Old Men, Sweeney Todd, and Hairspray each earned five. A partial list of nominations appears below:

PICTURE
American Gangster
Atonement
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Into the Wild
Juno
The Kite Runner
Michael Clayton
No Country for Old Men
Sweeney Todd
There Will Be Blood

ACTOR
George ClooneyMichael Clayton
Daniel Day-LewisThere Will Be Blood
Johnny DeppSweeney Todd
Ryan GoslingLars and the Real Girl

Emile HirschInto the Wild
Viggo MortensenEastern Promises

ACTRESS
Amy AdamsEnchanted
Cate BlanchettElizabeth: The Golden Age

Julie ChristieAway From Her
Marion CotillardLa Vie en Rose
Angelina JolieA Mighty Heart
Ellen PageJuno

SUPPORTING ACTOR
Casey AffleckThe Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

Javier BardemNo Country for Old Men
Philip Seymour HoffmanCharlie Wilson’s War

Hal HolbrookInto the Wild
Tom WilkinsonMichael Clayton

SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Cate Blanchett — I’m Not There

Catherine KeenerInto the Wild
Vanessa RedgraveAtonement
Amy RyanGone Baby Gone
Tilda SwintonMichael Clayton

ACTING ENSEMBLE
Hairspray
Juno
No Country for Old Men
Sweeney Todd
Gone Baby Gone
Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead

DIRECTOR
Tim BurtonSweeney Todd

Joel Coen and Ethan CoenNo Country for Old Men
Sidney LumetBefore the Devil Knows You’re Dead
Sean PennInto the Wild
Julian SchnabelThe Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Joe WrightAtonement

WRITER
Diablo CodyJuno
Joel Coen and Ethan Coen — No Country for Old Men
Tony GilroyMichael Clayton
Nancy OliverLars and the Real Girl

Sean Penn — Into the Wild
Aaron SorkinCharlie Wilson’s War

ANIMATED FEATURE
Bee Movie
Beowulf
Persepolis
Ratatouille
The Simpsons Movie

Meanwhile, the San Francisco Film Critics Circle has announced its 2007 favorites. Check ’em out:

Best Picture
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

Best Director
Joel and Ethan Coen for No Country for Old Men

Best Original Screenplay
The Savages

Best Adapted Screenplay

Away from Her

Best Actor
George Clooney for Michael Clayton

Best Actress
Julie Christie for Away from Her

Best Supporting Actor
Casey Affleck for The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

Best Supporting Actress
Amy Ryan for Gone Baby Gone

Best Foreign Language Film
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

Best Documentary
No End in Sight

Source: Variety (Critics Choice Nominees)
Source: San Francisco Film Critics Circle

Shekhar Kapur - Jeff Vespa/WireImage.comWhen Shekhar Kapur made Elizabeth in 1998 and began his journey charting the life of the virgin queen, he picked up an Oscar nod for Best Picture and helped his crew, and lead actress Cate Blanchett, secure their own nominations. Nine years later and the story continues in The Golden Age, exploring the events leading up to the Spanish Armada and Elizabeth I’s relationship with Sir Walter Raleigh. Rotten Tomatoes met with the director to learn more.

It was surprising to learn in the press notes that you’ve been very open in terms of liberties you’ve had to take with regards historical accuracy. How do you define the line between being historically accurate and telling a good story?

Shekhar Kapur: One of the things that I believe is that history is interpretation. One of the things I realised making the last film is that people called herthe Virgin Queen and the moment you say she’s the Virgin Queen, you’re already consigning her to myth. And myth isn’t historically accurate. Did Walter Raleigh really put the cape down or is that mythology? You just don’t know. There are certain basic facts, like the fact that the Armada existed, but according to the textbooks you’ll read the Armada was won by Drake, and yet when you interpret the facts you could conclude that the Armada was won by big freak storms, so it was won by the Gods. Which interpretation to do take?

Also if I made a film about Cleopatra today no-one would expect me to make it historically accurate because they agree that Cleopatra has been consigned to mythology. The moment you create an icon you’ve consigned to mythology anyway. Look at Diana, people are saying did she die? Did someone kill her? You’ve already consigned her to mythology. Things get very mixed up and so you interpret those things that have become more famous in the mythology of history.

The speech at Tilbury for example; I’ve always wondered if she’s addressing 10,000 men, how many of them heard it? Did the people at the front pass it on? Yet, every book you read says the 10,000 people roared with approval! It has to be myth! Did she just speak to her commanders who then interpreted it down to their soldiers? And what had changed by the time the last soldier had heard it? And did she write the speech? Did she speak it instinctively? All rulers have speech writers. Was it history or was it mythology? And who can tell?

Elizabeth: The Golden Age

At the same time it’s potentially quite brave of a filmmaker to make your own interpretation and on occasion challenge the scholars and the writers of textbooks.

SK: It’s the only thing a filmmaker can do – history doesn’t follow a three-act structure unfortunately! And there’s a difference between people who write the textbooks and scholars. Scholars say they’re interpreting. Scholarly work on history is always an interpretation and it’s very honest. They say up-front, “I’ve looked at this and looked at this and looked at this and therefore I coalesce these one-hundred different facts and come up with this interpretation. And it’s exactly the same in film because we have to tell our story in two hours. You do the Armada in three minutes… It was a six month long battle.

You’ve mentioned this is the second act in a planned trilogy; where do you pick up the story for part three?

SK: It has become a trilogy as I go on! This film ends with her becoming truly divine. Philip [of Spain] was divine and as you can see I’m heading towards that divine battle and the elements get involved and ultimately that’s the big myth that we’re heading to in the current-day world.

What’s interesting about Elizabeth is that all the great myths that we remember as people were killed. Ghandi was killed, he was divine, Diana was killed, she was divine, John F. Kennedy was killed, he was divine. Elizabeth is the only one who stayed divine, worshipped and died a natural death. How do you deal with people saying, you’re divine, you’re the Virgin Mary, while you’re alive? How do you come to terms with that? So it’ll be an interpretation of her own divinity and her own mortality, when she suddenly become ordinary and doesn’t live forever. Because of course you can’t sleep like Michael Jackson in an oxygen chamber.

Elizabeth: The Golden Age

Will we be waiting another nine years?

SK: I hope not, I hope that Cate will agree to do it earlier. People have said that Elizabeth was very old at that time and asked whether I’d be waiting for Cate to get that old and I’m saying no, cinematic age is an emotional age, it’s an interpreted age. If you see Cate now it’s amazing to see her in the film sitting down with drawn features. I’m convincing myself that she’s much, much older than she is. As soon as I say cut, she looks right at me and says, “What did you think of that?” And it’s ten years younger, her face. An actor will convince you of an age, and great actors are ageless as great icons are ageless. That’s cinema.

Tyler Perry
once again proved he is a forced to be reckoned with as his latest film
Why
Did I Get Married?
easily took the number one spot at the box office
this weekend, nearly doubling the nearest competitor. The other debuting films
met with so-so results and there’s a tight race for the runner-up spot.

The filmgoing audience showed once again that if Tyler Perry headlines a film,
they’re going to come out to see it.
Why
Did I Get Married?
  brought in an estimated $21.5M this weekend for
a powerful per screen average of $10,691. The opening was on par with Perry’s
first smash, 2005’s
Diary of a
Mad Black Woman
which opened with $21.9M and an even stronger $14,771
average. Unlike the last film with Perry’s name attached,
Daddy’s Little
Girls
, which opened with a softer $11.2M, Why Did I Get Married?
features Perry in a starring role. Throw in the popular
Janet Jackson
as a co-star and you’ve got a formula for success.


Dropping one spot was two-time box office champ
The Rock
in The Game Plan
which fell only 30% this weekend to an estimated $11.5M. The 30% drop was easily
the best hold in the top 10 this week, and its cume now stands at $59.4M. With
the recent success of comedies featuring tough guys and cute kids, it seems only
a matter of time before there’s a sequel to
Mr. Nanny
.


Battling The Rock for second place were two films that were within $10,000 of
each other this weekend. Currently sitting in third is the
George Clooney
starrer Michael
Clayton
. Expanding nationally from its successful debut last weekend,
the Warner Bros. award hopeful took in an estimated $11M this weekend, for a
solid per screen average of $4,385, bringing its cume to $12.1M. Following
closely on its heels was the
Joaquin
Phoenix
/Mark
Wahlberg
thriller
We Own the Night

which also debuted to an estimated $11M, for a per screen average of $4,179.
When the actual numbers come in on Monday, the 2nd through 4th films could
easily move around.


Falling 47% from its less-than-powerful opening last weekend was the
Ben Stiller
R-rated comedy
The Heartbreak Kid
which laughed up an estimated $7.4M this weekend,
bringing its total to a disappointing $26M. Look for a final theatrical run in
the $45-50M range, which is reasonable for a lot of films, but not for a Ben
Stiller/Farrelly
Brothers
comedy.


Opening in sixth place this weekend was the historical sequel
Elizabeth: The Golden Age
.
Bringing back star
Cate Blanchett
and director
Shekhar Kapur
nine years after the success of the original
Elizabeth
didn’t mean much for audiences as the film brought in an estimated $6.2M this
weekend for a per screen average of $3,169. A run on early season awards could
help the overall gross of the film, otherwise it may fade away quickly.


In seventh was the war drama
The Kingdom
which
fell 53% from last weekend to an estimated $4.5M. Its total now stands at a
shade under $40M. Adding a few hundred screens this weekend and crashing into
the top 10 was
Across the
Universe
which features the songs of the Beatles. The film took in $4M
in its fourth weekend, according to estimates, bringing its total to $12.9M.


In ninth place this weekend was
Resident
Evil: Extinction
which took in $2.6M in its fourth lap around the
country, bringing its total to $48M. And rounding out the top 10 was
The Seeker:
The Dark is Rising
which fell 42% from its soft opening last weekend to
an estimated $2.1M. Its cume stands at $7M and it should end up in the $12-14M
range with some hope for success on DVD. The only other film debuting this
weekend was the high school baseball pic
The Final Season

which opened to an estimated $665K for a per screen average of a pitiful $658.
Look for the film to quickly appear in DVD bargain bins.



The top 10 grossed $81.4M this weekend, which was down 15% from 2006 when
The Grudge 2
opened
with $20.8M, but up 23% from 2005 when another horror film,
The Fog
, bowed on top
with $11.7M.

Author: Sujit Chawla, www.boxofficeguru.com

This week at the movies we got lawyer types (Michael
Clayton
, starring
George Clooney
and Tilda
Swinton
), dueling brothers (We Own the Night,
starring Joaquin Phoenix and
Mark Wahlberg),
virgin queens (Elizabeth:
The Golden Age
, starring
Cate Blanchett),
baseball hopefuls (The
Final Season
, starring
Sean Astin and
Powers Boothe),
Beatles-inspired lovers (Across the Universe,
starring Evan Rachel
Wood
and
Jim Sturgess),
and reunited college friends (Tyler Perry’s Why Did I
Get Married?
). What say ye, critics?

Critics frequently bemoan the fact that movies are no
longer made for adults. Who better to come to their rescue than
George Clooney,
oft-called the Cary Grant of our generation? Clooney stars in
Michael Clayton
as
a washed-up legal consultant caught up in a pesticide case that isn’t quite what
it seems, with support from Tilda
Swinton
,
Tom Wilkinson, and
Sydney Pollack.
With strong performances all around, critics call this a challenging but
rewarding movie that also doesn’t skimp out on the popcorn factor.
At a Certified Fresh 89 percent, critics sustain Michael Clayton‘s appeal.



Wilkinson preparing to celebrate Bastille Day for the next 17
years.

Actors frequently re-team with directors they’ve worked with before. But two principal actors? Only once in a blue moon. Such an
event strikes for
We Own the Night
, a crime drama/thriller about two brothers on
opposite sides of the law. The film reunites
Joaquin Phoenix and
Mark Wahlberg
with director James Gray, who all previously created 2000’s
The Yards. But the
trio isn’t having as much luck the second time around: critics say Night cribs from
The Godfathers and
The Departed, while relying too heavily
on improbable plot turns to fuel the action.  But moviegoers who don’t expect
anything particularly original can have a reasonably good time. At 50 percent,
Night gets close, but doesn’t quite Own.



Who makes Mark Wahlberg a star? Who owns the night? We do, we do!

Cate Blanchett
is one of the best actresses on the planet today, and with
Elizabeth: The Golden Age
,
she revisits the role that made her a star. Big mistake, critics say. Age
picks up where its predecessor left off, with the Virgin Queen navigating the
rough waters of political unrest in 16th Century Europe, as well as palace
intrigue closer to home. The pundits say the costume and set design are
impeccable, but otherwise, this is a campy, bombastic flick, filled with silly
dialogue and featuring a script that’s more hysterical than historical. At 29 percent on the Tomatometer, this one ain’t golden. And it’s a steep drop from
the Certified Fresh
original
(at 79 percent).



Elizabeth contemplates conquering Narnia next.

It’s October, and that means it’s time for some
super-dramatic baseball action. Unfortunately, we’re talking about the MLB
playoffs, not
The Final Season
, which critics say is as predictable as
Alex Rodriguez failing in the clutch. Directed by
David Mickey Evans (who helmed
the cult-fave The Sandlot), Season is the story of a tiny Iowa
high school with a proud baseball tradition that may come to an end because of
redistricting. Season features a strong cast that includes
Sean Astin,
Powers Boothe, and
Rachael Leigh Cook, and the film oozes sincerity. But pundits
say it’s as safe as an intentional walk and as clichéd as a post-game interview.
At 11 percent on the Tomatometer, The Final Season is way below the
cinematic Mendoza line.



"11 percent?"

Is there anybody going to listen to this story, all about
Julie Taymor‘s attempt to capture the zeitgeist of the 1960s through the music
of the Beatles? As far as
Across the Universe
goes, some critics say
stop, others say go, go, go. Universe is the story of Lucy (Evan Rachel
Wood
) and Jude (Jim Sturgess), a young couple who stalk across the political and
social landscape of the tumultuous decade to the tune of such classics as "Come
Together," "Helter Skelter," and "All You Need is Love." The critics are pretty
split on Universe: some say the film is an audacious, beautiful movie
that will make you feel all right. But others say it’s all wrong (that is, they
think they disagree), calling the film an exercise in excess with bland
characters. We hope the film’s 52 percent Tomatometer will
Help!
you decide to see it or not.



An early incarnation of The Blue Man Group.

With his heartfelt domestic dramedies, Tyler Perry has
established himself as a commercial sure thing. But he’s yet to win over
critics, which may be why his latest,
Tyler Perry’s Why Did I
Get Married?
,
wasn’t screened before release. It’s the story of a reunion of college friends,
who, over the course of a long weekend together, begin to question their
marriages. Guess the Tomatometer.



"What happened to Steve Buscemi?"

Also opening this week in limited release:
Control
,
a
biopic of Joy Division singer Ian Curtis, is at 90 percent (check out our interview with director Anton Corbijn
here);
Terror’s Advocate
,
Barbet
Schroder
‘s documentary portrait of an
attorney for the undefendable, is at 83 percent on the Tomatometer;
Lars and
the Real Girl
, starring
Ryan Gosling as a delusional guy dating a female doll, is at 78 percent (check out our review from Toronto
here);
Canvas,
a drama about a family dealing with one member’s schizophrenia, is at 71
percent;
Golda’s Balcony
, about the Israeli prime minister, is at 64
percent; and Sleuth, an update of the 1972 murder mystery starring
Michael Caine and
Jude Law, is at 48 percent.



"We couldn’t quite afford Jessica Alba. But we got a good
replacement."

Recent Cate Blanchett Movies:

————————————-

69% —
I’m Not There
(2007)
32% —
The Good German
(2006)
87% —
Notes on a Scandal
(2006)
68% — Babel (2006) 
85% —
Little Fish
(2006)

Recent Mark Wahlberg Movies:

—————————————-

48% —
Shooter
(2007)
92% —
The Departed
(2006)
70% —
Invincible
(2006)
52% —
Four Brothers
(2005)
61% —
I Heart Huckabees
(2004)

Five new films push their way into nationwide release on Friday hoping to challenge two-time champ The Rock making for what should be a free-for-all at the North American box office with many different studios having a realistic shot at claiming the number one spot. Among the top contenders are Sony’s crime thriller We Own the Night, the Lionsgate comedy Why Did I Get Married?, and the George Clooney vehicle Michael Clayton which expands nationally after its scorching debut in limited release. Adding to the mix are the costume drama Elizabeth: The Golden Age and the baseball tale The Final Season. The box office race should be a tight one with as many as four films likely to reach the low double digit millions.

Oscar nominated actors Mark Wahlberg and Joaquin Phoenix face off as brothers on different sides of the law in the new action thriller We Own the Night. The R-rated pic co-stars Robert Duvall and Eva Mendes and will target an adult audience with a slightly male skew. The former Marky Mark proved his box office pull last spring as the only major star in Shooter which bowed to $14.5M and a $5,176 average by targeting the same audience. Things will be more difficult this time because of the intense competition for mature audiences especially from Michael Clayton. But Night‘s biggest advantage over Michael is that it has two commercial stars instead of just one. The combo should lead to a slim edge at the cash registers.

Despite its awkward title, Night has been pushing itself as an action-packed thriller with faces people love to watch. Reviews have been mixed and with such a crowded field, it will be hard to stand out as a must-see option. Starpower should be the main factor here and showdowns between two solid actors are usually popular with ticket buyers. Opening in over 2,000 theaters, We Own the Night could debut to about $12M.


Phoenix and Wahlberg in We Own the Night

Taking on those boys with some machismo of his own, George Clooney heads into wide release with his legal drama Michael Clayton which Warner Bros. has drummed up plenty of awards buzz for. The R-rated pic bowed to a sizzling $47,994 average last weekend from its platform bow in the Clooney-friendly towns of New York, Los Angeles, and Toronto. This weekend, the thriller will face the real test when it enters every major market across the 50 states. Thanks to his political outspokenness, the Academy Award winning actor has become a polarizing figure. He could easily win an election to become mayor of Hollywood, but in other parts of the country people would gladly pay theaters to not play his movies.

Clayton will test his drawing power since the film has no other box office anchors in it. Co-stars Tom Wilkinson, Tilda Swinton, and Sydney Pollack are well-respected, but they don’t sell tickets. There is plenty of direct competition which is why the film got a head start a week early. Buzz from its red hot platform bow has spread helping to build interest. The crowd will consist of the same people that opened Syriana to $11.7M, The Black Dahlia to $10M, and Zodiac to $13.4M. Night will take away some males and Elizabeth will steal some females so a huge gross will be hard to find. But over the long-term the film could have legs. Expanding into 2,511 locations, Michael Clayton stands as the widest of the new offerings and may capture around $11M over the Friday-to-Sunday period.


Clooney as Clayton

Tyler Perry‘s latest relationship comedy Why Did I Get Married? finds trouble brewing when four married couples come together for an annual winter getaway. The writer/director’s films have always tapped into his loyal fan base with African American women at the core. His 2005 smash Diary of a Mad Black Woman surprised the industry with its first-place debut with $21.9M and a $14,771 average and was followed a year later by Madea’s Family Reunion which grew bigger with a $30M launch. Perry’s last pic Daddy’s Little Girls, also a February release, saw more modest numbers with a $11.2M opening as the filmmaker did not star in the pic.

Married does not have the promotional value of Black History Month or the help of Presidents Day which Girls had early this year. However, Perry’s new film will not face any direct competitors for its target audience. Girls had to face the second weekend of Eddie Murphy‘s hit comedy Norbit which offered some audience overlap. Plus Married boasts more starpower with Perry back on screen and an added boost will come from Janet Jackson who is always a strong draw at the box office with the target audience every time she makes a rare appearance in a movie. The PG-13 film from Lionsgate is unlike anything else in the marketplace right now and with few buzzworthy films aimed at black moviegoers in recent months, it should successfully connect. Debuting in 2,011 theaters, Why Did I Get Married? might open with roughly $12M this weekend.


Tyler Perry’s Why Did I Get Married?
Another female-driven film, but taking place centuries ago and across the pond, is the historical drama Elizabeth: The Golden Age which finds Cate Blanchett reprising the role of the British Queen which made her a star nine years ago. The PG-13 pic also finds Geoffrey Rush returning and adds Clive Owen to the mix telling the story of the later years of the monarch’s 16th century reign when threats from Spain and a possible love affair at home led to new challenges. Though at the core a costume drama like its predecessor, Universal’s marketing has played up the action and adventure elements in hopes of attracting men looking for warfare and battle scenes. That may backfire when word gets out that there is actually very little action on screen.

The first Elizabeth opened in limited release in November 1998 and rolled through awards season that winter eventually reaching an impressive $30M while never playing in more than 600 theaters. It also bagged seven Oscar nominations including Best Picture. Now the studio is hoping that a built-in audience will want to take another trip to the past. Though the first was an acclaimed picture, no real demand ever surfaced for a sequel. So it will be tough for Golden Age at the box office especially with all the competition. Female-led dramas often struggle in the marketplace since it is often too hard for adult women to drag men with them to the multiplex for these stories. New films from Clooney and Wahlberg offer more cross-gender appeal. Ordering her troops into 2,000 theaters on Friday, Elizabeth: The Golden Age might take home about $8M over the three-day period.


Cate Blanchett and Geoffrey Rush in Elizabeth: The Golden Age

Likely to strike out at the box office this weekend is the high school baseball pic The Final Season which stars Sean Astin, Larry Miller, and Powers Boothe. The PG-rated film offers no starpower and has generated very little excitement for itself in the marketplace. Most sports fans interested in the national pastime will tune into the playoffs on their television sets this weekend. A quick trip to DVD is assured for this one which has no guarantee to clinch a spot in the top ten. Opening in about 1,000 theaters, a weekend take of just $2M could be in the works.


The Final Season

Among holdovers, The Game Plan surprised the industry two weeks in a row by taking the number one spot. Given its strong legs and continued lack of competition for the family audience and younger teens, a third round on top is not totally out of the question. Should all the newbies eat into each other and all fail to reach the $12M mark, the Disney kidpic by default may stay put. A 25% decline would give The Game Plan a third weekend tally of $12.5M pushing the 17-day total to a solid $58M.

Paramount and DreamWorks were caught by surprise by the lack of strength for the opening of the Ben Stiller comedy The Heartbreak Kid. With nothing to keep it afloat, a 45% decline might be in order especially since adults will be distracted by a wide assortment of other options. That would give the Farrelly brothers a sophomore session of about $7.5M and a cume of only $25.5M after ten days.

LAST YEAR: Sony used the Friday the 13th before Halloween to launch the sequel to one of the most successful horror films in history and captured the number one spot. The Grudge 2 bowed on top with $20.8M accounting for more than half of its $39.1M final. Eventual Oscar champ The Departed slipped to second with $19M easing only 29% for Warner Bros. The Robin Williams political comedy Man of the Year debuted in third with $12.3M before finishing with a disappointing $37.3M for Universal. Rounding out the top five were the Sony toon Open Season with $11.1M and New Line’s fright franchise flick Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning with $7.5M for a steep 60% plunge. Opening with weak results in sixth was the action pic The Marine with $7.1M on its way to $18.8M for Fox. The religious-themed drama One Night with the King bowed to $4.1M with a good $4,518 average and finished with $13.4M for 8X.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

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