Buena Vista courtesy Everett Collection

(Photo by Buena Vista/ courtesy Everett Collection)

All John Cusack Movies Ranked

John Cusack pulled off the tricky act of being one of those It kids of the ’80s without having that distinction become an albatross hanging across his career once the decade ended. Cusack found breakthrough roles in just about every permutation of the teen comedy in the spandex and big-hair era: the hormonal-driven (One Crazy Summer), the bizarro creations (Better Off Dead), the rom-com (The Sure Thing). But Cusack had an erudite quality that separated him from his contemporaries, drawing him to name directors like John Sayles (Eight Men Out) and Cameron Crowe, the latter of whom he worked with to close out the decade with perhaps the best romantic-comedy in a decade full of classics: 1989’s Say Anything….

Cusack of the 1990s represented a maturation that allowed him to fit into just about any mold: drama (The Thin Red Line), comedy (Bullets Over Broadway, The Grifters, Being John Malkovich), romance (Pushing Tin), and even action (Con Air). Some movies combined all the genres, like 1997’s Grosse Pointe Blank (in which he plays a hitman attending his high school reunion), one of those high-concept Hollywood movies that endures for decades after release.

2000’s High Fidelity may have been the last we’ve seen of Cusack in classic rom-com leading man form, as in the ensuing years he’s been putting more work into genre fare, and playing shadowy figures and villains. Highlights from this ongoing period include 1408, 2012, and Grand Piano. Meanwhile, 2015’s Brian Wilson biopic Love & Mercy is just about as good as anything he’s done in his career. And now we’re taking a look back with all John Cusack movies ranked by Tomatometer!

#64

The Contract (2006)
0%

#64
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Frank Carden (Morgan Freeman), one of the world's greatest assassins, is handed a lucrative contract to kill a highly secretive... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#63

The Prince (2014)
0%

#63
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A retired assassin is drawn back into his former life and a confrontation with an old rival when his daughter... [More]
Directed By: Brian A. Miller

#62

Reclaim (2014)
0%

#62
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Steven (Ryan Phillippe) and Shannon (Rachelle Lefevre) risk their lives to uncover the truth behind their newly adopted daughter's disappearance... [More]
Directed By: Alan White

#61

Arsenal (2017)
3%

#61
Adjusted Score: 4355%
Critics Consensus: Aside from an opportunity to watch a mustachioed Nicolas Cage acting from under a wig and behind a prosthetic nose, Arsenal has depressingly little to offer.
Synopsis: The Lindel brothers, Mikey and JP, only had each other to rely on growing up. As adults, JP finds success... [More]
Directed By: Steven C. Miller

#60

Shanghai (2010)
4%

#60
Adjusted Score: 4596%
Critics Consensus: Shanghai is crippled by a weak story and fatally undermined by clunky direction, making for a period political drama that lacks all of its key components.
Synopsis: In the months before the attack on Pearl Harbor, an American intelligence official (John Cusack) investigates a friend's death in... [More]
Directed By: Mikael Hafstrom

#59

Drive Hard (2014)
8%

#59
Adjusted Score: 7221%
Critics Consensus: Hitting the pavement with an empty tank of inspiration, Drive Hard goes through its action beats in fits and starts before puttering out completely.
Synopsis: A driving instructor (Thomas Jane) who used to race autos is forced to drive a getaway car for a thief... [More]
Directed By: Brian Trenchard-Smith

#58

The Bag Man (2014)
11%

#58
Adjusted Score: 11169%
Critics Consensus: Busy with attitude and light on intrigue, The Bag Man is a mystery box with nothing surprising inside.
Synopsis: A criminal waits in a seedy motel and waits for his boss after killing several men to steal a bag.... [More]
Directed By: David Grovic

#57

Cell (2016)
11%

#57
Adjusted Score: 12657%
Critics Consensus: Shoddily crafted and devoid of suspense, Cell squanders a capable cast and Stephen King's once-prescient source material on a bland rehash of zombie cliches.
Synopsis: A graphic novelist (John Cusack) begins a desperate search for his estranged wife (Clark Sarullo) and son (Ethan Andrew Casto)... [More]
Directed By: Tod Williams

#56

Distorted (2018)
18%

#56
Adjusted Score: 12722%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Lauren and Russell Curran decide to move away from the bustle of the city and into the peaceful oasis of... [More]
Directed By: Rob King

#55

The Raven (2012)
22%

#55
Adjusted Score: 26639%
Critics Consensus: Thinly scripted, unevenly acted, and overall preposterous, The Raven disgraces the legacy of Edgar Allen Poe with a rote murder mystery that's more silly than scary.
Synopsis: In 19th-century Baltimore, Detective Emmett Fields (Luke Evans) makes a horrifying discovery: The murders of a mother and daughter resemble... [More]
Directed By: James McTeigue

#54

River Runs Red (2018)
22%

#54
Adjusted Score: 12721%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A vengeful judge takes the law into his own hands when two cops kill his young son during a routine... [More]
Directed By: Wes Miller

#53
#53
Adjusted Score: 29234%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Emerson, a disgraced CIA agent, guards Katherine, a code operator, in a top secret CIA installation in Britain. When heavily... [More]
Directed By: Kasper Barfoed

#52

War, Inc. (2008)
29%

#52
Adjusted Score: 31856%
Critics Consensus: War, Inc. attempts to satirize the military industrial complex, but more often than not it misses its target.
Synopsis: Assassin Brand Hauser is sent to Turaqistan to carry out a hit. Occupied by the US corporation Tamerlane, Turaqistan is... [More]
Directed By: Joshua Seftel

#51
#51
Adjusted Score: 37550%
Critics Consensus: Despite its famous cast, the movie lacks sympathetic characters and is only funny in spurts.
Synopsis: For an awkward, self-conscious girl like Kiki (Julia Roberts), being the personal assistant to a beautiful megastar like Gwen (Catherine... [More]
Directed By: Joe Roth

#50

Martian Child (2007)
35%

#50
Adjusted Score: 38263%
Critics Consensus: Despite some charms, overt emotional manipulation and an inconsistent tone prevents Martian Child from being the heartfelt dramedy it aspires to be.
Synopsis: Wanting to experience fatherhood, a man (John Cusack) adopts a youngster (Bobby Coleman) who has an unusual crisis of identity,... [More]
Directed By: Menno Meyjes

#49

Must Love Dogs (2005)
37%

#49
Adjusted Score: 41886%
Critics Consensus: Despite good work from its likable leads, the romantic comedy Must Love Dogs is too predictable.
Synopsis: Sarah (Diane Lane), is 40 and recently divorced. Believing Sarah needs to date more, her sister, Carol (Elizabeth Perkins), creates... [More]
Directed By: Gary David Goldberg

#48

Dragon Blade (2015)
35%

#48
Adjusted Score: 36150%
Critics Consensus: Dragon Blade is beautifully staged and choreographed, but between the battles, its talented cast is overwhelmed by a dull story and choppy editing.
Synopsis: An exiled Chinese general (Jackie Chan) offers shelter to a renegade Roman (John Cusack) and his legion, then becomes involved... [More]
Directed By: Daniel Lee

#47

Igor (2008)
39%

#47
Adjusted Score: 41182%
Critics Consensus: With an animation style that apes Tim Burton, and a slew of cultural references that aren't clear enough to reach the crowds, Igor's patched together antics make it hard to see who the film is trying to please.
Synopsis: Lab assistant Igor (John Cusack) dreams of becoming a mad scientist like his master, Dr. Glickenstein. When the doctor runs... [More]
Directed By: Anthony Leondis

#46

2012 (2009)
39%

#46
Adjusted Score: 51440%
Critics Consensus: Roland Emmerich's 2012 provides plenty of visual thrills, but lacks a strong enough script to support its massive scope and inflated length.
Synopsis: Earth's billions of inhabitants are unaware that the planet has an expiration date. With the warnings of an American scientist... [More]
Directed By: Roland Emmerich

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 41346%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A staunch advocate of healthy living, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg (Anthony Hopkins) opens a sanitarium that promotes his progressive, if... [More]
Directed By: Alan Parker

#44

The Paperboy (2012)
45%

#44
Adjusted Score: 49609%
Critics Consensus: Trashy and melodramatic, The Paperboy is enlivened by a strong cast and a steamy, sordid plot, but it's uneven and often veers into camp.
Synopsis: In 1969 Florida, reporter Ward Jansen (Matthew McConaughey) returns to his hometown to write a story about death-row inmate Hillary... [More]
Directed By: Lee Daniels

#43

True Colors (1991)
47%

#43
Adjusted Score: 46463%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: College roommates Tim Gerrity (James Spader) and Peter Burton (John Cusack) seem as if they'll be friends forever despite their... [More]
Directed By: Herbert Ross

#42
#42
Adjusted Score: 47845%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Assigned to oversee the development of the atomic bomb, Gen. Leslie Groves (Paul Newman) is a stern military man determined... [More]
Directed By: Roland Joffé

#41

The Ice Harvest (2005)
47%

#41
Adjusted Score: 52991%
Critics Consensus: The Ice Harvest offers a couple of laughs, but considering the people involved, it should be a lot funnier.
Synopsis: As the attorney for a mobster (Randy Quaid), Charlie Arglist (John Cusack) has access to some not-so-clean money, which he... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#40

Pushing Tin (1999)
48%

#40
Adjusted Score: 49445%
Critics Consensus: Solid performances by the leads, but the generic ending needs help.
Synopsis: Two air traffic controllers (John Cusack, Billy Bob Thornton) who thrive on living dangerously compete to outdo each other on... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#39
Adjusted Score: 51691%
Critics Consensus: Clint Eastwood's spare directorial style proves an ill fit for this Southern potboiler, which dutifully trudges through its mystery while remaining disinterested in the cultural flourishes that gave its source material its sense of intrigue.
Synopsis: In this adaptation of John Berendt's book, a young journalist, John Kelso (John Cusack), travels to Savannah, Ga., to cover... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#38

Shadows and Fog (1992)
52%

#38
Adjusted Score: 52615%
Critics Consensus: Shadows and Fog recreates the chiaroscuro aesthetic of German Expressionism, but Woody Allen's rambling screenplay retreads the director's neurotic obsessions with derivative results.
Synopsis: A serial strangler is on the loose, and a mob of neighborhood vigilantes is on the hunt. When several neighbors... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#37

Blood Money (2017)
50%

#37
Adjusted Score: 31403%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Three friends on a wilderness excursion find a fortune stashed in the woods. Now they must outrun the white collar... [More]
Directed By: Lucky McKee

#36

Adult World (2013)
56%

#36
Adjusted Score: 55691%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An aspiring poet (Emma Roberts) takes a job as a clerk at an adult bookstore and tries to make her... [More]
Directed By: Scott Coffey

#35

Con Air (1997)
56%

#35
Adjusted Score: 59935%
Critics Consensus: Con Air won't win any awards for believability - and all involved seem cheerfully aware of it, making some of this blockbuster action outing's biggest flaws fairly easy to forgive.
Synopsis: Just-paroled army ranger Cameron Poe (Nicolas Cage) is headed back to his wife (Monica Potter), but must fly home aboard... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#34

Chicago Cab (1998)
56%

#34
Adjusted Score: 34135%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A nameless Chicago cab driver (Paul Dillon) picks up more than 30 different passengers over the course of a typical... [More]

#33

One Crazy Summer (1986)
45%

#33
Adjusted Score: 46169%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After graduating from high school, art school hopeful Hoops McCann (John Cusack) struggles to complete his application to the Rhode... [More]
Directed By: Savage Steve Holland

#32

City Hall (1996)
56%

#32
Adjusted Score: 56758%
Critics Consensus: City Hall explores political corruption with commendable intelligence, but this web of scandal struggles to coalesce into satisfying drama.
Synopsis: Tragedy strikes when a child is caught in the crossfire between a cop and a mobster on the streets of... [More]
Directed By: Harold Becker

#31

Serendipity (2001)
59%

#31
Adjusted Score: 64568%
Critics Consensus: Light and charming, Serendipity could benefit from less contrivances.
Synopsis: On a magical night when they are in in their 20s, Jonathan (John Cusack) meets Sara (Kate Beckinsale). He finds... [More]
Directed By: Peter Chelsom

#30

Tapeheads (1988)
60%

#30
Adjusted Score: 60343%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Unemployed pals Ivan (John Cusack) and Josh (Tim Robbins) decide to start Video Aces, a company that produces music videos.... [More]
Directed By: Bill Fishman

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 62603%
Critics Consensus: Though this by-the-numbers true procedural seems basic, The Frozen Ground presents a welcome return for Nicolas Cage in a solid performance.
Synopsis: A teenage escapee (Vanessa Hudgens) provides a critical break in the case, as an Alaskan detective (Nicolas Cage) hunts a... [More]
Directed By: Scott Walker

#28
#28
Adjusted Score: 67126%
Critics Consensus: Narratively unwieldy and tonally jumbled, Maps to the Stars still has enough bite to satisfy David Cronenberg fans in need of a coolly acidic fix.
Synopsis: Driven by an intense need for fame and validation, members of a dysfunctional Hollywood dynasty have lives as dramatic as... [More]
Directed By: David Cronenberg

#27

Grace Is Gone (2007)
62%

#27
Adjusted Score: 64318%
Critics Consensus: A refreshing departure from the current crop of Iraq war dramas, Grace is Gone is a heartfelt, finely acted portrayal of grief and healing.
Synopsis: Stanley Phillips (John Cusack) receives the kind of news that every spouse of a soldier dreads: His wife, Grace, has... [More]
Directed By: James C. Strouse

#26
#26
Adjusted Score: 71041%
Critics Consensus: Its flagrantly silly script -- and immensely likable cast -- make up for most of its flaws.
Synopsis: Four pals are stuck in a rut in adulthood: Adam (John Cusack) has just been dumped, Lou (Rob Corddry) is... [More]
Directed By: Steve Pink

#25

Cradle Will Rock (1999)
65%

#25
Adjusted Score: 67110%
Critics Consensus: Witty and provocative.
Synopsis: As labor strikes break out throughout the country, New York is alive with cultural revolution. Nelson Rockefeller (John Cusack) commissions... [More]
Directed By: Tim Robbins

#24

Floundering (1994)
67%

#24
Adjusted Score: 62700%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An out-of-work loser (James LeGros) is driven to action by the IRS, his girlfriend and the characters who cross his... [More]
Directed By: Peter McCarthy

#23

Max (2002)
69%

#23
Adjusted Score: 71248%
Critics Consensus: Well-acted in the execution of its provocative "what-if?" premise.
Synopsis: This is the story of a young artist named Adolf Hitler (Noah Taylor) and his relationship with a Jewish art... [More]
Directed By: Menno Meyjes

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 79000%
Critics Consensus: Gut-wrenching and emotionally affecting, Lee Daniels' The Butler overcomes an uneven narrative thanks to strong performances from an all-star cast.
Synopsis: After leaving the South as a young man and finding employment at an elite hotel in Washington, D.C., Cecil Gaines... [More]
Directed By: Lee Daniels

#21

Runaway Jury (2003)
73%

#21
Adjusted Score: 78446%
Critics Consensus: An implausible but entertaining legal thriller.
Synopsis: After a workplace shooting in New Orleans, a trial against the gun manufacturer pits lawyer Wendell Rohr (Dustin Hoffman) against... [More]
Directed By: Gary Fleder

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 76026%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Fiona Flynn (Moya Farrelly) and Kieran O'Day (Aidan Quinn) cross the class divide to find love in 1930s Ireland. Fiona... [More]
Directed By: Paul Quinn

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 79228%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In an Arctic village in 1931, British mapmaker Walter Russell (Patrick Bergin) selects 12-year-old Eskimo Avik (Robert Joamie) as his... [More]
Directed By: Vincent Ward

#18

Better Off Dead (1985)
77%

#18
Adjusted Score: 77517%
Critics Consensus: Better Off Dead is an anarchic mix of black humor and surreal comedy, anchored by John Cusack's winsome, charming performance.
Synopsis: Lane Meyer (John Cusack) is a teen with a peculiar family and a bizarre fixation with his girlfriend, Beth (Amanda... [More]
Directed By: Savage Steve Holland

#17

Grand Piano (2013)
79%

#17
Adjusted Score: 81430%
Critics Consensus: Grand Piano is so tense in its best moments -- and appealingly strange overall -- that it remains rewarding in spite of its flaws.
Synopsis: A concert pianist who has stage fright finds a threatening note written on his sheet music just moments before a... [More]
Directed By: Eugenio Mira

#16

The Jack Bull (1999)
80%

#16
Adjusted Score: 20566%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A Wyoming horse trader (John Cusack) clashes with a rancher (L.Q. Jones) who abused his horses and their Indian caretaker.... [More]
Directed By: John Badham

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 84751%
Critics Consensus: A high-concept high school reunion movie with an adroitly cast John Cusack and armed with a script of incisive wit.
Synopsis: After assassin Martin Blank (John Cusack) has trouble focusing on his work, resulting in a failed assignment, he returns to... [More]
Directed By: George Armitage

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 85725%
Critics Consensus: The Thin Red Line is a daringly philosophical World War II film with an enormous cast of eager stars.
Synopsis: In 1942, Private Witt (Jim Caviezel) is a U.S. Army absconder living peacefully with the locals of a small South... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#13

1408 (2007)
79%

#13
Adjusted Score: 87058%
Critics Consensus: Relying on psychological tension rather than overt violence and gore, 1408 is a genuinely creepy thriller with a strong lead performance by John Cusack.
Synopsis: Mike Enslin (John Cusack) is a successful author who enjoys worldwide acclaim debunking supernatural phenomena -- before he checks into... [More]
Directed By: Mikael Hafstrom

#12

Chi-Raq (2015)
82%

#12
Adjusted Score: 90973%
Critics Consensus: Chi-Raq is as urgently topical and satisfyingly ambitious as it is wildly uneven -- and it contains some of Spike Lee's smartest, sharpest, and all-around entertaining late-period work.
Synopsis: The girlfriend (Teyonah Parris) of a Chicago gang leader (Nick Cannon) persuades other frustrated women to abstain from sex until... [More]
Directed By: Spike Lee

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 24152%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Factory worker Joe (John Doe) leaves Los Angeles and embarks on a road trip through the desert on his vintage... [More]
Directed By: Abbe Wool

#10

The Sure Thing (1985)
86%

#10
Adjusted Score: 88509%
Critics Consensus: Though its final outcome is predictable, The Sure Thing is a charming, smartly written, and mature teen comedy featuring a breakout role for John Cusack.
Synopsis: Gib (John Cusack), a college freshman, keeps striking out with women. When he learns that a beautiful Californian (Nicollette Sheridan)... [More]
Directed By: Rob Reiner

#9

Anastasia (1997)
86%

#9
Adjusted Score: 88473%
Critics Consensus: Beautiful animation, an affable take on Russian history, and strong voice performances make Anastasia a winning first film from Fox animation studios.
Synopsis: The evil wizard Rasputin (Christopher Lloyd) puts a hex on the royal Romanovs and young Anastasia (Meg Ryan) disappears when... [More]
Directed By: Don Bluth, Gary Goldman

#8

Eight Men Out (1988)
86%

#8
Adjusted Score: 89618%
Critics Consensus: Perhaps less than absorbing for non-baseball fans, but nevertheless underpinned by strong performances from the cast and John Sayles' solid direction.
Synopsis: The Chicago White Sox, who are set to play the Cincinnati Reds in the World Series of 1919, are at... [More]
Directed By: John Sayles

#7
Adjusted Score: 92448%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Warm-hearted family tale of a girl's cross-country trek to find her father, set during the bleak days of the Depression... [More]
Directed By: Jeremy Kagan

#6

Never Grow Old (2019)
90%

#6
Adjusted Score: 90378%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A once-peaceful frontier town becomes a den of vice after vicious outlaw Dutch Albert and his gang arrive and begin... [More]
Directed By: Ivan Kavanagh

#5

The Grifters (1990)
91%

#5
Adjusted Score: 92739%
Critics Consensus: Coolly collected and confidently performed, The Grifters is a stylish caper that puts the artistry in con.
Synopsis: Hard-as-nails Lily Dillon (Anjelica Huston) works as a swindler for dangerous bookie Bobo (Pat Hingle), probably the only man she... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Frears

#4

Love & Mercy (2014)
89%

#4
Adjusted Score: 97820%
Critics Consensus: As unconventional and unwieldy as the life and legacy it honors, Love & Mercy should prove moving for Brian Wilson fans while still satisfying neophytes.
Synopsis: In the late 1960s, the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson stops touring, produces "Pet Sounds" and begins to lose his grip... [More]
Directed By: Bill Pohlad

#3

High Fidelity (2000)
91%

#3
Adjusted Score: 96311%
Critics Consensus: The deft hand of director Stephen Frears and strong performances by the ensemble cast combine to tell an entertaining story with a rock-solid soundtrack.
Synopsis: Rob Gordon (John Cusack) is the owner of a failing record store in Chicago, where he sells music the old-fashioned... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Frears

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 99893%
Critics Consensus: A gleefully entertaining backstage comedy, Bullets Over Broadway features some of Woody Allen's sharpest, most inspired late-period writing and direction.
Synopsis: Struggling 1920s playwright David Shayne (John Cusack), having failed to secure financing for his latest work, reluctantly makes a deal... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#1

Say Anything... (1989)
98%

#1
Adjusted Score: 100654%
Critics Consensus: One of the definitive Generation X movies, Say Anything... is equally funny and heartfelt -- and it established John Cusack as an icon for left-of-center types everywhere.
Synopsis: In a charming, critically acclaimed tale of first love, Lloyd (John Cusack), an eternal optimist, seeks to capture the heart... [More]
Directed By: Cameron Crowe

Zack Snyder announces a second Watchmen movie (kinda) and Sly Stallone announces his director’s cut of Rambo — so should you pick up the theatrical cut on DVD this week? Find out more inside.


Who Watches the Watchmen Spin-off DVD?

Zack Snyder will direct a Watchmen spinoff DVD film based on the meta-story Tales of the Black Freighter, which will hit shelves the week after the comic adaptation is released in theaters next March. The story within a story, which appears in the original Watchmen comics, was originally planned as a 300-esque live-action movie, but will be shot as a more cost-effective animated film. According to the New York Times, the DVD, set for stores five days after Watchmen hits theaters, will also feature a character-focused “documentary-style film” — and even Snyder knows the movie, spinoff, and resulting multiple releases means big bucks (“The überfans of this property are going to go crazy for that”).

Futurama: The Beast With a Billion Backs

Special features and artwork have been released for the second Futurama DVD movie, The Beast with a Billion Backs. The feature length movie picks up after the events of Bender’s Big Score, when an interplanetary alien declares Fry the new Pope and seeks Leela for his bride. Will intergalactic snu-snu ensue? Britney Murphy, David Cross, and Stephen Hawking provide guest vocals; expect TONS of great bonus features like commentary tracks, “A Brief History of Deathball,” and a sneak peek at the next Futurama film, Bender’s Game.

The name is Rambo. John Rambo.

Sylvester Stallone‘s Rambo— the fourth onscreen bloodbath starring his iconic titular character — is out on DVD this week. But before you count your pennies and head to the video store, be warned; he’s already planning a director’s cut. He said as much to Jay Leno, so it must be true. We say give Rambo a rental, but wait to buy Sly’s cut (entitled John Rambo) from which all the proceeds might go to the people of Burma.

 

 

Click for this week’s new releases!

Rambo


Tomatometer: 33%

Wherever there is a need for ass kicking, there he shall be. Twenty years after ousting the Soviets from Afghanistan in Rambo III (the Taliban thanks you, John Rambo!) Sly Stallone’s best-known character finds himself in Burma. When American missionaries get captured by the bloodthirsty Burmese Army, a reluctant Rambo leaves peaceful retirement behind and goes back to his old ways — now, with an even higher body count (3.2 per minute)!

Bonus Features:

As if watching Rambo rip throats out with his bare hands in slo-mo wasn’t its own bonus feature, the two-disc release boasts tons of featurettes on the music, weapons, and making of Rambo’s fourth onscreen adventure. Stallone’s commentary track and a feature that contextualizes the real life political climate of Burma make it a well-rounded release.

Grace Is Gone



Tomatometer: 58%

This Sundance drama is unlike the glut of Iraq war films we’ve seen in the past year; instead of a soldier’s story, we see the tragedy of a fallen soldier’s family back home, as told through the heartbreaking eyes of a new widower and father of two (John Cusack).

Bonus Features:

A few sobering featurettes on the film and what inspired it, along with a profile of TAPS, a Tragedy Assistance Program for survivors of loved ones in the Armed Forces, accompany the film.


Cassandra’s Dream


Tomatometer: 50%

Oh, how the mighty have fallen. First the middling Melinda and Melinda. Then the Oscar-nominated Match Point. The abysmal Scoop followed shortly thereafter, and now we again have another stop on Woody Allen‘s roller coaster ride of a career. Cassandra’s Dream, about two brothers caught up in a tragic quandary of morality and greed, is out on DVD this week — will it be a breath of fresh air or strangely familiar territory from the man who keeps remaking his own Crimes and Misdemeanors?

Bonus Features:

No DVD extras? We’ll take that as an admission of mediocrity and cross our fingers for Vicky Cristina Barcelona.


The Walker

Tomatometer: 51%

Paul Schrader completes the “lonely man” trilogy he began with American Gigolo and Light Sleeper with this tale of a Washington, D.C. society escort (Woody Harrelson) embroiled in a murder scandal. Though the film came and went quickly in theaters, now may be a better chance for the character study/thriller to find an audience on DVD.

Bonus Features:

Well, you’re not going to buy this for the extras. Unless a single featurette and trailer floats your boat, the film alone is the main attraction on this release.


Phenomena

Tomatometer: 80%

Dario Argento fans have a lot to be excited about this week; in addition to a special edition of his horror classic Tenebre and a five-disc box set, Anchor Bay is releasing a special edition of Phenomena (also known as Creepers), Argento’s 1985 horror-thriller starring a young Jennifer Connelly as a bug-whispering schoolgirl on the hunt for a killer.

Bonus Features:

Feast your eyes on a commentary by Argento and his crewmembers, music videos by Bill Wyman and Claudio Simonetti, and more.


Come Drink With Me

Tomatometer: N/A

Also great for retro fans this week are all-new releases of a few of the most classic kung fu titles of all time. In addition to releasing Gordon Liu‘s Heroes of the East (AKA Shaolin Challenges Ninja), Dragon Dynasty bestows upon us the wonderment that is the digitally restored Come Drink With Me, the seminal 1966 Wuxia film starring Cheng Pei-pei as a lethal, cross-dressing heroine named Golden Swallow.

Bonus Features:

Interviews with stars Cheng and Man Yueh Hua, a commentary track with Cheng and scholar Bey Logan, featurettes and theatrical trailers make this a must-see for any fan of Shaw Brothers-era kung fu. Behold, the trailer:


‘Til next week, happy viewing!

The nominations for the 65th annual Golden Globe Awards were announced this morning. Did your favorite films, stars, and songs make the cut?

The nominees were read at the Beverly Hilton by a surreal panel consisting of Dane Cook, Hayden Panettiere, Ryan Reynolds, and Quentin Tarantino. The film nominations follow below, with Tomatometers in parentheses:

Picture, Drama:

American Gangster (79 percent)
Atonement (85 percent)
Eastern Promises (88 percent)
The Great Debaters
Michael Clayton (90 percent)
No Country for Old Men (95 percent)
There Will Be Blood (100 percent)

Actress, Drama:
Cate Blanchett, Elizabeth: The Golden Age (34 percent)
Julie Christie, Away From Her (95 percent)
Jodie Foster, The Brave One (45 percent)
Angelina Jolie, A Mighty Heart (77 percent)
Keira Knightley, Atonement

Actor, Drama:
George Clooney, Michael Clayton
Daniel Day-Lewis, There Will Be Blood
James McAvoy, Atonement
Viggo Mortensen, Eastern Promises
Denzel Washington, American Gangster

Picture, Musical or Comedy:
Across the Universe (52 percent)
Charlie Wilson’s War (92 percent)
Hairspray (92 percent)
Juno (92 percent)
Sweeney Todd (92 percent)

Actress, Musical or Comedy:

Amy Adams, Enchanted (94 percent)
Nikki Blonsky, Hairspray
Helena Bonham Carter, Sweeney Todd
Marion Cotillard, La Vie En Rose (74 percent)
Ellen Page, Juno

Actor, Musical or Comedy:

Johnny Depp, Sweeney Todd
Ryan Gosling, Lars and the Real Girl (78 percent)
Tom Hanks, Charlie Wilson’s War
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Savages (89 percent)
John C. Reilly, Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Supporting Actress:
Cate Blanchett, I’m Not There (80 percent)
Julia Roberts, Charlie Wilson’s War
Saoirse Ronan, Atonement
Amy Ryan, Gone Baby Gone (93 percent)
Tilda Swinton, Michael Clayton

Supporting Actor:
Casey Affleck, The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (75 percent)
Javier Bardem, No Country for Old Men
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Charlie Wilson’s War
John Travolta, Hairspray
Tom Wilkinson, Michael Clayton

Director:
Tim Burton, Sweeney Todd
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Julian Schnabel, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (94 percent)
Ridley Scott, American Gangster
Joe Wright, Atonement

Screenplay:
Diablo Cody, Juno
Ethan Coen and Joel Coen, No Country for Old Men
Christopher Hampton, Atonement
Ronald Harwood, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly
Aaron Sorkin, Charlie Wilson’s War

Foreign Language:
4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, Romania (96 percent)
The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, France and U.S.
The Kite Runner, U.S. (65 percent)
Lust, Caution, Taiwan (64 percent)
Persepolis, France (100 percent)

Animated Film:
Bee Movie (52 percent)
Ratatouille (97 percent)
The Simpsons Movie (88 percent)

Original Score:
Michael Brook, Kaki King, Eddie Vedder, Into the Wild (82 percent)
Clint Eastwood, Grace Is Gone (70 percent)
Alberto Iglesias, The Kite Runner
Dario Marianelli, Atonement
Howard Shore, Eastern Promises

Original Song: Despedida from Love in the Time of Cholera (28 percent)
Grace Is Gone from Grace Is Gone
Guaranteed from Into the Wild
That’s How You Know from Enchanted

Walk Hard from Walk Hard: The Dewey Cox Story

Source: Associated Press
Source: Golden Globes

This week at the movies, we’ve got the first installment of the His Dark
Materials
trilogy:
The Golden Compass
, starring
Nicole Kidman,
Dakota
Blue Richards
, and
Daniel Craig. What do the critics have to say?

The highly-anticipated
The Golden Compass
is the first of Philip
Pullman’s novels to hit the screen. It has a veritable Murderer’s Row of acting
talent (Nicole Kidman,
Sam Elliott,
Eva Green,
Daniel Craig,
Ian McKellen,
Tom
Courtenay
, Derek Jacobi,
Ian McShane,
Christopher Lee, and
newcomer
Dakota
Blue Richards
). And critics say it’s got visual flash to spare. Unfortunately, they
also largely feel Compass is a little too cold to work any kind of spell.
The film tells the story of a 12-year-old girl attempting to save her friend
from the strange, malevolent Gobblers, and finds herself in a realm of mystery
and fantastical beings. Pundits say the wondrous production design and
way-too-brisk plot overwhelms the characters, and delivers little of the
intended sense of wonder. At 45 percent on the Tomatometer, The Golden
Compass
doesn’t quite shine.
 




But does it know the way to San Jose?

Also opening this week in limited release: Mexican import The Violin,
about three generations of musicians/guerillas, is at 100 percent on the
Tomatometer; Juno, starring
Ellen Page and
Michael Cera
in the comic tale of a sharp teen coping with an unplanned pregnancy, is
Certified Fresh at 92 percent (read our Page interview here);
Atonement
, a period drama about star-crossed
lovers starring
Keira Knightley and
James McAvoy,
is Certified Fresh at 88 percent (read our McAvoy and director Joe Wright interviews here and here, respectively);
Billy the Kid
, a doc about a teen dealing with
behavior issues in rural Maine, is at 82 percent;

‘Tis Autumn — the Search
for Jackie Paris
, a doc about an elusive, velvet-voiced jazz singer, is at
71 percent; Grace is Gone, starring
John Cusack as a man who picks up the
pieces after his wife is killed in Iraq, is at 69 percent;
Man in the Chair
,
about the bond between an elderly film crew member and a young cinephile
starring Christopher Plummer, is at 57 percent;
Paul Schrader‘s
The Walker,
starring Woody Harrelson as a D.C. socialite in the midst of some criminal
intrigue, is at 56 percent;
The Amateurs
, starring
Jeff Bridges in the
story of a group of suburbanites who make an adult film, is at 22 percent;
Tony N’ Tina’s Wedding
, based on the semi-improvisational off-Broadway comedy,
is at 20 percent; and
Guy Ritchie‘s
Revolver, starring Jason Statham as
an expert gambler who goes up against a crime boss, is at 15 percent.




"When I put headphones on my tummy, should I play Pavement or Archers of Loaf?”


Finally, we’d like to give props to
Rocdahut for staying awake long enough to
come closest to guessing Awake‘s 16 percent Tomatometer. I guess this
gives you a good reason to, um, rock the hut, Rocdahut.

Recent Keira Knightly Movies:
————————————–
8% — Silk (2007)
46% — Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (2007)
54% —
Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
(2006)
85% — Pride and Prejudice (2005)
73% — Pure (2005)

The Times bfi 51st London Film Festival - RT Highlights
LondonWelcome to the Times bfi 51st London Film Festival, the capital’s annual event celebrating the best in cinema from around the globe. Running this year from 17th October to the 1st November, the festival will play host to many local, national and international films, premieres, actors and directors.

Unlike the hyper-competative and sales-led environments of Cannes and Sundance, the London Film Festival is an altogether simpler affair, inviting members of the public to sample the films on offer. And the festival’s timing puts it in the perfect position to pick early Oscar hopefuls; many of the films in the programme are already generating early buzz and for most in the UK it’ll be the first and only chance to see them before the end of the year.

So it’s with that in mind that RT-UK editor Joe Utichi and film critic Paul Anderson have been hitting the festival to cherry pick the twenty films from the festival you’re likely to be hearing a lot about in the coming months.

Click on the films below to find out more, or click here to browse through the feature from the beginning.The Assassination of Jesse James, The Darjeeling Limited, The Diving Bell and the Butterfly, Eastern Promises
Enchanted, Funny Games, Grace is Gone, I'm Not There
In the Shadow of the Moon, Into the Wild, Juno, Lions for Lambs
Lust, Caution, Planet Terror, The Savages, Sicko
Son of Rambow, Surprise Movie, Talk to Me, Things we Lost in the Fire

The Times bfi 51st London Film Festival - RT Highlights
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford

It’s a long title, long film, long coats and a long time getting to the screen. There’s a lot of long going on here. It took two years to score a release once it was done, so what’s wrong with it? Well, er, nothing.

The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford, Brad Pitt‘s labour of love, is slow; very slow. Slow and long. But good westerns should be. The best western is as much about the pace and the look as it is about anything, and this looks amazing. There are sumptuous shots of prairies and sepia tinted men in hats and (long) coats saying a lot without speaking much. The film feels poetic and meditative, like you could be doing yoga while it’s on.

Yes it is Pitt’s movie but the star is Casey Affleck as the titular coward. Robert Ford always wanted to be in the James Gang, he idolised Jesse, wanted to be him, dag nabit he probably fancied him. The poster boy of the 1880’s, so myth would tell us, was a Robin Hood figure and American icon, but Jesse James was a vicious killer and this film doesn’t shy away from that, the source being a fictional version of the story by Ron Hansen.

There aren’t many gunfights as such and those that do happen flash up are brutal and over with quickly, as one suspects they probably were at the time. The parallel with Pitt’s own celebrity is interesting, this is a film as much about fame and idolisation and in the end Robert Ford thought he was doing society a favour by shooting James in the back.

Andrew Dominik is the Australian director of Chopper and in what is only his second film, rivals John Hillcoat’s The Proposition in handling the Wild West with great skill, giving the story time to breathe. Pitt stalks around brooding dark violence and menace while Affleck’s Ford is baby faced, naïve and eager to please. It is evident on this example at least that Affleck is destined to outshine brother Ben in front of the camera.

Take a cushion, you’re in for a fair stretch, but it is worth every ass-numbing minute. Gorgeous to witness, with some modern day resonance, an interesting story and subtle yet lightening performances. Paul Anderson

The Darjeeling Limited

Wes Anderson makes a welcome return to intimately quirkily comedy after the outrageously quirky comedy The Life Aquatic. Or, Wes Anderson makes another one of those quirky comedy things. It largely depends on your point of view.

The Darjeeling Limited tells the tale of three brothers and their pilgrimage across India in search of their mother who abandoned them years prior. Former Anderson collaborators Jason Schwartzman and Owen Wilson join Adrien Brody as the three brothers exploring India aboard the titular train, along the way learning more about each other than they’d ever learnt before.

Like many of Anderson’s characters, not one of the brothers has much in the way of redeeming qualities, and like many of Anderson’s locations, India is presented as a country of bright colours and strange inhabitants. Indeed, it’s safe to say that if you’re a Wes Anderson fan you can’t go wrong with this film; it’s pretty-much more of the same. For anyone not so enamoured of Anderson, that’ll be a big problem as this certainly won’t be the film to change that.

In the mid to late nineties, Anderson championed the quirky American indie, but as box-office receipts and film-school grads have multiplied, so the quirky American indie is fast enveloping the entire American indie landscape, and whether Anderson’s particular brand of quirk has any originality left at this point is a big topic for debate.

Schwartzman, Wilson and Brody do fine jobs in their roles, and the film’s opener – a fifteen minute segment entitled Hotel Chevalier and co-starring Natalie Portman – makes the project worth checking out on its own. For cineastes, it’s a well-realised portrait of love and lust while Portman fans can admire the lack of clothing on display.

But Hotel Chevalier is available for free on iTunes in the US, and at this point it’s worth wondering if more of the same from Anderson in the film proper really justifies the cost of admission. Joe Utichi

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly

Julian Schnabel is an artist in the truest sense; he makes art. He attracts like-minded individuals; Johnny Depp is not so much an admirer more a kindred spirit. Transforming a heart-breaking story into an entertaining film needed an artist’s hand and eye and luckily this film got it.

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly takes its name from the deeply moving book from Jean-Dominique Bauby, the editor of Elle magazine in France, who, at the age of 43, suffered a huge stroke that should have killed him but instead left him paralysed save for the ability to blink one eye. His brain was fine, he could understand, but he couldn’t speak. His condition was diagnosed as ‘locked in syndrome’.

The film begins as Bauby’s eyes open after a two-week coma, and for the opening segment the camera becomes his only working eye. Eventually we get to see the twisted, dribbling mouth of the wheelchair bound victim and Schnabel cleverly takes us on a comparison journey, in home movie style, with the ruggedly good looking Parisian Bauby living and loving life.

Beautiful women surround him; Celine, the mother of his three children, (Emmanuelle Seigner), to whom he is still cruel, is a saint. His speech therapist Henriette (Marie-Josee Croze) and the woman charged with dictating the book, Claude (Anne Consigny), are now beyond his once effortless seductive powers.

The narrative unfolds as an internal monologue from Matthew Amalric‘s Bauby, complete with snide remarks at the surgeon and a preoccupation with his nurse’s cleavage. His only releases are his flights of fancy; his imagination is not locked in and consequently he dines where he likes, seduces women, and travels wherever he wants, all the time cursing for being too selfish and unkind to his children.

Henriette and Claude could lend Job some patience, as the alphabet communication system is spelt out over and over until the correct letter, then word is reached. The most moving scenes are with Bauby’s father Papinou (Max Von Sydow) shown both in flashback and in an agonising post-stroke phone call, where a housebound elderly father likens his son’s situation to his own.

The book is a deeply moving, affecting and very funny masterpiece and Schnabel has replicated Bauby’s imagined world superbly to visually stunning effect. Flawless performances deserve a wide audience and make The Diving Bell and the Butterfly one of the Festival highlights. PA

Eastern Promises

A companion-piece to the excellent A History of Violence, David Cronenberg has enlisted the help of Viggo Mortensen again and directed a script from Steve Knight who brought us the story of the London people you see but ignore, Dirty Pretty Things. And he nearly gets away with it.

Mortensen is a Russian driver for an Eastern European gangland family and is tattooed to the max. A teenage girl dies while giving birth and Naomi Watts, a midwife, is so shaken by this she decides to find out more about her. This leads to a discovery of a diary, which in turn leads her to Mortensen. And do you know what? She really shouldn’t go there.

Vincent Cassel plays Mortensen’s tighter-than-tight buddy and in usual Cassel style can make you feel the need to change your underwear with just one look. This is an extremely violent film and although not a horror picture in Cronenberg’s usual sense, some scenes are certainly horrific.

Mortensen is brilliant (Aragorn… who knew?), and Watts her usual high standard, while Cassel is just nuts.

Unlike Dirty Pretty Things, Eastern Promises doesn’t capture the underbelly of the unseen so well. The homoeroticism is overplayed (why does Mortensen need to be naked to get a tattoo on the shoulder?) and there is no tangible sense of being an outsider looking into a closed world through the crack in the door, which would have made a half-decent thriller into a tense and buttock-clenching one.

Is this the end of horror for Cronenberg? Unlikely, but Eastern Promises is a disappointing follow-up to A History of Violence. Come on Dave, bring on the gore. PA

The Times bfi 51st London Film Festival - RT Highlights
Enchanted

Disney’s first attempt at hand-drawn animation in years, Enchanted, is perhaps one of this year’s family film highlights.

The tale of a tried and true Disney Princess, Gisele (Amy Adams), who finds her Prince Charming (James Marsden) before being sent to a faraway land by an evil stepmother (Susan Sarandon), is primarily live-action, book-ended by 20 minutes of hand-drawn Disney.

The faraway land in question is New York City, and so we open with an animated Gisele singing, dancing, and generally sickeningly happy as she engages a gaggle of woodland animals in some spring-cleaning. When she’s later sent down a well and into New York City we see her struggling with her surroundings and generally having trouble living a Disney life in a cold, harsh real world.

Fortunately, the film’s ultimate message, that real life isn’t a Disney cartoon, is unlikely to play to its young target audience, but it’s the biggest gag for parents and allows the whole family to enjoy the comedy and adventure without resorting to cheap and cheerful Dreamworks-esque innuendo.

Marsden is every inch the Prince Charming and Adams, while clearly not as beautiful as most outrageously sexy Disney princesses, moves with so many obvious Disney flairs that it’s a wonder they didn’t animate the whole thing and have her mime the animations.

The joke wears thin towards the end, and the film threatens to undermine years of classic animation from Disney of old, but when it works it really works, and it’s a joy to behold. It’s also worth a trip just for some hand-drawn animation, though on that score a CGI squirrel during the New York sequences rather ironically ends up stealing the show. JU

Funny Games

Funny Games is Michael Haneke‘s shot-for-shot remake of his German version for an American audience. It was just as nasty with subtitles.

A wealthy couple take peachy son and cuddly dog to summer home for a well-earned break. While dad and son sort out the sailing boat, that nice polite boy staying with friends’ next door pops round for some eggs. D’oh, he smashes them, asks for more and smashes those too. Hang on why is he wearing gloves?

So begins a descent into torture, bondage, humiliation, violence, blood and audience culpability. Yes, as an audience member one feels complicit and voyeuristic, as the so-called games are unveiled. Haneke wants to evoke this feeling; he wants the troubled youth and aggressive society in which they inhabit to be all your fault.

Funny Games is a deeply unlikeable film, but there is no criticism implicit in that, it is meant to be unlikeable. No one cries better on screen than Naomi Watts and as ever she is willing to visit the land of raw for her art and as usual does it brilliantly. Tim Roth as the husband is a bit-part once he gets clobbered with a golf club and it is Michael Pitt who steals the show as the creepily polite psychopath accomplice to Brady Corbet‘s egg-smasher. It was ever thus with cinema psychos that the more ‘normal’ they seem the more sinister they really are.

The nods and winks to the camera are a touch irritating as is the rewind bit in the middle but if you’ve seen the original you’ll be expecting all that. Funny Games is an uncomfortable, disturbing film perfect for festivals. PA

Grace is Gone

Lonesome Jim writer James C. Strouse marks his directorial debut with Grace is Gone, a moving portrait of a man struggling to come to terms with the death of his wife in Iraq and his role as a single parent to two young girls.

What’s most remarkable about the film is that it doesn’t attempt to politicise its story at all. As John Cusack‘s Stanley Philipps opens the film, leading his team at an out-of-town shopping complex in a chant about how the customer is always right, we instantly connect with him, and as he learns of his wife’s fate a couple of scenes later we’re already invested in his life. So when his brother, unaware of Grace’s passing, later attempts to chastise Stanley for his position on the war he’s quickly silenced. It’s a film about family conflict, not political conflict, and it’s all the stronger for it.

The film takes a journey with Stanley as he abandons his commitments, pulls his kids out of school and takes them on a road trip with the sole purpose of keeping the news of their mother’s death from them. It becomes an albatross that hangs over Stanley, but it’s just as much an enabler, for on the journey he gets to grips with his role as a parent and his relationship with his kids.

Cusack has never been better, his nack for engaging an audience more essential here than ever due to some of the more dubious decisions Stanley makes along the way, and Strouse directs with much-needed reserve, never allowing the film to get in the way of Stanley’s story. JU

I'm Not There

Velvet Goldmine, Todd Haynes‘ film about a seventies glam rock idol, split filmgoers down the middle. You either get it and it’s a masterpiece or you think there was nothing glamorous about the seventies and all bands look like bricklayers in make up. This time round Haynes is lucky, Bob Dylan already polarises people.

Haynes has taken six moments in Dylan’s life in I’m Not There, married them to what he believes is the musician’s personality at the time, and cast six different actors to play him, including a woman and a black kid.

Littered throughout the piece are references to characters in Dylan songs and well-documented events throughout his life. None of the characters is called Bob Dylan however. Ben Whishaw is Arthur Rimbaud, reflecting the singer’s love for the poet, Heath Ledger plays him as an actor troubled by his success and disappearing from view; Richard Gere, whose sequence is the weakest in the film, is Billy The Kid, a nod to Dylan’s appearance in Pat Garrett and Billy The Kid, and Marcus Carl Franklin is supposedly a black 12 year-old Woody Guthrie, a youth out of time. The stand-out performance and the one that takes up most screen time is Cate Blanchett‘s as Jude, a singer at the height of fame struggling with the constant barrage of questions about the meaning of the songs and the singer’s authenticity. To her credit, five minutes in you forget she’s a woman.

Ambitious and inspired, it’s a little long and full of too many Dylan in-jokes and references. It won’t change your mind either way about Dylan but it might encourage other filmmakers to try future biopics in this way. PA

The Times bfi 51st London Film Festival - RT Highlights
In the Shadow of the Moon

Theory: There’s nothing more exciting than listening to the former astronauts for the Apollo missions tell their tales of visiting the lunar surface. Except perhaps being one of them. Yes, David Sington‘s In the Shadow of the Moon is a little heavy on the America-the-Great, but it’s also one of the best documentaries of the year; a fascinating portrait of men so brave that most regular Joes couldn’t possible comprehend their journey.

And, to its credit, it allows them to get on with it – there’s no narrator – we’re just shown fascinating footage from the moon’s surface, from the launch pad, from the shuttle, and in between these men tell us their story.

For the real space-junkies, there’s doubtless little in here to learn, but for the rest of us the film is full of fascinating factoids and, like the best movies set in space – fictional or not – it’ll leave you feeling smaller than the smallest needle in the biggest haystack. JU
Into the Wild

While most outside America will be unfamiliar with the name Christopher McCandless, the story of his abandonment of civilisation in favour of hiking across America on his way to Alaska is one we can probably all relate to. Who hasn’t thought about throwing off the shackles and experiencing nature in all its glory?

Of course most of us are either too scared or too sensible ever to attempt to do that and that’s perhaps why McCandless’ tale is so intoxicating; his journey is one we all wish we had the courage to take.

Sean Penn directs Emile Hirsch in this adaptation of Jon Krakauer’s book, Into the Wild, about McCandless, and while it runs a little long, at 140 minutes, in takes in some of the most breathtaking scenery imaginable and keeps us gripped throughout as we join our young lead on his journey into either enlightenment or insanity.

Penn deifies McCandless a little too readily, encouraging us to make an idol out of him, and while most will happily do just that, it also makes it hard for us to engage with the film. Penn’s embrace of no-frills solitariness is flawed by the trailers, catering and crew we know to be behind single shot.

No, real credit must go to Hirsch, who goes out of his way to inhabit McCandless regardless of the creature comforts available to him off-screen, for it’s with him and him alone we must ultimately spend two hours of our time with. JU

Juno

Jason Reitman‘s debut feature, Thank You For Smoking, coming, as it did, in the same year as his father Ivan’s My Super Ex Girlfriend, was a brilliantly biting satire about the tobacco industry and suggested that perhaps dad’s talent had been well and truly passed on.

His second, Juno, continues his trend for witty comedy, casting Ellen Page as a high-school girl whose desire to lose her virginity leads to an unfortunate bout of pregnancy. She meets Jason Bateman and Jennifer Garner through an ad in the Penny Saver and agrees to adopt the infant their way. But nine months is a long time, and pregnancy seems sure to bring with it a whole heap of inconvenience.

Page is brilliant as Juno, and a cast of recognisable supporting players back her up with aplomb. It’s definitely full of quirk – it’s an American indie after all – but, like Thank You For Smoking, there’s something real at the film’s heart and we’re encouraged to believe the quirk rather than let it wash over us. JU

Lions for Lambs

The most high profile of the recent glut of war themed releases – due mainly to its stellar cast – Lions For Lambs gets its title from an alleged quote from a World War One German General who said of the British troops, “never before have I seen such lions led by such lambs”. Apocryphal or not the debate over right against might is real enough.

There are three layers to the film. The first is a moral, ethical, hypothetical discourse with Robert Redford as a scarily convincing looking college Professor and Andrew Garfield as the owner of a fine mind behind a surfer exterior; the second is a political and strategic debate with media and PR consequences featuring an electrifying face off between Meryl Streep and Tom Cruise. Thirdly is the actuality of the troops in a war zone.

The performances are flawless with Cruise on his best smarmy bastard form as the ambitious senator and cheerleader for the masters of war trading blows with Streep’s journalist, over a new plan for the war in Afghanistan. Streep pleads mea culpa over the media’s acquiescence during the first Iraq/Afghan surge, but is less compliant this time even in the face of an exclusive story. Redford and Garfield debate whether seriously smart people should ‘do something’ with specific reference to two soldiers, Redford’s ex pupils, from neighbourhoods ignored by Uncle Sam who worked hard for their college grades then enlisted to make a real change.

And yes it is those same soldiers we see in the war zone, injured and low on ammo. Lions for Lambs is a one eyed view on the futility of the war on terror. Redford’s politics are all over it despite his best efforts at balance with Cruise’s hawk view. Nothing happens in the film in terms of action bar a few exchanges from the pinned down troops; it’s all about the dialogue and its evident that this is what Redford wants to achieve. When you leave the cinema and go to the pub he wants you to engage and discuss the politics of a war that few in the US want anymore.

There are many Vietnam references and lots of questions needing answers and decisions to be made as a consequence. What do you want to do? Do you want to end the war on terror? Do you think you should act/protest/enlist/run for the Senate? America’s liberal, artsy intelligentsia is pricking consciences but does anyone or should anyone outside the US care? PA

The Times bfi 51st London Film Festival - RT Highlights
Lust, Caution

Ang Lee‘s startling ability to jump between projects as diverse as Hulk, Crouching Tiger and Brokeback Mountain is almost as exciting to behold as every new film from the director is.

Lust, Caution is no exception; it’s a thrilling, breathtaking, dramatic, devastating and enrapturing film about a young girl who goes undercover in World War II-era Shanghai in an attempt to woo and then assassinate a key political figure.

Based on an Eileen Chang story, Tony Leung is Mr. Yee, a seemingly untouchable man whose heart is won by Tang Wei‘s Wang Jiazhi. And while Leung is outstanding, it’s Tang Wei, in her first role, who really steals the show, delivering a nuanced and emotional performance as a girl torn apart by politics and her heart, two elements that rarely see eye-to-eye.

Key sexual moments between Yee and Wang are shot explicitly, though never exploitatively, and it’s interesting to note that the film will be released as an NC-17 in the US. The rating is commercial suicide, but the film simply wouldn’t have the power it has without the sex scenes so it helps that it’s penned by the exec in charge of the studio, long time Lee collaborator James Schamus.

Breaking box-office records in Hong Kong and Taiwan, Lust, Caution deserves to have the same cross-over effect as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, and here’s hoping this is the NC-17 film that breaks down the confines of the curious American ratings system. JU

Planet Terror

Let’s get the disappointment out of the way first; Machete is the only fake trailer attached to the theatrical standalone print of Planet Terror. It makes sense that it’s Robert Rodriguez‘ trailer that made the cut, but for those of us outside the United States for whom the idea of pirating the camcorder jobs done on Grindhouse doesn’t sit right, it’s a crying shame. We’re missing out on Edgar Wright’s brilliant Don’t, Eli Roth’s inspired Thanksgiving, and Rob Zombie’s brilliantly-titled Werewolf Women of the S.S. You can sit all the way through the credits; you’ll be wasting your time.

Honestly, the idea of experiencing the whole, balls-to-the-wall grindhouse experience was the biggest disappointment facing fans outside North America, but the Weinsteins’ needs must, and their decision to split the flicks could have been forgiven had the full experience, at the very least, survived two ticket prices. We got some extra time with Death Proof, but the Planet Terror that’s hitting cinemas is the same cut premièred as part of Grindhouse, providing ample opportunity to queue up all the fake trailers within it. As it is most theatregoers outside of the US will, in fact, be missing that full experience at the very least until the DVD arrival of Planet Terror. So why bother?

Well, for starters, perspective is important. As much as the brothers Weinstein plan to reap the rewards that come from double-dipping the Grindhouse experience internationally, we are still getting two films from a pair of the most creative film-makers on the planet. Death Proof is unadulterated Tarantino, and Planet Terror is the funniest zombie movie since Shaun and the goriest since 28 Days.

The films exist in something of a shared universe. For those who’ve seen Death Proof first, nods to Jungle Julia’s fate and an expansion of that somewhat cryptic Dr. Block/Earl McGraw scene will bond the two films even if they’re covered by separate admissions, and the fake film grime and dodgy projection effects cross both features.

Multi-hyphenate Rodriguez creates a stunning world in which he unleashes his zombie plague, draws delicious characters straight out of seventies B-movies, and lets his actors run wild with them. Freddy Rodriguez Rose McGowan shine, but with the remaining cast performing so brilliantly around them it’s the ensemble that sells it. JU

The Savages

It’s a tricky thing, the what-to-do-with-the-old-folks-when-they-start-to-lose-it movie. Filmmakers are always battling with the question of balance between dark humour and pathos, not forgetting to allow just enough dignity to prick everybody’s conscience about dealing with the elderly. One of the better more recent attempts was Away From Her based on the short story by Alice Munro with Julie Christie as an Alzheimer’s victim. The Savages nails the balance beautifully.

Directing her own script, Tamara Jenkins has landed two of cinema’s best in the lead roles. Philip Seymour Hoffman and Laura Linney are John and Wendy Savage, siblings suddenly thrown together after years of non-communication, to take care of their father who is rapidly descending into dementia. John is writing a book on Brecht, he is also about to end a long-term relationship and Wendy is a penniless playwright in an unfulfilling relationship with a married man.

So they’re pretty uptight people, right? What plays out is a beautifully told story of responsibility, guilt, communication and selfishness with a heavy dose of realism. Philip Bosco is dad Lenny, a heady mix of deaf, cantankerous and incontinent, who beat his kids when mum left and wasn’t as bothered about caring for them as they are about him now.

Hoffman plays the pragmatist, managing the situation with the adroitness of a nursing home administrator. Linney’s Wendy is more emotional and tries to get dad into a beautifully landscaped home but sadly dad fails the test, so she buys a lava lamp for his room. What is prevalent throughout is the brilliant comedic touch in Jenkins’s script, which allows some hilarious bickering between Hoffman and Linney, especially when he puts his neck out playing tennis.

To its credit The Savages doesn’t bash you over the head with its message about being good to the old folks. Some people get ill and old, Lenny cuts a pathetic and pitiful character, but we all die and luckily the script is funny and nuanced enough, while being executed brilliantly by the leads, not to make it maudlin. PA

Sicko

Michael Moore is back with a new documentary about the healthcare system in America and its ill-treatment of patients who are paying through the nose for medical cover.

Sicko presents a compelling case against HMOs, but as with most of Moore’s work it is more than obvious that while the facts are indisputable there are plenty more he’s chosen to ignore. For this British critic, his portrayal of the socialised system of our NHS made that abundantly clear. Yes, as Moore shows us, we don’t pay for our hospital visits, and the cashier in hospitals gives us money for transport home after an operation, and our doctors are, indeed, incentivised to offer the best care to their patients.

But Moore neglects to ask how long we need to wait for a hospital bed in many cases. Or if people ever get sick because the hospitals they’re staying in aren’t clean enough. This is where our NHS fails, but because it doesn’t support Moore’s case it’s simply not mentioned.

That the treatment of patients in America is shockingly inhuman in many cases is obvious, and Moore uncovers a huge number and variety of horror stories about it. Like much of his work, though, while the film will inspire plenty of discussion through its accessibility, the discussion about Moore himself will outweigh that of the subject he examines. JU

The Times bfi 51st London Film Festival - RT Highlights
Son of Rambow

You can tell that Son of Rambow came from a pair of creative types. There’s something about the notion of a couple of friends getting together after school with a video camera and a vague memory of cool things they’d seen in movies and putting together their own tribute that just screams creativity and one wonders how much of the film came from Nick Goldsmith and Garth Jennings‘ own experiences as kids.

When his parents strict religious beliefs force him out of a Geography lesson and into the hallway, Will meets troublemaker Carter and strikes up an unlikely friendship. Carter teaches Will a little of his streetwise attitude and, when he’s shown First Blood, Will convinces himself he’s Rambo’s son and shows Carter a sketchbook full of colourful illustrations which tell a slightly odd but rather wonderful story.

The pair set out to make a sequel in which Will, as the Son of Rambow, attempts to rescue his dad and save the world. Along the way they pick up some collaborators, but when tensions fray on set their friendship, Carter’s relationship with his brother, and Will’s relationship with the church are all called into question.

Best known for producing and directing Hitchhiker’s Guide as well as any number of the nineties greatest music videos as Hammer and Tongs, Goldsmith and Jennings bring their creative flair to an independent level with this heart-warming coming-of-age story that’s been gathering momentum since its debut at this year’s Sundance.

But what’s most important is that Son of Rambow is so much more than its basic premise. Those of us who grew up with grand designs to make the next Indiana Jones will identify with Will and Carter, but all can identify with the film’s grander themes. Lead brilliantly by its two confident young leads, Son of Rambow may well be the best British movie of the year. JU

Surprise Movie: No Country for Old Men

The last few years haven’t been kind to the Brothers Coen. Indeed, you have to go back to 2001 – past The Ladykillers and Intolerable Cruelty – to get back onto comfortable ground when it comes to their work, and considering these are the guys who brought the world Raising Arizona, Miller’s Crossing and The Big Lebowski, that’s a crying shame. Fortunately with this year’s offering, which played as the surprise movie at the LFF, the Coens have gone back to those roots and have delivered a film worthy of the standards they’ve previously set. No Country for Old Men is classic Coen, both sumptuously involving and wickedly funny.

Based on the book by Cormac McCarthy, the Coens have brought their unique sensibilities to bear on a tale of a drug deal gone wrong and the $2 million in cash found at the scene by a hunter living a modest life in Texas. His name is Llewellyn Moss and he’s smart enough to know that someone will be coming for the loot. But it soon becomes obvious you can’t prepare for Chigurh, an assassin with a flair for creative execution and an enthusiasm for high body counts.

On the trail, too, is an aging Sheriff called Bell who’s convinced the world has changed on him a little too much as he jumps from crime scene to crime scene hoping to track Moss down before Chigurh has a chance.

Full of just the right mix of drama, action and comedy, this is the sort of movie that’ll have you engrossed until its final moments. And if it does get a little bogged down in Texan philosophizing in those final moments, they do nothing to touch what’s come before. JU

Talk to Me

It’s easy to forget in this multimedia, mass media, and global communications world just how important radio used to be at times of major unrest or trauma. The 1960s was a turbulent decade of change and 1968 in particular was the most incredible year. Martin Luther King was assassinated, so too Bobby Kennedy and, in Washington DC at least, there was a man who gave hope to those with a sense of hopelessness following those two tragedies. Talk to Me is his story.

Ralph ‘Petey’ Green was an ex con, raised by his maternal Grandmother, who learned to DJ in jail playing records his Grandma sent him. Between songs he would speak the felon’s point of view. A recovering junkie and alcoholic he spoke the same language and had been to the same places. Released early thanks to a deal he cut with the warden, he bullied his way into a job at Washington radio station WOL, whose head of programming, Dewey Hughes, was the brother of a fellow inmate. Don Cheadle plays Green and Chiwetel Ejiofor is Hughes.

The film plays out as a ‘what Petey did next’ to a glorious soundtrack of soul and funk music over two decades. Cheadle plays Petey with such exuberance, even when showing his many flaws, that all thoughts of ‘that accent’ in Ocean’s are banished forever. This guy was bling way before bling existed. Green set up volunteer programmes all over the city and encouraged poor kids from the projects to get educated and avoid the path leading to incarceration. Can you imagine Wogan having the same effect? TV snapped him up and he became a big star and eventually quit drinking.

he performances of the two leads are what save the film from becoming a plodding catalogue of Petey adventures. Ejiofor plays the black man working in the white man’s world brilliantly; the initial exchanges between him and Cheadle when Petey derides him by calling him Mr Tibbs are lightning. Hughes went out on a limb for Green and the two became firm and lifelong friends.

The studio boss is Martin Sheen; comically corporate and at first exasperated by Hughes’s decision to employ Green. But it soon becomes apparent to everyone that Green has a connection to the street and the listeners the station wants to reach, through his own experiences and his articulation of the civil rights issues and the plight of the Afro-American; evidenced by his heartfelt announcement of the shooting of Dr King, equal parts sad and angry. Suddenly the voice of the street was being heard by ‘The Man’.

Green had bucket loads of self-belief which the film overall lacks. Take the lead performances away and Talk to Me doesn’t go anywhere, which is a shame because the story deserves better. PA

Things we Lost in the Fire

Are there any better ‘lived in’ faces than Benicio Del Toro‘s? If he saw you at the bus stop and introduced himself as a recovering heroin addict you’d believe him right? Conversely Halle Berry is too beautiful, that smile, those cheekbones, that skin! Luckily they got cast in the right roles, then.

Berry and David Duchovny are prosperous and sexy and utterly devoted to each other and their two kids. Then he gets shot and killed trying to help a woman being attacked and suddenly lives are shattered and the people involved are ill equipped to pick up the pieces. Del Toro plays Jerry, he and Duchovny’s Brian have been best friends forever. He’s a failed lawyer and junkie going to his addict meetings and working as a janitor. Berry turns to him after the shooting to help her get her life back on track. She asks him to come live in the garage, converted after the fire of the title, so they can lean on each other and patch up their lives. This works up to a point but their relationship is strained as Del Toro gets on with the kids really well, knows some of their secrets (because their dad told him), and fulfils some of the role that Duchovny hadn’t a chance to. Berry’s character Audrey is in denial and not coping with her loss.

It is a gently humorous film with a brilliantly convincing performance from Del Toro, especially during cold turkey after a relapse into the old ways. Berry is tearful and luminous but it seems as if it’s nothing more than just a job, emotionally there is no depth. Yes there is a lot of sad, and a drizzle of schmaltz and a surprising amount of emotional intimacy; Bier handles the pace, relationships and chemistry with the actors with expert ease. The kids are really cute too.

Overall it’s unclear what Things We Lost in the Fire is trying to say. Life goes on? We all suffer loss and face traumatic events and sharing is good? Whatever the message, it would be ignored without Del Toro’s mighty performance. PA

For the last two years Clint Eastwood has released heavy-hitting dramas (Million Dollar Baby, Letters from Iwo Jima) in the final voting moments of the Oscar season. This year his last minute submission isn’t one he directed; rather it’s one he’s scoring.

Grace is Gone was bought by Bob and Harvey Weinstein’s Weinstein Group at Sundance for $4 million. An indie tearjerker starring John Cusack, the film tells the story of a father who loses his soldier wife in Iraq. Before telling his two daughters their mother is gone, he heroically decides to take them on a road trip –- one last happy memory before their world changes.

According to the LA Times’ Gold Derby, Clint Eastwood’s score is set for delivery right before the film plays the New York Film Festival in September. Eastwood’s score is replacing that of relative newcomer Max Richter. Eastwood has scored many of his own directorial projects, including Mystic River, and Million Dollar Baby, both of which were favored by the Academy.

Written and directed by James C. Strouse (writer of the Steve Buscemi-directed Lonesome Jim), Grace is Gone won the Sundance Audience Award and Scriptwriter’s prize. Now with Eastwood’s score, Weinstein Co. is hoping Grace is Gone will offer them another shot at their first Oscar since they split with Miramax.

Sources: LA Times’ Gold Derby

While sitting on a Comic Con panel, Frank Miller was asked about the hold-up on Sin City 2. (Numerous times, probably.) And it looks like the celebrated author / artist / filmmaker is laying the blame solely at the feet of the Weinstein brothers.

Could it be that Grindhouse threw a monkey wrench into future Weinstein production plans? Sheer speculation on my part, but I’d have thought a Sin City sequel would be a no-brainer by this point. Then again, both Frank Miller and Robert Rodriguez are presently hard at work on other projects — to say nothing of the large number of busy actors who’d be needed. So there’s probably enough "blame" to go around, really.

According to Dark Horizons, Mr. Miller "confirmed that he and Robert Rodriguez have a script ready – an adaptation of A Dame to Kill and some of the book’s other short stories — but left the cryptic hint that the Weinstein’s themselves are part of the hold up — likely tying into the fledgling distributor’s lack of success so far at the box-office."

OK, so the Weinsteins didn’t exactly set the world on fire with Grindhouse, Miss Potter, Bobby, The Matador, Derailed, Pulse, Breaking and Entering, Harsh Times, DOA: Dead or Alive, The Gathering, Unknown, The Ex, Nomad, School for Scoundrels, Black Christmas, Arthur and the Invisibles, or Factory Girl — but they’re doing OK with 1408 and Sicko. Plus they’ve got some treats in store (Grace Is Gone is excellent, The Mist sounds great so far) for later this year. And maybe someday they’ll actually release Killshot, Teeth and Rogue and make a few dollars off of ’em. Still it’s tough to feel bad for the guys who put money behind Who’s Your Caddy? and Hannibal Rising. Then again, Clerks 2 was pretty darn funny.

Anyway, yeah: Sin City 2. As the highway signs sometimes say: Expect delays.

Source: Dark Horizons

Results are in for this year’s Sundance festival winners, including awards for John Cusack‘s "Grace is Gone," Christopher Zalla’s "Padre Nuestro," NASA documentary "In the Shadow of the Moon," and the racy teen horror flick, "Teeth."

Read on for the full list of awards:

Grand Jury Prize: Documentary – "Manda Bala (Send a Bullet)"

Grand Jury Prize: Dramatic – "Padre Nuestro"

World Cinema Jury Prize: Documentary – "Enemies of Happiness"

World Cinema Jury Prize: Dramatic – "Sweet Mud"

Audience Award: Documentary – "Hear and Now"

Audience Award: Dramatic – "Grace is Gone"

World Cinema Audience Award: Documentary — "In the Shadow of the Moon"

World Cinema Audience Award: Dramatic – "Once"

Directing Award: Documentary – Sean Fine & Andrea Nix, "War/Dance"

Directing Award: Dramatic – Jeffrey Blitz, "Rocket Science"

Excellence in Cinematography Award: Documentary – Heloisa Passos, "Manda Bala (Send a Bullet)"

Excellence in Cinematography Award: Dramatic – Benoit Debie, "Joshua"

Documentary Editing Award – Hibah Sherif Frisina, Charlton McMillian, and Michael Schweitzer, "Nanking"

Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award – James C. Strouse, "Grace is Gone"

Documentary Jury Special Jury Prize – "No End in Sight"

Independent Film Dramatic Competition Special Jury Prize for Acting – Jess Weixler, "Teeth" and Tamara Podemski, "Four Sheets to the Wind"

Independent Film Dramatic Competition Special Jury Prize for Singularity of Vision – Chris Smith, "The Pool"

World Cinema Documentary Competition Special Jury Prize – "Hot House"

World Cinema Dramatic Competition Special Jury Prize – "The Legacy"

Alfred P. Sloan Prize – "Dark Matter"

The Weinstein Company paid $4 million for the worldwide distribution rights to "Grace is Gone," the biggest sale of this year’s Sundance Film Festival so far. It played on Saturday night and was purchased in the wee hours of Sunday morning. The Weinsteins beat out Fox Searchlight and Sony Pictures Classics for the first purchase of a non-documentary film at Sundance.

"Grace" stars John Cusack as a widowed father who must break the news to his two daughters of his wife’s death while she was serving in the armed forces in Iraq. The film attracted buyers’ interest for Cusack’s outstanding performance and the film’s emotional impact. The Weinsteins plan to release it next winter as an Oscar contender.

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