Troll 2

(Photo by Trans World Entertainment /courtesy Everett Collection. Thumbnail: 20th Century Fox / courtesy Everett Collection.)

The 50 Worst Sequels of All Time

Jaws. The Karate Kid. Speed. Paul Blart: Mall Cop. All classic movies. What’s also binding them together is the fact they’ve all had terrible sequels. These forlorn follow-ups are below 10% on the Tomatometer and we’ve rounded them up, and other movies like them, for our guide to the 50 worst sequels of all time.

Franchises with multiple entries include Atlas Shrugged, Highlander, and Big Momma’s House. If you’re questioning why Police Academy only appears only once despite multiple sequels with a 0% Tomatometer score, it’s because there’s a 10 review minimum, to ensure that each sequel that shows up here has crushed enough critics’ hopes for getting a decent follow-up. And for movies with the same Tomatomter score, we ranked the the ones with more reviews higher up. We used the same ranking method for our list of the 100 worst movies ever.

Now, get ready for some brand name disappointment with the 50 worst sequels of all time! Alex Vo

#50
Adjusted Score: 9692%
Critics Consensus: Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers trades the simple, brutal effectiveness of the original for convoluted mysticism, with disastrously dull results.
Synopsis: This installment marks the return of the seemingly indestructible masked murderer Michael Myers (George P. Wilbur), who is targeting Tommy... [More]
Directed By: Joe Chappelle

#49
#49
Adjusted Score: 11645%
Critics Consensus: This teen horror movie brings nothing new to an already exhausted genre. And it's bad. Really bad.
Synopsis: At Alpine University, one senior student will be awarded the prestigious Hitchcock Award for best thesis film, virtually guaranteeing the... [More]
Directed By: John Ottman

#48
Adjusted Score: 12788%
Critics Consensus: A witless follow-up to the surprise 1999 hit, Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo is raunchy, politically incorrect, and not particularly funny.
Synopsis: Unlikely gigolo Deuce Bigalow (Rob Schneider) resumes his sex-related antics when his friend and former pimp, T.J. Hicks (Eddie Griffin),... [More]
Directed By: Mike Bigelow

#47

Little Fockers (2010)
9%

#47
Adjusted Score: 14713%
Critics Consensus: As star-studded as it is heartbreakingly lazy, Little Fockers takes the top-grossing trilogy to embarrassing new lows.
Synopsis: After 10 years of marriage and two children, it seems that Greg Focker (Ben Stiller) has finally earned a place... [More]
Directed By: Paul Weitz

#46

Teen Wolf Too (1987)
8%

#46
Adjusted Score: 8172%
Critics Consensus: Aiming for the low bar set by its predecessor and never coming close to clearing it, Teen Wolf Too is an unfunny sequel whose bark is just as awful as its bite.
Synopsis: Although awkward college student Todd Howard (Jason Bateman) is particularly adept at science, he's paying for school with an athletic... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Leitch

#45

Mimic 2 (2001)
8%

#45
Adjusted Score: 4179%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Though well-meaning scientists thought they'd destroyed them all, a single gigantic, murderous "Judas Breed" cockroach, which is capable of taking... [More]
Directed By: Jean de Segonzac

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: 7689%
Critics Consensus: Do not enter.
Synopsis: Ray Breslin manages an elite team of security specialists trained in the art of breaking people out of the world's... [More]
Directed By: Steven C. Miller

#43
Adjusted Score: 11645%
Critics Consensus: Jason terrorizes a ship and nearly sinks the franchise in a clunky sequel that feels like self-parody without the charm.
Synopsis: Mass murderer Jason Voorhees (Kane Hodder) is resurrected from the bottom of Crystal Lake. After he kills a passing boat's... [More]
Directed By: Rob Hedden

#42
#42
Adjusted Score: 7857%
Critics Consensus: Sloppy, vulgar, and manic, A Haunted House 2 might be worth a chuckle or two, but mostly it's a string of pop culture references and crude gags that fail to hit their intended targets.
Synopsis: After the ordeal he suffered with his now former girlfriend's (Essence Atkins) demonic possession, Malcolm (Marlon Wayans) has decided to... [More]
Directed By: Michael Tiddes

#41

Rings (2017)
8%

#41
Adjusted Score: 15243%
Critics Consensus: Rings may offer ardent fans of the franchise a few threadbare thrills, but for everyone else, it may feel like an endless loop of muddled mythology and rehashed plot points.
Synopsis: A young woman (Matilda Lutz) becomes worried about her boyfriend (Alex Roe) when he explores a dark subculture surrounding a... [More]
Directed By: F. Javier Gutiérrez

#40

Grown Ups 2 (2013)
8%

#40
Adjusted Score: 11339%
Critics Consensus: While it's almost certainly the movie event of the year for filmgoers passionate about deer urine humor, Grown Ups 2 will bore, annoy, and disgust audiences of nearly every other persuasion.
Synopsis: Lenny Feder (Adam Sandler) moves his family back to his hometown to be with his friends, but he finds --... [More]
Directed By: Dennis Dugan

#39

Problem Child 2 (1991)
8%

#39
Adjusted Score: 8222%
Critics Consensus: Crude, rude, puerile, and pointless, Problem Child 2 represents a cynical nadir in family-marketed entertainment.
Synopsis: Ben Healy (John Ritter) and his adopted son, the mischievous and destructive Junior (Michael Oliver), move to a new town... [More]
Directed By: Brian Levant

#38
Adjusted Score: 3880%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A man (Arye Gross) and his friend (Jonathan Stark) exhume an ancestor (Royal Dano) in the house where his parents... [More]
Directed By: Ethan Wiley

#37

Race 3 (2018)
7%

#37
Adjusted Score: 6368%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Members of a ruthless family become embroiled in a high-stakes heist.... [More]
Directed By: Remo D'Souza

#36
Adjusted Score: 7253%
Critics Consensus: It reunites most of the original cast and rounds them up for a trip to Fort Lauderdale for spring break, but Revenge of the Nerds II: Nerds in Paradise forgets to pack enough jokes or compelling characters to make it through its 89-minute running time.
Synopsis: After triumphing over the jocks in the Alpha Beta fraternity at Adams College, the nerds of Tri-Lamba are headed to... [More]
Directed By: Joe Roth

#35
#35
Adjusted Score: 7286%
Critics Consensus: The Next Karate Kid is noteworthy for giving audiences the chance to see a pre-Oscars Hilary Swank, but other than a typically solid performance from Pat Morita, this unnecessary fourth installment in the franchise has very little to offer.
Synopsis: Karate master Mr. Miyagi (Noriyuki "Pat" Morita) goes to Boston to attend a military reunion. There, he visits with Louisa... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Cain

#34
Adjusted Score: 7197%
Critics Consensus: A low-brow comedy, minus the comedy.
Synopsis: Van Wilder protege Taj Badalandabad (Kal Penn) heads to England's prestigious Camden University to further his studies and cement his... [More]
Directed By: Mort Nathan

#33
Adjusted Score: 9473%
Critics Consensus: Boring, predictable, and bereft of thrills or chills, I Still Know What You Did Last Summer is exactly the kind of rehash that gives horror sequels a bad name.
Synopsis: A year after killing vengeful hit-and-run victim Ben Wills (Muse Watson), who gutted her friends with an iron hook, college... [More]
Directed By: Danny Cannon

#32
#32
Adjusted Score: 6059%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A college student faces down school bullies while competing in track and field.... [More]
Directed By: Punit Malhotra

#31
Adjusted Score: 6874%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Led by Marvin Lazar (Tony Curtis), their latest in a string of bumbling coaches, beleaguered Little Leaguers the Bad News... [More]
Directed By: John Berry

#30
#30
Adjusted Score: 4027%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Resort islanders (Tricia O'Neil, Steve Marachuk, Lance Henriksen) face flying killer-fish left over from a government experiment that flopped.... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 9500%
Critics Consensus: A sequel to a remake, Cheaper 2 wastes its solid cast in scenes of over-the-top, predictable humor.
Synopsis: Tom Baker (Steve Martin) and his wife, Kate (Bonnie Hunt), take their children for what they hope will be a... [More]
Directed By: Adam Shankman

#28

Son of the Mask (2005)
6%

#28
Adjusted Score: 9080%
Critics Consensus: Overly frantic, painfully unfunny, and sorely missing the presence of Jim Carrey.
Synopsis: A cartoonist and family man, Tim Avery (Jamie Kennedy) lives a peaceful existence with his wife, Tonya (Traylor Howard), as... [More]
Directed By: Lawrence Guterman

#27
#27
Adjusted Score: 11508%
Critics Consensus: Unable to match the suspense and titilation of its predecessor, Basic Instinct 2 boasts a plot so ludicrous and predictable it borders on "so-bad-it's-good."
Synopsis: After a crash that kills her boyfriend, Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone) has her car searched by the police, who find... [More]
Directed By: Michael Caton-Jones

#26

RoboCop 3 (1993)
6%

#26
Adjusted Score: 6465%
Critics Consensus: This asinine sequel should be placed under arrest.
Synopsis: Greedy corporation Omni Consumer Products is determined to begin development on its dream project, Delta City, which will replace the... [More]
Directed By: Fred Dekker

#25

Leprechaun 2 (1994)
6%

#25
Adjusted Score: 4813%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A leprechaun (Warwick Davis) surfaces in Los Angeles to claim a bride, as his previous object of affection was denied... [More]
Directed By: Rodman Flender

#24

Troll 2 (1992)
5%

#24
Adjusted Score: 3533%
Critics Consensus: Oh my god.
Synopsis: When young Joshua (Michael Stephenson) learns that he will be going on vacation with his family to a small town... [More]
Directed By: Drago Floyd

#23
Adjusted Score: 5496%
Critics Consensus: Borderline unwatchable and unspeakably dull, Highlander III is a sloppy third installment that still somehow manages to mark a slight improvement over its predecessor.
Synopsis: An evil immortal swordsman (Mario Van Peebles) catches up to his sorcerer foe (Christopher Lambert) at a deserted New Jersey... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Morahan

#22

Major League II (1994)
5%

#22
Adjusted Score: 4571%
Critics Consensus: Striking out on every joke, Major League II is a lazy sequel that belongs on the bench.
Synopsis: The Cleveland Indians, an endearing assortment of oddballs who improbably won the division championship last season, have since lost their... [More]
Directed By: David S. Ward

#21
Adjusted Score: 6908%
Critics Consensus: Universal Soldier - The Return fails on almost every level, from its generic story to its second rate action and subpar performances.
Synopsis: After being brought back from the dead as a genetically enhanced warrior, Luc Deveraux (Jean-Claude Van Damme) is now fully... [More]
Directed By: Mic Rodgers

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 7880%
Critics Consensus: Bathed in flop sweat and bereft of purpose, Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 strings together fat-shaming humor and Segway sight gags with uniformly unfunny results.
Synopsis: Six years after he saved the day at his beloved New Jersey shopping mall, security guard Paul Blart (Kevin James)... [More]
Directed By: Andy Fickman

#19
Adjusted Score: 5813%
Critics Consensus: Unnecessary, unfunny, and generally unwelcome, Big Mommas: Like Father, Like Son offers more of the same for fans of Martin Lawrence's perplexingly popular series.
Synopsis: After stepson Trent (Brandon T. Jackson) witnesses a murder, FBI agent Malcolm Turner (Martin Lawrence) brings back Big Momma, his... [More]
Directed By: John Whitesell

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 7611%
Critics Consensus: Unfunny and unoriginal. In other words, a perfect piece of evidence for opponents of pointless movie sequels.
Synopsis: After his mentor is killed, an FBI agent (Martin Lawrence) reprises his disguise as a fat old lady and takes... [More]
Directed By: John Whitesell

#17
Adjusted Score: 4849%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Tiffany travels to Derrick Lake to celebrate her 18th birthday at a Halloween frat party in the middle of the... [More]
Directed By: Tyler Perry

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 4046%
Critics Consensus: Poorly written, clumsily filmed and edited, and hampered by amateurish acting, Atlas Shrugged: Part II does no favors to the ideology it so fervently champions.
Synopsis: With the world's economy on the brink of collapse, Dagny Taggart discovers a possible solution to the global energy crisis.... [More]
Directed By: John Putch

#15

Caddyshack II (1988)
4%

#15
Adjusted Score: 3804%
Critics Consensus: Handicapped by a family friendly PG rating, even the talents of Caddyshack II's all-star comic cast can't save it from its lazy, laughless script and uninspired direction.
Synopsis: Jack Hartounian (Jackie Mason), a boorish but good-hearted real estate tycoon, applies for membership at a snooty country club, but... [More]
Directed By: Allan Arkush

#14

Scary Movie V (2013)
4%

#14
Adjusted Score: 4411%
Critics Consensus: Juvenile even by Scary Movie standards, this fifth installment offers stale pop culture gags that generate few laughs.
Synopsis: Much bizarre activity follows after a husband (Simon Rex) and wife (Ashley Tisdale) bring their newborn infant home from the... [More]
Directed By: Malcolm D. Lee

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 6680%
Critics Consensus: Speed 2 falls far short of its predecessor, thanks to laughable dialogue, thin characterization, unsurprisingly familiar plot devices, and action sequences that fail to generate any excitement.
Synopsis: Annie (Sandra Bullock) is looking forward to a Caribbean cruise with her cop boyfriend, Alex (Jason Patric), who purchased the... [More]
Directed By: Jan de Bont

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 8495%
Critics Consensus: A strained, laugh-free sequel, The Whole Ten Yards recycles its predecessor's cast and plot but not its wit or reason for being.
Synopsis: After faking his death, former killer-for-hire Jimmy "The Tulip" Tudeski (Bruce Willis) retires to Mexico with his new wife, Jill... [More]
Directed By: Howard Deutch

#11
Adjusted Score: 5736%
Critics Consensus: With its shallow characters, low budget special effects, and mindless fight scenes, Mortal Kombat - Annihilation offers minimal plot development and manages to underachieve the low bar set by its predecessor.
Synopsis: Every generation, a portal opens up between the Outerworld and Earth. Emperor Shao-Kahn (Brian Thompson), ruler of the mythical Outerworld,... [More]
Directed By: John R. Leonetti

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 2576%
Critics Consensus: Illogical, tension-free, and filled with cut-rate special effects, Jaws: The Revenge is a sorry chapter in a once-proud franchise.
Synopsis: The family of widow Ellen Brody (Lorraine Gary) has long been plagued by shark attacks, and this unfortunate association continues... [More]
Directed By: Joseph Sargent

#9

Daddy Day Camp (2007)
1%

#9
Adjusted Score: 4028%
Critics Consensus: A mirthless, fairly desperate family film, Daddy Day Camp relies too heavily on bodily functions for comedic effect, resulting in plenty of cheap gags but no laughs.
Synopsis: Spurred on by their wives' insistence that their children attend summer camp, daycare entrepreneurs Charlie Hinton (Cuba Gooding Jr.) and... [More]
Directed By: Fred Savage

#8
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In the ruins of a once-productive factory, Dagny Taggart (Laura Regan) finds a revolutionary motor that could be the answer... [More]
Directed By: James Manera

#7
#7
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: An acting student encounters a malevolent spirit after participating in a viral challenge.... [More]
Directed By: Travis Cluff, Chris Lofing

#6

The Ring 2 (1999)
0%

#6
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: While investigating the mysterious death of her boyfriend, Mai (Miki Nakatani) learns of the existence of a videotape that causes... [More]
Directed By: Hideo Nakata

#5
Adjusted Score: 4016%
Critics Consensus: Zero brains.
Synopsis: A boy (Michael Kenworthy) and his friends free something evil from a canister fallen off an Army truck.... [More]
Directed By: Ken Wiederhorn

#4
Critics Consensus: Utterly, completely, thoroughly and astonishingly unfunny, Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol sends a once-innocuous franchise plummeting to agonizing new depths.
Synopsis: Feeling that his squad is not up to snuff, a police commander comes up with an unorthodox plan to hire... [More]
Directed By: Jim Drake

#3
Adjusted Score: 119%
Critics Consensus: There should have been only one.
Synopsis: In this sci-fi/fantasy sequel, Connor MacLeod (Christopher Lambert) has become an elderly man after losing his immortality. Living in a... [More]
Directed By: Russell Mulcahy

#2
Adjusted Score: 229%
Critics Consensus: Despite its lush tropical scenery and attractive leads, Return to the Blue Lagoon is as ridiculous as its predecessor, and lacks the prurience and unintentional laughs that might make it a guilty pleasure.
Synopsis: When widow Sarah Hargrave (Lisa Pelikan) washes ashore on a tropical island with her daughter and adopted son, she learns... [More]
Directed By: William A. Graham

#1
Adjusted Score: 1108%
Critics Consensus: A startling lack of taste pervades Superbabies, a sequel offering further proof that bad jokes still aren't funny when coming from the mouths of babes.
Synopsis: Toddlers use their special abilities to stop a media mogul (Jon Voight) from altering the minds of children.... [More]
Directed By: Bob Clark

Let’s get this out of the way right up front: We wish only the best for Ted 2, and hope it turns out to be one of the year’s funniest comedies while making plenty of money for everyone who worked on it. But we also know that the track record for comedy sequels isn’t terribly encouraging, and while waiting for Seth MacFarlane and Mark Wahlberg to return for another round of R-rated hijinks between a man-child and his talking stuffed bear, our thoughts turned inexorably to the many times when the sequels kept coming long after the laughs stopped. If comedy equals tragedy plus time, then perhaps the movies featured in this week’s list are still waiting for their moment — or maybe they’re just bad. Either way, it’s time for Total Recall!


Mannequin Two: On the Move (1991) 13%

How, pray tell, does one go about putting together a sequel to the 1987 hit Mannequin without the raw sexual magnetism between Kim Cattrall and Andrew McCarthy, or the wan unctuousness of James Spader? The sensible answer is “one does not,” but the folks behind Mannequin Two: On the Move had other ideas — mainly consisting of re-enlisting flamboyant Mannequin second banana Meshach Taylor to reprise his role as mincing window dresser Hollywood Montrose for a follow-up with different stars (William Ragsdale and Kristy Swanson, trying in vain to duplicate Cattrall and McCarthy’s unforgettable chemistry) but the same basic plot. Chiefly of interest for fans of prolific character actor Terry Kiser, who used his downtime between Weekend at Bernie’s movies to work in his appearance as Mannequin Two villain Count Gunther Spretzle, this is a sequel so bereft of ideas that it even recycles the original’s theme song, the Starship hit “Nothing’s Gonna Stop Us Now.” As Variety wearily observed, “It took four writers to struggle with another idea of why a mannequin would come to life in a department store and what would happen if she did.”

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Weekend at Bernie’s II (1993) 10%

Is the original Weekend at Bernie’s a comedy classic? Assuredly not, but there are still plenty of chortles to be wrung from the sight of a couple of corporate drones panicking their way through a scheme that involves using the body of their recently deceased boss as a comically ineffective prop, and we would be lying if we said we’d turn it off if we happened upon that first Weekend while scrolling through channels. It most certainly did not, however, need a sequel — and yet theatrical grosses dictated that stars Jonathan Silverman, Andrew McCarthy, and Terry Kiser (as Bernie) reunite for a humiliatingly absurd caper involving a voodoo ritual gone awry and millions in stolen cash. “Frankly,” opined Scott Weinberg for eFilmCritic, “I’m stunned that every American who paid to see it didn’t file a class action suit against Tri-Star Pictures for their blatant misrepresentation of the word ‘comedy.'”

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Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo (2005) 9%

It would take a profoundly silly person to argue that Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo was at all deserving of a sequel on qualitative grounds, but Rob Schneider’s comedy pulled in nearly $100 million at the box office, so a sequel was bound to happen — and it did in 2005, when fans of putative comedies about male sex escorts were treated to Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo, which sent Schneider to… oh, we don’t need to talk about the storyline, do we? The only thing that really matters about this movie is what it triggered offscreen: the infamous dustup between Schneider and Roger Ebert, who lambasted it in his review (“Aggressively bad, as if it wants to cause suffering to the audience”) and later distilled his thoughts regarding European Gigolo to a simple message he relayed directly to Schneider: “Your movie sucks.” The two later had a moving reconciliation during Ebert’s last days, setting an example that almost (but not quite) justifies spending an hour and 28 minutes of one’s life to watch the film.

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Revenge of the Nerds 2: Nerds in Paradise (1987) 7%

It’s difficult to watch the original Revenge of the Nerds today without cringing at some of the embarrassing stereotypes and rampant misogyny that passed for comedy at the time, but there were a few kernels of legitimately forward-thinking ideas embedded in all the lewd gags, and in some respects, it can be argued that the first Nerds was a movie slightly ahead of its time. No such arguments have ever been made on behalf of Revenge of the Nerds II: Nerds in Paradise, in which our gentle-hearted (and yet oh so horny) heroes descend upon Fort Lauderdale for some old-fashioned spring break debauchery — and once again find themselves forced to contend with persecution from their beefy jock nemeses. With twice the jiggle and half the reason for actually existing, Nerds in Paradise needed to worry less about musclebound frat boys than it did about critics: Carrie Rickey of the Philadelphia Inquirer summed up the nigh-universal scorn of her colleagues when she sneered, “By all evidence, to make Nerds II, it took over 1,000 people with an aggregate IQ of under 1.”

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Teen Wolf Too (1987) 8%

Jason Bateman is an immensely likable performer with sharp comedic timing and a gift for playing the straight man, but he’s also had some pretty rough luck when it comes to picking film scripts, and that snakebitten streak extends all the way back to his big-screen debut. The original Teen Wolf barely got by on Michael J. Fox’s fresh-faced charm and an eager enthusiasm for low-budget B-movie tropes (not to mention Mark Safan’s “Win in the End,” an unsung ’80s teen movie sports montage soundtrack classic), but not even Fox’s refusal to return for more kept the studio from commissioning a sequel in which his character’s cousin (played by Bateman) heads off to college and discovers that he too is burdened with the family curse. While producers may have thought they were recapturing lightning in a bottle by tapping another young TV sitcom star — and Bateman may have made for a more imposing teen werewolf than the diminutive Fox — none of it mattered in the face of a screenplay that barely bothered pretending to go through the motions. “The pacing is near-cataleptic and the movie’s intended comic highlight is a frog-fight in the biology lab,” fumed Michael Wilmington for the Los Angeles Times. “Isn’t that just what you’re dying to see and hear? Bad dialogue, lugubriously paced; awful jokes about werewolves, and guffawing actors churlishly hurling around a lot of little frogs?”

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Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2 (2015) 6%

If you’re somehow able to finance and film one movie about a Segway-riding mall cop with a main gag that revolves around the fact that his last name rhymes with “fart,” you might as well make another one, right? Hence Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2, in which Kevin James returns to ride his motorized scooter of justice — and in the time-honored sequel tradition, finds himself in a new location (Las Vegas) and in the middle of even more high-stakes action (a hotel heist involving the theft of some priceless art). It all added up to another $100 million-plus outing for the increasingly pratfall-dependent James, whose brightest moments in Mall Cop 2 included fighting an ostrich and punching an elderly woman in the stomach — none of which were enough to distract critics from delivering a swift and vicious pummeling for the film that Joe Neumaier of the New York Daily News referred to as “the cinematic equivalent of biting into an old brown banana.”

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Major League II (1994) 5%

In theory, a sequel to 1989’s Major League wasn’t necessarily such a bad idea. The first movie made a pile of money, it had a solid cast (most of whom were willing to return for a follow-up), and the seasonal nature of baseball meant it would be relatively easy — and narratively feasible — to bring the gang back together for another round of yuks. Add in the fact that director/co-writer David S. Ward (who doggedly pitched the original for years before it was released) was returning, and Major League II should have been (ahem) a home run. But even with all that going for it, this belated sequel — which opened five years later but picked up the season after Major League — just didn’t have the same zip as the original, and based on the box office, audiences no longer really cared whether Rick “Wild Thing” Vaughn (Charlie Sheen) and his motley crew of teammates had what it took to send the Cleveland Indians to the World Series. Sighed Caryn James for the New York Times, “There has rarely been such a steep and strange decline between a movie and its sequel as the one between the fast, silly original and the dismal, boring Major League II.”

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Caddyshack II (1988) 4%

Caddyshack is a comedy classic that virtually hums with the madcap energy thrown off by director Harold Ramis and his incredible cast, a marvelously motley bunch that included Rodney Dangerfield, Ted Knight, Bill Murray, and Chevy Chase. Naturally, the sequel brought back virtually no one who’d been involved the first time around, limiting the classic Caddyshack vibes to a supporting appearance from Chase and a new song from Kenny Loggins on the soundtrack. This might not have been such a bad thing if these crucial absences had been filled by the right people or a suitably funny storyline, but director Allan Arkush was presented with a cobbled-together script that virtually reprised the original and asked Harvey Mason to serve as a Dangerfield facsimile with Robert Stack as Knight’s proxy. Audiences saw through the flimsy carbon copy and so did critics; the result was, as Steven Rea wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer, “a sight not to behold.”

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The Whole Ten Yards (2003) 4%

Just because a movie makes a bunch of money doesn’t mean it needs a sequel. Case in point: The Whole Ten Yards, the 2004 travesty that reunited the cast of the 2000 hit The Whole Nine Yards simply because the studio seemed to take the first film’s box office receipts as some sort of mandate. Once again, Matthew Perry (as nebbishy dentist Nicholas “Oz” Ozeransky) and Bruce Willis (as retired hitman Jimmy “The Tulip” Tudeski) find themselves in hot water with vengeful mob boss Laszlo Gogolak (Kevin Pollak), and the sequel’s retreaded plot — as well as a marked decrease in the original’s laughs-per-minute quotient — left critics openly questioning why anyone would bother. “So mirthless is this misbegotten enterprise,” grumbled Peter Howell for the Toronto Star, “the sound of fake chucklers busting a gut would at least have given us valuable clues as to when we’re supposed to laugh.”

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Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol (1987) 0%

If film franchises were professional sports teams, the Police Academy movies would hover somewhere near the 2011-’12 Charlotte Bobcats in the standings, with Police Academy 4: Citizens on Patrol representing the most painfully lopsided defeat in a long stretch of stunning futility. All of which is to say that critics loathed each of the Academy films in their own special way, and no fewer than four of the seven installments in the series boast a 0 percent Tomatometer rating, but with 20 uniformly negative reviews, it’s 1987’s Citizens on Patrol that represents the jewel in the franchise’s crown of failure. We could go into plot, but it’s a Police Academy movie, and the plot’s all laid out in the title; really, all you need to know is that there’s definitely something better to watch. As Dave Kehr pointed out in his review for the Chicago Reader, “Jim Drake is credited with the direction and Gene Quintano with the script, though they’d probably appreciate it if you kept it to yourself.”

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Look Who’s Talking Now (1993) 0%

Look Who’s Talking was a pleasantly undemanding comedy that reminded audiences they still liked John Travolta and featured some funny voicework from Bruce Willis as the inner monologue of a baby. Three years later, Look Who’s Talking Too tried to double down on the toddler-driven laughs by adding Roseanne Barr as the voice of Willis’ sister, but that gambit proved woefully unsuccessful — so three years after that, we got Look Who’s Talking Now, in which the kids are old enough to speak with their own voices… and old enough to have pets who, you guessed it, the audience can hear speak. As concepts go, it’s pretty thin, but Now still might have benefited from the talents of its new voice cast if someone had written a worthy script; alas, Danny DeVito (as a streetwise mutt named Rocks) and Diane Keaton (as Daphne the purebred poodle) were left to try and wring a few laughs out of a premise long past its prime while the human stars of the series, John Travolta and Kirstie Alley, bore the onscreen brunt of a series of humiliations that included Alley dressing up as an elf. “The first film had maybe a shred of realism to flavor its romantic comedy,” lamented Roger Ebert. “This one looks like it was chucked up by an automatic screenwriting machine.”

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Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2 (2004) 0%

Jon Voight is a very famous, highly respected actor, but he also has bills to pay, which may explain how he ended up alongside Scott Baio and Vanessa Angel playing second fiddle to a diaper-clad quartet in Superbabies: Baby Geniuses 2. Then again, if you take Voight at his word, he chose the project because “When you look around the world, everybody’s really in a fearful state in some way, and kids are getting that, they’re getting that fear, and they need to be given a kind of empowerment in some sense” — but no, you know what? We prefer the “bills to pay” explanation. Either way, this alleged action comedy about an evil media mogul who’s out to kidnap four freakishly smart toddlers has gone down as one of the more shockingly awful stinkers to seep out of Hollywood in recent memory — as well as, sadly, the final effort from Porky’s director Bob Clark. “The first Baby Geniuses, released in 1999, was one of the most inane, humorless, ill-conceived, poorly acted comedies of the year,” wrote Jean Oppenheimer for the New Times. “As difficult as it is to imagine, the sequel is even worse.”

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Another frame packed with four new national releases is led by Oliver Stone‘s 9/11 drama "World Trade Center" from Paramount. A trio of lower profile pics round out the weekend – Sony’s family adventure "Zoom," Buena Vista’s teen drama "Step Up," and The Weinstein Company’s horror flick "Pulse." Despite all the new entries, Will Ferrell will try to win the box office title for the second consecutive time with his comedy "Talladega Nights" which has been racing well ahead of its competition since opening last weekend.

Nicolas Cage, Michael Pena, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Maria Bello star in the high-profile story of courage "World Trade Center" which Paramount debuted on Wednesday. The PG-13 film tells the real life story of John McLoughlin and William Jimeno, two Port Authority cops who were trapped in the rubble of the Twin Towers on September 11. Rather than focus on any villains, "WTC" only tells the story of ordinary men put into extraordinary circumstances and how their families coped. Mature adults will make up the primary audience. Teen appeal seems limited. Since the box office is currently lacking choices for older adults, the Oliver Stone film will not face much direct competition. Men and women will be equally drawn to this emotionally-charged story of heroism.

There will be many moviegoers that will find it to be too soon for a film about a tragedy just approaching its fifth anniversary. However, curiousity will bring out others looking for an uplifting story about that fateful Tuesday morning. "WTC" should appeal to many of the same people who turned out for 2004’s "Ladder 49." That film featured Cage’s "Face/Off" nemesis John Travolta as a noble firefighter and just told a tale about American heroes doing the right thing for each other, and not really dwelling on any enemy. "Ladder" bowed to $22.1M over three days.

Center will also be compared to April’s United 93 which was the first Hollywood film to tackle 9/11. With a subdued release in under 1,800 locations, that pic opened well with $11.5M and a solid $6,395 average. "WTC" has more theaters, more starpower in front of and behind the camera, and is not as grim. Reviews have mostly been good which will help. Long-term prospects are encouraging since the rest of August has nothing major for mature adults. Now playing in 2,803 theaters, "World Trade Center" might open with about $18M over the weekend and around $24M over five days.

Tim Allen plays an ex-super hero who is called upon to train a group of slacker kids in Sony’s new family film "Zoom." The PG-rated pic will have plenty of competition as it marks the fourth consecutive week that studios have rolled out movies aimed at young ones. Only this time, it isn’t a toon. Allen has always been a consistent draw in this genre, most notably in his "Santa Clause" movies which sees its third installment this coming holiday season. Earlier this year, he starred in the Disney remake "The Shaggy Dog" which bowed to $16.3M in March. "Zoom," which co-stars Courteney Cox and Chevy Chase, will not reach that level as it is not generating as much excitement. Plus the volume on the marketing push has been typical of a mid-August opener. Flying into 2,501 theaters, "Zoom" might debut with around $9M.

Hollywood seems to have written a new rule stating that 9/11 films must be counter-programmed with teen-girl pics that explore popular extracurricular activities. "United 93" opened against the gymnastics comedy "Stick It," and now "WTC" will face Buena Vista’s "Step Up" which finds a ballerina and a tough street dancer locking hips. The PG-13 film will play primarily to young females and the studio is hoping to score another low-cost hit like Disney’s April comedy which debuted to a better-than-expected $10.8M. "Step Up" lacks marquee stars, but does offer some faces that add value when it comes to the Clearasil crowd. The bad boy meets good girl formula is once again tested and little crossover to older patrons is likely. Competition for teens and young adults is ample so a breakout bow may not surface, but a respectable showing is likely. Dancing into 2,100 theaters, "Step Up" could debut to around $8M.

Supernatural beasties attack us innocent humans through cell phones and email in the new horror flick "Pulse." The PG-13 film is aimed at teens that have seen every other film and want some quick thrills before heading back to school. With no major stars, and a concept that is far from intriguing, the Weinstein Co. release should be in for some modest dollars over the weekend. "The Descent" will be "Pulse’s" major foe, but like most fright flicks, the chicks-in-a-cave movie should tumble down further on the charts in its second weekend. "Step Up" and "Talladega Nights" will also be distracting teens. Opening in 2,326 theaters, "Pulse" might scare up about $8M this weekend.

In foreign film releases, Yash Raj Films opens the all-star Bollywood film "Kabhi Alvida Naa Kehna" (Never Say Goodbye) in top markets across North America. Shot in New York, the Hindi-language film explores the breakdown of marital bonds. Brazilian actress Fernanda Montenegro ("Central Station") headlines "The House of Sand" which Sony Classics platforms in New York and Los Angeles this Friday. The story of three generations of women in the barren lands of northern Brazil played at the Tribeca Film Festival and will roll out into more cities throughout the rest of summer.

Last weekend’s box office champ "Talladega Nights" hopes to retain its crown in its second lap. The Will Ferrell hit is sure to see a large decline, but competition for teens and young adults is not too fierce. A 50% drop would leave Sony with about $23M for the session and a solid ten-day cume of $92M. Paramount’s "Barnyard" may fall by 40% and rake in around $9.5M pushing its total to $33M after ten days. The Johnny Depp megasmash "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" could drop by another 40% to $6.5M lifting its jaw-dropping total to $392M.

LAST YEAR: Director John Singleton scored a top spot debut with his revenge thriller "Four Brothers" which debuted with $21.2M. Paramount found its way to $74.5M with the Mark Wahlberg drama. Opening in second was the Kate Hudson suspense thriller "The Skeleton Key" with $16.1M on its way to $47.8M for Universal. Falling from first to third was the comedy "The Dukes of Hazzard" with $13M dropping a steep 58% from its bow. Rival comedy "Wedding Crashers" held up much better easing 26% in its fifth frame to $11.8M. Opening in fifth place with $9.6M was Sony’s comedy sequel "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo" which ended its run with just $22.3M. The weekend’s other new release, the military drama "The Great Raid," opened modestly in tenth with only $3.4M on its way to $10.2M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

You thought the awards season ended with the Oscars? Please. MTV’s just gearing up for their movie awards, which will be broadcast worldwide on June 8th — but we have all the nominations listed just a click away. (Interesting to note that not only were Paris Hilton & Rob Schneider nominated for awards, but also that "Hustle & Flow" earned three noms — a movie produced by "MTV Films.")

More than an award show, but a film unto itself, MTV: Music Television today announced the cast, or nominees, of the “2006 MTV Movie Awards.” Up for starring roles are the “40-Year-Old Virgin” and “Wedding Crashers,” each receiving five nominations. Also vying for the spotlight are “Batman Begins,” “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire,” “Hustle & Flow,” “Sin City” and “Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge Of The Sith” with three nominations each. Filming June 3rd at Sony Picture Studios in Culver City, CA, the “2006 MTV Movie Awards” will premiere to audiences nationwide on Thursday, June 8th at 9pm ET/PT on MTV.

MTV also announced it will cast for new categories of “Best Hero,” “Sexiest Performance” and the “mtvU Student Filmmaker Award” for the first time ever. And in another Movie Awards first, all of this year’s categories, including “Best Performance,” will make no distinction between male and female. Breaking the gender barrier and award show tradition, both actors and actresses will be vying for the same coveted golden popcorns.

Fans can vote for the entire nominated cast of the “2006 MTV Movie Awards” by visiting movieawards.mtv.com before May 19th . Fans can also vote from their mobile phone by texting “MOVIEAWARDS” to 91757 to receive a ballot. Voting is also available by dialing toll free to 1-877-MTV-VOTE where fans can support their favorite nominees with a different category available for voting each day.

“This year’s Movie Awards will be more than an awards show — it’s an experience completely inspired by the movies, and everything we love about them,” said Christina Norman, President, MTV. “This year’s cast of movies and stars are all deserving nominees, and there is no doubt this year’s Movie Awards will in itself, be a movie to remember.”

Starring Hollywood’s hottest actors and celebrities, the “2006 MTV Movie Awards” promises to be one of the summer’s biggest blockbusters. Sources close to the production have remained tight lipped, revealing little of the project’s storyline or script except to say mystery, adventure and mayhem prevail. MTV will announce other starring roles in the upcoming weeks including the project’s leading man and/or lady, along with featured bands and performers making up the production’s soundtrack.

The “2006 MTV Movie Awards” will be seen in 171 countries/territories via 50 music programming services, and in 23 languages in more than 479.5 million households.

Nominees for the “2006 MTV Movie Awards” are:

*BEST MOVIE*

The 40-Year-Old Virgin
(Universal Pictures)
Batman Begins (Warner Bros. Pictures)
King Kong (Universal Pictures)
Sin City (Dimension Films)
Wedding Crashers (New Line Cinema)

*BEST PERFORMANCE*

Joaquin PhoenixWalk the Line
Jake GyllenhaalBrokeback Mountain
Rachel McAdamsRed Eye
Steve CarellThe 40-Year-Old Virgin
Terrence HowardHustle & Flow
Reese WitherspoonWalk the Line

*BEST COMEDIC PERFORMANCE*

Owen WilsonWedding Crashers
Adam SandlerThe Longest Yard
Steve Carell – The 40-Year-Old Virgin
Tyler PerryTyler Perry’s Madea’s Family Reunion
Vince VaughnWedding Crashers

*BEST ON-SCREEN TEAM*

Steve Carell, Paul Rudd, Seth Rogen & Romany MalcoThe 40-Year-Old Virgin
Johnny Knoxville, Seann William Scott & Jessica SimpsonThe Dukes of Hazzard
Jessica Alba, Ioan Gruffudd, Chris Evans & Michael ChiklisFantastic Four
Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson & Rupert GrintHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Vince Vaughn & Owen Wilson – Wedding Crashers

*BEST VILLAIN*

Cillian Murphy
Batman Begins
Hayden ChristensenStar Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith
Ralph FiennesHarry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Tilda SwintonThe Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Tobin BellSaw II

*BREAKTHROUGH PERFORMANCE*

Andre “3000” BenjaminFour Brothers
Isla FisherWedding Crashers
NellyThe Longest Yard
Jennifer CarpenterThe Exorcism of Emily Rose
Romany Malco –The 40-Year-Old Virgin
Taraji P. HensonHustle & Flow

*BEST HERO*

Christian BaleBatman Begins
Jessica Alba – Fantastic Four
Daniel Radcliffe – Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
Kate BeckinsaleUnderworld: Evolution
Ewan McGregorStar Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith

*SEXIEST PERFORMANCE*

Beyonce KnowlesThe Pink Panther
Jessica Alba – Sin City
Jessica Simpson – The Dukes of Hazzard
Ziyi ZhangMemoirs of a Geisha
Rob SchneiderDeuce Bigalow: European Gigolo

*BEST FIGHT*

Kong vs. The Planes — King Kong
Stephen Chow vs. Axe Gang – Kung Fu Hustle
Angelina Jolie vs. Brad PittMr. & Mrs. Smith
Ewan McGregor vs. Hayden Christensen – Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith

*BEST KISS*

Jake Gyllenhaal & Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain
Taraji P. Henson & Terrence Howard – Hustle & Flow
Anna Faris & Chris Marquette – Just Friends
Angelina Jolie & Brad Pitt – Mr. & Mrs. Smith
Rosario Dawson & Clive OwenSin City

*BEST FRIGHTENED PERFORMANCE*

Rachel Nichols – The Amityville Horror
Jennifer Carpenter – The Exorcism of Emily Rose
Derek RichardsonHostel
Paris HiltonHouse of Wax
Dakota FanningWar of the Worlds

*mtvU STUDENT FILMMAKER AWARD*

Joshua Caldwell (Fordham University) – A Beautiful Lie
Sean Mullin (Columbia University) – Sadiq
Stephen Reedy (Diablo Valley College) – Undercut
Jarrett Slavin (University of Michigan) – The Spiral Project
Landon Zakheim (Emerson College) – The Fabulous Felix McCabe

*2006 MTV Movie Awards *
*Total Number of Combined Category Nominations*

The 40-Year-Old Virgin — 5
Wedding Crashers — 5
Batman Begins — 3
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire — 3
Hustle & Flow — 3
Sin City — 3
Star Wars: Episode III – Revenge of the Sith — 3
Brokeback Mountain — 2
The Dukes of Hazzard — 2
The Exorcism of Emily Rose — 2
Fantastic Four — 2
King Kong — 2
The Longest Yard — 2
Mr. & Mrs. Smith — 2
Walk the Line — 2
The Amityville Horror — 1
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe — 1
Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo — 1
Four Brothers — 1
Hostel — 1
House of Wax — 1
Just Friends — 1
Kung Fu Hustle — 1
Tyler Perry’s Madea’s Family Reunion — 1
Memoirs of a Geisha — 1
The Pink Panther — 1
Red Eye — 1
Saw II — 1
Underworld: Evolution — 1
War of the Worlds — 1

* Nominees are chosen through a national poll of MTV and MTV2 viewers.

Fans of bad movies have The Stinkers and The Razzies to look forward to every year, and now that the latter organization has announced their winners, we can put this issue to bed and enjoy the next ten months of cinematic ineptitude.

2005 Razzie Awards Winners

Worst Picture: "Dirty Love"
Worst Actor: Rob Schneider, "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo"
Worst Actress: Jenny McCarthy, "Dirty Love"
Worst Supporting Actor: Hayden Christensen, "Star Wars Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith"
Worst Supporting Actress: Paris Hilton, "House of Wax"
Worst Screen Couple: Will Ferrell & Nicole Kidman, "Bewitched"
Worst Sequel: "Son of the Mask"
Worst Screenplay: Jenny McCarthy, "Dirty Love"
Worst Director: John Asher, "Dirty Love"

Yeah, so apparently they really hated the fish-in-a-barrel-ish "Dirty Love." For the rest of the winners/losers, head on over to the Razzies site.

Low budget horror film “Alone in the Dark” took home the industry’s biggest booby prize as Hollywood’s annual anti-Oscars, The Stinkers Bad Movie Awards, dished out awards in 24 competition categories. The dishonors came courtesy of the Los Angeles-based Bad Cinema Society, a panel of movie critics and film fans which annually awards Hollywood’s worst films and performances.

Though “Alone in the Dark” didn’t receive the most awards, it managed to beat the field in four major categories, including worst film of the year, worst director (Uwe Boll, who some critics and fans have likened to legendary bad movie maker Ed Wood), worst actress (Tara Reid), and worst special effects.

The top award winner for 2005, with five Stinkers, was “Son of the Mask,” New Line’s ill-conceived follow-up to the Jim Carrey mega-hit “The Mask.” The mind-numbing sequel, which was inexplicably still produced after Carrey refused to participate in the project, took honors for Worst Actor (Jamie Kennedy), Worst Sequel, and Worst Couple (Kennedy and anyone forced to co-star with him). The film was also named 2005’s foulest family film.

Jessica Simpson picked up three awards for her portrayal of Daisy Duke in the big screen remake of the TV series “The Dukes of Hazzard.” Her warbling of “These Boot Are Made For Walkin’” earned her a Stinker for worst song in a movie. She was also named worst supporting actress of the year and can lay claim to having sported the most annoying fake accent in a movie.

Media target Paris Hilton, who had a small role in the horror remake “House of Wax,” came away unscathed by the society. Mentioned as a worst supporting actress on other year-end lists, the hotel heiress did not make the final cut on the more selective Stinkers ballot. "To get on the Stinkers ballot you are judged on your performance, not your tabloid persona,” said Stinkers Bad Movie Awards co-founder Michael Lancaster. “Anyone that would put Paris Hilton on a list of the five worst supporting actresses in 2005 didn’t see a lot of movies in 2005."

The Stinkers ballot featured five worst film candidates that any other year would have been winners or at the very least runners-up in their own right. Proof positive that 2005 will go down as one of the worst film years on record. One category (worst song) had ten nominees, tying a Stinker record. “Hollywood just doesn’t seem to understand that what’s keeping paying customers away is the bad product they hype. You can’t just keep advertising that bad films are the funniest films of the year. Eventually the lies will catch up with you,” said Bad Cinema Society co-founder Ray Wright. He warned that 2006 was gearing up to be more of the same. “We’ve already had another film by Uwe Boll [BloodRayne] released and we will be all over ‘The Pink Panther.’”

With more than 50 sequels and remakes lined up for release in the next year, it’s safe to say that Hollywood has run out of ideas.” Added Lancaster, “I think the public has finally caught on to what we’ve been saying for years — that a lot of what Hollywood sells is not worth the price of an admission ticket. I love that people are avoiding some of these overhyped films like the plague.”

Lancaster and Wright say the film that earned the most Stinkers for 2005 (“Son of the Mask”) is a perfect example of a Hollywood system gone horribly wrong. “I can’t for the life of me imagine how this project got approved. I think the minute Jim Carrey passes on this you say, ‘let’s not make the sequel.’ Now I guess we can all see how New Line is spending their ‘Lord of the Rings’ profits,” said Lancaster.

The Stinkers Bad Movie Awards have been featured in Entertainment Weekly, USA TODAY, the Los Angeles Times, and on the BBC, CNN, as well as in a slew of regional and international newspapers and magazines. The group’s website has received nearly two million hits.

Complete list of winners and nominees for 2005:

WORST FILM
Alone in the Dark

WORST SENSE OF DIRECTION (Stop them before they direct again!)
Uwe Boll (Alone in the Dark)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
Jamie Kennedy (Son of the Mask)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
Tara Reid (Alone in the Dark)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Tyler Perry (as Madea) (Diary of a Mad Black Woman)

WORST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Jessica Simpson (The Dukes of Hazzard)

WORST SCREENPLAY FOR A FILM GROSSING MORE THAN $100 MILLION*
*using Hollywood math
Fantastic Four

MOST PAINFULLY UNFUNNY COMEDY
Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo

WORST SONG OR SONG PERFORMANCE IN A FILM OR ITS END CREDITS
These Boots Are Made For Walkin’ (Jessica Simpson) (The Dukes of Hazzard)

MOST INTRUSIVE MUSICAL SCORE
Son of the Mask

LESS THAN DYNAMIC DUO
Samuel L. Jackson and Eugene Levy (The Man)

WORST ON-SCREEN COUPLE
Jamie Kennedy and anyone forced to co-star with him (Son of the Mask)

MOST ANNOYING FAKE ACCENT
MALE: Norm MacDonald (Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo)
FEMALE: Jessica Simpson (The Dukes of Hazzard)

LEAST "SPECIAL" SPECIAL EFFECTS
Alone in the Dark

WORST REMAKE
Yours, Mine and Ours

WORST SEQUEL
Son of the Mask

WORST RESURRECTION OF A "CLASSIC" TV SERIES
The Honeymooners

THE SPENCER BRESLIN AWARD (FOR WORST PERFORMANCE BY A CHILD)
Adrian Alonso (The Legend of Zorro)

WORST CHILD ENSEMBLE
Yours, Mine and Ours

FOULEST FAMILY FILM
Son of the Mask

LEAST SCARY HORROR MOVIE
The Fog

MOST OVERRATED FILM
Syriana

WORST ANIMATED FILM
Chicken Little

For full nominee lists and more awards, stop by the Stinkers official website!

Courtesy of their official site come the annual Razzie Awards Nominations … or as I like to call them: The Amazingly Obvious Fish in a Barrel Nominations in Which We Savage People We Don’t Like, Regardless of the Quality of Their Work. Oh, and it seems the Razzers have decided to branch out an include a "Most Tiresome" category, which I happen to find pretty ironic.

26th Annual Golden Raspberry (RAZZIE®) Award Nominations

WORST PICTURE

Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Dirty Love
The Dukes of Hazzard
House of Wax
Son of the Mask

WORST ACTOR

Tom Cruise / War of the Worlds
Will Ferrell / Bewitched and Kicking & Screaming
Jamie Kennedy / Son of the Mask
The Rock / Doom
Rob Schneider / Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo

WORST ACTRESS
Jessica Alba / Fantastic Four and Into the Blue
Hilary Duff / Cheaper by the Dozen 2 and The Perfect Man
Jennifer Lopez / Monster in Law
Jenny McCarthy / Dirty Love
Tara Reid / Alone in the Dark

MOST TIRESOME TABLOID TARGETS
(New Category, Saluting the Celebs We’re ALL Sick & Tired Of!)
Tom Cruise & His Anti-Psychiatry Rant
Tom Cruise, Katie Holmes, Oprah Winfrey‘s Couch, The Eiffel Tower & “Tom’s Baby”
Paris Hilton and…Who-EVER!
Mr. & Mrs. Britney, Their Baby & Their Camcorder
The Simpsons: Ashlee, Jessica & Nick

WORST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Hayden Christensen / Star Wars III: No Sith, He’s Supposed to Be Darth Vader?!?!
Alan Cumming / Son of the Mask
Bob Hoskins / Son of the Mask
Eugene Levy / Cheaper by the Dozen 2 and The Man
Burt Reynolds / The Dukes of Hazzard and The Longest Yard

WORST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Carmen Electra / Dirty Love
Paris Hilton / House of Wax
Katie Holmes / Batman Begins
Ashlee Simpson / Undiscovered
Jessica Simpson / The Dukes of Hazzard

WORST SCREEN COUPLE

Will Ferrell & Nicole Kidman / Bewitched
Jamie Kennedy & ANYBODY Stuck Sharing the Screen with Him / Son of the Mask
Jenny McCarthy & ANYONE Dumb Enough to Befriend or Date Her / Dirty Love
Rob Schneider & His Diapers / Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Jessica Simpson & Her “Daisy Dukes” / The Dukes of Hazzard

WORST REMAKE OR SEQUEL
Bewitched
Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
The Dukes of Hazzard
House of Wax
Son of the Mask

WORST DIRECTOR
John Asher / Dirty Love
Uwe Boll / Alone in the Dark
Jay Chandrasekhar / The Dukes of Hazzard
Nora Ephron / Bewitched
Lawrence Guterman / Son of the Mask

WORST SCREENPLAY

Bewitched
Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
Dirty Love
The Dukes of Hazzard Written
Son of the Mask

My apologies to the Razz Crew, but I think they could put a lot more effort into their nominations. And maybe learn to tell the difference between "bad performances" and "stuff we just feel like ranting about." (And perhaps stop nominating one person for multiple performances, because then it just becomes obvious that you’re gunning for someone. Example: They hated Ferrell in the witch comedy and the soccer flick, but they loved his work in "The Producers?" Phooey.)

Am I too harsh? Are the Razzies really cool and I’m just a crotchety old whiner? Quite possible.

In classic Rob Schneider fashion, Rob Schneider has penned an open letter to the New York Times defending his one-eyed, pidgin-spouting Tongan character in "50 First Dates."

Responding to an op-ed piece lamenting the recent passing of Japanese-American actor Pat Morita and the dearth of respectable roles for Asians in Hollywood, Schneider wrote his letter to correct the assumption that he, with his cockeyed performance in "Dates," was just another Caucasian actor playing to stereotypes in the vein of Mickey Rooney in "Breakfast at Tiffany’s." In fact, the erstwhile "Deuce Bigalow" is half-Filipino, but that’s beside his point. Citing black and brown-faced performances like Orson Welles‘ titular Moor in "Othello," Schneider argues that actors should be cast "irrespective of ethnicity, race or in my case ‘looks.’"

He also notes that the real-life Ula, on whom his Tongan "Dates" caricature was based, approved of his being cast in the role.

You might recall Schneider’s previous brush with the world of journalism earlier this year, when he dashed off an angry, ill-researched letter to the Los Angeles Times in response to a front-page article dismissing his sequel "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo" as an example of studio-produced junk. His full-page attack ad ran in the trades and lambasted Times writer Patrick Goldstein as a mean-hearted, third-rate reporter; it was later revealed that Schneider’s own online research had overlooked at least one of Goldstein’s industry-granted writing awards.

With the recent stir over casting in the upcoming "Memoirs of a Geisha," Schneider’s take on authenticity in acting provides an interesting, if controversial, counterpoint to the argument against Chinese actresses playing Japanese roles. Is this Schneider’s appeal to become Pat Morita’s Asian comic-relief successor? Will "Deuce Bigalow 3: Memoirs of a Gigolo" elicit angry protests across the globe, splitting the collective conscience of movie-going audiences everywhere?

John Horn of the LA Times delivers an interesting article on the sad state of affairs over at Sony Pictures. Seems that, aside from "Hitch," none of Sony’s releases have found an overly receptive audience this year. (For those keeping score, Sony’s 2005 releases include "Stealth," "xXx: State of the Union," "Lords of Dogtown," "Bewitched," and that "Deuce Bigalow" sequel.) Also, it seems that "Fun With Dick & Jane" is a merciless money-pit, and that alleged "Sinbad" movie starring Keanu Reeves and "Stealth" director Rob Cohen? Yeah, that project’s dead now.

"Light romantic comedies are not supposed to be expensive, grueling endeavors, but the filming of "Fun With Dick and Jane" was anything but fun for Sony Pictures.

Months over schedule and millions over budget, the remake of the 1977 caper comedy had a revolving door of top-dollar screenwriters constantly reworking its script. A year after the Jim Carrey movie began filming, director Dean Parisot had to go back behind the cameras, reshooting some 30 pages of new dialogue. The movie missed its planned summer release and will now come out in December."

Also, "the studio pulled the plug on "The 8th Voyage of Sinbad," a planned expensive spectacle that was to pair "Matrix" star Keanu Reeves with director Cohen. While Cohen’s "The Fast and the Furious" and the first "XXX" movie were global smashes, his $135-million "Stealth" was a summer flop, grossing just $32.1 million in domestic theaters and generating a Sony loss of almost $50 million."

Check out the full LA Times article right here.

According to Variety, Rob Schneider is going to direct a movie. And since I consider Variety a pretty reliable news source, I shall now go bang my head against a wall. Schnieder will be directing "Big Stan," a comedy about a geek who learns kung fu to defend himself in prison.

""Big Stan," from an original screenplay by Josh Lieb ("The Simpsons"), concerns a weak and nebbishy con man who panics when he learns he’s going to prison for fraud. He hires a mysterious martial arts guru, who transforms him into a kung fu expert who can fight off inmates who want to hurt him — and love him."

Not surprisingly, Rob Schneider will be playing the weak and nebbishy con man. We hear the director thinks Schneider is hilarious.

Over the past few days, we’ve tried to counter the common misconception that this summer’s cinematic fare was bereft of quality. However, that doesn’t mean the season was without some stinkers, at least critically speaking.

The most rotten movie of the summer was "Supercross: The Movie," which won praise from two percent of the critics. "Undiscovered," the title of which was often used derisively in reviews, stood at four percent. Rounding out the top five were "The Perfect Man" (six percent) "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo" (10 percent), and "Honeymooners" (12 percent). The most rotten limited release of the summer was the Aussie slasher flick "Undead."

Here’s the 20 most rotten films of the summer, in ascending order:

2% — Supercross: The Movie
4% — Undiscovered
6% — The Perfect Man
10% — Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo
12% — Honeymooners
13% — Stealth
14% — Rebound
14% — The Cave
17% — Monster-In-Law
17% — The Dukes of Hazzard
20% — The Adventures of Shark Boy and Lava Girl in 3D
23% — House of Wax
23% — Valiant
23% — Undead
25% — Bewitched
25% — Fantastic Four
27% — 9 Songs
28% — Mindhunters
28% — Pretty Persuasion
28% — The Baxter

Check out the rest of our coverage:
Summer Tomatometer Wrap-up: Box Office Down, Tomatometer Up
Summer Tomatometer Wrap-up #2: The Best of the Wide Releases
Summer Tomatometer Wrap-up #3: The Best of the Limited Releases

John Singleton‘s action drama "Four Brothers" opened in 2,500 theaters to a better-than-expected $20.7 million in its first weekend, handily beating a trio of other newcomers. One of its main competitors was the Kate Hudson bayou thriller "The Skeleton Key," which unlocked nearly $15.8 million (from about 2,800 theaters) in a comparatively slow weekend at the box office.

Still hanging around in third place was WB’s "The Dukes of Hazzard," which added another $13m to its $57.5 total gross. Fourth place went to the powerful "Wedding Crashers," which grossed just over $12 million, adding to its total gross just over $164 million(!) Rounding out the top five was "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo," which made $9.4 million in just over 3,100 theaters.

Miramax’s long-delayed "The Great Raid" just managed to crack the top ten by grossing about $3.3 million from nearly 820 theaters.

In milestone news, Christopher Nolan‘s "Batman Begins" became only the third movie this year to gross over $200 million, after "Star Wars Episode 3: Revenge of the Sith" and "War of the Worlds."

Next week sees the arrival of another cinematic foursome: the bike-racing flick "Supercross" opens on Wednesday, while Steve Carell in "The 40 Year-Old Virgin," Wes Craven‘s airplane thriller "Red Eye," and Disney’s animated adventure "Valiant" will wait until next Friday.

As always, please stop by the Rotten Tomatoes Box Office Page for a closer look at the weekend stats.

This week at the movies gives us four brothers with vigilante justice on their minds, a woman who discovers the frightening secrets of an old house on the bayou, a band of brothers on a mission to save their own, and the latest in sophisticated, lofty humor from Rob Schneider. What do the critics have to say?

What is "Four Brothers"? Is it a neo-western? A blaxploitation update? A family drama? A tough-minded action flick with gritty humor? Critics say it’s all these things and more. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Tyrese Gibson, and Andre Benjamin (aka Andre 3000), John Singleton’s film tells the tale of four adoptive brothers who grudgingly reunite to avenge their adoptive mother’s murder. At 68 percent on the Tomatometer, critics say "Four Brothers" is not without its flaws, but that it’s rough and inspiring just the same. And it’s helping Singleton’s combined Tomatometer, currently at 64 percent.

Naomi Watts, Jennifer Connelly, Nicole Kidman…. A big-time actress starring in relatively generic horror flick has been something of a trend in the past few years. Now Kate Hudson gives it her best shot in "The Skeleton Key." Big scares in the Big Easy was the plan, and with a distinguished cast (Gena Rowlands, John Hurt), this one may have looked like helta skelta on the delta. Unfortunately, it seems like this gumbo is a little undercooked; critics say the atmosphere is there, but the execution is less than spellbinding. At 36 percent on the Tomatometer, this "Skeleton Key" could use some more meat on its bones.

The Greatest Generation has been the subject of some great films, from "The Great Escape" to "Saving Private Ryan." "The Great Raid," starring Benjamin Bratt, tells the story of a remarkable rescue of POWs in the Philippines. But critics say a great story does not make for a great movie; for all its noble intentions, this one is overlong and not as compelling as its subject matter requires.

Cats and dogs, Yankees and Red Sox, Rob Schneider and movie critics — some things are just natural enemies. Recently, Monsieur Schneider, star of "Deuce Bigalow: European Gigolo," has been publicly dissing some of the scribes for their assessment of his work. He might have listened to the advice of a humorist who slightly exceeds his stature (Mark Twain): "Never pick a fight with someone who buys his ink by the barrel." At a staggering eight percent on the Tomatometer, the latest installment of the "Deuce" saga is unsurprisingly getting pummeled. And it’s lower on the Tomatometer than "The Hot Chick" (at 22 percent! I can’t believe it either!)

Recent Rob Schneider Movies
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22% — The Hot Chick (2002)
29% — The Animal (2001)
24% — Deuce Bigalow: Male Gigolo (1999)

Recent John Singleton-Directed Movies:
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37% — 2 Fast 2 Furious (2003)
67% — Baby Boy (2001)
69% — Shaft (2000)
89% — Rosewood (1997)
46% — Higher Learning (1994)