As we celebrate America’s 241st birthday, this special 24 Frames gallery highlights Fresh and Certified Fresh patriotic movies for our long weekend of good food, family, and fireworks!

Mel Gibson is getting the best reviews of his directorial career for Hacksaw Ridge, the World War II true story of conscientious objector Desmond Doss, who received the Medal of Honor for saving 75 men without ever carrying a gun or weapon. The legend of Doss inspires this week’s gallery: 24 Certified Fresh WWII movies!

(And before you ask, Grave of the Fireflies is Fresh but not Certified Fresh.)

For a guy who’s continually rumored to be done with acting, Clint Eastwood is doing a pretty good job of staying busy in front of the camera.

Variety reports that Eastwood has agreed to direct and star in Gran Torino, a just-announced Warner Bros./Village Roadshow film being targeted for a December release…and that’s about all we know, actually. From the article:

Details of “Torino” are being kept under tantalizingly tight wraps. Existence of the film, and Eastwood’s role, were only revealed on Tuesday when Warner quietly dated the movie for sometime in December.

As Variety points out, a December release will put Gran Torino up against another Eastwood film — he directed Changeling, the “child abduction drama” starring Angelina Jolie that’s reaching theaters November 7.

Though he hasn’t acted since directing himself in 2004’s Million Dollar Baby, Eastwood has remained busy behind the camera, directing Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima; according to Variety, he’s also confirmed to direct the Nelson Mandela biopic The Human Factor for Warners.

Source: Variety

Jigsaw’s twisted games return for another late-October round of torture fun with Saw IV which should allow the lucrative franchise to claim the biggest horror opening of the year for the second straight time. The R-rated gorefest follows last year’s Saw III which bowed to $33.6M this very weekend setting a new debut record for the series. Jigsaw’s death in that installment did not stop a fourth flick from being produced since the most popular horror movie villains never truly die anyway. Although III set a new opening weekend record for the Lionsgate series, it did not match Saw II‘s overall $87M gross and instead finished a bit behind with $80.2M. Still, with small budgets (Saw III was produced for $12M) this cash cow continues to churn out profits and shows no sign of stopping.

The audience for Saw IV is clearly defined and new fans are not likely to be generated. Competition will come primarily from last weekend’s number one opener 30 Days of Night which will suffer a sharp fall this weekend. Otherwise, there is not much to distract genre fans on the weekend before the pumpkin holiday. The marketing has been on par with previous films, but as the franchise ages it risks losing fans who may have had enough with three helpings already. Plus this year has seen a wide assortment of horror films crash and burn which has led to some fright fatigue. Another factor could be the World Series which last year only affected Saw III‘s Friday bow but this year will cut into both Saturday and Sunday business. Many young adults may opt for the torture that the Red Sox are inflicting on the Rockies instead. Saw IV opens on Friday in 3,183 locations and could take in about $29M over three days.


Saw IV

Steve Carell provides some laughs to those not interested in Halloween horror. Following the relatively disappointing $100.3M gross for his $175M budgeted comedy Evan Almighty, the funnyman returns in the dramedy Dan in Real Life playing a depressed widower who falls for his brother’s girlfriend during a family reunion weekend. Juliette Binoche and Dane Cook co-star. The PG-13 film is not a full-fledged comedy so it won’t attract the entire Carell fan base that has grown rapidly over the years thanks to The 40-Year-Old Virgin and the hit sitcom The Office. Also Buena Vista is not releasing the film too wide so the numbers will be kept to a manageable level. Dan should skew mostly to an adult audience so a cluttered marketplace filled with options for mature moviegoers will be a factor too. A poor title won’t help either. Though reviews have been generally positive for this lovable loser tale, a large number of moviegoers might just wait for the DVD on this one. Dan in Real Life stumbles into more than 1,700 theaters on Friday and could collect about $9M.


Steve Carell in Dan in Real Life

Last weekend vampires ruled the box office with 30 Days of Night, but this time a steep fall is guaranteed. Horror pics always drop hard on the second weekend and add in the arrival of Saw which will steal away the same audience, and a 55% decline could result. That would give Sony about $7M for the frame and a decent ten-day total of $27M. Tyler Perry‘s hit comedy Why Did I Get Married? has little in the way of new competition to deal with which means another good hold is likely. The Lionsgate pic may slide by 40% to around $7M as well and boost its 17-day total to $48M.


30 Days of Night

The Game Plan has been the fall season’s top grosser and Disney once again has no threats opening against it. The Rock‘s durable hit should dip by 30% to roughly $6M for a cume to date of $76M. George Clooney’s well-reviewed legal drama Michael Clayton will face some competition for adults from Steve Carell this weekend, but a solid hold does seem likely. A 30% drop would put the Warner Bros. title at $4.5M for the session and lift the sum to $28M.

LAST YEAR: Like clockwork, Saw III came in and dominated the pre-Halloween box office with a franchise-best $33.6M debut grossing more than the rest of the top five combined. The Jigsaw pic eroded fast and ended up trailing Saw II‘s total tally and finished with $80.2M. Holding tight in second place was Martin Scorsese‘s crime saga The Departed with $9.8M in its fourth assignment and the lowest drop in the top ten. The magician drama The Prestige followed closely in third with $9.6M. The war drama Flags of Our Fathers ranked fourth with $6.3M while the animated hit Open Season placed fifth with $5.9M. Opening to dismal results outside the top ten was the Tim Robbins drama Catch A Fire with only $2M on its way to a horrible $4.3M. Platforming in only seven sites was the ensemble drama Babel which went on to gross $34.3M and win the Golden Globe for Best Picture – Drama.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

Competition, or a lack of it, will be the deciding factor at the North American box office this weekend for the half-dozen new releases that studios are packing into already overcrowded multiplexes. Leading the way is the horror film 30 Days of Night followed by the sports comedy The Comebacks which both will be targeting the teens and young adults that Hollywood has been ignoring in recent weeks. Mature adults who already have a wide selection of serious dramas to choose from will be served up three more – Reese Witherspoon‘s Rendition, Ben Affleck‘s Gone Baby Gone, and Halle Berry‘s Things We Lost in the Fire. With far too many films aiming for the same finite audience segment, some are sure to eat into the potential of others.

Sony will monopolize the horror crowd looking for a scare before Halloween with its gorefest 30 Days of Night which tells of vampires that attack a small town in northern Alaska during its annual sunless period. The R-rated film prominently informs moviegoers in its marketing that it is based on a graphic novel hoping to tap into a little bit of the excitement generated by 300 last spring. The first eight months of this year were brutal to R-rated horror films with none reaching number one and high-profile franchise flicks like Hostel II, 28 Weeks Later, and The Hills Have Eyes 2 all failing to reach $10M on opening weekend. But the Halloween remake over Labor Day weekend changed all that and was followed three weeks later by another top spot debut from horror-action hybrid Resident Evil: Extinction. But those have died out so 30 Days stands as the only creepfest at a time when scary movies are in demand. Attacking 2,700 theaters, 30 Days of Night should easily top the charts and could bite into around $19M over the weekend.


30 Days of Night

Fox spoofs the world of sports films with its new comedy The Comebacks which will target adolescents either too young for 30 Days or uninterested in scary movies. With so many mature stories hogging up screens, the market can certainly use a dose of immature humor right about now. The Comebacks is the first viable PG-13 comedy aimed at teens since fellow sports comedy Balls of Fury launched at the end of August. After a mid-week debut, that pic bowed to $11.4M over three days and Comebacks will play to many of the same folks. And with seventeen R-rated films opening wide over the last eight weeks, there has been little to celebrate for the under-17 crowd. Sure The Comebacks looks dumb, but dumb can sell. Add in a trim running time of under 90 minutes and commercial prospects are not bad. This is disposable entertainment for 14-year-olds. It will draw attention upfront, and be forgotten two weeks from now. Thanks to a lack of direct competition, The Comebacks could debut with about $11M from 2,800 sites.


The Comebacks

Leading the charge for the 30-plus crowd this weekend is Reese Witherspoon who headlines the political thriller Rendition from New Line. The R-rated drama finds the Oscar winner playing a woman whose Egyptian-born husband is captured by the CIA after being suspected of being a terrorist. Jake Gyllenhaal and Meryl Streep add to the cast. Rendition follows The Kingdom and In the Valley of Elah as military-themed films this fall with connections to the Middle East. Audiences will want only so much of this content. Witherspoon will have her starpower put to the test since she is the only major commercial star here and she is outside of her safety zone of romantic comedies. The film will play to mature adults and will have to compete not only with this weekend’s other new dramas, but also with an assortment of holdovers already playing to the same audience. Reviews have been mixed which will also make things difficult. Debuting in roughly 2,200 locations, Rendition may capture about $9M over the Friday-to-Sunday period.


Reese Witherspoon and Peter Sarsgaard in Rendition

Ben Affleck makes his directorial debut with the crime thriller Gone Baby Gone which stars his brother Casey in the lead role. The Miramax release also stars Morgan Freeman, Ed Harris, and Michelle Monaghan and carries a R rating. Reviews have been good which will come as a shocker to those that look at this movie as nothing more than Daredevil getting to hop into the director’s chair. Reese, Joaquin, George, Cate, and Halle will all be cutting into the adult pie which can only expand by a certain amount. The marketing push has been highlighting the film as being from the author of Mystic River in hopes of finding those who loved that other Boston-set fall crime drama. An invite to the top five may not arrive for Ben. Opening in approximately 1,500 theaters, Gone Baby Gone could collect about $6M this weekend.


Freeman, Affleck and Monaghan in Gone Baby Gone
Yet another new option for adults looking for serious fare is the Halle BerryBenicio Del Toro starrer Things We Lost in the Fire. The Paramount release about a widow who seeks comfort from her dead husband’s drug-addicted friend will play to a mature audience and skew more female. The R-rated film has generated some good early reviews and both leads have Oscars on their shelves, but it will not be enough to compete with the other films targeting the same crowd. Berry showed in April that she can only open a picture so much when her thriller Perfect Stranger bowed to a $4,211 average even though A-lister Bruce Willis co-starred. With a not-so-wide release in about 1,000 theaters this weekend, Things We Lost in the Fire might debut with around $3M.


Halle Berry and Benicio Del Toro in Things We Lost in the Fire

Freestyle Releasing has booked the few remaining empty screens out there for its teen thriller Sarah Landon and the Paranormal Hour. As one of the only PG-rated suspense pics ever made, the film will try to attract younger teenagers not interested in sports-themed comedies. With only 1,100 theaters, a quiet marketing campaign, no stars, and zero buzz, a weak debut of about $1M could result.


Sarah Landon and the Paranormal Hour

After a potent number one debut, Tyler Perry‘s hit comedy Why Did I Get Married? should suffer a big fall in its second weekend if history is any indicator. Sophomore drops for the filmmaker’s previous offerings include 50% for Diary of a Mad Black Woman, 58% for Madea’s Family Reunion, and 57% for Daddy’s Little Girls. Lionsgate should see a 50% fall to about $10M this weekend giving the ensemble relationship tale $37M in ten days.

Disney’s The Game Plan once again has no new competition for the kiddie audience. Why studios have programmed so many serious adult dramas into this month and no other good family films is anyone’s guess. A 35% dip would leave The Rock with $7M and an impressive cume of $68M after 24 days.

Both Sony’s We Own the Night and the Warner Bros. thriller Michael Clayton will have to fight extra hard in order to compete with the new releases gunning for their customers. Night looks to slide more and fall by 45% while the strongly reviewed Clayton could ease by 40% with both films grossing roughly $6M over the weekend. That would lead to ten-day totals of $20M and $21M, respectively.

LAST YEAR: Just two months after the release of the similarly-themed magician pic The Illusionist, Buena Vista still managed to score a number one bow for The Prestige which opened with $14.8M on its way to $53.1M. Martin Scorsese‘s The Departed enjoyed a strong hold and ranked second with $13.5M in its third frame. Debuting in third was Clint Eastwood‘s war saga Flags of Our Fathers with $10.2M leading to a disappointing $33.6M final for Paramount. Sony’s animated hit Open Season ranked fourth with $8.2M. Rounding out the top five was rival family film Flicka with $7.7M for Fox on its way to only $21M. Also premiering in the top ten was Sony’s Marie Antoinette with $5.4M which led to a final tally of just $16M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

Jamie Bell nabbed a BAFTA and a string of other awards for his debut performance, aged fourteen, in Billy Elliot. He’s since starred in a string of vastly disparate roles in films such as Nicholas Nickleby, Dear Wendy, King Kong and Flags of Our Fathers, working with some of the world’s finest directors and proving to audiences that he’s got what it takes to avoid the child-star pitfalls. RT‘s Joe Utichi talks to him about his latest role, in David Mackenzie‘s Hallam Foe, as well as his process, his accent portfolio, his turn in Doug Liman‘s upcoming Jumper and that persistent rumour that he’ll be replacing Daniel Radcliffe in Equus on London’s stage.

Hallam Foe is released in the UK on August 31st. A US release is currently TBA.

Did you know that Steven Soderbergh was making a movie about Che Guevara? Starring Benicio Del Toro in the title role? Yeah, me too. But somehow I missed the news that he was making TWO films about the historical figure.

According to Variety, Oscar nominee Catalina Sandino Moreno (Maria Full of Grace) will join Oscar winner Del Toro (as well as Julia Ormond, Franka Potente, and Jorge Perugorria) in not one but two films from Mr. Soderbergh: Both The Argentine and Guerrilla will tell the Che Guevara story from two different perspective. I’m guessing here, but I’m getting a Flags of Our Fathers / Letters from Iwo Jima vibe on these projects.

Steven Soderbergh, as you probably already know, is one of those filmmakers who leaps between indie-style and big-budget whenever he feels like it. One one side he gave us sex, lies & videotape, The Limey, Full Frontal, and Bubble — and on the other side we got Out of Sight, Erin Brockovich, Traffic, and the whole Ocean’s series. And then somewhere in the middle are The Good German and Solaris. Pretty impressive if you ask me.

Soderbergh begins his dual-movie project later this month in Spain. For more info on the projects check out this page at Benicio Del Toro’s website.

Source: Variety

If you liked "Casino Royale," (and who didn’t?) you’ll be happy to know that the screenwriting trio is now back in action for the 22nd Bond flick.

The as-yet-untitled "Bond 22" was written by British screenwriters Neal Purvis and Robert Wade, but producers recently lured Polishin’ Paul Haggis back to the project. Mr. Haggis, who also wrote (or co-wrote) "Crash," "Million Dollar Baby," and "Flags of Our Fathers," is generally credited with giving "Casino Royale" its tougher, grittier exterior. (One needs only to look at the Bond flicks written solely by the Wade & Purvis team — "Die Another Day" and "The World Is Not Enough" — to gauge how important Haggis’ input was.)

We still don’t know who the producers will pick as their director, but they’ll probably be making a decision pretty soon. "Bond 22" is scheduled for a November 2008 release date.

Source: L.A. Times

The expected heavy hitters made the grade — Scorsese, Whitaker, "Dreamgirls" — but there were a handful of surprises…let’s just say, if you thought you’d never read "the Oscar-nominated ‘Borat’" in print, think again! The nominees for the 79th annual Academy Awards are in!

Yes, "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" stole a nomination for best adapted screenplay, and will compete against "Children of Men," "Notes on a Scandal," "The Departed," and "Little Children" in that category. High Five!

Fans of Ryan Gosling will be happy to know that he made the Oscar list for his work in "Half Nelson," joining company like Leonardo DiCaprio ("The Departed"), Peter O’Toole ("Venus") and Forest Whitaker ("Last King of Scotland") in the lead actor category. The fifth nominee? The Fresh Prince himself, Will Smith ("Pursuit of Happiness").

Golden Globe winner Martin Scorsese is also up for the best director Oscar in a near-rematch of that race. This time, the Academy’s given only one nod to Clint Eastwood ("Letters From Iwo Jima") to make room for "United 93" director Paul Greengrass.

"Little Miss Sunshine" tot Abigail Breslin has a nomination for supporting actress and will face off with "Babel" twosome Adriana Barraza and Rinko Kikuchi, "Notes on a Scandal"’s Cate Blanchett, and "Dreamgirls" star Jennifer Hudson. Breslin’s ten years old. Is that a new youngest-ever nominee?

"Dreamgirls" nabbed noms in both supporting categories (Golden Globe winners Jennifer Hudson and Eddie Murphy, respectively), as well as art direction, costume design, and three of the five Best Song nominations. We’ll see if voters can differentiate between "Listen," "Love You I Do," and "Patience" or if they’ll split their "Dreamgirls" votes and send the Oscar to Melissa Etheridge’s "Inconvenient Truth" song or Randy Newman’s ditty from "Cars."

And then, the other awards. Those categories that enable certain sub-performing films to call themselves "Oscar-nominated."

  • The Oscar-nominated "Black Dahlia" (36 percent Tomatometer), for best cinematography
  • The Oscar-nominated "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (53 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in sound mixing and visual effects
  • The Oscar-nominated "Poseidon" (32 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in visual effects
  • The Oscar-nominated "Click" (31 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in make-up

Tune in Sunday, February 25 at 5pm PST/8 pm EST for the awards ceremony telecast on ABC!

Read on for the full list of Oscar Nominations!

Performance by an actor in a leading role

Leonardo DiCaprio in "Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Ryan Gosling in "Half Nelson" (THINKFilm)
Peter O’Toole in "Venus" (Miramax, Filmfour and UK Council)
Will Smith in "The Pursuit of Happyness" (Sony Pictures Releasing)
Forest Whitaker in "The Last King of Scotland" (Fox Searchlight)

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

Alan Arkin in "Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Jackie Earle Haley in "Little Children" (New Line)
Djimon Hounsou in "Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Eddie Murphy in "Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Mark Wahlberg in "The Departed" (Warner Bros.)

Performance by an actress in a leading role

Penélope Cruz in "Volver" (Sony Pictures Classics)
Judi Dench in "Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Helen Mirren in "The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
Meryl Streep in "The Devil Wears Prada" (20th Century Fox)
Kate Winslet in "Little Children" (New Line)

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

Adriana Barraza in "Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Cate Blanchett in "Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Abigail Breslin in "Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Jennifer Hudson in "Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Rinko Kikuchi in "Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)

Achievement in directing

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage) Alejandro González Iñárritu
"The Departed" (Warner Bros.) Martin Scorsese
"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.) Clint Eastwood
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Stephen Frears
"United 93" (Universal and StudioCanal) Paul Greengrass

Best animated feature film of the year

"Cars" (Buena Vista) John Lasseter
"Happy Feet" (Warner Bros.) George Miller
"Monster House" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Gil Kenan

Achievement in art direction

"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Art Direction: John Myhre
Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

"The Good Shepherd" (Universal)
Art Direction: Jeannine Oppewall
Set Decoration: Gretchen Rau and Leslie E. Rollins

"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse)
Art Direction: Eugenio Caballero
Set Decoration: Pilar Revuelta

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Art Direction: Rick Heinrichs
Set Decoration: Cheryl A. Carasik

"The Prestige" (Buena Vista)
Art Direction: Nathan Crowley
Set Decoration: Julie Ochipinti

Achievement in cinematography

"The Black Dahlia" (Universal) Vilmos Zsigmond
"Children of Men" (Universal) Emmanuel Lubezki
"The Illusionist" (Yari Film Group) Dick Pope
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) Guillermo Navarro
"The Prestige" (Buena Vista) Wally Pfister

Achievement in costume design

"Curse of the Golden Flower" (Sony Pictures Classics) Yee Chung Man
"The Devil Wears Prada" (20th Century Fox) Patricia Field
"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount) Sharen Davis
"Marie Antoinette" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Milena Canonero
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Consolata Boyle

Best documentary feature

"Deliver Us from Evil" (Lionsgate)
A Disarming Films Production
Amy Berg and Frank Donner

"An Inconvenient Truth" (Paramount Classics and Participant Productions)
A Lawrence Bender/Laurie David Production
Davis Guggenheim

"Iraq in Fragments" (Typecast Releasing)
A Typecast Pictures/Daylight Factory Production
James Longley and John Sinno

"Jesus Camp" (Magnolia Pictures)
A Loki Films Production
Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady

"My Country, My Country" (Zeitgeist Films)
A Praxis Films Production
Laura Poitras and Jocelyn Glatzer

Best documentary short subject

"The Blood of Yingzhou District"
A Thomas Lennon Films Production
Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon

"Recycled Life"
An Iwerks/Glad Production
Leslie Iwerks and Mike Glad

"Rehearsing a Dream"
A Simon & Goodman Picture Company Production
Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon

"Two Hands"
A Crazy Boat Pictures Production
Nathaniel Kahn and Susan Rose Behr

Achievement in film editing

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Stephen Mirrione and Douglas Crise

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Steven Rosenblum

"Children of Men" (Universal)
Alex Rodríguez and Alfonso Cuarón

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
Thelma Schoonmaker

"United 93" (Universal and StudioCanal)
Clare Douglas, Christopher Rouse and Richard Pearson

Best foreign language film of the year

"After the Wedding" A Zentropa Entertainments 16 Production
Denmark
"Days of Glory (Indigènes)" A Tessalit Production
Algeria
"The Lives of Others" A Wiedemann & Berg Production
Germany
"Pan’s Labyrinth" A Tequila Gang/Esperanto Filmoj/Estudios Picasso Production
Mexico
"Water" A Hamilton-Mehta Production
Canada

Achievement in makeup

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista) Aldo Signoretti and Vittorio Sodano
"Click" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Kazuhiro Tsuji and Bill Corso
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) David Marti and Montse Ribe

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage) Gustavo Santaolalla
"The Good German" (Warner Bros.) Thomas Newman
"Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight) Philip Glass
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) Javier Navarrete
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Alexandre Desplat

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)

"I Need to Wake Up" from "An Inconvenient Truth"
(Paramount Classics and Participant Productions)
Music and Lyric by Melissa Etheridge

"Listen" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger and Scott Cutler
Lyric by Anne Preven

"Love You I Do" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger
Lyric by Siedah Garrett

"Our Town" from "Cars"
(Buena Vista)
Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

"Patience" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger
Lyric by Willie Reale

Best motion picture of the year

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
An Anonymous Content/Zeta Film/Central Films Production
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Jon Kilik and Steve Golin, Producers

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
A Warner Bros. Pictures Production
Nominees to be determined

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
A DreamWorks Pictures/Warner Bros. Pictures Production
Clint Eastwood, Steven Spielberg and Robert Lorenz, Producers

"Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
A Big Beach/Bona Fide Production
Nominees to be determined

"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
A Granada Production
Andy Harries, Christine Langan and Tracey Seaward, Producers

Best animated short film

"The Danish Poet" (National Film Board of Canada)
A Mikrofilm and National Film Board of Canada Production
Torill Kove

"Lifted" (Buena Vista)
A Pixar Animation Studios Production
Gary Rydstrom

"The Little Matchgirl" (Buena Vista)
A Walt Disney Pictures Production
Roger Allers and Don Hahn

"Maestro" (Szimplafilm)
A Kedd Production
Geza M. Toth

"No Time for Nuts" (20th Century Fox)
A Blue Sky Studios Production
Chris Renaud and Michael Thurmeier

Best live action short film

"Binta and the Great Idea (Binta Y La Gran Idea)"
A Peliculas Pendelton and Tus Ojos Production
Javier Fesser and Luis Manso

"Éramos Pocos (One Too Many)" (Kimuak)
An Altube Filmeak Production
Borja Cobeaga

"Helmer & Son"
A Nordisk Film Production
Soren Pilmark and Kim Magnusson

"The Saviour" (Australian Film Television and Radio School)
An Australian Film Television and Radio School Production
Peter Templeman and Stuart Parkyn

"West Bank Story"
An Ari Sandel, Pascal Vaguelsy, Amy Kim, Ravi Malhotra and Ashley Jordan Production
Ari Sandel

Achievement in sound editing

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista)
Sean McCormack and Kami Asgar

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Lon Bender

"Flags of Our Fathers" (DreamWorks and Warner Bros., Distributed by Paramount)
Alan Robert Murray and Bub Asman

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
Alan Robert Murray

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Christopher Boyes and George Watters II

Achievement in sound mixing

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista)
Kevin O’Connell, Greg P. Russell and Fernando Camara

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer and Ivan Sharrock

"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Michael Minkler, Bob Beemer and Willie Burton

"Flags of Our Fathers" (DreamWorks and Warner Bros., Distributed by Paramount)
John Reitz, Dave Campbell, Gregg Rudloff and Walt Martin

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Paul Massey, Christopher Boyes and Lee Orloff

Achievement in visual effects

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
John Knoll, Hal Hickel, Charles Gibson and Allen Hall

"Poseidon" (Warner Bros.)
Boyd Shermis, Kim Libreri, Chaz Jarrett and John Frazier

"Superman Returns" (Warner Bros.)
Mark Stetson, Neil Corbould, Richard R. Hoover and Jon Thum

Adapted screenplay

"Borat Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" (20th Century Fox)
Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Peter Baynham & Dan Mazer
Story by Sacha Baron Cohen & Peter Baynham & Anthony Hines & Todd Phillips

"Children of Men" (Universal)
Screenplay by Alfonso Cuarón & Timothy J. Sexton and David Arata and Mark Fergus & Hawk Ostby

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
Screenplay by William Monahan

"Little Children" (New Line)
Screenplay by Todd Field & Tom Perrotta

"Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Screenplay by Patrick Marber

Original screenplay

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Written by Guillermo Arriaga

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
Screenplay by Iris Yamashita
Story by Iris Yamashita & Paul Haggis

"Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Written by Michael Arndt

"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse)
Written by Guillermo del Toro

"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
Written by Peter Morgan

Sound the alarms! Tonight’s telecast (8pm EST) of the 64th Annual Golden Globes Awards signaled the real start of Oscar mania, so check out our list of winners…and weigh in with your own two cents on who won, who should’ve won, and who definitely should not have worn what. RESULTS IN NOW!!

Royal thesps Helen Mirren and Forest Whitaker took home Best Actor nods (for "The Queen" and "The Last King of Scotland," respectively) as expected, and "Dreamgirls" re-cemented its still-potent Oscar power with three wins (Jennifer Hudson for Best Supporting Actress, Eddie Murphy for Best Supporting Actor, and "Dreamgirls" for Best Picture – Comedy/Musical).

"The Departed" director Martin Scorsese capitalized on his recent Awards Season favor by nabbing Best Director, while fellow nominee Clint Eastwood collected a Globe for Best Foreign Film (the Japanese-language "Letters From Iwo Jima").

"The Queen" also won for Best Screenplay, written by Peter Morgan; limited release period flick "The Painted Veil" threw its name into the public eye by winning the award for Best Score.

Sacha Baron Cohen‘s Best Comedy Actor win for "Borat" was one of the night’s highlights, with an acceptance speech that gave new meaning to the term "Golden Globes."

The show’s capper — presented by the Governator himself, Arnold Schwarzenegger (he used to be in the movies, right?) — awarded the Best Drama trophy to surprise pick "Babel," instantly renewing that film’s chances come Oscar time.

Find out who else won the hearts of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association Monday night [scroll down for full list of winners and nominees]…

And check out Rotten Tomatoes’ Awards Tour for winners and nominees of this season’s other film awards and critics’ group picks (plus our handy-dandy Buzz chart combining Tomatometer, Awards Won, and Box Office numbers into an Oscar guide for you prognosticators)!

And the nominees for the 64th Annual Golden Globes Awards are (Winners in bold):

Best Original Song

44% Bobby
80% Dreamgirls
76% Happy Feet
23% Home of the Brave
66% Pursuit of Happyness

Best Supporting Actress, Drama



Adriana Barraza for Babel
Cate Blanchett for Notes on a Scandal
Emily Blunt for Devil Wears Prada
Jennifer Hudson for Dreamgirls
Rinko Kikuchi for Babel

Best Animated Film



76% Cars
76% Happy Feet
74% Monster House



Best Actress in a Musical or Comedy

Annette Bening for Running with Scissors
Toni Collette for Little Miss Sunshine
Beyonce Knowles for Dreamgirls
Meryl Streep for Devil Wears Prada
Renée Zellweger for Miss Potter

Best Supporting Actor, Drama

Ben Affleck for Hollywoodland
Eddie Murphy for Dreamgirls
Jack Nicholson for Departed
Brad Pitt for Babel
Mark Wahlberg for Departed



Best Screenplay

Todd Field, and Tom Perrotta for Little Children
Guillermo Arriaga Jordan for Babel
Patrick Marber for Notes on a Scandal
William Monahan for Departed
Peter Morgan for The Queen

Best Foreign Language Film



Best Original Score

Alexandre Desplat for The Painted Veil
Clint Mansell for The Fountain
Gustavo Santaolalla for Babel
Carlo Siliotto for Nomad
Hans Zimmer for The Da Vinci Code



Best Director

Clint Eastwood for Flags of Our Fathers
Clint Eastwood for Letters From Iwo Jima
Stephen Frears for Queen
Alejandro González Iñárritu for Babel
Martin Scorsese for Departed

Best Actor in a Musical or Comedy

Sacha Baron Cohen for Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan
Johnny Depp for Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest
Aaron Eckhart for Thank You For Smoking
Chjwetel Ejiofor for Kinky Boots
Will Ferrell for Stranger Than Fiction

Best Motion Picture, Musical/Comedy

91% Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan
76% Devil Wears Prada
80% Dreamgirls
92% Little Miss Sunshine
86% Thank You For Smoking

Best Actress in a Drama

Penélope Cruz for Volver
Judi Dench for Notes on a Scandal
Maggie Gyllenhaal for Sherrybaby
Helen Mirren for The Queen
Kate Winslet for Little Children

Best Actor in a Drama

Leonardo DiCaprio for Blood Diamond
Leonardo DiCaprio for Departed
Peter O’Toole for Venus
Will Smith for Pursuit of Happyness
Forest Whitaker for The Last King of Scotland

Best Motion Picture, Drama

70% Babel
44% Bobby
93% Departed
82% Little Children
98% Queen

Best Television Series – Drama

"24"
"Big Love"
"Grey’s Anatomy"
"Heroes"
"Lost"

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Drama

Patricia Arquette for "Medium"
Edie Falco for "The Sopranos"
Evangeline Lilly for "Lost"
Ellen Pompeo for "Grey’s Anatomy"
Kyra Sedgwick for "The Closer"

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Drama

Patrick Dempsey for "Grey’s Anatomy"
Michael C. Hall for "Dexter"
Hugh Laurie for "House"
Bill Paxton for "Big Love"
Kiefer Sutherland for "24"

Best Television Series – Musical or Comedy

"Desperate Housewives"
"Entourage"
"The Office"
"Ugly Betty"
"Weeds"

Best Performance by an Actress in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

Marcia Cross for "Desperate Housewives"
America Ferrera for "Ugly Betty"
Felicity Huffman for "Desperate Housewives"
Julia Louis-Dreyfus for "The New Adventures Of Old Christine"
Mary-Louise Parker for "Weeds"

Best Performance by an Actor in a Television Series – Musical or Comedy

Alec Baldwin for "30 Rock"
Zach Braff for "Scrubs"
Steve Carell for "The Office"
Jason Lee for "My Name Is Earl"
Tony Shalhoub for "Monk"

Best Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

"Bleak House" (PBS)
"Broken Trail" (AMC)
"Elizabeth I" (HBO)
"Mrs. Harris" (HBO)
"Prime Suspect: The Final Act" (PBS)

Best Performance By An Actress in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Gillian Anderson for "Bleak House"
Annette Bening for "Mrs. Harris"
Helen Mirren for "Elizabeth I"
Helen Mirren for "Prime Suspect: The Final Act"
Sophie Okonedo for "Tsunami, The Aftermath"

Best Performance By An Actor in a Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

André Braugher for "Thief"
Robert Duvall for "Broken Trail"
Michael Ealy for "Sleeper Cell: American Terror"
Chiwetel Ejiofor for "Tsunami, The Aftermath"
Ben Kingsley for "Mrs. Harris"
Bill Nighy for "Gideon’s Daughter"
Matthew Perry for "The Ron Clark Story"

Best Performance By An Actress in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Emily Blunt for "Gideon’s Daughter"
Toni Collette for "Tsunami, The Aftermath"
Katherine Heigl for "Grey’s Anatomy"
Sarah Paulson for "Studio 60 On The Sunset Strip"
Elizabeth Perkins for "Weeds"

Best Performance By An Actor in a Supporting Role in a Series, Mini-Series or Motion Picture Made for Television

Thomas Haden Church for "Broken Trail"
Jeremy Irons for "Elizabeth I"
Justin Kirk for "Weeds"
Masi Oka for "Heroes"
Jeremy Piven for "Entourage"

"Dreamgirls," the feature adaptation of the Broadway musical, took top honors in four categories including Best Musical or Comedy and Best Director (Bill Condon), Best Supporting Actress (Jennifer Hudson), and Best Sound in the 11th Annual Satellite Awards held Sunday, December 17.

Tying "Dreamgirls" with four wins was "The Departed," which won Best Drama, Best Supporting Actor (Leonardo DiCaprio), Best Adapted Screenplay, and Best Ensemble. The WWII epic "Flags of Our Fathers," in addition to netting the dramatic Best Director prize for Clint Eastwood, also won the Best Cinematography and Best Art Direction honors.


Jennifer Hudson, right, has a lot to sing about.

Helen Mirren ("The Queen") and Forest Whitaker ("The Last King of Scotland") were respectively awarded Best Actress and Actor in a Drama, while Meryl Streep ("The Devil Wears Prada") and Joseph Cross ("Running With Scissors") were their counterparts in the Comedy or Musical category.

The Satellite Awards is an annual event held by the International Press Academy, an organization composed of over 200 entertainment journalists.

Read on for the complete list of winners below.

Actress in Motion Picture, Drama:
Helen Mirren, "The Queen"

Actor in a Motion Picture, Drama:
Forest Whitaker, "The Last King of Scotland"

Actress in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical:
Meryl Streep, "The Devil Wears Prada"

Actor in a Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical:
Joseph Cross, "Running with Scissors"

Actress in a Supporting Role:
Jennifer Hudson, "Dreamgirls"

Actor in a Supporting Role:
Leonardo DiCaprio, "The Departed"

Motion Picture, Drama:
"The Departed"

Motion Picture, Comedy or Musical:
"Dreamgirls"

Motion Picture, Foreign Language:
"Volver," Spain

Motion Picture, Animated or Mixed Media:
"Pan’s Labyrinth"

Motion Picture, Documentary:
"Deliver Us from Evil"

Director:
*TIE* Clint Eastwood, "Flags of Our Fathers" and Bill Condon, "Dreamgirls"

Screenplay, Original:
Peter Morgan, "The Queen"

Screenplay, Adapted:
William Monahan, "The Departed"

Original Score:Gustavo Santolalla, "Babel"

Original Song:"You Know My Name," Chris Cornell, David Arnold; "Casino Royale"

Cinematography:
Tom Stern, "Flags of Our Fathers"

Visual Effects:
John Knoll, Hal Hickel; "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest"

Film Editing:
Mark Helfrich, Mark Goldblatt, Julia Wong; "X-Men: The Last Stand"

Sound (Editing & Mixing):
Willie Burton, Michael Minkler, Bob Beemer, Richard E. Yawn; "Dreamgirls"

Art Direction & Production Design:
Henry Bumstead, Jack G. Taylor Jr, Richard Goddard; "Flags of Our Fathers"

Costume Design:
Patricia Field, "The Devil Wears Prada"

In this week’s Ketchup, we snuck a peek at the "Spider-Man 3" trailer, Keira Knightley may jump ship before the "Pirates" franchise walks the plank, and MGM seems to be putting all its eggs in a few baskets.

Also, "The Simpsons Movie" trailer made it’s first official appearance, and at least two people want a "Daredevil" sequel. Read on.

This Week’s Most Popular News:

Unfinished "Spider-Man 3" Trailer — Now with Venom!

It might not survive on the internet for too long, so if you want to see what Venom is going to look like in "Spider-Man 3," and you don’t mind suffering through some obviously incomplete special effects, then you better click the goods right now — before they’re gone!

Ms. Swann Leaving the "Pirates" Nest?

With "Pirates of the Carbbean: At Worlds End" being primed for its summertime release, the actors are now sharing their thoughts on the future of the series. And as far as Keira Knightley is concerned, she seems fine with moving on when the trilogy ends.

MGM Promises More Panther, Bond, Crown, Rocky & Hobbit

It looks like the cash-strapped MGM is about to seriously scale back on its productions, but they still have five strapping franchises on which they’ll bet the ranch…

Trailer Bulletin: "The Simpsons Movie"

Just in case you missed it last night during (a rather amusing episode of) "The Simpsons," here’s the brand-new trailer for "The Simpsons Movie" — but don’t go in expecting anything in the way of spoilers or plot breakdowns.

"Daredevil" Director (and Villain) Want to Do a Sequel

Director Mark Steven Johnson recently opined that, yeah, he’d like to do a "Daredevil" sequel, provided anyone at Sony actually wanted to. And then big ol’ Michael Clarke Duncan spoke up and said "Me too! I’d do a sequel!"


Who wants some more of this?


In Other News:

  • Tim Firth will adapt Ahmet Zappa‘s kids’ book "The Monstrous Memoirs of a Mighty McFearless" for Jerry Bruckheimer Films and Walt Disney Pictures.
  • Rhona Mitra will star in the lead female role for writer/director Neil Marshall in Rogue Pictures’ futuristic action thriller "Doomsday," which is slated to begin production in early 2007.
  • Beach Boy Brian Wilson has made a deal with producer Mark Gordon to tell his life story in a feature film. The deal also provides access to Wilson’s vast catalogue of music for use in the film.
  • New Line Cinema has launched development of a feature based on the life of Daphne Sheldrick, a pioneer in efforts to save orphaned baby elephants.
  • Paramount Vantage has scooped up film rights to Frank Portman’s debut novel, "King Dork," for Will Ferrell and Adam McKay‘s Gary Sanchez Productions to produce.
  • National Lampoon Inc. is partnering with the Farrelly Brothers through their Conundrum Entertainment on National Lampoon’s "Bag Boy," centered on an underdog teen who discovers he’s got the talent to excel in the world of competitive grocery bagging.
  • Universal Pictures has picked up "Walk of Shame," a pitch by Jessi Klein for Stuber/Parent to produce.The film is a romantic comedy about the lives of a group of young singles living in New York.
  • Former 007 Pierce Brosnan is going back to the spy world, signing on to star in the comedy "Spy vs. Stu."
  • DreamWorks has acquired film rights to actress Gina Gershon‘s children’s book "Camp Creepy Time," which she co-wrote with her brother, Dann Gershon.
  • Warner Bros. has acquired the rights to "Funny Fat Guy," from the "Broken Lizard" comedy troupe members Kevin Heffernan and Steve Lemme.

Can’t leave the espionage alone.