This week on streaming video, we’ve got some popular television, a few contemporary favorites, a few iconic classics, and more. Read on for the full list:


New on Hulu

 

The 100: Season 3 (2016) 83%

The CW’s sci-fi drama follows a group of imprisoned teens who are returned to Earth from a space station, years after the planet has been devastated by nuclear war. The season three premiere is now streamable on Hulu.

Available now on: Hulu


Fear the Walking Dead: Season 1 (2015) 76%

AMC’s Certified Fresh spinoff from its popular series focuses on a dysfunctional family’s attempts to survive the early days of the zombie apocalypse. The season one pilot is available to watch on RT now, and the entire season is on Hulu.

Available now on: Hulu


The X-Files: Season 10 (2016) 64%

Mulder and Scully are back! The new six-episode arc of The X-Files reunites the two former partners to investigate new conspiracies. The season ten premiere is online now and available to stream.

Available now on: Hulu


New on Amazon Prime

 

Fargo (1996) 94%

The Coen brothers’ Certified Fresh Best Picture winner — which inspired the acclaimed TV series of the same name — stars William H. Macy as a put-upon car salesman whose ill-advised plot to have his wife kidnapped goes woefully awry.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Sabrina (1954) 93%

Audrey Hepburn, Humphrey Bogart, and William Holden star in this Billy Wilder classic about a pair of brothers who compete for the affections for their chauffeur’s daughter.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Six Degrees of Separation (1993) 88%

Will Smith stars in this drama about a young con man who inserts himself into the lives of an aging wealthy couple by posing as close friend of their children.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Mercy Street: Season 1 (2016) 73%

Josh Radnor and Mary Elizabeth Winstead star in PBS’s period drama about a pair of Civil War nurses who must learn to put their loyalties aside when they’re forced to work together in a makeshift hospital during the war.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on Netflix

 

Drone (2014) 94%

This documentary explores the ethics of drone warfare from the perspectives of the pilots and those on the ground who have experienced the effects firsthand.

Available now on: Netflix


Turbo Kid (2015) 91%

Set in an alternate universe’s post-apocalyptic 1997, this Certified Fresh throwback to cheesy 1980s action films follows a BMX-riding teen who teams up with an odd, abandoned young woman to take down a local crime lord.

Available now on: Netflix


From Dusk Till Dawn: Season 2 (2015)

Based on the Robert Rodriguez film of the same name, this supernatural El Rey Network action series follows a pair of fugitives who cross the border into Mexico and find themselves trapped in a strip club populated by vampires.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Fandor

 

Seven Samurai (1954) 100%

Akira Kurosawa’s influential masterpiece tells the story of a handful of rōnin samurai who are hired by a small town to protect them from pillaging bandits.

Available now on: Fandor


The Wages of Fear (1953) 100%

Henri-Georges Clouzot’s drama follows four men of varying nationalities who are stuck in Mexico and answer an oil company’s call for drivers to transport dangerous chemicals across a hazardous terrain.

Available now on: Fandor


Solaris (1972) 92%

Andrei Tarkovsky’s sci-fi drama centers on a psychologist who is sent to a remote space station to investigate a mysterious death and the deteriorating mental states of the remaining crew, only to discover something more ominous.

Available now on: Fandor


The Virgin Spring (1959) 87%

Ingmar Bergman’s dark, moralistic drama centers on a group of thugs who rape a young woman in the woods, then continue on their way and unknowingly arrive at her home, where they face the wrath of her father.

Available now on: Fandor


Available to Purchase

 

The Assassin (2015) 80%

Nominated for several critics awards this year — and a BAFTA — Hou Hsiao-Hsien’s Certified Fresh period martial arts drama stars Shu Qi as an assassin conflicted about her profession who is ordered to kill someone from her romantic past.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


Crimson Peak (2015) 73%

Mia Wasikowska, Tom Hiddleston, and Jessica Chastain star in Guillermo Del Toro’s visually impressive gothic supernatural drama about an aspiring American writer who is whisked away by a dashing baronet to a creaky old English mansion, where specters begin to appear to her.

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu


Truth (2015) 63%

Cate Blanchett and Robert Redford star in this political drama about Dan Rather’s final days as CBS news anchor and the election-related controversy that blemished the end of his career in 2004.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu

(Photo by Frederick M. Brown / Getty Images)

 

Wes Craven, the influential horror director behind such genre classics as A Nightmare on Elm Street and Scream, died Sunday, Aug. 30 after a battle with brain cancer. He was 76.

Craven’s films are among horror cinema’s most indelible and iconic. Freddy Krueger, whose blade-fingered reign of terror began in Craven’s 1984 classic A Nightmare on Elm Street, is arguably the definitive big-screen boogeyman of the 1980s, and his Scream films showed that Craven could juggle self-referential laughs with bone chilling scares.

Born in Cleveland in 1939, Craven worked as a professor at several colleges before getting a job as a sound engineer at a post-production company in New York City (he also worked on adult productions using a pseudonym). Craven’s first film was a major success; the low-budget proto-slasher movie The Last House on the Left was a brutal tale of murder and revenge that sparked controversy and threats of censorship as well as admiration for its uncommon intelligence (its story borrowed heavily from Ingmar Bergman’s The Virgin Spring). Craven went on to direct The Hills Have Eyes (1977), about a family of cannibals, and Swamp Thing (1982), based on the DC comics character, before hitting the jackpot with A Nightmare on Elm Street (featuring Johnny Depp in his big-screen debut).

In addition to his work in horror films, Craven also directed the 1999 drama Music of the Heart starring Meryl Streep as a violin teacher; and the Hitchcockian thriller Red Eye, starring Rachel McAdams as an airplane passenger trying to outwit a terrorist played by Cillian Murphy. Craven’s last directorial credit was Scream 4, though he was an executive producer on the 2015 Scream TV series. He is survived by his wife, Iya Labunka, and two children from a previous marriage.

Craven shared his Five Favorite Films with RT in 2009. For Craven’s complete filmography on Rotten Tomatoes, click here.

Wes-Craven-600

(Photo by Frazer Harrison / Staff / Getty Images)

 

No director in recent history has made their particular genre as much their own as Wes Craven. The legendary helmer virtually redefined the horror movies with the likes of The Hills Have Eyes and The Nightmare on Elm Street. His very first film was the horrifically violent box-office smash The Last House on the Left. Unlike Elm Street – which is being reinvented without any input from Craven – Last House is being remade with the director’s blessing, under the stewardship of Dennis Iliadis, and hits UK screens this Friday. RT had some time with Craven, and with the scaremongering legend on the other end of our phone, we just couldn’t resist asking him for his five favourite films.


The Virgin Spring (1959) 87%

“Firstly I’m going to go for The Virgin Spring. It’s a film that may surprise people but it really had an impact on me and I was just amazed by it. I saw it in a relatively short period of my life when I was teaching at college. When I was younger I hadn’t been allowed to watch any because I went to a Baptist College, but by this time I had put the religion behind me and that was one of the first art films I saw and I was very impressed by it. I mean, I could list you a dozen movies from that era by European by European film directors by Godard, TruffautBreathless, 400 Blows, all those wonderful European movies.”

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) 93%

“Thinking about my upbringing, this was actually one of the first movies I saw. I was about 15. I was always told that films were evil and such, but I started to realise what a load of crap it was that something this good should be forbidden. I had been allowed to read as much as I wanted when I was younger, so I recognised great art when I saw it, I just didn’t realise it would be at the cinema as well. And so I walked away from that. To Kill a Mockingbird was so important because it was such adult film-making – to see something that dealt with such an important issue and had such an enlightened outlook on the world.”

Red River (1948) 100%

“For some reason. I think the combination of the gruff, tyrannical old man pursuing the unruly, rebellious son really appeals to me. The scenario is, in some odd way, almost as scary as Freddy Krueger, you know! The evil father is an idea that’s really fascinating to me. Hawks is great, The Treasure of Sierra Madre, The Big Sleep… He could do the Salt-of-the-Earth very well. He was a very smooth director; a very good film architect in terms of his storytelling. That’s how he constructed this film, and got so deep into the characters.”

Night of the Living Dead (1968) 96%

“I saw this movie when it first came out and at that point I’d never see a horror film, believe it or not! I had a girlfriend at the time, she was an anthropology student, and she said, ‘I heard there’s this new film called Night of the Living Dead, c’mon lets go.’ Eventually we left and when we got there the theatre was buzzing before the film even started. And then it starts, and we’re in the cemetery with the brothers and sisters bickering and then the zombie lurches towards them! Some people are screaming, some were saying the lines of the characters and suddenly I was swept into it and jumping and laughing and afraid, and I realised that this guy Romero was incredible.

“It also made me realise that with a genre film, as long as it scared you, you could say anything; about politics, about psychology. It made me realise as well that fear is one of the primary thresholds you experience things through. Fear of anything – even sex – is scary! The first time you do it you’re like, ‘Oh my God, what am I doing? Am I going to fail?’ And you get through it and you realise it’s a wonderful thing. That’s what’s great about the horror genre is that you’re getting a load of people together in the cinema at the same place and the same time, having them all experience extreme fear, and come out alive at the end. It’s an uplifting experience and there’s a sense of elation.”

The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974) 89%

“This really scared me coming out of it. You knew it was made for 10 cents – that was obvious – but it actually had some fabulous performances. Some of the moments – like when Leatherface kicks open the door and comes after them – I mean your blood just runs cold. It was just amazingly visceral visual storytelling. A few years earlier, I was at college and I wrote a synopsis for a novel and my teacher feedback was “this would make a great movie!” And I was crestfallen, but it made me realise I had a great visual imagination as well, and for years I fought it but eventually realised that was the thing I could do.”

With the passing of Ingmar Bergman Monday, the world of cinema lost one of its most unique and important voices. Thus, we at Rotten Tomatoes decided to pick our favorite Bergman films as a tribute to the man who contributed so much to the art of movies.

From dark allegory (The Seventh Seal) to light(er) comedy (Smiles of a Summer Night), from emotionally wrenching period drama (Sawdust and Tinsel, Cries and Whispers) to musical theater (The Magic Flute), Bergman contributed a depth of feeling and intelligence to the cinema seldom seen before. The great Swedish director confronted the mysteries of human existence head-on, and, in doing so, carved out a niche that casts a long shadow over the medium.

Bergman’s work has influenced everything from The Break-Up to Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey; Wes Craven utilized The Virgin Spring as the basis for Last House on the Left, while Woody Allen and Robert Altman cited him as a key influence.

With a filmography as rich and potent as Bergman’s, it’s hard to know where to start. If you’re a beginner to Bergman’s oeuvre, here are some of our favorites.

Wild Strawberries

A lyrical and sometimes surreal film about a man in the twilight of his life, Wild Strawberries explores Bergman’s recurrent themes of innocent children subjected to dishonorable elders. The old man in Wild Strawberries realizes too late that he’s failed to create meaningful relationships with those near to him and remembers, with some dishonesty, his often painful past.

Fanny and Alexander

A broadly autobiographical film about Bergman’s own upbringing, Fanny and Alexander was made for Swedish TV and re-edited from 300 minutes down to 168 for release in American theaters. Bergman’s most popular film in the states, Fanny and Alexander deals again with Bergman’s issues of innocence and knowledge and displays in, sometimes depraved ways, how children don’t lose their innocence so much as have it stolen from them.

— Sara Schieron

Winter Light

Best known as the middle entry of Bergman’s “faith trilogy,” Winter Light revolves around a pastor’s crisis of faith after he’s unable to console one of his congregation. It’s an emotionally direct film — no dream sequences, no parlor games with Death — and Bergman skillfully draws tension from this simplicity. The film essentially ends the same way it begins, but everything that transpires in between gives the film’s final moment a shot of existential horror Bergman is legendary for.

— Alex Vo

Persona

A deeply unsettling, hypnotic work, Persona explores the fluidity of human existence. Liv Ullman plays Elizabeth, an actress who has suffered an onstage breakdown; she refuses to speak, and is cared for by Alma (Bibi Andersson). What follows is a disquieting journey into the depths of the soul; as Alma reveals her deepest secrets to Elizabeth, she finds herself in an emotional tug-of-war with her patient. Persona is Bergman at his most formally experimental, and his obsession with the poetry of the human face is at its apex in this mysterious, rewarding film.

Monika

One of Bergman’s earliest films, Monika is about the fleeting nature and naiveté of youthful passions. A free-spirited teenager named Monika (Harriet Andersson) and her reserved boyfriend Harry (Lars Ekborg) spend an idyllic summer on a remote island — before reality and responsibility set in. Monika may lack the existential probing and Big Questions of Bergman’s later films, but as an examination of the messiness of teenage emotions, it has a delicate beauty all its own.

— Tim Ryan

Ingmar Bergman, the “poet with a camera,” died in his sleep at his home in Faro, Sweden Monday at the age of 89. The director of such influential films as The Seventh Seal, Persona, Cries and Whispers, and Fanny and Alexander, Bergman was known for his literary sensibilities and existential ruminations. The director’s work has exerted a profound influence on filmmakers as disparate as Woody Allen, Lars Von Trier, and Wes Craven.

Bergman’s childhood and early career is outlined in potent detail in his autobiography The Magic Lantern. A precursor to the slide projector, Bergman acquired a magic lantern from his brother in trade for 100 tin soldiers. Citing his imagination as a refuge from the oppressive discipline of a Lutheran clergyman father and housewife mother, it’s rather poetic he should enter the realm of cinema by trading toys for visions. (Fanny and Alexander, about an upper-class family in Upsala before the First World War, is regarded as a loosely autobiographical portrayal of his youth).


Bergman on the set of Saraband

Bergman left his home at the age of 19 and got a menial job at the Royal Opera House. In 1942 the Swedish Film Industry hired him as an assistant scriptwriter. Torment (aka Frenzy or Hets), a script he wrote in 1944 was filmed by then dominant director Alf Sjoeberg and went on to win several awards including the grand prize at the 1946 Cannes Film Festival. Promptly thereafter, Bergman began his directorial career, producing an average of one film a year. When his comedy Smiles of a Summer Night (1955) appeared in theaters he won international acclaim. Bergman also worked in television, directing everything from soap commercials to the monumental miniseries Scenes from a Marriage (1973).

Bergman frequently collaborated with such notables as Max von Sydow, , Harriet Andersson, Gunnar Bjornstrand, Ingrid Thulin, Erland Josephson, and especially Liv Ullmann, with whom he produced ten films and a daughter.

Bergman won Academy Awards for best foreign film in 1960 (The Virgin Spring), 1961 (Through a Glass Darkly) and 1963 (Winter Light). The latter two films were part of his “faith trilogy,” and it’s suggested the third in the series (The Silence) was too sexually suggestive to be considered for the Oscars. In 1972, two of his films, Persona and Wild Strawberries (1957), were included in Sight and Sound’s prestigious poll of critics as two of the 10 greatest films of all time. In 2005, Time Magazine called him the world’s greatest living filmmaker.

The Associated Press reports the filmmaker, director of 54 features, and 129 stage productions, never fully recovered from a hip surgery he had in October. His last film was 2005’s Saraband.

Bergman is survived by his nine children. Funeral services have not yet been announced but the Swedish Film Institute plans a memorial event for the month of August.