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(Photo by Warner Bros/Everett Collection)

All Ryan Gosling Movies Ranked

Not every child actor grows up to be a multiple Oscar nominee, but then, not every child actor is Ryan Gosling. After a stint singing and dancing alongside Justin Timberlake and Britney Spears on The Mickey Mouse Club, Gosling flashed early signs of his potential in movies like Remember the Titans and The Believer, then melted hearts everywhere as Noah Calhoun in The Notebook. Just two years later, he’d garner his first Best Actor nod for Half Nelson, as he starred in a string of acclaimed independent films like Lars and the Real Girl and Blue Valentine. Even as he’s risen to the A-list, he continues to star in a wide variety of projects, from cult favorites like Drive and The Nice Guys to high-profile spectacles like Blade Runner 2049 and La La Land, which earned him his second Oscar nomination. With all of that in mind, we’ve rounded up all Ryan Gosling movies and sorted them by Tomatometer. Have look below and see where your favorites land!

#24

Stay (2005)
27%

#24
Adjusted Score: 30540%
Critics Consensus: A muddled brain-teaser, Stay has a solid cast and innovative visuals but little beneath the surface.
Synopsis: Sam Foster (Ewan McGregor), a psychiatrist, has a new patient, Henry Letham (Ryan Gosling), who claims to be suicidal. In... [More]
Directed By: Marc Forster

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: 34886%
Critics Consensus: A predictable police procedural that works better as a character study rather than a thriller.
Synopsis: The body of a young woman is found in a ditch in the woods of the small California coastal town... [More]
Directed By: Barbet Schroeder

#22

Gangster Squad (2013)
31%

#22
Adjusted Score: 38313%
Critics Consensus: Though it's stylish and features a talented cast, Gangster Squad suffers from lackluster writing, underdeveloped characters, and an excessive amount of violence.
Synopsis: Ruthless, Brooklyn-born mobster Mickey Cohen (Sean Penn) has 1949 Los Angeles in an iron fist, as he accumulates a fortune... [More]
Directed By: Ruben Fleischer

#21
Adjusted Score: 36652%
Critics Consensus: The United States of Leland has its moments, but they're undermined by a muddled plot, unsympathetic characters, and frustratingly uneven performances.
Synopsis: A withdrawn young man, Leland Fitzgerald (Ryan Gosling) is imprisoned for the murder of a mentally disabled boy, who also... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Ryan Hoge

#20

All Good Things (2010)
35%

#20
Adjusted Score: 37222%
Critics Consensus: It's well-acted, and the true story that inspired it offers plenty of drama -- which is why it's so frustrating that All Good Things is so clichéd and frustratingly ambiguous.
Synopsis: Heir to a real-estate dynasty, David Marks (Ryan Gosling) lives in the shadow of his father, Sanford (Frank Langella). He... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Jarecki

#19
#19
Adjusted Score: 47522%
Critics Consensus: Director Refn remains as visually stylish as ever, but Only God Forgives fails to add enough narrative smarts or relatable characters to ground its beautifully filmed depravity.
Synopsis: In Thailand, a drug trafficker's (Ryan Gosling) icy mother (Kristin Scott Thomas) sends him on a mission to avenge his... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

#18

Song to Song (2017)
44%

#18
Adjusted Score: 52286%
Critics Consensus: As visually sumptuous as it is narratively spartan, Terrence Malick's Song to Song echoes elements of the writer-director's recent work -- for better and for worse.
Synopsis: Set against the Austin, Texas, music scene, two entangled couples -- struggling songwriters Faye (Rooney Mara) and BV (Ryan Gosling),... [More]
Directed By: Terrence Malick

#17

The Notebook (2004)
53%

#17
Adjusted Score: 59400%
Critics Consensus: It's hard not to admire its unabashed sentimentality, but The Notebook is too clumsily manipulative to rise above its melodramatic clichés.
Synopsis: In 1940s South Carolina, mill worker Noah Calhoun (Ryan Gosling) and rich girl Allie (Rachel McAdams) are desperately in love.... [More]
Directed By: Nick Cassavetes

#16

Fracture (2007)
71%

#16
Adjusted Score: 78326%
Critics Consensus: Though Fracture's plot is somewhat implausible, the onscreen face-off between Gosling and Hopkins overshadows any faults.
Synopsis: Willy Beachum (Ryan Gosling), a hotshot prosecutor, is about to leave his post for a lucrative job at a private... [More]
Directed By: Gregory Hoblit

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 76982%
Critics Consensus: An inspirational crowd-pleaser with a healthy dose of social commentary, Remember the Titans may be predictable, but it's also well-crafted and features terrific performances.
Synopsis: In Virginia, high school football is a way of life, an institution revered, each game celebrated more lavishly than Christmas,... [More]
Directed By: Boaz Yakin

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 74217%
Critics Consensus: A bleak but original indie, The Slaughter Rule benefits from outstanding performances by Ryan Gosling and David Morse.
Synopsis: Roy (Ryan Gosling) gets cut from his high school football team just days after his estranged father dies. For him,... [More]

#13
Adjusted Score: 86075%
Critics Consensus: Ambitious to a fault, The Place Beyond the Pines finds writer/director Derek Cianfrance reaching for -- and often grasping -- thorny themes of family, fatherhood, and fate.
Synopsis: In upstate New York, two men (Ryan Gosling, Bradley Cooper), and later, their sons (Dane DeHaan, Emory Cohen) must deal... [More]
Directed By: Derek Cianfrance

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 88253%
Critics Consensus: It never lives up to the first part of its title, but Crazy, Stupid, Love's unabashed sweetness -- and its terrifically talented cast -- more than make up for its flaws.
Synopsis: Cal Weaver (Steve Carell) is living the American dream. He has a good job, a beautiful house, great children and... [More]
Directed By: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 86187%
Critics Consensus: Lars and the Real Girl could've so easily been a one-joke movie. But the talented cast, a great script, and direction never condescends to its character or the audience.
Synopsis: Extremely shy Lars (Ryan Gosling) finds it impossible to make friends or socialize. His brother (Paul Schneider) and sister-in-law (Emily... [More]
Directed By: Craig Gillespie

#10

The Believer (2001)
83%

#10
Adjusted Score: 84526%
Critics Consensus: Gosling commands the screen with a raw, electrifying performance.
Synopsis: A little knowledge is a dangerous thing -- an adage proven with shocking ramifications in Henry Bean's "The Believer." The... [More]
Directed By: Henry Bean

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 92727%
Critics Consensus: While not exactly exposing revelatory truths, The Ides of March is supremely well-acted drama that moves at a measured, confident clip.
Synopsis: As Ohio's Democratic primary nears, charming Gov. Mike Morris (George Clooney) seems a shoo-in for the nomination over his opponent,... [More]
Directed By: George Clooney

#8

Blue Valentine (2010)
86%

#8
Adjusted Score: 94133%
Critics Consensus: This emotionally gripping examination of a marriage on the rocks isn't always easy to watch, but Michelle Williams and Ryan Gosling give performances of unusual depth and power.
Synopsis: Dean (Ryan Gosling) and Cindy (Michelle Williams) live a quiet life in a modest neighborhood. To the casual observer, everything... [More]
Directed By: Derek Cianfrance

#7

First Man (2018)
87%

#7
Adjusted Score: 115360%
Critics Consensus: First Man uses a personal focus to fuel a look back at a pivotal moment in human history - and takes audiences on a soaring dramatic journey along the way.
Synopsis: Hoping to reach the moon by the end of the decade, NASA plans a series of extremely dangerous, unprecedented missions... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 120782%
Critics Consensus: Visually stunning and narratively satisfying, Blade Runner 2049 deepens and expands its predecessor's story while standing as an impressive filmmaking achievement in its own right.
Synopsis: Officer K (Ryan Gosling), a new blade runner for the Los Angeles Police Department, unearths a long-buried secret that has... [More]
Directed By: Denis Villeneuve

#5

The Big Short (2015)
89%

#5
Adjusted Score: 101774%
Critics Consensus: The Big Short approaches a serious, complicated subject with an impressive attention to detail -- and manages to deliver a well-acted, scathingly funny indictment of its real-life villains in the bargain.
Synopsis: In 2008, Wall Street guru Michael Burry realizes that a number of subprime home loans are in danger of defaulting.... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#4

Half Nelson (2006)
91%

#4
Adjusted Score: 96526%
Critics Consensus: Half Nelson features powerful performances from Ryan Gosling and Shareeka Epps. It's a wise, unsentimental portrait of lonely people at the crossroads.
Synopsis: Dan Dunne (Ryan Gosling) is a history teacher at a Brooklyn school. Though well-liked by his students and colleagues, he... [More]
Directed By: Ryan Fleck

#3

La La Land (2016)
91%

#3
Adjusted Score: 120063%
Critics Consensus: La La Land breathes new life into a bygone genre with thrillingly assured direction, powerful performances, and an irresistible excess of heart.
Synopsis: Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and Mia (Emma Stone) are drawn together by their common desire to do what they love. But... [More]
Directed By: Damien Chazelle

#2

The Nice Guys (2016)
91%

#2
Adjusted Score: 110270%
Critics Consensus: The Nice Guys hearkens back to the buddy comedies of a bygone era while adding something extra courtesy of a knowing script and the irresistible chemistry of its leads.
Synopsis: Holland March (Ryan Gosling) is a down-on-his-luck private eye in 1977 Los Angeles. Jackson Healy (Russell Crowe) is a hired... [More]
Directed By: Shane Black

#1

Drive (2011)
93%

#1
Adjusted Score: 102675%
Critics Consensus: With its hyper-stylized blend of violence, music, and striking imagery, Drive represents a fully realized vision of arthouse action.
Synopsis: Driver is a skilled Hollywood stuntman who moonlights as a getaway driver for criminals. Though he projects an icy exterior,... [More]
Directed By: Nicolas Winding Refn

This week, we’ve got a Disney hit from early this year, some binge-worthy Netflix programming, and a contemplative adventure movie to kick things off. Then we’ve also got a handful of smaller films, a few acclaimed older films, and a bona fide Hollywood classic. Check out the full list below.


New on Netflix

 

Strong Island (2017) 100%

This documentary chronicles the roots of director Yance Ford’s family, leading up to the 1992 murder of his own brother William Jr. and the aftereffects of the tragedy.

Available now on: Netflix


American Vandal: Season 1 (2017) 98%

This Netflix original mockumentary series pokes fun at the true-crime genre, as a high school sophomore investigates whether or not a classmate was unjustly expelled for crimes of vandalism he may not have committed.

Available now on: Netflix


Manhunt: Unabomber (2017) 93%

Sam Worthington and Paul Bettany star in this scripted series from Discovery recounting the true story behind the FBI’s search and capture of the Unabomber.

Available now on: Netflix


Half Nelson (2006) 91%

Ryan Gosling and Shareeka Epps star in this drama about a high school teacher and heroin addict who bonds with a student who knows his secret.

Available now on: Netflix


Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (2007) 88%

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Ethan Hawke, and Marisa Tomei star in Sidney Lumet’s dark drama about a pair of brothers whose plan to rob their parents’ jewelry store goes awry.

Available now on: Netflix


First They Killed My Father (2017) 88%

Angelina Jolie directs this biopic inspired by the life of Cambodian human rights activist Loung Ung.

Available now on: Netflix


Beauty and the Beast (2017) 71%

Emma Watson and Dan Stevens star in Bill Condon’s live-action Disney adaptation of the studio’s own take on the classic tale of a young woman held captive by an angry beast who was once a prince.

Available now on: Netflix


Slack Bay (2016) 65%

Juliette Binoche stars in this French comedy about an eccentric family whose seaside vacation is interrupted by two bumbling cops investigating a string of missing tourists.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Amazon Prime

 

My Man Godfrey (1936) 97%

William Powell and Carole Lombard star in this classic screwball comedy about a wealthy young woman who hires a vagrant as her new butler, only to discover there’s more to him than meets the eye. Amazon has both the original black-and-white version as well as a colorized version available to stream.

Available now on Amazon Prime: Original, In Color


The Lost City of Z (2016) 86%

Charlie Hunnam and Tom Holland star in this historical adventure-drama about Percy Fawcett, the British explorer who disappeared in the Amazon during a search for a lost civilization.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


We Are What We Are (2013) 86%

In this slow-burning gothic chiller, a small-town family with a controlling patriarch will do anything to preserve its most treasured — and perverse — traditions.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Alex of Venice (2014) 74%

Mary Elizabeth Winstead stars as the titular character in Chris Messina’s directorial debut, about a recently single attorney who learns to move on with life.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


New on FandangoNOW

 

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) 94%

To celebrate the occasion of the 40th anniversary of Steven Spielberg’s monumental sci-fi film, FandangoNOW now has the original theatrical version, the director’s cut, and a special collector’s edition available to stream.

Available now on FandangoNOW: Theatrical Cut, Director’s Cut, Collector’s Edition


A Ghost Story (2017) 91%

Rooney Mara and Casey Affleck star in David Lowery’s contemplative drama about a recently deceased man whose spirit returns to the home he shared with his wife, only to find her slowly slipping away.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


The Book of Henry (2017) 22%

Naomi Watts and Jacob Tremblay star in Colin Trevorrow’s mystery drama about a woman who discovers one of her sons has been secretly plotting to help the girl next door escape her abusive father.

Available now on: FandangoNOW


Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017) 30%

Johnny Depp returns for the fifth installment of Disney’s swashbuckling franchise, which finds Jack Sparrow on the run from a deadly ghost pirate bent on his destruction.

Available now on: FandangoNOW

 

Ryan Gosling reunites with his Crazy, Stupid, Love. and Gangster Squad co-star Emma Stone for this weekend’s La La Land — and even though it’s only opening in New York and L.A., this festival favorite is already Certified Fresh and well on its way to ending up as one of the better-reviewed movies of the year. In honor of its arrival, we decided to take a fond look back at some of the brighter highlights from Mr. Gosling’s growing filmography, and you know what that means, folks: It’s time for Total Recall!


10. The Place Beyond the Pines (2012) 78%

gosling-place-beyond-pines

After accruing critical acclaim together with Blue Valentine, Gosling and writer-director Derek Cianfrance reunited for 2013’s The Place Beyond the Pines — a very different sort of drama that, instead of picking over the bones of a doomed relationship, traces the aftermath of a man’s fateful decision to turn to crime in order to support his child. Starring Gosling in the lead opposite Bradley Cooper as the cop who targets his character after he breaks the law, Pines earned its hefty 140-minute running time with an ambitious multi-generational story that proved Valentine‘s accolades were no fluke; as Steven Rea wrote for the Philadelphia Inquirer, “This is a story about legacy, the sins of the father, the restlessness in our souls. It’s powerful, it’s bold, it hits you hard.”

Watch Trailer


9. Lars and the Real Girl (2007) 81%

gosling-lars-real-girl

It may have a perfectly tasteless-sounding plot, but Lars and the Real Girl is actually far more empathetic, wise, and finely shaded than any movie about a man in a relationship with a sex doll has a right to be — and that’s largely because few actors could have grounded its largely inscrutable and possibly demented central character as sensitively as Gosling, who earned a Golden Globe nomination for his work. Gosling was supported with a solid cast and a tender script that, in the words of the Globe and Mail’s Rick Groen, offered “A sweet little fable about how a delusional man-child is helped by the loving ministrations of his family and community, the kind of throwback flick where human nature is seen as inherently good — a notion so quaint that it feels damn near buoyant.”

Watch Trailer


8. The Believer (2001) 83%

gosling-the-believer

Less than a decade removed from his early career as a children’s TV fixture on shows like Young Hercules and the mid-’90s Mickey Mouse Club revival — and just a year after popping up briefly in Remember the Titans — Gosling scored the lead role in Henry Bean’s The Believer, a harrowing dramatization of the incredible life story of Jewish Neo-Nazi Daniel Burros. While Gosling’s character in the film achieves a somewhat happier ending than the real-life Burros, who shot himself after his heritage was publicly revealed, that doesn’t make the rest of The Believer any easier to watch — and neither does it detract from Gosling’s searing performance. “It’s blunt, controversial and never takes the easy road through its themes and situations,” observed Rich Cline of Shadows on the Wall. “It’s also profoundly moving.”

Watch Trailer


 7. The Ides of March (2011) 84%

gosling-ides-of-march

Howard Dean’s 2004 presidential campaign may not have amounted to much besides a lot of mocking soundbites from pundits, but it did provide the inspiration for Beau Willimon’s well-reviewed play Farragut North — which, in turn, inspired George Clooney to adapt its script into the screenplay for The Ides of March, a solidly reviewed 2011 political drama about, as Willimon put it, “the lust for power and the costs one will endure to achieve it.” While it wasn’t exactly a blockbuster, Ides outperformed at the box office considering its Beltway subject matter — and it found no shortage of critical accolades for Clooney (who starred, directed, and earned an Oscar nomination for his screenplay), Gosling (who picked up another Golden Globe nomination for his work as a conflicted campaign manager), or the film itself. As Charlie McCollum put it for the San Jose Mercury News, “This is intelligent filmmaking, and a provocative moral fable. It may not be perfect, but it stands as one of the better, most realistic movies about the way we elect our leaders.”

Watch Trailer


6. The Big Short (2015) 89%

gosling-big-short

How do you take the 2008 financial crisis and turn it into an entertaining movie? Hand the reins to ex-SNL writer and frequent Will Ferrell confederate Adam McKay, stock the larder with a top-shelf cast that includes Brad Pitt, Steve Carrell, Christian Bale, and Ryan Gosling, and focus your story on the trials and tribulations of a hedge fund manager — oh, and while you’re at it, line up Margot Robbie and Selena Gomez to explain modern finance. The end result is The Big Short, an all-star dramedy that manages to make banking shenanigans entertaining — no small feat, especially considering that many people are still dealing with the real-life effects of the story. As Dana Stevens put it for Slate, “One of the most appealing things about this very appealing movie — a stylistic Chex Mix of storytelling, satire, advocacy, and clip art — is its high regard for the intellect of the viewer.”

Watch Trailer


5. Blue Valentine (2010) 86%

gosling-blue-valentine

Writer/director Derek Cianfrance struggled for years to find funding for Blue Valentine, but his faith was handsomely rewarded when the film’s sensitive, non-linear portrayal of a young urban couple’s courtship and divorce ended up earning some of the most passionate critical accolades of 2010 — including a Golden Globe nomination for Gosling and an Academy Award nomination for Michelle Williams. Boasting improvised dialogue and appropriately raw performances, Valentine enraptured critics like Mike Scott of the Times-Picayune, who observed, “It’s at its root a hard-to-resist character study. That’s because the character being studied is you and me and everyone else who has ever fallen in, and out of, love.”

Watch Trailer


4. Half Nelson (2006) 91%

gosling-half-nelson

Gosling earned an Academy Award nomination for his work in this Sundance favorite, a piercing drama about a middle-school teacher whose worsening drug problem complicates — and serves as an unlikely basis for — his friendship with a student (Shareeka Epps) who’s facing her own substance-related struggles. Though it was far from a big hit at the box office, Half Nelson proved definitively that its star could carry more than just handsomely lensed weepies like The Notebook — and it proved an instant favorite for critics like Terry Lawson of the Detroit Free Press, who wrote, “Although the subject promises more than the film can deliver, there is compensation in Gosling’s convincing, unromanticized portrayal of someone seeking escape from longing and loss that neither he nor the movie can really define.”

Watch Trailer


3. Drive (2011) 93%

gosling-drive

He didn’t have much dialogue — or even really a name — but Ryan Gosling’s character in Nicolas Winding Refn’s Drive came equipped with enough cool to rock a satin scorpion jacket — and enough hard-won knowledge of the L.A. underworld to try and make a difference in the lives of his alluringly sad neighbor (Carey Mulligan) and her recently returned ex-con husband (Oscar Isaac). Sleek, dark, and stylish, Drive doled out a heaping helping of action thrills without sacrificing smarts or character; as Jason Best put it for Movie Talk, “From its opening shots, Refn’s movie is as cool and controlled as its protagonist… at once unhurriedly stylish and intensely gripping. You’d like to lean back and admire, but the action keeps pulling you to the edge of your seat.”

Watch Trailer


2. The Nice Guys (2016) 91%

gosling-the-nice-guys

In the right hands, even the most well-worn formula can make for entertaining viewing, and The Nice Guys offers delightfully profane proof. Starring Gosling alongside Russell Crowe as a pair of LAPD detectives who stumble into a conspiracy while investigating the death of a porn star, it highlights its leads’ comic chemistry while underscoring director/co-writer Shane Black’s way with a buddy cop picture — plus, its ’70s setting makes room for a cool soundtrack and all sorts of questionable wardrobe choices. “The Nice Guys flies high on the chemistry between Gosling and Crowe, and Black gives them plenty to chew on,” wrote Adam Graham for the Detroit News. “It’s a gourmet summer treat. Nice, guys.”

Watch Trailer


1. La La Land (2016) 91%

ryan-gosling-lalaland-recall

Not many screen couples get the opportunity to team up for more than one movie — and those who do often learn the hard way that lightning rarely strikes twice. Gosling and Emma Stone suffered the sophomore jinx with their second outing, Gangster Squad, but their effervescent onscreen chemistry rebounded in a big way with La La Land. In this throwback musical from Whiplash writer-director Damian Chizelle, Stone plays an aspiring starlet and Gosling is a musician dedicated to a dream — a time-tested setup that pays an affectionate debt to the classics of yesteryear while unfolding against the backdrop of a lovingly filmed Los Angeles. To say critics were charmed would be an understatement; after wowing festival crowds and a rapturously received limited theatrical release, La La Land ranked among the best-reviewed films of 2016. “Catch the film on the largest screen you can find, with a sound system to match,” urged the New Yorker’s Anthony Lane. “Even if that means journeying all day.”

Watch Trailer

The 27-year-old actor will be playing the husband to 36-year-old Rachel Weisz. They’ll be playing the parents of a (dead) 14-year-old girl in the Peter Jackson pic.

Odd math, I know. Then again, Gosling’s a damn fine actor so I’ve no doubt he can pull off "mid-30s" without too much effort. The signing of Oscar nominee Ryan Gosling ("Half Nelson") and Oscar winner Rachel Weisz ("The Constant Gardener") adds some instant class to Jackson‘s long-time passion project. His adaptation of Alice Sebold’s "The Lovely Bones" will begin production in October. The plan is to shoot in Pennsylvania and (of course) New Zealand.

According to Variety, the "story revolves around a young girl who has been murdered and watches over her family — and her killer — from heaven. Girl must weigh her desire for vengeance against her desire for her family to heal." Now I have to decide if I want to read the book before or after I see the movie.

Ryan Gosling’s other films include "Fracture," "Stay," "The Notebook," and "The Believer."

Source: Variety

In this week’s Ketchup, another European has surfaced as a possibile star for the third "Terminator" sequel, "Alien vs. Predator 2" gets a ‘horrific’ makeover, and we get an inside look at "Iron Man."

Also, an update about the "X-Men" spinoff films, and some "Dark Knight" IMAX action. Read on.

This Week’s Most Popular News:


Schwarzenegger vs. Schenkenberg in "Terminator 4"?

Ladies and gentlemen, do we have a new "Terminator"?

"Alien vs. Predator 2" is a "Horror Movie"

It’s been a while since we’ve done anything on "Alien vs. Predator 2," so let’s talk about that one for a few minutes.

Lots of New "Iron Man" Stuff!

Entertainment Tonight hit the "Iron Man" set and came back with some video footage, plus we found another spy pic from the scene.

Update on the "X-Men" Spinoffs

Wondering what’s up with the "Wolverine" and "Magneto" movies? So were the guys at the "X-Men" Films blog, so they got in touch with producer Tom Rothman…

Four ‘Dark Knight’ Sequences to Be Shot in IMAX

As if you needed one more reason to go see the "Batman Begins" sequel: Four of the scenes, including the introduction of The Joker, will be shot in the IMAX format.


More teasers on the way.


In Other News:

  • Helen Mirren will star in the drama "Gaza," about a Jewish woman in the strife-torn Gaza Strip.
  • Chris and Paul Weitz are planning to adapt Michael Moorcock’s fantasy saga "Elric" into a possible feature film series.
  • Darnell Martin will direct the period drama "Cadillac Records" for Sony BMG’s film division.
  • Dennis Iliadis will direct "The Last House on the Left," a remake of Wes Craven‘s first film, with Craven serving as producer.
  • Dane Cook is in talks to star in the comedy "Bachelor No. 2," with Howard Deutch in talks to direct for Lionsgate.
  • Random House pictures and Rogue Films has acquired Scott Sigler’s thriller novel "Infested" for a feature film adaptation.
  • Miramax Films has signed the team behind "Half Nelson" to adapt the Marisha Pessl novel "Special Topics in Calamity Physics" into a feature film. Ryan Fleck will serve as director with Anna Boden producing.

More projects for this guy.

Known as a big predictor of what’ll go down Oscar night, the Screen Actors Guild Awards ceremony took place last Sunday to a rapturous Hollywood crowd without a hitch (or surprises or upsets). Check out the full winners list below, along with analysis on how the SAG results affect the Oscar nominees’ chances.

The SAG Awards frequently mirror Oscar nominations and wins. And this year, they’re more similar than in recent memory. Of the 25 Acting and Best Picture nominations, the SAG and Oscar disagree only twice: the SAG reserved a Supporting Actor nom spot for Leonardo DiCaprio, while the Academy has eyes for Mark Wahlberg (both for "The Departed"). And in the Best Picture category, the SAG had "Bobby" whereas the Oscars have "Letters from Iwo Jima."

"There appears to be a developing unanimity about the year’s best actors," writes Hollywood Reporter’s Gregg Kilday. Indeed, who doubted that Forest Whitaker (Male Actor winner for "The Last King of Scotland"), Jennifer Hudson (the Supporting Female Actor winner for "Dreamgirls"), or Helen Mirren (Outstanding Female Actor for "The Queen") wouldn’t be going home empty-handed? They’ve dominated all the other awards shows prior to the SAG Awards.


"The Queen": Helen Mirren phones it in.

However, it’s hard to say that "Dreamgirls‘" Eddie Murphy, who took home the Outstanding Supporting Male Actor award, is guaranteed the same Oscar reward. According to OscarWatch, every actor nominated for the Supporting Actor Oscar have won roughly the same number of awards as he has.

The same can be said for the Best Picture Oscar. "Little Miss Sunshine" won Best Ensemble Acting (the SAG’s Best Picture equivalent), but the other Best Picture Oscar nominees have just about the same number of accolades. And "Little Miss Sunshine’s" directors snub from the Academy can be another problem. Risky Biz Blog points out that only twice has a Best Picture winner not also have its director(s) nominated (1932’s "Grand Hotel" and 1989’s "Driving Miss Daisy").


Eddie Murphy is SAGacious in "Dreamgirls."

Kilday also notes that "no one film has dominated the best picture race this awards season." Oscar nominess "The Departed," "Babel," "Little Miss Sunshine," and "The Queen" have all been accumulating accolades at about the same rate. "Letters From Iwo Jima", however, lags far behind.


The cast surveys the scene in "Little Miss Sunshine."

And in the case of "Little Miss Sunshine," it can also be said that comedies almost never win the Best Picture. Then again, stranger things have happened. Remember when a neurotic little dude single-handedly took down the Death Star?

Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture

"Little Miss Sunshine"

"Babel"
"Bobby"
"The Departed"
"The Queen"

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Leading Role

Forest Whitaker for "The Last King of Scotland"

Leonardo DiCaprio for "Blood Diamond"
Ryan Gosling for "Half-Nelson"
Peter O’Toole for "Venus"
Will Smith for "Pursuit of Happyness"

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role

Helen Mirren for "The Queen"

Penelope Cruz for "Volver"
Judi Dench for "Notes on a Scandal"
Meryl Streep for "The Devil Wears Prada"
Kate Winslet for "Little Children"

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Supporting Role

Eddie Murphy for "Dreamgirls"

Alan Arkin for "Little Miss Sunshine"
Leonardo DiCaprio for "The Departed"
Jackie Earle Haley for "Little Children"
Djimon Hounsou for "Blood Diamond"

Outstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Supporting Role

Jennifer Hudson for "Dreamgirls"

Adriana Barraza for "Babel"
Cate Blanchett for "Notes on a Scandal"
Abigail Breslin for "Little Miss Sunshine"
Rinko Kikuchi for "Babel"

The expected heavy hitters made the grade — Scorsese, Whitaker, "Dreamgirls" — but there were a handful of surprises…let’s just say, if you thought you’d never read "the Oscar-nominated ‘Borat’" in print, think again! The nominees for the 79th annual Academy Awards are in!

Yes, "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" stole a nomination for best adapted screenplay, and will compete against "Children of Men," "Notes on a Scandal," "The Departed," and "Little Children" in that category. High Five!

Fans of Ryan Gosling will be happy to know that he made the Oscar list for his work in "Half Nelson," joining company like Leonardo DiCaprio ("The Departed"), Peter O’Toole ("Venus") and Forest Whitaker ("Last King of Scotland") in the lead actor category. The fifth nominee? The Fresh Prince himself, Will Smith ("Pursuit of Happiness").

Golden Globe winner Martin Scorsese is also up for the best director Oscar in a near-rematch of that race. This time, the Academy’s given only one nod to Clint Eastwood ("Letters From Iwo Jima") to make room for "United 93" director Paul Greengrass.

"Little Miss Sunshine" tot Abigail Breslin has a nomination for supporting actress and will face off with "Babel" twosome Adriana Barraza and Rinko Kikuchi, "Notes on a Scandal"’s Cate Blanchett, and "Dreamgirls" star Jennifer Hudson. Breslin’s ten years old. Is that a new youngest-ever nominee?

"Dreamgirls" nabbed noms in both supporting categories (Golden Globe winners Jennifer Hudson and Eddie Murphy, respectively), as well as art direction, costume design, and three of the five Best Song nominations. We’ll see if voters can differentiate between "Listen," "Love You I Do," and "Patience" or if they’ll split their "Dreamgirls" votes and send the Oscar to Melissa Etheridge’s "Inconvenient Truth" song or Randy Newman’s ditty from "Cars."

And then, the other awards. Those categories that enable certain sub-performing films to call themselves "Oscar-nominated."

  • The Oscar-nominated "Black Dahlia" (36 percent Tomatometer), for best cinematography
  • The Oscar-nominated "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (53 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in sound mixing and visual effects
  • The Oscar-nominated "Poseidon" (32 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in visual effects
  • The Oscar-nominated "Click" (31 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in make-up

Tune in Sunday, February 25 at 5pm PST/8 pm EST for the awards ceremony telecast on ABC!

Read on for the full list of Oscar Nominations!

Performance by an actor in a leading role

Leonardo DiCaprio in "Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Ryan Gosling in "Half Nelson" (THINKFilm)
Peter O’Toole in "Venus" (Miramax, Filmfour and UK Council)
Will Smith in "The Pursuit of Happyness" (Sony Pictures Releasing)
Forest Whitaker in "The Last King of Scotland" (Fox Searchlight)

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

Alan Arkin in "Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Jackie Earle Haley in "Little Children" (New Line)
Djimon Hounsou in "Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Eddie Murphy in "Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Mark Wahlberg in "The Departed" (Warner Bros.)

Performance by an actress in a leading role

Penélope Cruz in "Volver" (Sony Pictures Classics)
Judi Dench in "Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Helen Mirren in "The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
Meryl Streep in "The Devil Wears Prada" (20th Century Fox)
Kate Winslet in "Little Children" (New Line)

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

Adriana Barraza in "Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Cate Blanchett in "Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Abigail Breslin in "Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Jennifer Hudson in "Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Rinko Kikuchi in "Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)

Achievement in directing

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage) Alejandro González Iñárritu
"The Departed" (Warner Bros.) Martin Scorsese
"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.) Clint Eastwood
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Stephen Frears
"United 93" (Universal and StudioCanal) Paul Greengrass

Best animated feature film of the year

"Cars" (Buena Vista) John Lasseter
"Happy Feet" (Warner Bros.) George Miller
"Monster House" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Gil Kenan

Achievement in art direction

"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Art Direction: John Myhre
Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

"The Good Shepherd" (Universal)
Art Direction: Jeannine Oppewall
Set Decoration: Gretchen Rau and Leslie E. Rollins

"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse)
Art Direction: Eugenio Caballero
Set Decoration: Pilar Revuelta

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Art Direction: Rick Heinrichs
Set Decoration: Cheryl A. Carasik

"The Prestige" (Buena Vista)
Art Direction: Nathan Crowley
Set Decoration: Julie Ochipinti

Achievement in cinematography

"The Black Dahlia" (Universal) Vilmos Zsigmond
"Children of Men" (Universal) Emmanuel Lubezki
"The Illusionist" (Yari Film Group) Dick Pope
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) Guillermo Navarro
"The Prestige" (Buena Vista) Wally Pfister

Achievement in costume design

"Curse of the Golden Flower" (Sony Pictures Classics) Yee Chung Man
"The Devil Wears Prada" (20th Century Fox) Patricia Field
"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount) Sharen Davis
"Marie Antoinette" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Milena Canonero
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Consolata Boyle

Best documentary feature

"Deliver Us from Evil" (Lionsgate)
A Disarming Films Production
Amy Berg and Frank Donner

"An Inconvenient Truth" (Paramount Classics and Participant Productions)
A Lawrence Bender/Laurie David Production
Davis Guggenheim

"Iraq in Fragments" (Typecast Releasing)
A Typecast Pictures/Daylight Factory Production
James Longley and John Sinno

"Jesus Camp" (Magnolia Pictures)
A Loki Films Production
Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady

"My Country, My Country" (Zeitgeist Films)
A Praxis Films Production
Laura Poitras and Jocelyn Glatzer

Best documentary short subject

"The Blood of Yingzhou District"
A Thomas Lennon Films Production
Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon

"Recycled Life"
An Iwerks/Glad Production
Leslie Iwerks and Mike Glad

"Rehearsing a Dream"
A Simon & Goodman Picture Company Production
Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon

"Two Hands"
A Crazy Boat Pictures Production
Nathaniel Kahn and Susan Rose Behr

Achievement in film editing

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Stephen Mirrione and Douglas Crise

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Steven Rosenblum

"Children of Men" (Universal)
Alex Rodríguez and Alfonso Cuarón

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
Thelma Schoonmaker

"United 93" (Universal and StudioCanal)
Clare Douglas, Christopher Rouse and Richard Pearson

Best foreign language film of the year

"After the Wedding" A Zentropa Entertainments 16 Production
Denmark
"Days of Glory (Indigènes)" A Tessalit Production
Algeria
"The Lives of Others" A Wiedemann & Berg Production
Germany
"Pan’s Labyrinth" A Tequila Gang/Esperanto Filmoj/Estudios Picasso Production
Mexico
"Water" A Hamilton-Mehta Production
Canada

Achievement in makeup

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista) Aldo Signoretti and Vittorio Sodano
"Click" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Kazuhiro Tsuji and Bill Corso
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) David Marti and Montse Ribe

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage) Gustavo Santaolalla
"The Good German" (Warner Bros.) Thomas Newman
"Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight) Philip Glass
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) Javier Navarrete
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Alexandre Desplat

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)

"I Need to Wake Up" from "An Inconvenient Truth"
(Paramount Classics and Participant Productions)
Music and Lyric by Melissa Etheridge

"Listen" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger and Scott Cutler
Lyric by Anne Preven

"Love You I Do" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger
Lyric by Siedah Garrett

"Our Town" from "Cars"
(Buena Vista)
Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

"Patience" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger
Lyric by Willie Reale

Best motion picture of the year

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
An Anonymous Content/Zeta Film/Central Films Production
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Jon Kilik and Steve Golin, Producers

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
A Warner Bros. Pictures Production
Nominees to be determined

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
A DreamWorks Pictures/Warner Bros. Pictures Production
Clint Eastwood, Steven Spielberg and Robert Lorenz, Producers

"Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
A Big Beach/Bona Fide Production
Nominees to be determined

"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
A Granada Production
Andy Harries, Christine Langan and Tracey Seaward, Producers

Best animated short film

"The Danish Poet" (National Film Board of Canada)
A Mikrofilm and National Film Board of Canada Production
Torill Kove

"Lifted" (Buena Vista)
A Pixar Animation Studios Production
Gary Rydstrom

"The Little Matchgirl" (Buena Vista)
A Walt Disney Pictures Production
Roger Allers and Don Hahn

"Maestro" (Szimplafilm)
A Kedd Production
Geza M. Toth

"No Time for Nuts" (20th Century Fox)
A Blue Sky Studios Production
Chris Renaud and Michael Thurmeier

Best live action short film

"Binta and the Great Idea (Binta Y La Gran Idea)"
A Peliculas Pendelton and Tus Ojos Production
Javier Fesser and Luis Manso

"Éramos Pocos (One Too Many)" (Kimuak)
An Altube Filmeak Production
Borja Cobeaga

"Helmer & Son"
A Nordisk Film Production
Soren Pilmark and Kim Magnusson

"The Saviour" (Australian Film Television and Radio School)
An Australian Film Television and Radio School Production
Peter Templeman and Stuart Parkyn

"West Bank Story"
An Ari Sandel, Pascal Vaguelsy, Amy Kim, Ravi Malhotra and Ashley Jordan Production
Ari Sandel

Achievement in sound editing

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista)
Sean McCormack and Kami Asgar

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Lon Bender

"Flags of Our Fathers" (DreamWorks and Warner Bros., Distributed by Paramount)
Alan Robert Murray and Bub Asman

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
Alan Robert Murray

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Christopher Boyes and George Watters II

Achievement in sound mixing

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista)
Kevin O’Connell, Greg P. Russell and Fernando Camara

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer and Ivan Sharrock

"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Michael Minkler, Bob Beemer and Willie Burton

"Flags of Our Fathers" (DreamWorks and Warner Bros., Distributed by Paramount)
John Reitz, Dave Campbell, Gregg Rudloff and Walt Martin

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Paul Massey, Christopher Boyes and Lee Orloff

Achievement in visual effects

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
John Knoll, Hal Hickel, Charles Gibson and Allen Hall

"Poseidon" (Warner Bros.)
Boyd Shermis, Kim Libreri, Chaz Jarrett and John Frazier

"Superman Returns" (Warner Bros.)
Mark Stetson, Neil Corbould, Richard R. Hoover and Jon Thum

Adapted screenplay

"Borat Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" (20th Century Fox)
Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Peter Baynham & Dan Mazer
Story by Sacha Baron Cohen & Peter Baynham & Anthony Hines & Todd Phillips

"Children of Men" (Universal)
Screenplay by Alfonso Cuarón & Timothy J. Sexton and David Arata and Mark Fergus & Hawk Ostby

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
Screenplay by William Monahan

"Little Children" (New Line)
Screenplay by Todd Field & Tom Perrotta

"Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Screenplay by Patrick Marber

Original screenplay

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Written by Guillermo Arriaga

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
Screenplay by Iris Yamashita
Story by Iris Yamashita & Paul Haggis

"Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Written by Michael Arndt

"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse)
Written by Guillermo del Toro

"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
Written by Peter Morgan

It’s time again to celebrate the best that indie-land has to offer. The Spirit Award nominees are out, with "Little Miss Sunshine" and "Half Nelson" leading all contenders with five nods each, including best feature.

The family dysfunction on-the-road comedy "Sunshine" was also nominated for Best Director (Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris), Supporting Male (Alan Arkin and Paul Dano) and Best First Screenplay (Michael Arndt). Meanwhile, "Half Nelson," a drama about a troubled inner-city teacher, received nods for Best Director (Ryan Fleck), Male Lead (Ryan Gosling), Female Lead (Shareeka Epps), and Best First Screenplay (Anna Boden and Fleck).


"Wait… we might both win Spirit Awards?"

The other nominees for Best Feature are "American Gun," "The Dead Girl," and "Pan’s Labyrinth." In the Best Director category, the nominees also include Robert Altman for "A Prairie Home Companion," Karen Moncrieff for "The Dead Girl," and Steven Soderbergh for "Bubble."

In addition to Gosling, the Male Lead nominees are Aaron Eckhart ("Thank You For Smoking"), Edward Norton ("The Painted Veil"), Ahmad Razvi ("Man Push Cart"), and Forest Whitaker ("American Gun"). In addition to Epps, the others up for the Female Lead award are Catherine O’Hara ("For Your Consideration"), Elizabeth Reaser ("Sweet Land"), Michelle Williams ("Land of Plenty"), and Robin Wright Penn ("Sorry, Haters").


"Pan’s Labyrinth": Do fauns qualify for Spirit Awards?

The Spirit Awards, formerly the Independent Spirit Awards, recognize films made on budgets of less than $20 million. The winners will be announced on Feb. 24, a day before the Academy Awards.

For a complete list of the nominees, click here. Also, check out RT’s interview with "Little Miss Sunshine" directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris here.

ELSEWHERE IN INDIE NEWS THIS WEEK:

"Tears" Finally Makes It To Theaters

The brightly colored, highly stylized Thai western "Tears of the Black Tiger" will open in January, six years after its premiere at Cannes. The film has been acquired by Magnolia from Miramax; "Tears" played on the festival circuit before landing in the company’s vault.

Swiss Oscar Selection Gets Distributor

The North American rights for "Vitus," Switzerland’s candidate for the Foreign Film Oscar, have been acquired by Sony Pictures Classics. The film, starring Bruno Ganz and Teo Gheorghiu, tells the tale of a child prodigy and his complex relationship with his parents.

Top Reviewed Limiteds

Opening last week in limited release: "Backstage," a dark examination of celebrity, is at 100 percent on the Tomatometer with 10 reviews; "The History Boys," a tale of hypercompetitive English schoolboys adapted from Alan Bennett, is at 62 percent with 50 reviews; and "Opal Dream," a coming-of-age tale about a little girl with imaginary friends in the Australian outback, is at 57 percent with 14 reviews.

Top Performing Limiteds

In last week’s indie box office battle, Pedro Almodovar‘s "Volver" grossed an average of $17,071 on 30 screens, beating out the Bollywood drama "Dhoom 2," which averaged $15,540 on 63 screens. "The History Boys" opened on seven screens with a $14,400 average, while the Jean-Luc Godard classic "Two Or Three Things I Know About Her…" and the Slamdance-approved documentary "Abduction: The Megumi Yokota Story" both opened on one screen apiece to earn $10,764 and $5,034, respectively. Last week’s top indie "Bobby" dropped to 15th place after expanding from two to 1,667 screens, dropping its per-screen average from $34,519 to $2,914.


"The History Boys": No threat to the Hell’s Angels.

Thanks to Nick Hershey for his contribution to this story.

With the sale of independent-minded ThinkFilm last week, can indie film distributors survive without big studio backing?

Author: Juliana Tringali

ThinkFilm, best known for releasing 2004’s "Born Into Brothels," was recently purchased by the Capco group for $25 million. Group head David Bergstein plans to merge ThinkFilm with Capitol Films (another formerly fledgling distribution company), creating a "formidable new force in the independent marketplace."


We’re not going to tell you how the wheels on "Shortbus" go.

For five years, ThinkFilm has built a reputation for distributing daring films that many others wouldn’t touch. Its current theatrical releases include John Cameron Mitchell‘s sexually explicit "Shortbus" and "Half Nelson," the story of a drug addicted inner city teacher. Meanwhile, Capital Films has helped to sell such fare as "A Prairie Home Companion" to international markets.

Before the purchase, ThinkFilm was the one Canadian company distributing movies in the states. Their game plan was generally to acquire documentaries or daring low budget films and subsequently attempt to sell them to more mainstream audiences.

The strategy won an Oscar for "Brothels" (which scored a 96 percent on the Tomatometer), and garnered further nominations for other releases ("The Story of the Weeping Camel," "Murderball"). But despite some critical and moderate commercial successes (including "Spellbound"), none of the ThinkFilm’s offerings broke through to widespread box office popularity. Capco says the merger will allow ThinkFilm to be a bigger player in the global film market.


"Murderball": Better than "Rollerball!"

In the expensive world of film production, perhaps the acquisition of smaller companies has always been an uncomfortable but irrevocable truth. After all, when indie first went boom in 1994, its most powerful mainstays had already been snatched up.

Miramax was purchased by Walt Disney Co. in 1993 (just before releasing "Pulp Fiction," the shot that sounded out the new era in film). In 1994, Turner Broadcasting System purchased New Line Cinema, which had dared to produce movies from unknown filmmakers since 1967.


No, this isn’t a metaphor for the indies and the majors.

But 1994 was a time of optimism. Making films outside the studio system was not only possible, it was hot, and bright-eyed believers were standing up to be counted. Among them were Newmarket Films, then a new privately-owned production and distribution company (purchased by New Line/HBO in 2005), and the Independent Film Channel (IFC). Palm Pictures was started in 1998, and ThinkFilm began in 2001.

Studios had their finger on the pulse as well. In 1994, Fox Searchlight was introduced as the indie wing of 20th Century Fox and it went on to produce some of the most successful "independent" films of the 1990s. NBC Universal followed suit in 2002 with Focus Features. Not surprisingly, these smaller sectors of major studios have had more staying power than their more authentic counterparts.

Top Reviewed Limiteds

Opening last week in limited release: "Shut Up & Sing," a rockumentary about the Dixie Chicks, is at 93 percent with 30 reviews; "Exit: The Right to Die," a documentary about assisted suicide, is at 88 percent (8 reviews); "Absolute Wilson," a documentary about avant-gardist Robert Wilson, is at 82 percent (11 reviews); "Cocaine Cowboys," a documentary about drug smuggling in Miami in the late 1970s and early 1980s, is at 78 percent (23 reviews); "Babel," Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu‘s globetrotting film about despair and interconnectivity, starring Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, is at 74 percent (61 reviews); and "The Bridge," a doc about suicides on San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge, is at 64 percent (28 reviews).


Dixie Chicks flick: a hit with crits!

Top Performing Limiteds

"Babel" was the biggest indie winner this week, grossing $366,000 for a big per-screen average of $52,258, despite playing in only seven theaters in New York and Los Angeles. Stephen Frears‘ "The Queen," starring Helen Mirren, continued its strong performance, grossing $1.9 million, with a $12,638 per-screen average (it’s made $6.3 million during its theatrical run). "Shut Up & Sing" made $51,000 in four theaters, for an average of $12,750. But something of a disappointment was "Death of a President" which, despite the hum of controversy, made only $167,000 with a per-screen average of $1,835.


Why so blue, Cate? Critics and audiences like "Babel."

A trio of young actors have signed on to appear in "Alien vs. Predator 2: Survival of the Fittest," and I believe their character names are "First Victim," "Eventual Meabtag," and "Dead by Act II."

From The Hollywood Reporter: "Shareeka Epps, John Ortiz and Johnny Lewis have been cast in 20th Century Fox’s "Alien vs. Predator: Survival of the Fittest." Fox’s sequel to the monster showdown "Alien vs. Predator" marks the first studio role for Epps since her acclaimed onscreen debut opposite Ryan Gosling in the Sundance Film Festival favorite "Half Nelson," in which she co-starred as a student in a rundown inner-city school. Epps will play Kendra, a young girl who must protect her little brother. Ortiz, who most recently appeared as Jose Yero in Michael Mann‘s "Miami Vice," will play a recently elected sheriff. Lewis, a featured player on "The O.C.," will play Ricky, a troubled kid. They join a cast that includes Reiko Aylesworth and Steven Pasquale."

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