Movies can transport you from your life for a little while, but did you ever let the movies transport you in life? Every country and virtually every way of life has been captured on film, so it’s rather irresistible to catch the travelling bug from the silver screen.

Today, let Rotten Tomatoes be your travel guide, as we present 10 places whose architecture, landscape, and beauty have given life to some famous movies in history. Navigate the cities below and fire up your wanderlust!

What is your top movie vacation spot?


Paramount reigned supreme at the North American box office as its animated
adventure tale Beowulf seized the number one spot in its opening weekend while
the studio’s other toon
Bee
Movie
finished in second place in its third frame.
But the overall marketplace remained troubled posting ticket sales that were
more like October numbers than like the typically robust figures seen in
November. In fact, the top ten films combined for just over $92M making it the
worst showing in nine years for the weekend before Thanksgiving.



The 3D computer-animated actioner Beowulf collected an estimated $28.1M over the
Friday-to-Sunday period becoming the top choice of movie fans this weekend.
Attacking 3,153 theaters, the PG-13 film averaged a strong $8,912 per location
for Paramount which scored its seventh number one hit of 2007. The
Robert Zemeckis-directed
picture used motion capture technology to tell the story of a Viking warrior who
saves a kingdom from demonic beasts. Ray Winstone
and
Angelina Jolie contributed their voices and
likenesses. Reviews were generally favorable.



Beowulf was the widest opener ever for a 3D film with over 700 of the venues
offering the adventure in the high-tech format. The Real D format accounted for
638 of the locations (20% of the total) and roughly $8M (28%) of the weekend
gross. Several dozen Imax sites also played the 3D version while traditional
theaters played the 2D one. According to studio research the audience was 60%
male and was split evenly between those over and under the age of 25.


Warner Bros. co-financed the $150M project and opened Beowulf in several
international territories day-and-date with the domestic bow. The ancient epic
grossed an estimated $17M overseas from 2,500 screens in 13 markets for a global
opening of $45.1M. It enjoyed solid second-place debuts in the United Kingdom
and Germany and rang up number one bows in many Asian markets like Hong Kong,
South Korea, Thailand, and Singapore. Beowulf invades France, Russia, Spain, and
Mexico later this week and attacks Australia, Brazil, and Japan on the following
weekend.



Paramount also claimed the silver medal with another toon, the
Jerry Seinfeld
hit Bee
Movie
, which dropped 44% to an estimated $14.3M in its third outing.
After 17 days of release, the PG-rated kidpic has amassed $93.9M from just under
4,000 theaters and could be headed for $130-140M by the end of its domestic run.


The one-two punch of Beowulf and Bee marked the first time in three years that
animated films occupied the top two positions at the box office. The last
occurrence was over the November 12-14, 2004 frame when
The Incredibles
remained
number one with a mighty $50.3M in its sophomore session and Zemeckis’
The Polar
Express
opened in second with $23.3M. Only two other times this year has one
studio claimed the top two films. Warner Bros. ruled the March 23-25 weekend
with TMNT and
300 while a few weeks later Paramount reigned with
Disturbia and
Blades of Glory.


Despite the studio’s killer B’s leading the box office, the overall marketplace
was in bad shape which does not bode well for the end of what has been a record
year. The top ten films have now failed to break the $100M mark over
back-to-back weekends during the normally busy month of November. This has not
occurred during this month since 2000. Also, the weekend before Thanksgiving is
routinely used by Hollywood studios to launch some of their biggest holiday
season blockbusters. Beowulf generated the worst opening for a number one film
over this high-profile frame in nine years. Clearly the box office is lacking
strength right now and moviegoers are losing excitement over the current menu of
films that studios have served up. To make things worse, the next two weekends
lack any film expected to see explosive sales.



American Gangster

shot up another $13.2M in ticket stubs, according to
estimates, and raised its 17-day cume to $101M. Off 45%, the
Denzel
Washington
Russell
Crowe
hit became the 21st film of 2007 to break the century
mark and the fifth for Universal which leads all studios. Warner Bros, Fox,
Buena Vista, and Sony have all claimed three such blockbusters each this year
with Paramount close to joining them when Bee Movie crosses the barrier later
this week. Gangster should head towards $130-140M domestically.


In Europe, the
Ridley Scott-helmed crime saga began generating heat with number
one openings in the United Kingdom, Germany, France, Belgium, Portugal, and
Switzerland for an international weekend haul of $14M from 1,471 theaters in 14
markets. In the U.K., Gangster went head to head against the debut of Beowulf
and beat it by 13%.



Vince Vaughn
‘s Christmas comedy
Fred Claus

fared well in its second weekend
losing only 35% of its business and grossed an estimated $12M for fourth place.
The Warner Bros. title has collected $35.8M in ten days and with the lucrative
Thanksgiving holiday session around the corner, could go on to bank $70-80M from
North America.



Fox attracted mediocre numbers for its new kidpic Mr. Magorium’s Wonder
Emporium
which opened in fifth with an estimated $10M from 3,164 sites. The G-rated tale
starring
Dustin Hoffman and
Natalie Portman averaged a mild $3,168 per theater.
Reviews were mostly negative and competing family films from a busy bee and
Santa’s brother provided ample competition for the target audience.



For the third straight weekend, the Steve Carell dramedy
Dan in Real Life

enjoyed the smallest drop in the top ten as the Buena Vista release continued to
benefit from solid word-of-mouth. The romantic comedy dipped only 25% to an
estimated $4.5M in its fourth frame and pushed its total up to $37.1M. A $50M
final could result.


The latest offering from the
Coen brothers
No Country for
Old Men
expanded into
wider release and posted sensational numbers allowing it to enter the top ten at
number seven while still only playing in 148 theaters. The R-rated thriller
starring Tommy Lee Jones,
Javier Bardem, and
Josh Brolin grossed an estimated
$3.1M for a scorching $20,932 average lifting the total to $4.9M from limited
play. Strong reviews, good word-of-mouth, and a loyal fan following for the
filmmaking duo helped to keep Country going strong. On Wednesday, Miramax will
go nationwide by widening the pic to about 800 locations giving upscale adult
audiences something meaty for the turkey frame. Paramount Vantage co-financed
the pic.



Tumbling 57% in its sophomore frame, the political snoozer
Lions for Lambs

fell to eighth with an estimated $2.9M giving the MGM release a wimpy $11.6M in
ten days. Produced for $35M, the
Tom CruiseRobert RedfordMeryl
Streep
vehicle
should end its run with about half its budget in domestic grosses. Poor reviews
and off-putting subject matter negated the starpower that the film tried to rely
on for commercial success. Redford will have the honor of directing Cruise’s
lowest-grossing movie since
Legend
which took in a mere $15.5M in 1986.
Factoring in inflation over the superstar’s quarter-century career, Lions For
Lambs
will end up selling the second fewest number of tickets for Tom Cruise
beating only 1983’s Losin’ It which found most of its audience on VHS tapes and
late-night cable television airings.


The horror sequel
Saw IV
fell 53% to an estimated $2.3M in its fourth weekend
and lifted its cume to $61.8M. Look for a $66M final gross putting it ahead of
Saw‘s $55.2M from 2004, but behind the $87M of
Saw II and the $80.2M of last
year’s Saw III.
Together the four torture flicks will reach $288M in combined domestic grosses
with another installment in the works.



It’s a rare weekend when Javier Bardem stars in two films that reach the top
ten, but the acclaimed actor also saw his romantic drama Love in the Time of Cholera debut in the ten spot with an estimated $1.9M. Panned by critics, the
R-rated pic averaged a poor $2,201 from 852 locations for New Line. Thanks to
Cholera, the box office has now seen wide releases bow to averages of less than
$2,500 during nine of the last ten frames.



Despite mixed reviews from critics, the
Nicole Kidman
Jennifer Jason Leigh drama
Margot at the Wedding
opened to muscular numbers in its platform bow in
Manhattan with an estimated $83,000 from two locations for a sizzling $41,465
average. Paramount Vantage will expand the R-rated dysfunctional family drama
into 35 theaters in the top dozen markets across North America.



Four films dropped out of the top ten this weekend. Disney’s hit family comedy

The Game Plan

was the top-grossing picture during the September-October corridor
and fell 51% to an estimated $1.2M. With a robust $87.4M to date, the sports
flick should finish with just over $90M matching The Rock’s biggest film in a
leading role – $90.5M for 2002’s The Scorpion King. Summit’s fright flick
P2
tumbled 62% in its sophomore session to an estimated $800,000. With a weak $3.6M
in ten days, the suspense title should conclude its run with only $5M.


Sony’s $30M vampire thriller

30 Days of Night

has grossed $39.1M to date and looks headed for a finish of just north of $40M.
New Line’s
John Cusack
flop
Martian
Child
crashed 75% to an estimated $465,000 for a $7.2M sum. Don’t expect
the cume to get much higher than $8M.



The top ten films grossed an estimated $92.4M which was down a troubling 29%
from last year when Happy Feet opened in first place with $41.5M; and down a
disturbing 45% from 2005 when Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire debuted in the
top spot with $102.3M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

With cops, drug dealers, and lots of bullets flying, the action film Miami Vice hits theaters across North America this weekend with its aim squarely on the number one spot. Young kids, meanwhile, will be offered another animated film in the form of The Ant Bully while teens get a new high school comedy in John Tucker Must Die. The overall box office should continue to be much healthier than last year as the Jack Sparrow-dominated month of July comes to a close.

Universal can smell a number-one opening in the air tonight. The studio hopes to claim bragging rights to the film that finally knocks Pirates out of the top spot with its action thriller Miami Vice. Directed by Michael Mann, the R-rated pic stars Jamie Foxx and Colin Farrell in a loose update of the hit NBC cop show from the 1980s. Gong Li co-stars in this story of an undercover operation into the workings of a South American drug lord. In a summer full of Kryptonian heroes, pirates, and mutant villains, moviegoers are ready for a standard action film, set in modern times, with big stars playing the bad-ass good guys. With the tame PG-13 actioners behind us, Miami Vice ups the volume on violence and doesn’t hold back when it comes to gun battles and the offing of bad guys.

Vice has racked up some of the best reviews of any summer action film this year which should help in selling the pic to older adults. Though Mann stumbled with 2001’s Ali, the director has been pretty solid with the films he’s delivered over the past decade with Collateral, The Insider, and Heat. This new film’s leads will be the driving force at the box office. Both are hip and cool enough to appeal to teens as well as adults. The men exude plenty of sex appeal which will aid in drawing in women, plus Foxx has tremendous pull with African-American moviegoers who should be out in large numbers. Universal’s marketing has been as slick and cool as can be and makes the film seem like a necessary investment for action movie fans.

Miami Vice looks to appeal to the same audiences as a pair of action titles from the summer of 2003. Bad Boys II was another R-rated, star-driven, cop buddy picture set in Miami and bowed to $46.5M with a $14,602 average that July. Will Smith and Martin Lawrence made for a more potent commercial combo at the cash registers plus the sequel boasted plenty of comedy and already had a large built-in fan following. The next month, Farrell scored his fourth number-one opening of that year starring in another remake of an old cop show by teaming up with Samuel L. Jackson for S.W.A.T. The PG-13 film debuted on top with $37.1M and a $11,575 average.

Detectives Crockett and Tubbs will bring a breath of fresh air to a marketplace that is ready to move on from the record-breaking pirate shenanigans. Older teens and adult moviegoers are ready to see something else, and for now, this is it. Busting into 3,020 theaters, Miami Vice could debut with about $38M this weekend.

A ten-year-old boy gets miniaturized and becomes one with an insect colony in The Ant Bully, a new toon from Warner Bros. Young kids and their parents are the target audience here as the studio is aiming for the summer vacation crowd with this PG-rated adventure. An impressive voice cast that includes Julia Roberts, Nicolas Cage, and Meryl Streep might attract some biz and throwing in the name of producer Tom Hanks won’t hurt either. But Bully is going after the exact same audience as last week’s rival toon Monster House so the pie will get split. Neither is being treated as a must-see from a well-known franchise. Like Sony’s kidpic, Bully also will be playing in select 3D theaters as Imax is on board with a special run in their locations. The added value will certainly intrigue some families. Reviews are weak, but these films really rely on the ratio of nagging from kids to the willingness to give in by parents. Invading 3,050 sites, The Ant Bully might debut to around $15M.

High school hijinks are at the core of the new comedy John Tucker Must Die which finds Jesse Metcalfe playing the title character, a teen romeo that juggles three girlfriends who learn of the infidelity and plot their revenge. The PG-13 pic comes from director Betty Thomas (Dr. Dolittle, Private Parts) and co-stars Ashanti, Brittany Snow, and Jenny McCarthy. Teenage girls will make up the target audience but with limited starpower, Tucker’s potential should be limited as well. The Fox film will be going up against a handful of comedies currently clogging up screens in multiplexes. Young females not of age to buy a Vice ticket, or just uninterested in that shoot-em-up cop pic, will take interest in the female revenge story of Tucker. Some interest from teen guys could be there too, but the post-college crowd is not likely to donate many bills. The marketing push has been decent and a bold title will get some attention. Opening in 2,561 locations, John Tucker Must Die might take in about $9M this weekend.

Woody Allen seems to have loved working with Scarlett Johansson in London so much with the Oscar-nominated Match Point that he went for round two in his latest film Scoop which opens in moderate national release on Friday. The Focus title features the young starlet playing an American journalism student who gets the inside track on uncovering the identity of a serial killer from the spirit of a deceased reporter. Hugh Jackman, Ian McShane, and Allen himself co-star in the PG-13 flick. Critics have not been kind as reviews so far have been weak which will impact the box office significantly. Die-hard Woody fans won’t be swayed, but other upscale moviegoers will be affected. Scoop enters 537 theaters this weekend and might collect about $2M.

Fox Searchlight platformed its Sundance darling Little Miss Sunshine on Wednesday ahead of a gradual national roll-out that will continue into late August. The R-rated film about a dysfunctional family that takes a road trip to enter their young daughter in a beauty contest stars Greg Kinnear, Steve Carell, Toni Collette, and Alan Arkin. Sunshine wowed audiences in Park City and won a reported $10M distribution deal from the Fox subsidiary. Armed with glowing reviews across the board, the comedy from the husband-wife directing team of Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris should score a sizzling average from its seven theaters in New York and Los Angeles. Long-term prospects also seem bright as Sunshine should play out as the indie alternative to a summer of mindless popcorn flick.

Kings lose crowns and this weekend Johnny Depp looks to give up his title as three-time ruler of the box office. Still, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest has been holding up well during the week and Miami Vice is the only new film to make a serious dent in its treasure chest. Another drop of 45% would give Disney about $19M for the session boosting the overall domestic haul to a mammoth $357M.

Sony’s animated adventure Monster House got off to a strong start last weekend with a $22.2M bow, but will face head-to-head competition from Ant Bully this weekend which will be looking to kick some sand in its face. A 40% fall would leave House with around $13M and a ten-day total of $45M.

M. Night Shyamalan‘s latest thriller Lady in the Water debuted below expectations last week and will be entering its all-important sophomore frame. If history is any indicator, the grosses should see a steep drop. Second weekend declines for the director’s last three films have been 68% for 2004’s The Village, 51% for 2002’s Signs, and 52% for 2000’s Unbreakable. Lady may not sink the way Village did as it seems to be generating both love-it and hate-it camps. Still, with such a low starting point, and Crockett and Tubbs stealing away adults, a fall of at least 50% could be in order. That would give the bedtime story roughly $9M and a cume of $34M in ten days.

LAST YEAR: After two weeks at number one and two respectively, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Wedding Crashers swapped places with the Owen WilsonVince Vaughn comedy taking over at the top with $20M, slipping a mere 22%. The Johnny Depp kidpic followed with $16.4M in its third frame. Newcomers filled up the rest of the top five. Leading the way was Disney’s super hero family film Sky High with $14.6M on its way to a solid $63.9M. Close behind were Sony’s action flop Stealth with $13.3M and the Warner Bros. romantic comedy Must Love Dogs wth $12.9M. Final grosses reached $31.7M and $43.9M, respectively.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

This week at the movies, Crockett and Tubbs are back on the beat ("Miami Vice," starring Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx); an ant bully gets cut down to size ("The Ant Bully"); John Tucker must die ("John Tucker Must Die"); Woody Allen’s got a hot new scoop ("Scoop"); and a Sundance crowd-pleaser ("Little Miss Sunshine") hits theaters. What do the critics have to say?

"High concept" was a buzzword for Hollywood in the 1980s, and virtually nothing embodied that idea more than "Miami Vice," which creator Michael Mann has described as "MTV Cops." Crockett and Tubbs became synonymous for a certain type of glamorous, slightly campy crime fighting that was nonetheless thoroughly engaging. Twenty years later, the film version takes a much darker approach; Colin Farrell and Jamie Foxx are deep undercover in a gritty film that’s more like Mann’s "Heat" than "Starsky and Hutch." Maybe that’s the problem; while critics say "Miami Vice" looks terrific and features some outstanding action scenes, they also note that the film is a bit too self-serious and much too long. It currently stands at 55 percent on the Tomatometer, and it’s Mann’s worst-reviewed film since 1983’s "The Keep" (Heard of it? Yeah, me neither).

"Perhaps you’d understand it better/ Standin’ in my shoes/ It’s the ultimate enticement/ It’s the smuggler’s blues."

How’s this for a dream cast? Nicolas Cage, Julia Roberts, Meryl Streep, Paul Giamatti, and Bruce Campbell star in "The Ant Bully," the latest CGI spectacle for the kids. "The Ant Bully" tells the story of a 10-year-old boy who takes out his frustrations on anthills, but subsequently finds himself shrunk down to ant-size, where adventures ensue and he learns a thing about life. The critics say the film is visually remarkable, but lacks originality and a strong narrative. It currently stands at 48 percent on the Tomatometer.


"Run for your lives!"

Missing the mark by a long shot is the romantic vengeance comedy, "John Tucker Must Die," a teen sex laffer about a three-timing lothario ("Desperate Housewives" junk Jesse Metcalfe) and the trio of girlfriends (a cheerleader, a hippie, and a brainiac) out to get him. Critics say that a few too many sight gags and clunky jabs at pop culture savvy make "Tucker" unwatchable for anyone over the age of thirteen; even then, they say it’s one of the better teen flicks to come around of late. Take from that what you will. At 25 percent on the Tomatometer, "Tucker" is far too aptly titled.


"John Tucker Must Die": A movie in dire need of conflict resolution.

News flash! Rumors of Woody Allen‘s career resurgence may have been greatly exaggerated. The scribes say his latest, "Scoop," is more than a little disappointing in the wake of last year’s Certified Fresh "Match Point." Like that one, "Scoop" is set in London, stars Scarlett Johansson, and there’s a murder at the center of the plot. But "Scoop" is a comedy, and an unsuccessful one at that; critics say it relies way too much on hackneyed schtick. At 39 percent on the Tomatometer, "Scoop" is looking like yesterday’s news. And it’s one of the worst-reviewed films of Allen’s great career.


"Little Miss Sunshine": The weakest street gang ever.

"Little Miss Sunshine" was a big hit at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, and now that it’s hitting the theaters, the scribes are just as enthusiastic as the folks in Park City. This tale of a dysfunctional family hitting the road for a child pageant is Certified Fresh, and features sharp performances from its ensemble cast, particularly Greg Kinnear and Steve Carell. At 94 percent, this one’s a ray of "Sunshine." And it’s the third-best reviewed film of the year with 40 reviews or more. (Check out RT’s interview with co-directors Valerie Faris and Jonathan Dayton here.)

Also out this week in limited release: The idiosyncratic doc "I Like Killing Flies" is at 100 percent on the Tomatometer; "Brothers of the Head," to our knowledge the only mockumentary about a pair of Siamese twins who are lead singers of a fictitious 1970s punk band, is at 87 percent; the French thriller "13 (Tzameti)," about a Georgian immigrant in France, is at 87 percent; "The Photographer, His Wife, Her Lover," a documentary about the last days of celebrated photographer O. Winston Link, is at 80 percent; "Darshan – The Embrace," a doc about one of India’s most famous spiritual guides, is at 44 percent; "Another Gay Movie," an "American Pie"-style comedy, is at 33 percent; and the muckraking Libertarian documentary "America: Freedom to Fascism" is at zero percent.

The Best Reviewed Films Of 2006 With 40 Or More Reviews:
—————————————————————————–
1. Kekexili (98%)
2. Wordplay (95%)
3. Little Miss Sunshine (94%)
4. Fateless (94%)
5. Dave Chappelle’s Block Party (93%)

Recent TV- To- Film Adaptations:
—————————————–
49% — Strangers with Candy (2006)
10% — Aeon Flux (2005)
80% — Serenity (2005)
15% — The Dukes of Hazzard (2005)
25% — Bewitched (2005)

Recent CG Animated Films
———————————-
70% — Monster House (2006)
76% — Cars (2006)
75% — Over the Hedge (2006)
58% — Ice Age: The Meltdown (2006)
19% — The Wild (2006)

Worst Reviewed Woody Allen Films (As Star Or Director)
————————————————————————-
29% — Scenes from a Mall (1991)
32% — Casino Royale (1967)
38% — Don’t Drink the Water (1994)
38% — Celebrity (1998)
40% — King Lear (1987)

Like most pathetic movie geeks, I was up at the crack of dawn (ok, 8:30am eastern time) to see how my nomination prediction ballot would measure up. (I was perfect on all 20 acting nods and all 10 screenwriting nods, but I erroneously predicted that “Walk the Line” would get nominated over “Capote” for Best Picture, and I picked Croneberg for director over Benett Miller.) Anyhow, here are the nominations for us to rant and rave about for the next five weeks…

BEST PICTURE
Brokeback Mountain
Capote
Crash
Good Night, and Good Luck.
Munich

BEST DIRECTOR
George Clooney – Good Night, and Good Luck.
Paul Haggis – Crash
Ang Lee – Brokeback Mountain
Bennett Miller – Capote
Steven Spielberg – Munich

BEST ACTOR

Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote
Terrence HowardHustle & Flow
Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain
Joaquin PhoenixWalk the Line
David Strathairn – Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ACTRESS
Judi DenchMrs. Henderson Presents
Felicity HuffmanTransamerica
Keira KnightleyPride & Prejudice
Charlize TheronNorth Country
Reese Witherspoon – Walk the Line

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Matt Dillon – Crash
George Clooney – Syriana
Paul GiamattiCinderella Man
Jake Gyllenhaal – Brokeback Mountain
William HurtA History of Violence

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Amy AdamsJunebug
Catherine Keener – Capote
Frances McDormand – North Country
Rachel WeiszThe Constant Gardener
Michelle Williams – Brokeback Mountain

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Match PointWoody Allen
The Squid & the WhaleNoah Baumbach
Good Night, and Good Luck. – George Clooney & Grant Heslov
Syriana – Stephen Gaghan
Crash – Paul Haggis & Robert Moresco

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
The Constant Gardener – Jeffrey Caine
Capote – Dan Futterman
Munich – Tony Kushner & Eric Roth
Brokeback Mountain – Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana
A History of Violence – Josh Olson

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Don’t Tell (La Bestia nel Cuore) – Italy
Joyeux Noel – France
Paradise Now – Palestine
Sophie Scholl – Germany
Tsotsi – South Africa

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Darwin’s Nightmare
Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
March of the Penguins
Murderball
Street Fight

ANIMATED FILM
Corpse Bride
Howl’s Moving Casle
Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit

ART DIRECTION

Good Night, and Good Luck.
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire
King Kong
Memoirs of a Geisha
Pride & Prejudice

CINEMATOGRAPHY

Batman Begins
Brokeback Mountain
Good Night, and Good Luck.
Memoirs of a Geisha
The New World

COSTUME DESIGN

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory
Memoirs of a Geisha
Mrs. Henderson Presents
Pride & Prejudice
Walk the Line

FILM EDITING

Cinderella Man
The Constant Gardener
Crash
Munich
Walk the Line

MAKEUP
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Cinderella Man
Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith

SCORE

Brokeback Mountain
The Constant Gardener
Memoirs of a Geisha
Munich
Pride & Prejudice

SONG
“In The Deep” – Crash
“It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” – Hustle & Flow
“Travelin’ Thru” – Transamerica

SOUND EDITING

King Kong
Memoirs of a Geisha
War of the Worlds

SOUND MIXING

The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
King Kong
Memoirs of a Geisha
Walk the Line
War of the Worlds

VISUAL EFFECTS
The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
King Kong
War of the Worlds

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT
The Death of Kevin Carter: Casualty of The Bang Bang Club
God Sleeps in Rwanda
The Mushroom Club
A Note of Triumph: The Golden Age of Norman Corwin

LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM

Ausreisser (The Runaway)
Cashback
The Last Farm
Our Time Is Up
Six Shooter

ANIMATED SHORT FILM
Badgered
The Moon and the Son: An Imagined Conversation
The Mysterious Geographic Explorations of Jasper Morello
9
One Man Band

I hate to sound like a geek (actually, no I don’t), but how was Episode III not nominated for best FX? And would it have been so hard for the Academy to throw some small amount of love towards Sin City?

And how the hell was Serenity not nominated for Best Picture???

If you didn’t watch tonight’s Golden Globes Awards, you missed out on two big winners, a few personal triumphs, and (surprisingly) few fire-your-stylist fashion faux pas. Read on for the entire list of winners from the television and film honorees (here’s a hint: the Hollywood Foreign Press sure like those cowboys)!

Leading the Golden Globes with seven nominations, Ang Lee’s cowboy love story “Brokeback Mountain” emerged victorious with four awards for Best Picture (Drama), Best Director, Best Screenplay and Best Song (“A Love That Will Never Grow Old”).

Also winning multiple honors, the Johnny Cash biopic “Walk the Line” took home three awards in the Musical or Comedy category, including Best Picture. Reese Witherspoon and Joaquin Phoenix, who star as June and Johnny Cash, each won Golden Globes for their performances.

Adding to the gay-friendly honors of the night were Felicity Huffman, who nabbed Best Actress for her portrayal of a pre-operative transsexual in “TransAmerica,” and Philip Seymour Hoffman, whose spot-on personification of gay author Truman Capote in "Capote"won him a Best Actor trophy.

Two other front-runners for the Globes, George Clooney’s “Good Night, and Good Luck” and Woody Allen’s “Match Point,” came out empty-handed despite each having four nominations apiece (Clooney, at least, won the Best Supporting Actor award for his role in "Syriana"). Meanwhile, the critical dud “Memoirs of a Geisha” (currently at 33 percent on the Tomatometer) came out a winner for Best Original Score, thanks to composer extraordinaire John Williams. And finally, Sir Anthony Hopkins Cecil B. DeMille lifetime achievement award from his “Proof” co-star Gwyneth Paltrow.

In the realm of television, awards went to ABC’s “Lost” and “Desperate Housewives” for Best Drama Series and Comedy Series, respectively, and HBO’s “Empire Falls” for Best Mini-Series or TV Movie. Read on for the complete list of television and film winners.

Best Motion Picture – Drama
"Brokeback Mountain"

Also nominated:
"The Constant Gardener"
"Good Night, and Good Luck"
"A History of Violence"
"Match Point"

Best Performance By An Actress In A Motion Picture – Drama
Felicity Huffman, "TransAmerica"

Also nominated:
Maria Bello, "A History of Violence"
Gwyneth Paltrow, "Proof"
Charlize Theron, "North Country"
Ziyi Zhang, "Memoirs of a Geisha"

Best Performance By An Actor In A Motion Picture – Drama
Philip Seymour Hoffman, "Capote"

Also nominated:
Russell Crowe, "Cinderella Man"
Terrence Howard, "Hustle & Flow"
Heath Ledger, "Brokeback Mountain"
David Strathairn, "Good Night, and Good Luck"

Best Motion Picture – Musical Or Comedy
"Walk the Line"

Also nominated:
"Mrs. Henderson Presents"
"Pride & Prejudice"
"The Producers"
"The Squid and the Whale"

Best Performance By An Actress In A Motion Picture – Musical Or Comedy
Reese Witherspoon, "Walk the Line"

Also nominated:
Judi Dench, "Mrs. Henderson Presents"
Keira Knightley, "Pride & Prejudice"
Laura Linney, "The Squid and the Whale"
Sarah Jessica Parker, "The Family Stone"

Best Performance By An Actor In A Motion Picture – Musical Or Comedy
Joaquin Phoenix, "Walk the Line"

Also nominated:
Pierce Brosnan, "The Matador"
Jeff Daniels, "The Squid and the Whale"
Johnny Depp, "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory"
Nathan Lane, "The Producers"
Cillian Murphy, "Breakfast on Pluto"

Best Foreign Language Film
"Paradise Now" (Palestine)

Also nominated:
"Kung Fu Hustle" (China)
"Master of the Crimson Armor AKA The Promise" (China)
"Merry Christmas (Joyeaux Noel)" (France)
"Tsotsi" (South Africa)

Best Performance By An Actress In A Supporting Role In A Motion Picture
Rachel Weisz, "The Constant Gardener"

Also nominated:
Scarlett Johansson, "Match Point"
Shirley MacLaine, "In Her Shoes"
Frances McDormand, "North Country"
Michelle Williams, "Brokeback Mountain"

Best Performance By An Actor In A Supporting Role In A Motion Picture
George Clooney, "Syriana"

Also nominated:
Matt Dillon, "Crash"
Will Ferrell, "The Producers"
Paul Giamatti, "Cinderella Man"
Bob Hoskins, "Mrs. Henderson Presents"

Best Director – Motion Picture
Ang Lee, "Brokeback Mountain"

Also nominated:
Woody Allen, "Match Point"
George Clooney, "Good Night, and Good Luck"
Peter Jackson, "King Kong"
Fernando Meirelles, "The Constant Gardener"
Steven Spielberg, "Munich"

Best Screenplay – Motion Picture
Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana, "Brokeback Mountain"

Also nominated:
Woody Allen, "Match Point"
George Clooney & Grant Heslov, "Good Night, and Good Luck"
Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco, "Crash"
Tony Kushner & Eric Roth, "Munich"

Best Original Score – Motion Picture
John Williams, "Memoirs of a Geisha"

Also nominated:
Alexandre Desplat, "Syriana"
James Newton Howard, "King Kong"
Gustavo Santaolalla, "Brokeback Mountain"
Harry Gregson, "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe"

Best Original Song – Motion Picture
"A Love That Will Never Grow Old" – "Brokeback Mountain"

Also nominated:
"Christmas In Love" – "Christmas In Love"
"There’s Nothing Like a Show on Broadway" – "The Producers"
"Travelin’ Thru" – "TransAmerica"
"Wunderkind" – "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe"

Best Television Series – Drama
"Lost" (ABC)

Also nominated:
"Commander In Chief" (ABC)
"Grey’s Anatomy" (ABC)
"Prison Break" (FOX)
"Rome" (HBO)

Best Performance By An Actress In A Television Series – Drama
Geena Davis, "Commander In Chief"

Also nominated:
Patricia Arquette, "Medium"
Glenn Close, "The Shield"
Kyra Sedgwick, "The Closer"
Polly Walker, "Rome"

Best Performance By An Actor In A Television Series – Drama
Hugh Laurie, "House"

Also nominated:
Patrick Dempsey, "Grey’s Anatomy"
Matthew Fox, "Lost"
Wentworth Miller, "Prison Break"
Kiefer Sutherland, "24"

Best Television Series – Musical Or Comedy
"Desperate Housewives" (ABC)

Also nominated:
"Curb Your Enthusiasm" (HBO)
"Entourage" (HBO)
"Everybody Hates Chris" (UPN)
"My Name Is Earl" (NBC)
"Weeds" (Showtime)

Best Performance By An Actress In A Television Series – Musical Or Comedy
Mary-Louise Parker, "Weeds"

Also nominated:
Marcia Cross, "Desperate Housewives"
Teri Hatcher, "Desperate Housewives"
Felicity Huffman, "Desperate Housewives"
Eva Longoria, "Desperate Housewives"

Best Performance By An Actor In A Television Series – Musical Or Comedy
Steve Carell, "The Office"

Also nominated:
Zach Braff, "Scrubs"
Larry David, "Curb Your Enthusiasm"
Jason Lee, "My Name Is Earl"
Charlie Sheen, "Two and a Half Men"

Best Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
"Empire Falls" (HBO)

Also nominated:
"Into The West" (TNT)
"Lackawanna Blues" (HBO)
"Sleeper Cell" (Showtime)
"Viva Blackpool" (BBC America)
"Warm Springs" (HBO)

Best Performance By An Actress In A Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
S. Epatha Merkerson, "Lackawanna Blues"

Also nominated:
Halle Berry, "Their Eyes Were Watching God"
Kelly MacDonald, "The Girl in the Café"
Cynthia Nixon, "Warm Springs"
Mira Sorvino, "Human Trafficking"

Best Performance By An Actor In A Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
Jonathan Rhys Meyers, "Elvis"

Also nominated:
Kenneth Branagh, "Warm Springs"
Ed Harris, "Empire Falls"
Bill Nighy, "The Girl in the Café"
Donald Sutherland, "Human Trafficking"

Best Performance By An Actress In A Supporting Role In A Series, Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
Sandra Oh, "Grey’s Anatomy"

Also nominated:
Candice Bergen, "Boston Legal"
Camryn Manheim, "Elvis"
Elizabeth Perkins, "Weeds"
Joanne Woodward, "Empire Falls"

Best Performance By An Actor In A Supporting Role In A Series, Mini-Series Or Motion Picture Made for Television
Paul Newman, "Empire Falls"

Also nominated:
Naveen Andrews, "Lost"
Jeremy Piven, "Entourage"
Randy Quaid, "Elvis"
Donald Sutherland, "Commander In Chief"" accepted the

The Chicago Film Critics Group announced their nominees just before New Years’ Eve, and they reconvened this week to vote on their year-end favorites. Also, the Iowa Film Critics chimed in with their picks as well. Why not? Iowa has film critics, too!

Chicago Film Critics

Best Picture
Crash

Best Foreign Language Film
Cache

Best Director
David CronenbergA History of Violence

Best Screenplay
Crash — Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco

Best Actor
Philip Seymour HoffmanCapote

Best Actress
Joan AllenThe Upside of Anger

Best Supporting Actor
Mickey RourkeSin City

Best Supporting Actress
Maria Bello — A History of Violence

Best Cinematography
Rodrigo PrietoBrokeback Mountain

Best Original Score
Gustavo Santaolalla — Brokeback Mountain

Best Documentary
Grizzly Man

Most Promising Performer
Miranda JulyMe and You and Everyone We Know

Most Promising Director
Bennett Miller – Capote

Iowa Film Critics

Best Picture
Brokeback Mountain

Best Director
Ang Lee — Brokeback Mountain

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman — Capote

Best Actress
Joan Allen — The Upside of Anger

Best Supporting Actor
Paul GiamattiCinderella Man

Best Supporting Actress
Rachel WeiszThe Constant Gardener

The Best Movie Yet to Open in Iowa
Match Point

As always, thanks to Movie City News for keeping all the lists so darn organized.

The OFCS, which is hosted right here at Rotten Tomatoes and (full disclosure) includes yours truly as a member, announced their year-end nominations yesterday … and we hope you’ll find a few solid surprises among the more familiar (yet obviously deserving) nominees. The winners will be announced on Monday the 16th.

BEST PICTURE

Brokeback Mountain
Crash
Good Night, and Good Luck.
A History of Violence
Munich

BEST DIRECTOR

George Clooney, Good Night, and Good Luck.
David Cronenberg, A History of Violence
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain
Peter Jackson, King Kong
Steven Spielberg, Munich

BEST ACTOR

Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote
Terrence Howard, Hustle & Flow
Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain
Joaquin Phoenix, Walk the Line
David Strathairn, Good Night, and Good Luck.

BEST ACTRESS

Joan Allen, The Upside of Anger
Felicity Huffman, Transamerica
Keira Knightley, Pride & Prejudice
Naomi Watts, King Kong
Reese Witherspoon, Walk the Line

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR

Matt Dillon, Crash
Paul Giamatti, Cinderella Man
Jake Gyllenhaal, Brokeback Mountain
William Hurt, A History of Violence
Mickey Rourke, Sin City

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS

Amy Adams, Junebug
Maria Bello, A History of Violence
Catherine Keener, Capote
Rachel Weisz, The Constant Gardener
Michelle Williams, Brokeback Mountain

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

Woody Allen, Match Point
Noah Baumbach, The Squid and the Whale
George Clooney and Grant Heslov, Good Night, and Good Luck.
Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco, Crash
Jim Jarmusch, Broken Flowers

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

Jeffrey Caine, The Constant Gardener
Dan Futterman, Capote
Tony Kushner & Eric Roth, Munich
Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana, Brokeback Mountain
Josh Olson, A History of Violence

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY

Christopher Doyle, Kwan Pun Leung and Yiu-Fai Lai, 2046
Robert Elswit, Good Night, and Good Luck.
Emmanuel Lubezki, The New World
Rodrigo Prieto, Brokeback Mountain
Robert Rodriguez, Sin City

BEST EDITING

Michael Kahn, Munich
Stephen Mirrione, Good Night, and Good Luck.
Robert Rodriguez, Sin City
Ronald Sanders, A History of Violence
Claire Simpson, The Constant Gardener

BEST MUSICAL SCORE

James Newton Howard, King Kong
James Newton Howard and Hans Zimmer, Batman Begins
James Horner, The New World
Gustavo Santaolalla, Brokeback Mountain
John Williams, Munich

BEST DOCUMENTARY

The Aristocrats

Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
Grizzly Man
March of the Penguins
Murderball

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE (NON-ENGLISH) FILM

Cache
Downfall
Kung Fu Hustle
Oldboy
2046

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE

Howl’s Moving Castle
Madagascar
Robots
Tim Burton’s Corpse Bride
Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-Rabbit

BEST BREAKTHROUGH FILMMAKER

Judd Apatow, The 40-Year-Old Virgin
Craig Brewer, Hustle & Flow
Paul Haggis, Crash
Bennett Miller, Capote
Joe Wright, Pride & Prejudice

BEST BREAKTHROUGH PERFORMER

Nathan Fillion, Serenity
Georgie Henley, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Tony Jaa, Ong-Bak: The Thai Warrior
Q’Orianka Kilcher, The New World
Owen Kline, The Squid and the Whale

Founded in 1997, the Online Film Critics Society has been the key force in establishing and raising the standards for Internet-based film journalism. The OFCS membership spans the U.S., Canada, Europe, Latin America, Africa, and the Asia/Pacific Rim region, with journalists representing many of the most important online film-related sites including Salon, Slate, TV Guide Online, IndieWire, Netflix, Film Threat, eFilmCritic.com and the Internet Movie Database.

The Society’s web site, which has been hosted since January 2001 by the highly influential film resource Rotten Tomatoes, provides the most comprehensive online listing of reviews and original interviews with the leading artists in today’s cinema, plus links to the most important motion picture-related web sites.

Thanks to Movie City News for sharing the scoop on the Windy City critics and their favorite flicks of 2005.The Chicago film journalists will announce their year-end winners on January, 2006.

Best Picture

Brokeback Mountain
Crash
Good Night, and Good Luck
A History of Violence
King Kong

Best Foreign Language Film

2046
Cache
Downfall
Kung-Fu Hustle
Oldboy

Best Director

George Clooney: Good Night, and Good Luck
David Cronenberg: A History of Violence
Peter Jackson: King Kong
Ang Lee: Brokeback Mountain
Steven Spielberg: Munich

Best Screenplay

Brokeback Mountain by Larry McMurtry & Diana Ossana
Capote by Dan Futterman
Crash by Paul Haggis & Bobby Moresco
Good Night, and Good Luck by George Clooney & Grant Heslov
A History of Violence by Josh Olson

Best Actor

Philip Seymour Hoffman
– Capote
Terrence HowardHustle & Flow
Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain
Joaquin PhoenixWalk the Line
David Strathairn – Good Night, and Good Luck

Best Actress

Joan AllenThe Upside of Anger
Felicity HuffmanTransamerica
Keira KnightleyPride & Prejudice
Naomi Watts – King Kong
Reese Witherspoon – Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor

Matt Dillon – Crash
Terrence Howard – Crash
Paul GiamattiCinderella Man
Jake Gyllenhaal – Brokeback Mountain
Mickey RourkeSin City
Donald Sutherland – Pride & Prejudice

Best Supporting Actress

Amy AdamsJunebug
Maria Bello – A History of Violence
Scarlett JohanssonMatch Point
Catherine Keener – Capote
Rachel WeiszThe Constant Gardener
Michelle Williams – Brokeback Mountain

Best Original Score

Batman BeginsHans Zimmer and James Newton Howard
Brokeback Mountain – Gustavo Santaolalla
Charlie and the Chocolate FactoryDanny Elfman
King Kong – James Newton Howard
Memoirs of a GeishaJohn Williams

Best Cinematography

Brokeback Mountain – Rodrigo Prieto
Good Night, and Good Luck – Robert Elswit
King Kong – Andrew Lesnie
Munich – Janusz Kaminski
The New WorldEmmanuel Lubezki
Pride & Prejudice – Roman Osin

Best Documentary

Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room
Grizzly Man
Mad Hot Ballroom
March of the Penguins
Murderball

Most Promising Performer

Chris "Ludacris" Bridges – Crash and Hustle & Flow
Georgie HenleyThe Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe
Miranda JulyMe and You and Everyone We Know
Q’Orianka Kilcher – The New World
Owen KlineThe Squid and the Whale

Most Promising Director

Craig Brewer – Hustle & Flow
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know
Bennett Miller – Capote
Phil Morrison – Junebug
Joe Wright – Pride & Prejudice

Thanks again to MovieCityNews.com for keeping us up-to-date on all the year-end critics flick-picks. This time it’s the San Diego, Las Vegas and Utah reviewers who share their favorites, from "Brokeback" to "Kong."

San Diego Film Critics Awards

Best Picture
King Kong

Best Director
Bennett Miller, Capote

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman, Capote

Best Actress
Joan Allen, The Upside of Anger

Best Supporting Actor
Jeffrey Wright, Broken Flowers

Best Supporting Actress
Rachel Weisz, The Constant Gardener

Best Original Screenplay
Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

Best Adapted Screenplay
Capote

Best Documentary
Grizzly Man

Best Foreign Language Film
Innocent Voices

Best Animated Film
Howl’s Moving Castle

Las Vegas Film Critics Awards

Best Picture
Brokeback Mountain

Best Director
Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain

Best Actor
Heath Ledger, Brokeback Mountain

Best Actress
Reese Witherspoon, Walk the Line

Best Supporting Actor
Matt Dillon, Crash

Best Supporting Actress
Frances McDormand, North Country

Best Screenplay
Crash

Best Documentary
March of the Penguins

Best Foreign Language Film
Kung Fu Hustle

Best Animated Film
Wallace & Gromit in The Curse of the Were-rabbit

Utah Film Critics Awards

Best Film
Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up: Me and You and Everyone We Know

Best Director
Ang Lee – Brokeback Mountain
Runner-up: Woody AllenMatch Point

Best Screenplay (tie)
Shane Black – Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang
Miranda July – Me and You and Everyone We Know

Best Actor
Philip Seymour Hoffman – Capote
Runner-up: Heath Ledger – Brokeback Mountain

Best Actress
Reese Witherspoon – Walk the Line
Runner-up: Maria BelloA History of Violence

Best Supporting Actor
Andy Serkis – King Kong
Runner-up: Paul GiamattiCinderella Man

Best Supporting Actress
Rachel Weisz – The Constant Gardener
Runner-up: Amy AdamsJunebug

Best Documentary
Murderball
Runner-up: Grizzly Man

Best Foreign Film
Kung-Fu Hustle
Runner-up: Downfall