Focus Features

(Photo by Focus Features)

All Charlize Theron Movies Ranked

Charlize Theron launched a career turning heads in 1996’s Two Days in the Valley as one of the quirky neo-noir’s femme fatales. The big breakthrough for the South African actress came but a year later, playing the satanic bait in The Devil’s Advocate. Thanks, Keanu! Theron suddenly became inescapable, working with some big name directors (Woody Allen, John Frankenheimer, Robert Redford) on their worst movies (The Curse of the Jade Scorpion, Reindeer Games, The Legend of Bagger Vance). Then 2003 brought her international recognition (The Italian Job) and a significant Oscar win (Monster). Ever since, she’s fluctuated between catnip for fanboys (AEon Flux, Hancock, Prometheus) and dramatic art (North Country and the Jason Reitman collaborations Young Adult and Tully), and sometimes she’s found that rarefied sweet spot in-between (Mad Max: Fury Road).

Recently, she launched another potential action franchise with The Old Guard, and continued apace in another (F9). And now we’re ranking all Charlize Theron movies by Tomatometer!

#50

The Last Face (2016)
8%

#50
Adjusted Score: 10847%
Critics Consensus: The Last Face's noble intentions are nowhere near enough to carry a fundamentally misguided story that arguably demeans the demographic it wants to defend.
Synopsis: Miguel (Javier Bardem), a Spanish doctor, puts himself in harm's way to deliver medical treatment to the victims of military... [More]
Directed By: Sean Penn

#49

Aeon Flux (2005)
9%

#49
Adjusted Score: 12782%
Critics Consensus: Aeon Flux lacks the gravity-defying pace of its animated predecessor, and, despite some flash, is largely a dull affair.
Synopsis: In the 25th century, the Earth's population has dwindled to a surviving five million following a devastating virus that almost... [More]
Directed By: Karyn Kusama

#48
#48
Adjusted Score: 12517%
Critics Consensus: The humor is on the level of a corny sitcom, and the tone is condescending.
Synopsis: Candy (Charlize Theron) and Lonnie Earl (Billy Bob Thornton) are just crazy about each other. The problem: she's married to... [More]
Directed By: Jordan Brady

#47
#47
Adjusted Score: 17034%
Critics Consensus: Despite the best efforts of its talented leads, The Astronaut's Wife moves at a snail's pace and fails to generate enough intrigue to keep viewers engaged.
Synopsis: When astronaut Spencer Armacost (Johnny Depp) returns to Earth after a mission that nearly cost him his life, he decides... [More]
Directed By: Rand Ravich

#46

Sweet November (2001)
15%

#46
Adjusted Score: 18441%
Critics Consensus: Schmaltzy and manipulative, Sweet November suffers from an implausible plot and non-existent chemistry between its leads.
Synopsis: Nelson Moss (Keanu Reeves) and Sara Deever (Charlize Theron) have nothing in common except an hour spent in DMV hell.... [More]
Directed By: Pat O'Connor

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 18759%
Critics Consensus: Head in the Clouds aspires to soapy melodrama, but gets lost in its own lather, never mining romance from its central love affair or achieving authenticity in its period setting.
Synopsis: Gilda Besse (Charlize Theron) is a rising photographer living in Paris in the 1930s. She invites Guy Malyon (Stuart Townsend),... [More]
Directed By: John Duigan

#44

Trapped (2002)
17%

#44
Adjusted Score: 17237%
Critics Consensus: With its plot about child kidnapping and endangerment, Trapped is an exploitative thriller, more queasy than suspenseful.
Synopsis: When Will (Stuart Townsend) and Karen (Charlize Theron) Jennings are held hostage and their daughter is abducted, a relentless plan... [More]
Directed By: Luis Mandoki

#43

Sleepwalking (2008)
17%

#43
Adjusted Score: 17690%
Critics Consensus: Despite some sharp performances, Sleepwalking suffers from a grimness of tone and sluggish pacing.
Synopsis: When her boyfriend is arrested for marijuana possession, Joleen Reedy (Charlize Theron) and her 11-year-old daughter, Tara (AnnaSophia Robb), take... [More]
Directed By: William Maher

#42
Adjusted Score: 32631%
Critics Consensus: The Huntsman: Winter's War is visually arresting and boasts a stellar cast, but neither are enough to recommend this entirely unnecessary sequel.
Synopsis: Betrayed by her evil sister Ravenna (Charlize Theron), heartbroken Freya (Emily Blunt) retreats to a northern kingdom to raise an... [More]
Directed By: Cedric Nicolas-Troyan

#41

Dark Places (2015)
23%

#41
Adjusted Score: 25676%
Critics Consensus: Dark Places has a strong cast and bestselling source material, but none of it adds up to more than a mediocre thriller that gets tripped up on its own twists.
Synopsis: A woman (Charlize Theron) confronts traumatic, childhood memories of the murder of her mother and two sisters when she investigates... [More]
Directed By: Gilles Paquet-Brenner

#40
#40
Adjusted Score: 33373%
Critics Consensus: Altogether ooky, and not in a good way.
Synopsis: Everyone's favorite spooky family is back in the animated comedy sequel, The Addams Family 2. In this all new movie... [More]

#39

Reindeer Games (2000)
26%

#39
Adjusted Score: 27988%
Critics Consensus: Despite a decent cast, subpar acting and a contrived plot disappointed reviewers.
Synopsis: Just released from prison, all Rudy Duncan (Ben Affleck) wants is to start a new life with Ashley (Charlize Theron),... [More]
Directed By: John Frankenheimer

#38

15 Minutes (2001)
32%

#38
Adjusted Score: 36607%
Critics Consensus: As critical as it is about sensationalism in the media, 15 Minutes itself indulges in lurid violence, and its satire is too heavy-handed to be effective.
Synopsis: At the center of "15 Minutes" is a New York City double murder that must be solved. But the fast-paced... [More]
Directed By: John Herzfeld

#37
Adjusted Score: 41958%
Critics Consensus: While it offers a few laughs and boasts a talented cast, Seth MacFarlane's overlong, aimless A Million Ways to Die in the West is a disappointingly scattershot affair.
Synopsis: Mild-mannered sheep farmer Albert Stark (Seth MacFarlane) feels certain that the Western frontier is trying to kill him, then he... [More]
Directed By: Seth MacFarlane

#36
#36
Adjusted Score: 39396%
Critics Consensus: This heavily symbolic, melodramatic multi-narrative drama lacks emotional resonance.
Synopsis: In the present, Sylvia (Charlize Theron) appears to lead a confident life as a restaurant manager but she cleverly hides... [More]
Directed By: Guillermo Arriaga

#35

Celebrity (1998)
40%

#35
Adjusted Score: 41716%
Critics Consensus: Entertaining, but too scattered.
Synopsis: The career and personal life of writer Lee (Kenneth Branagh) are at a standstill, so he divorces his bashful wife,... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#34

Gringo (2018)
40%

#34
Adjusted Score: 47610%
Critics Consensus: Gringo rounds up a bafflingly overqualified cast for a misfire of a comedy that's fatally undermined by its messy plot, poorly conceived characters, and obvious debts to better films.
Synopsis: Mild-mannered U.S. businessman Harold Soyinka finds himself at the mercy of backstabbing colleagues, local drug lords and a black ops... [More]
Directed By: Nash Edgerton

#33

Hancock (2008)
41%

#33
Adjusted Score: 50178%
Critics Consensus: Though it begins with promise, Hancock suffers from a flimsy narrative and poor execution.
Synopsis: A scruffy superhero named Hancock (Will Smith) protects the citizens of Los Angeles but leaves horrendous collateral damage in the... [More]
Directed By: Peter Berg

#32

Men of Honor (2000)
42%

#32
Adjusted Score: 44697%
Critics Consensus: De Niro and Goodings Jr. manage to turn in performances that make this by-the-numbers inspirational movie watchable.
Synopsis: Carl Brashear (Cuba Gooding Jr.) is an ambitious sharecropper who joins the U.S. Navy to become the world's first black... [More]
Directed By: George Tillman Jr.

#31
Adjusted Score: 47760%
Critics Consensus: Despite the talent involved in The Legend of Bagger Vance, performances are hindered by an inadequate screenplay full of flat characters and bad dialogue. Also, not much happens, and some critics are offended by how the film glosses over issues of racism.
Synopsis: During the Great Depression, Georgia socialite Adele Invergordon (Charlize Theron) announces a publicity-garnering high-stakes match at her struggling family golf... [More]
Directed By: Robert Redford

#30
Adjusted Score: 49563%
Critics Consensus: The writing for Scorpion is not as sharp as Woody Allen's previous movies as most of the jokes fall flat.
Synopsis: Woody Allen stars as CW Briggs, the top insurance investigator in New York in 1940-or so he keeps telling the... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 53374%
Critics Consensus: The Addams Family's starry voice cast and eye-catching animation aren't enough to outweigh its saccharine handling of the delightfully dark source material.
Synopsis: Members of the mysterious and spooky Addams family -- Gomez, Morticia, Pugsley, Wednesday, Uncle Fester and Grandma -- are readily... [More]

#28
Adjusted Score: 59204%
Critics Consensus: While it offers an appropriately dark take on the fairy tale that inspired it, Snow White and the Huntsman is undone by uneven acting, problematic pacing, and a confused script.
Synopsis: Queen Ravenna (Charlize Theron), who seized control of her kingdom by marrying and killing its rightful ruler, needs the life... [More]
Directed By: Rupert Sanders

#27

Trial and Error (1997)
50%

#27
Adjusted Score: 51692%
Critics Consensus: Trial and Error gets some laughs out of the comedic chemistry between its pleasantly mismatched leads, although the results are still somewhat less than memorable.
Synopsis: Lawyer Charlie (Jeff Daniels) is sent by his boss (Lawrence Pressman) to a small Nevada town to file a continuance... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Lynn

#26

Astro Boy (2009)
50%

#26
Adjusted Score: 55326%
Critics Consensus: While it isn't terribly original, and it seems to have a political agenda that may rankle some viewers, Astro Boy boasts enough visual thrills to please its target demographic.
Synopsis: In futuristic Metro City, a brilliant scientist named Tenma builds Astro Boy (Freddie Highmore), a robotic child with superstrength, X-ray... [More]
Directed By: David Bowers

#25

Mighty Joe Young (1998)
56%

#25
Adjusted Score: 57363%
Critics Consensus: Beguiling effects transcend a predictable plot.
Synopsis: As a child living in Africa, Jill Young (Charlize Theron) saw her mother killed while protecting wild gorillas from poachers... [More]
Directed By: Ron Underwood

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 57822%
Critics Consensus: Well intentioned and passionate, this docu-drama about the 1999 WTO protests is heavier on politics than character development.
Synopsis: In 1999, members of the World Trade Organization arrive in Seattle for negotiations that are closed to the public. Concerned... [More]
Directed By: Stuart Townsend

#23

F9 The Fast Saga (2021)
59%

#23
Adjusted Score: 75949%
Critics Consensus: F9 sends the franchise hurtling further over the top than ever, but director Justin Lin's knack for preposterous set pieces keeps the action humming.
Synopsis: Vin Diesel's Dom Toretto is leading a quiet life off the grid with Letty and his son, little Brian, but... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#22

F9 The Fast Saga (2021)
59%

#22
Adjusted Score: 75949%
Critics Consensus: F9 sends the franchise hurtling further over the top than ever, but director Justin Lin's knack for preposterous set pieces keeps the action humming.
Synopsis: Vin Diesel's Dom Toretto is leading a quiet life off the grid with Letty and his son, little Brian, but... [More]
Directed By: Justin Lin

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 65187%
Critics Consensus: Though it is ultimately somewhat undone by its own lofty ambitions, The Devil's Advocate is a mostly effective blend of supernatural thrills and character exploration.
Synopsis: Aspiring Florida defense lawyer Kevin Lomax (Keanu Reeves) accepts a high-powered position at a New York law firm headed by... [More]
Directed By: Taylor Hackford

#20
#20
Adjusted Score: 65152%
Critics Consensus: A labyrinthine thriller with a host of memorable characters, 2 Days in the Valley is an uneven but intriguing thriller/black comedy.
Synopsis: Dosmo Pizzo (Danny Aiello), an ordinary guy, finds himself involved in a murder-for-hire scheme. He is betrayed by his partner,... [More]
Directed By: John Herzfeld

#19

The Yards (2000)
64%

#19
Adjusted Score: 67342%
Critics Consensus: Featuring strong performances and direction, The Yards is a richly textured crime thriller with an authentic feel.
Synopsis: After serving time in prison for taking the fall for a group of his friends, Leo just wants to get... [More]
Directed By: James Gray

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 90575%
Critics Consensus: The Fate of the Furious opens a new chapter in the franchise, fueled by the same infectious cast chemistry and over-the-top action fans have come to expect.
Synopsis: With Dom and Letty married, Brian and Mia retired and the rest of the crew exonerated, the globe-trotting team has... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#17

Bombshell (2019)
68%

#17
Adjusted Score: 87988%
Critics Consensus: Bombshell benefits from a terrific cast and a worthy subject, but its impact is muffled by a frustrating inability to go deeper than the sensationalistic surface.
Synopsis: The provocative real story of three whip-smart, ambitious, strong women who anchored one of America's most powerful news networks --... [More]
Directed By: Jay Roach

#16
Adjusted Score: 69075%
Critics Consensus: The Life and Death of Peter Sellers struggles to truly capture its subject's singular genius, but remains a diverting tribute -- and a showcase for the talents of Geoffrey Rush.
Synopsis: A biographical film about Peter Sellers' turbulent rise from popular BBC radio performer to one of the world's most gifted... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Hopkins

#15

North Country (2005)
69%

#15
Adjusted Score: 75821%
Critics Consensus: Though sometimes melodramatic and formulaic, North Country is nonetheless a rousing, powerful story of courage and humanity.
Synopsis: Single mother Josey Aimes (Charlize Theron) is part of a group of the first women to work at a local... [More]
Directed By: Niki Caro

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 75759%
Critics Consensus: The Cider House Rules derives affecting drama from wonderful performances, lovely visuals, and an old-fashioned feel.
Synopsis: The film follows the life of Homer Wells (Tobey Maguire), a precocious orphan who leaves his lifelong home and his... [More]
Directed By: Lasse Hallström

#13

The Italian Job (2003)
73%

#13
Adjusted Score: 78186%
Critics Consensus: Despite some iffy plot elements, The Italian Job succeeds in delivering an entertaining modern take on the original 1969 heist film, thanks to a charismatic cast.
Synopsis: After a heist in Venice, Steve (Edward Norton) turns on his partners in crime, killing safecracker John Bridger (Donald Sutherland)... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#12

Prometheus (2012)
73%

#12
Adjusted Score: 86503%
Critics Consensus: Ridley Scott's ambitious quasi-prequel to Alien may not answer all of its big questions, but it's redeemed by its haunting visual grandeur and compelling performances -- particularly Michael Fassbender as a fastidious android.
Synopsis: The discovery of a clue to mankind's origins on Earth leads a team of explorers to the darkest parts of... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#11
#11
Adjusted Score: 79851%
Critics Consensus: Though some of Paul Haggis's themes are heavy-handed, In the Valley of Elah is otherwise an engrossing murder mystery and antiwar statement, featuring a mesmerizing performance from Tommy Lee Jones.
Synopsis: A police detective (Charlize Theron) helps a retired Army sergeant (Tommy Lee Jones) search for his son, a soldier who... [More]
Directed By: Paul Haggis

#10

The Road (2009)
74%

#10
Adjusted Score: 81876%
Critics Consensus: The Road's commitment to Cormac McCarthy's dark vision may prove too unyielding for some, but the film benefits from hauntingly powerful performances from Viggo Mortensen and Kodi McPhee.
Synopsis: America is a grim, gray shadow of itself after a catastrophe. A man (Viggo Mortensen) and his young son (Kodi... [More]
Directed By: John Hillcoat

#9

Atomic Blonde (2017)
79%

#9
Adjusted Score: 105734%
Critics Consensus: Atomic Blonde gets enough mileage out of its stylish action sequences -- and ever-magnetic star -- to make up for a narrative that's somewhat less hard-hitting than its protagonist.
Synopsis: Sensual and savage, Lorraine Broughton is the most elite spy in MI6, an agent who's willing to use all of... [More]
Directed By: David Leitch

#8

Young Adult (2011)
80%

#8
Adjusted Score: 87444%
Critics Consensus: Despite its somewhat dour approach, Young Adult is a funny and ultimately powerful no-holds-barred examination of prolonged adolescence, thanks largely to a convincing performance by Charlize Theron.
Synopsis: Mavis Gary (Charlize Theron) is a successful writer of teen literature who returns to her hometown with a dual mission:... [More]
Directed By: Jason Reitman

#7

Monster (2003)
81%

#7
Adjusted Score: 87460%
Critics Consensus: Charlize Theron gives a searing, deglamorized performance as real life serial killer Aileen Wuornos in Monster, an intense, disquieting portrait of a profoundly damaged soul.
Synopsis: Shortly after moving to Florida, longtime prostitute Aileen Wuornos (Charlize Theron) meets young and reserved Selby Wall (Christina Ricci) and... [More]
Directed By: Patty Jenkins

#6

The Old Guard (2020)
80%

#6
Adjusted Score: 99787%
Critics Consensus: The Old Guard is occasionally restricted by genre conventions, but director Gina Prince-Bythewood brings a sophisticated vision to the superhero genre - and some knockout action sequences led by Charlize Theron.
Synopsis: A group of mercenaries, all centuries-old immortals with the ablity to heal themselves, discover someone is onto their secret, and... [More]
Directed By: Gina Prince-Bythewood

#5

Long Shot (2019)
81%

#5
Adjusted Score: 99821%
Critics Consensus: A sharp and deceptively layered comedy that's further fueled by the odd couple chemistry of its leads, this Long Shot largely hits its marks.
Synopsis: Fred Flarsky is a gifted and free-spirited journalist who has a knack for getting into trouble. Charlotte Field is one... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Levine

#4

Tully (2018)
87%

#4
Adjusted Score: 104374%
Critics Consensus: Tully delves into the modern parenthood experience with an admirably deft blend of humor and raw honesty, brought to life by an outstanding performance by Charlize Theron.
Synopsis: Marlo is a New York suburbanite who's about to give birth to her third child. Her husband, Ron, is loving... [More]
Directed By: Jason Reitman

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 96277%
Critics Consensus: A light, sweet, and thoroughly entertaining debut for director Tom Hanks, That Thing You Do! makes up in charm what it lacks in complexity.
Synopsis: Wily band manager Mr. White helps a small town band achieve big time success when they release a Beatles-style pop... [More]
Directed By: Tom Hanks

#2
#2
Adjusted Score: 110030%
Critics Consensus: Kubo and the Two Strings matches its incredible animation with an absorbing -- and bravely melancholy -- story that has something to offer audiences of all ages.
Synopsis: Young Kubo's (Art Parkinson) peaceful existence comes crashing down when he accidentally summons a vengeful spirit from the past. Now... [More]
Directed By: Travis Knight

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 114455%
Critics Consensus: With exhilarating action and a surprising amount of narrative heft, Mad Max: Fury Road brings George Miller's post-apocalyptic franchise roaring vigorously back to life.
Synopsis: Years after the collapse of civilization, the tyrannical Immortan Joe enslaves apocalypse survivors inside the desert fortress the Citadel. When... [More]
Directed By: George Miller

Charlize’s hair apparent to her Furiosa character in Mad Max: Fury Road is Atomic Blonde, as she inhabits a new badass creation with a license to break bones and drub clowns across ’80s Germany. We could go Theron and on but let’s cut to the chase: Here’s 24 more female action movies, ranked by Tomatometer!

Quentin Tarantino‘s Death Proof hits DVD shelves this week as a stand-alone from Grindhouse, his two-for-the-price-of-one collaboration with Robert Rodriguez. The tale of a group of young women terrorized by an aging stuntman in a killer automobile, Death Proof is an homage to 1970s road movies like Vanishing Point, as well as Tarantino’s twisted take on the slasher genre.

By itself, Death Proof fared pretty well with the critics, notching a 71 percent on the Tomatometer (check out RT’s take here); still, it’s a cut below Grindhouse‘s 82 percent. At a press conference at Cannes, the Death Proof gang, which included Tarantino, stars Kurt Russell, Rosario Dawson, Rose McGowan, Tracie Thoms, and Zoë Bell, as well as executive producer Harvey Weinstein, talked about the differences between the stand-alone version and the Grindhouse cut, as well as Tarantino’s influences, his ability to write for female characters, and what’s going on with his World War II flick, Inglorious Bastards.




Quentin Tarantino, Kurt Russell, and Rosario Dawson at Cannes.

The cinema of the 1970s is something of an artistic inspiration for you. You’ve done blaxploitation, action movies, and martial arts. What was your inspiration this time around?

Quentin Tarantino: Two things. My starting off point was that I wanted to do a slasher film. I thought that fit in really well with the whole idea, but when I started thinking about the slasher film, that genre is so rigid. I thought if I did that, it’d be too self-reflective and [the audience] would be too outside of the experience. But I still kind of liked that genre, so I tried to do a completely different thing and use the structure of a slasher. People are asking me, “Is this a revenge film?” or “Is this a feminist film? Because the film empowers women and that’s not like the exploitation movies you took this from.” And I say, “That’s not 100 percent correct.” Actually, exploitation movies dealt with female empowerment in violent genres in ways that Hollywood never did. You just brought up blaxsploitaiton and there was no A-list, white, Hollywood equivalent of Pam Grier in the 1970s. She stood alone. There was [an equivalent] in Japan, there was in Hong Kong, and there was in the last act of every slasher film. There’s always a final girl that stands up and has the moral fortitude to beat the boogeyman. That’s always been the staple of that genre and here there isn’t one final girl, its three, and they all play it chipperly but it still follows the basic rules of the genre.

About the girls: I had no idea they talk that way when they were among themselves, and especially not in a man’s presence. How did you girls work your dialogue and what made you allow him in?

Tracie Thoms: He listens to women. I can’t figure out how he knows how we talk to each other when men aren’t around.

Rose McGowan: We’re not quite as precious as most people.

TT: We’re not and he just listens. He observes people. I read the script and thought, “I have this conversation a lot. How’d he know!?” And we rehearsed the conversation a lot.

Rosario Dawson: Quentin definitely prides himself at being the lone guy when his girlfriends go out.

TT: No one else could write Quentin’s dialogue.

RD: So you just work on it.

You recently mentioned you are eager to make a film with Arnold Schwarzenegger, Bruce Willis, and Sylvester Stallone. That would be the coolest film ever.

QT: Inglorious Bastards — I never said it was going to star Bruce Willis, Schwarzenegger and Stallone. I don’t know who’s going to be in it at this point. I have to write it first. It always starts with me and the characters. Whenever I cast an actor and try to write the character around it I always end up regretting it, so I always try to write the character and cast the actor to fit the character. Whenever I’ve written the character like in the case of Zoë [Bell] or Vanessa [Ferlito], where I know they’re who I want to play, I write it about them. Vanessa is Vanessa and Zoë is Zoë. It’s not like I thought, “I like Kurt Russell for Mike, he’d be very good.” No, I wrote Zoë. And if I couldn’t get Zoë, I’d have to throw the script away because I couldn’t do it. Same with Uma [Thurman], but she said she could do it [Kill Bill] so we did.



What about the “missing scene” in the American version?

QT: For the American version, I wanted this perverse pleasure: I enjoyed the idea of building up to this scene and not giving it to you. (Laughs) I looked forward to hearing the audience go, “Awww!” and curse my name in unison. But one of the biggest things I put [back in] was the black and white reel in the second half of the movie where Kurt’s character spies his next victims. I put that in. Most of the stuff I put back in was stuff I took out of Grindhouse for the simple fact that – we made three movies. When we made Death Proof and Planet Terror we made Grindhouse; they are three separate movies. Death Proof and Planet Terror were meant to stand alone, but when we put them together for Grindhouse we had to make them work together as one evening experience. In the case of Death Proof, in the opening scene, you meet all the girls and they all talk and everything and you have to remember in the opening scene, that’s just five minutes into the movie and we can take time and let the dialogue play out. In the case of Grindhouse, that’s not five minutes into the movie, that’s 95 minutes into the movie, and you don’t have the patience to let the jokes play. Those were the biggest cuts I made, especially shortening dialogue.

In the first cut when Stuntman Mike doesn’t get his lap dance, you kind of feel sorry for him. But in the second cut when he does get his lap dance, he kind of comes off as a sonofab—-. Did you intend any of that or was that an accidental result of the editing?

QT: That was intended. I really enjoy the fact that if you count the minutes [runtime] actually hasn’t changed that much but it has changed things 180 degrees emotionally because something as simple as showing that Stuntman Mike is stalking the girls outside the restaurant — you actually see the pictures of the girls and you know he’s the villain, you know he’s stalking them and you know he’s been there and you still don’t believe…that’s what I love. The way the tone changes is the greatest difference between the two movies (Death Proof alone and as part of Grindhouse] and I’m very proud of what I was able to do that while changing very little.

How do you feel about that, Kurt?

Kurt Russell: I haven’t seen this version, so I can’t tell you —

QT: When I knew it was going to play Cannes, I didn’t want to let the actors see it before they see it [here] so they’ve all been verboten from seeing it.

KR: I’m disappointed for any audience who walks into Grindhouse this April. There will be no movie made in the next five years for the Grindhouse audience like this one. They [audiences] will be able to see Death Proof or Planet Terror as separate films but my prediction is that 20 years from now you will want “the Grindhouse experience,” You won’t watch the films separately. You will see them separately now and hopefully you’ll enjoy them but in the end of the day, if you want to have the full effect, the full experience is something bizarre. In that regard, I like the short version, I like how it is and I’m interested to see the film in its long version [and compare] to see how it stands on its own.

QT: Most grindhouse movies have risen to the top as cult films in the last 10 years because they’ve had an audience on DVD. I feel that part of my job is to be like the symphony conductor and the audience is the orchestra. And my job is to get them to “ooh” and “ahh” and scream and clap when I want them to. That is part of the almost revival tent, religious show experience I was trying to create in the audience. It can be experienced in a lot of different ways but a bunch of strangers who have this thing in front of them that can get them to respond audibly, is the reason I worked on this and the goal I had in the editing room every single day.

Harvey Weinstein might not want to put the film out together —

Harvey Weinstein: I had a great time talking with the British press about this, who thought it was a sacrilege I release these films separately. When you see the new Planet Terror and the new Death Proof, you’re seeing Robert Rodriguez making a Robert Rodriguez movie and Quentin Tarantino making a Quentin Tarantino movie. It’s pure. The things these guys took out of their movie to save time and keep these movies together took out some of the essence of their films. Quentin talks about the scenes where Mike is introduced as a character; it’s a completely different scene in a completely different movie. It’s like cutting Kill Bill and Sin City to 70 minute versions — you’re taking some of the essence out of it. Yes, we had a fun time doing a Grindhouse for European audiences, and yes, they’ll have a great time seeing Grindhouse the way it was intended —

QT: I see what you’re saying, and I love them [the trailers] all, but it’d be wrong to try to put them in Death Proof or Planet Terror and Grindhouse isn’t going anywhere. You’ll be able to see it on DVD for the rest of your life. It would be cheapening them and prostituting them to some degree if I were to attach the trailers to the single films. It’s what makes Grindhouse special.



Your films have had such an influence. How do you define your style?

QT: I don’t define my style. I think that’s for you to do: Add the adjectives and tell me what I’ve done. I’m very proud of the influence I’ve had on filmmakers. I’m very proud when young filmmakers come up to me and say, “I know you’ve heard this a million times, but you’re the reason I’m in filmmaking.” I can’t hear that enough, and I know what I responded to before I was making movies. I actually thought to myself, “I want to make movies that when people like me see them, will make them want to make movies.” I didn’t know how I was going to do that or how I would be able to do that, I didn’t know if I’d ever be able to direct a film but that it’s worked out that way is one of the things I’m the proudest of. I wanted to find a style. As a young man watching movies, I knew what I responded to and if I saw a film I really liked: Jim McBride‘s Breathless, Jonathan Demme‘s Something Wild, John Carpenter‘s The Thing. Once I saw that, I couldn’t see another movie, it was like I couldn’t live another day until I saw that movie again. And usually, especially in my early 20s, I had to see it four times before I could say, “Okay, I can see another movie. Okay, I can move on with my life.” It was like sticking my finger in a light socket and getting all that electricity. I can only hope I can do that for other people.

RD: I think it’s safe to say you do. When I was 16, I was in this film called Kids and after that I told my dad, “I’d like to get into acting.” And the first film my dad handed me was Reservoir Dogs and I watched it seven times. If you wanna talk about his style… he [Tarantino] put his actors in a room in all the same clothes, and put it on his actors to get something going and it gets you really sucked in. I mean he doesn’t use tricks. Zoë Bell is really on the hood of that car. The movie magic he’s doing is not made of tricks; he’s making you feel something about his characters. [To Tarantino] So you did do what you set out to. I had to see your movie again and again and again. And when I had to be in your film I auditioned again and again and again. I was like, “Damn, there’s eight chicks in this movie, I gotta get at least one of them!”

What kind of expectations do you have for the audience? Do you think you have to be a die-hard grindhouse fan to enjoy the film?

QT: No, not at all. If you had to be a die-hard grindhouse fan to enjoy it then the movie is probably pretty limited. I feel that way about any kind of cinema. If you grew up with these movies and you have a sense of history with them then you’ll enjoy the film one way. But if you don’t know about those kinds of movies. I’m not saying my movie is better than those movies, but I am trying to transcend it. I do have a definite agenda. As much as I love those films, if you do love those films then hopefully everything will seem brand new to you and you’ll appreciate those films more. I have my own agenda that I’m trying to get across with the film and that agenda is different than the agenda of most drive-in movies.

Seems like we’ve been hearing about a "Barbarella" remake for quite a while now, but there finally seems to be some serious progress on the project: "Casino Royale" writers Neal Purvis and Robert Wade have been hired to pen the screenplay for producer Dino de Laurentiis.

The producer signed a deal with the estate of author Jean-Claude Forest, so in addition to a new-fangled and ultra-modernized "Barbarella" adventure, we’ll also be offered new reprints of the original French comic book series. Apparently the producers are shooting for something slick and high-tech; not the campy loopiness of Roger Vadim‘s original film. (Then again, "Barbarella" was kinda high-tech for the late ’60s.)

Apparently the British writing team will deliver "a free, modern gal who survives in a futuristic world through her intelligence, fighting skills and sexuality." Hey, that sounds pretty great and all, but I bet that’s what producers had in mind when they made "Aeon Flux" and "Ultraviolet." And we all know how those ones turned out.

No word yet on who’ll be playing the title role, but I’m betting it won’t be Jane Fonda again.

Source: Variety

The post-turkey blues will kick in as the North American box office should slump this weekend following a busy Thanksgiving holiday frame.

Three new releases venture into the multiplexes. The Biblical drama "The Nativity Story" will open in the most theaters and try to court a faith-based audience as Christmas nears. Teens and young adults looking to push the envelope with R-rated fare have the college comedy "Van Wilder: The Rise of Taj" and the horror thriller "Turistas." Meanwhile, the penguin toon "Happy Feet" and the James Bond actioner "Casino Royale" will both be past the $100M mark by Friday and will try to stay atop the charts for a third straight time.

The story of Baby Jesus comes to the big screen with New Line’s "The Nativity Story" which stars Keisha Castle-Hughes ("Whale Rider") as Mary. The PG-rated film should appeal to Christian parents wanting to share the religious saga with their children in an environment that the whole family can enjoy. Certainly "The Passion of the Christ" showed how big a Biblical film could be at the box office. However, "Nativity" is completely different and does not have that film’s high-profile director, controversy, or national media frenzy.


Keisha Castle-Hughes and friends in "The Nativity Story."

Instead, it may tap into the same audience as October’s Babylon epic "One Night With the King" which opened to $4.1M from just 909 theaters for a $4,518 average. "The Nativity Story" will launch in more than twice the number of theaters and has a more timely release with December 25 right around the corner, but could generate a similar per-theater average. Critics have not been kind to the pic which might prompt some to wait for the DVD. Opening in around 2,800 theaters, "The Nativity Story" could collect about $13M over the weekend.

Four and a half years after the release of National Lampoon’s first raunchy college comedy "Van Wilder" comes a new installment with "Van Wilder: The Rise of Taj." This R-rated tale finds Taj (Kal Penn) from the first film moving to England to teach a group of misfits how to party down. It’s been a tough road in recent weeks for R-rated films aimed at young males. "Tenacious D in The Pick of Destiny," "Let’s Go to Prison," and "Harsh Times" all opened with about $2M or $3M a piece. "Taj" has some brand recognition since the first "Van Wilder" went on to become popular on video and on cable. In theaters, it opened to $7.3M and a $3,612 average in April 2002 leading to a $21M final. However, a crowded marketplace will make it tough for the sequel to stand out. And "Borat" becoming a runaway smash with four straight $10M+ weekends won’t help either. Opening in 2,000 around theaters, "Van Wilder: The Rise of Taj" might debut with about $5M.


Kal Penn returns in "Van Wilder: The Rise of Taj."

Fox’s new division Fox Atomic, which will cater to teen and young adult audiences, sets sail with its first film with the horror pic "Turistas." The R-rated thriller is directed by John Stockwell ("Blue Crush," "Crazy/Beautiful") and follows a group of American tourists on vacation in Brazil who cross paths with creepy organ harvesters. No starpower here. Instead, Fox is hoping to appeal to college kids looking for a good scare. Outside of older teens and twentysomethings, appeal should be minimal. Even with its core audience, "Turistas" will have to share shelf space with "Taj" so potential will be limited. Opening in less than 2,000 theaters, "Turistas" could find its way to a weekend gross of roughly $4M.


A trio of scared turistas in "Turistas."

Among holdovers, films usually suffer steep declines on the weekend after the Thanksgiving holiday frame. Overall box office spending contracts and studios usually avoid programming any of their heavy hitters into the slot. In fact in the last 15 years, only one new release has opened at number one during this particular weekend – 2003’s "The Last Samurai."

This weekend, it could end up being "Happy Feet" and "Casino Royale" duking it out for box office supremacy for the third straight time. Family pics do extremely well over the turkey frame, but then come down hard a week later. Plus "The Nativity Story" could provide some competition for families. Warner Bros. might suffer a 55% fall for its penguin film which would leave it with $17M for the weekend and $120M after 17 days.

The new blonde Bond is pleasing audiences worldwide and in the United States, "Casino Royale" is set to give "Die Another Day" a run for its money thanks to good word-of-mouth. With kids back in school, the Sony adventure film has taken over the number one spot during the mid-week period. "Casino" could drop by 50% this weekend to around $15M which would push the domestic cume to $116M. Look for the global tally to surpass the $400M mark with ease by the end of the holiday season.

Last weekend, Denzel Washington‘s action thriller "Deja Vu" got off to a good start with a $28.6M five-day bow. Buena Vista may witness a 50% drop and collect roughly $10M over three days and raise its 12-day total to $43M.

LAST YEAR: For the third straight weekend, "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" rose to the head of the class and grossed $19.9M to lead the box office. Paramount opened its Charlize Theron actioner "Aeon Flux" to $12.7M on its way to a lukewarm $25.9M. It was the only new wide release of the weekend. "Walk the Line" dropped to third with $9.5M, "Yours, Mine, and Ours" placed fourth with $8.3M, and "Just Friends" rounded out the top five with $5.6M.

Fearing an "action-chick" bomb not unlike "Ultraviolet," "Aeon Flux," or "Elektra," Lionsgate has bailed on plans to bring Marvel’s "Black Widow" to the big screen, much to the chagrin of screenwriter David Hayter, who’s been plugging away on the project for quite some time.

From IGN FilmForce: "Hayter told IGN that after Lionsgate dropped Black Widow, "Marvel and I then spoke to a few other financing entities, but I never felt comfortable that we had found a place that was willing to take the movie, and the character, seriously."

He continued, "I have put it aside until a reputable studio comes along, but in the meantime, I am heartbroken. I love this character, I love the story/world we came up with for her, and I sincerely hope the movie gets done some day. In the meantime, I am creating an original feature to shoot next year."

Black Widow was to be a contemporary and realistic espionage adventure that would have taken the Black Widow into Kazakhstan, to the Red Room and beyond."

David Hayter’s previous films include "X-Men," "X2," and "The Scorpion King."

Michael Bay already owns his own production company (Platinum Dunes), so obviously he has to own his own FX house! This explains why the "Transformers" director and a partner dropped what must have been a LOT of cash to purchase well-regarded FX company Digital Domain.

Digital Domain, the Academy Award®-winning full-service digital studio and production company responsible for jaw-dropping visual sequences in such films as "Titanic," "The Day After Tomorrow" and "I, Robot" as well as commercials such as the recent Budweiser Super Bowl "Superfan" spot, has been acquired by South Florida-based Wyndcrest Holdings, LLC, a group led by director Michael Bay and investor John Textor.

Carl Stork, a long-time senior Microsoft executive and principal of Wyndcrest Holdings, has been elected chief executive officer and a member of the Board of Directors of Digital Domain, replacing Scott Ross who is stepping down as CEO and remaining a consultant to the company. C. Bradley Call will remain president and chief operating officer. Bay and Textor will co-chair the Board of Directors.

"At a time when every top grossing motion picture is relying on digital visual effects to help tell compelling and entertaining stories, we believe this translates into a bright future for companies in this field, and we believe Digital Domain represented a unique opportunity to invest," said Stork, whose accomplishments at Microsoft included leading the development of Windows® 95/98. "The creative and talented team at Digital Domain has a great reputation in both the feature film business and in the commercial advertising community for high-quality, award-winning work. Adding the expertise, business acumen and diverse relationships of the Wyndcrest principals will allow Digital Domain to capitalize on the rapidly expanding opportunities in the entertainment business.

"On behalf of all involved with Digital Domain, I would like to thank Scott Ross for his remarkable contributions as a founder and leader of the company over the past 13 years," Stork said. "We intend to draw on his advice and counsel over the coming years and we wish him well in his future endeavors."

"Having worked with Digital Domain in the past, I am well aware of the talent and creativity of the team here, and understand first-hand why the company has a well-earned reputation for creative and high-quality work," said Bay. "Rapidly evolving digital visual effects technology is going to allow motion picture directors to tell even more compelling and visually stunning stories in the future, and we believe that Digital Domain is uniquely positioned to take advantage of these new technologies, as well as new distribution channels and platforms."

"Digital Domain is well-positioned with exceptional people and leading technology at a time when reliance on visual effects is increasing in every sector of entertainment," said Textor, who has known Bay since their days at Wesleyan University and has been his business partner for eight years. "We look forward to combining these attributes with a renewed commitment to build the commercial and film industries’ leading director-centric visual effects business. Through the addition of new capital and the appropriate strategic relationships, we are also committed to the extension of the Digital Domain business into the direct development of animated films and effects-reliant live action films."

"While we all believe we’ve accomplished a great deal in the industry, we’re incredibly enthusiastic about the future as we believe this new ownership group will provide the necessary capital and strategic resources to allow us to grow our business profitably in both feature films and in advertising while retaining an environment that encourages our artists to strive for ever-greater heights of creative excellence," said Call, a decade-long Digital Domain executive who assumed the presidency of Digital Domain, as well as day-to-day responsibility for leading the company, in 2002.

"We know that our future depends on continuing to satisfy the creative needs of our clients in a manner, and on a budget, that other competitors cannot match," Call added.

Stork will take over as Digital Domain CEO effective immediately.

–Digital Domain press release courtesy of ComingSoon.net.

In addition to the three titles mentioned above, Digital Domain also provided visual effects for movies such as "True Lies" (their first flick), "Apollo 13," "The Fifth Element," "Armageddon," "Fight Club," "X-Men," "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory," "Stealth," "Aeon Flux," and the upcoming "My Super Ex-Girlfriend."

"Sunday Morning Shootout’s" Peter Bart & Peter Guber spent some time on the interview circuit at the last San Diego Comic Con, and the fine folks at Comics2Film.com were kind enough to host the whole entire episode for us.

Although the juiciest tidbit here is Bryan Singer admitting that "Superman Returns" cost more than a quarter-billion dollars, Pete and Pete also get to chat with Kate Beckinsale ("Underworld: Evolution") and Charlize Theron ("Aeon Flux"). Also included is a short little side-bar with Joss Whedon ("Serenity"), which means this clip crosses all sorts of movie-geek borders.

Plus it gives you a small taste of the world’s biggest Comic Con, which sure does look like an awesome place to visit!

Click here for the 23-minute "Shootout" episode.

Filmmaker David Dobkin (Wedding Crashers, Clay Pigeons) has his next project lined up over at Universal: Based on a comic book series by Peter Lenkov, R.I.P.D. is a sci-fi comedy concept about a recently demised cop enlisted to head a zombie-fightin’ task force. (And the Aeon Flux scribes are writing it.)

Says Variety: "David Dobkin is moving from cads to cadavers. Universal Pictures has set the "Wedding Crashers" helmer to direct "R.I.P.D.," an adaptation of the comicbook tale about cops out to rid the world of the recently deceased.

Phil Hay and Matt Manfredi, who penned the feature "Aeon Flux," are on board to write the spec, which is being positioned as a sci-fi comedy.

Premise of the comic was that a murdered cop was recruited to work in the Rest in Peace Dept., a ghost-busting police force (itself comprised of ghosts) that battles spirits unready to depart this world."

UGO.com has the very first trailer up for the new action flick from director Kurt ("Equilibrium") Wimmer. It features the always-sexy Milla Jovovich kicking some serious butt … and it’s not zombies she’s beatin’ on this time!

"Set in the late 21st century, a subculture of humans have emerged who have been modified genetically by a vampire-like disease (Hemophagia), giving them enhanced speed, incredible stamina and acute intelligence, and as they are set apart from "normal" and "healthy" humans, the world is pushed to the brink of worldwide civil war (a war between humans and hemophages) aimed at the destruction of the "diseased" population. In the middle of this crossed-fire is – an infected woman – Ultraviolet (Jovovich), who finds herself protecting a nine-year-old boy who has been marked for death by the human government as he is believed to be a threat to humans."

Co-starring William Fichtner, Cameron Bright, and Nick Chinlund, the irritatingly PG-13-rated "Ultraviolet" whacks into theaters on February 24th.

So the flick looks like "Kill Bill," "Resident Evil," "Underworld," and "Aeon Flux" fell into a blender. I still think it looks pretty cool.

According to Variety, the lovely Ms. Charlize Theron is about to reunite with the producer behind "Monster" to deliver "The Ice at the Bottom of the World," a drama she’ll produce and star in.

Deal puts Theron back in business with Picturehouse head Bob Berney, who ran Newmarket and distributed "Monster," the last film Theron produced and the one that won her the actress Oscar.

Just as Theron was a hands-on participant in that project, she has been similarly enterprising on "Ice." The film is set up to be bank-financed through New Line and handled as a negative pickup. In the deal orchestrated by One Entertainment and her attorney Steve Warren, Theron will wind up owning the negative.

For several years, Theron has controlled the rights to the drama, which Mark Richard scripted from his fictional short story.

It’s set in the Chesapeake Bay, where a Navy captain reluctantly retires for health reasons. After years of neglecting his family while at sea, the grizzled veteran throws his dysfunctional family into chaos. Theron will play one of his daughters, who returns home a heroin addict and the single mother of a mixed-race child.

Theron, who most recently starred in "North Country" and "Aeon Flux," hasn’t chosen the next film and "Ice" is a possibility for that slot, depending on how quickly a director and cast are set.

This week’s sole wide release is the highly anticipated "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe." Will the film garner the lion’s share of accolades?

Once "The Lord of the Rings" became a hot cinematic property, it was inevitable that Hollywood would turn to Tolkien’s friend and fellow fantasist C.S. Lewis and give his "The Chronicles of Narnia" for epic big screen treatment. It’s got a built-in fan base, fantastical lands and creatures, and a grand quest. Critics say that although this is no "Lord of the Rings" (what is?), Andrew Adamson‘s film is largely a winner, filled with wondrous, phantasmagoric images, and deft acting. Though there are some complaints about the film’s length (140 minutes) and some quibbles about the CGI effects, the scribes say fans will be pleased with "Narnia"’s adherence to, and in some cases improvement upon, the source material. At 78 percent on the Tomatometer, it’s looking like the season of the "Witch." The "Narnia" series is off to a good start, as the first film is Certified Fresh.

In a completely unrelated note, I want to congratulate both almeisan and Galaxyfilms22 for their correct "Aeon Flux" Tomatometer predictions of 10 percent. As promised, you do indeed win props from Critical Consensus. However, a word of warning: Don’t let the studios know about your Tomatometer crystal balls, because they might go to sinister lengths to get their hands on them. Additional props to rockstarfrank (who I assume is male) for his astute, insightful assessment of "Flux": ‘This will clearly be one of the greatest movies in the history of mankind. I mean the grass attacks, people. The grass attacks!’ Well put, Frank. The grass attacks, indeed.

Recent Children’s Book Adaptations:
——————————————–
88% — Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005)
75% — Zathura (2005)
83% — Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005)
57% — The Polar Express (2004)
71% — Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004)

Tag Cloud

heist movie Quiz venice international NBA BET DC streaming service Funimation 2018 TCM supernatural trailers Food Network VICE Grammys new york 2017 DGA Neflix screen actors guild Classic Film YouTube Red finale Hallmark Christmas movies DirecTV CBS All Access Musical Mystery dragons Pride Month rotten blockbuster Columbia Pictures slashers quibi asian-american king kong Comic-Con@Home 2021 Mary Poppins Returns comic books LGBTQ Epix Freeform NYCC marvel cinematic universe Holidays crime drama a nightmare on elm street sequels Turner Classic Movies gangster young adult Crackle Fox Searchlight vs. HBO Go dark zombie Infographic Marathons strong female leads 45 chucky AMC Plus Best and Worst parents BET Awards OneApp live action reviews canceled TV shows screenings Cosplay Chilling Adventures of Sabrina franchise 72 Emmy Awards documentary Star Trek elevated horror The CW hidden camera Awards spanish HBO USA National Geographic hollywood 90s transformers satire wonder woman indiana jones laika documentaries Instagram Live Britbox facebook Stephen King Paramount Ghostbusters foreign Disney streaming service composers Marvel Studios prank Pet Sematary Red Carpet DC Universe breaking bad Exclusive Video BBC America Hulu action-comedy Dark Horse Comics rt archives Wes Anderson 99% Logo diversity docuseries TV Land 2021 robots fresh MTV cats blaxploitation women ITV stop motion independent Nickelodeon Sundance TV Mary Tyler Moore cinemax obituary Baby Yoda Ellie Kemper cancelled PlayStation Superheroe Discovery Channel Calendar cults archives Superheroes A24 Drama technology Binge Guide Comedy Central football Kids & Family harry potter Premiere Dates zombies Hallmark Syfy Character Guide Hear Us Out OWN Family Travel Channel Cannes Emmys Trophy Talk dceu indie Thanksgiving Peacock serial killer video adenture 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards spain Mudbound hispanic heritage month superman mutant royal family new star wars movies Ovation cooking Oscars tv talk versus Creative Arts Emmys game show natural history joker crime thriller 73rd Emmy Awards dreamworks anthology saw french First Reviews Biopics CMT jurassic park Disney Winter TV Watching Series genre debate scary movies batman jamie lee curtis spy thriller The Purge 20th Century Fox TBS Video Games spinoff stoner free movies Turner period drama RT History Writers Guild of America comiccon Year in Review Marvel El Rey basketball Warner Bros. teaser GoT telelvision streaming TV renewals scorecard 71st Emmy Awards FX on Hulu name the review IFC romantic comedy cancelled TV shows Bravo high school cops Starz Rom-Com spider-man films USA Network Polls and Games Podcast Christmas canceled golden globes politics Nat Geo FX series Lucasfilm new zealand 2015 australia biopic directors Winners IFC Films space 21st Century Fox Sneak Peek Fall TV golden globe awards Martial Arts leaderboard christmas movies rt labs The Academy video on demand critics spider-verse scary Fantasy 93rd Oscars Country green book streaming movies toronto Mary poppins travel comics fast and furious Extras Rocketman Women's History Month nature classics live event singing competition FXX richard e. Grant rt labs critics edition SXSW Academy Awards HBO Max Netflix AMC Black Mirror ABC pirates of the caribbean Adult Swim monster movies worst Esquire worst movies Countdown Masterpiece Sci-Fi Music rotten movies we love all-time best CBS war Amazon Prime Video TCA 2017 Opinion Television Critics Association 4/20 BBC One Film YouTube Premium TCA true crime nfl 2016 TIFF disaster President Amazon festival GIFs The Walt Disney Company Tubi Walt Disney Pictures feel good television news Sony Pictures Prime Video TLC hist Certified Fresh olympics PBS Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt king arthur IMDb TV ratings CNN Marvel Television SDCC trophy Valentine's Day award winner unscripted MSNBC Schedule adaptation Brie Larson Reality Competition mcc TruTV mission: impossible VH1 Pirates Set visit kaiju Summer dc anime james bond WGN posters kids Animation social media The Walking Dead Sundance MCU Shondaland cartoon vampires CW Seed child's play 79th Golden Globes Awards marvel comics werewolf doctor who godzilla History Hollywood Foreign Press Association blockbusters Rocky remakes kong Disney+ Disney Plus Amazon Prime Toys FOX comic book movie Pop Broadway Tumblr BBC ABC Signature LGBT science fiction thriller Cartoon Network Heroines Spring TV aliens suspense 007 historical drama ghosts miniseries based on movie Apple TV+ ID 24 frames Spectrum Originals Musicals Interview E! Teen Arrowverse Tarantino game of thrones Alien Lionsgate black comedy cars San Diego Comic-Con black aapi Holiday Vudu Western witnail Action political drama superhero Universal dogs TCA Awards concert Comics on TV Universal Pictures SundanceTV Tags: Comedy book adaptation movie Tomatazos TNT medical drama The Arrangement comic Avengers Fargo movies universal monsters Apple TV Plus 2019 discovery APB japanese Box Office casting YA Lifetime art house twilight New York Comic Con toy story legend Horror psycho hispanic spanish language justice league BAFTA Nominations TV movies Election boxoffice Photos Star Wars Disney Channel Television Academy Black History Month Comedy halloween tv Captain marvel binge Apple dexter biography RT21 See It Skip It TV One animated die hard nbcuniversal A&E Trailer Rock reboot sag awards PaleyFest romance TV police drama halloween mob cancelled TV series Pop TV Chernobyl slasher E3 Legendary Paramount Network Amazon Studios Reality Crunchyroll revenge Pacific Islander sitcom critic resources Netflix Christmas movies VOD Super Bowl lord of the rings YouTube Anna Paquin italian south america children's TV Lifetime Christmas movies Trivia Shudder comedies TCA Winter 2020 X-Men GLAAD NBC mockumentary Acorn TV target boxing festivals stand-up comedy emmy awards popular Disney Plus Tokyo Olympics WarnerMedia ViacomCBS Endgame rom-coms Film Festival dramedy sequel comic book movies sopranos theme song ABC Family japan DC Comics Song of Ice and Fire sports Elton John cancelled television crossover 2020 criterion The Witch Comic Book Paramount Plus know your critic latino adventure Spike talk show Pixar 1990s Showtime Image Comics what to watch Awards Tour HFPA razzies deadpool Mindy Kaling First Look docudrama scene in color American Society of Cinematographers Fox News renewed TV shows Sundance Now ESPN book psychological thriller zero dark thirty Emmy Nominations crime