James Franco - Steve Granitz/WireImage.com
Having established his name in the Spider-Man movies, these days James Franco is clearly making some more personal career choices. He was in three films in 2008, notable for their vastly different styles. His extended cameo as Richard Gere‘s son in the weepy Nights in Rodanthe, based on the Nicholas Sparks novel, was followed by two far less forgettable roles; opposite Seth Rogen in Pineapple Express (for which he received a Golden Globe nomination) and as Sean Penn‘s boyfriend in Milk (for which he has been nominated with the cast for the SAG ensemble award).

He says he signed on for Pineapple because it was a chance to work with Judd Apatow and company, whom he knew from his days on the TV series Freaks and Geeks. “We did a lot of goofing around in a kind of constructed way,” he says of the film. “It’s a lot of improvisation, just letting the camera roll and doing the scene over and over again and seeing what happens. And I loved that!”

When asked to contrast the experiences on the two sets, he stops and thinks. “Milk had its own kind of looseness,” he says. “Gus Van Sant has his own approach, and there was the freedom to try different kinds of things. And Sean really encouraged that too. So it was somewhat improvisational, but what it did was to make the performances more natural. And it may be funny to say, but it was the same with Pineapple. I think that’s one of the things that Judd Apatow brings to comedies: there are wacky situations but it feels more emotionally grounded.”

Clearly this on-screen naturalism is important to him. He’s been studying film at New York University, and chooses five favourites that are all firmly rooted in authenticity…

 

Gimme Shelter (1970, 100% Tomatometer)



Gimme Shelter
It’s just amazing. I’ve been watching all of the Maysles Brothers‘ films and I’m really into their approach, which they called “direct cinema”, and the whole school that came out of DA Pennebaker, Robert Drew and so on. I love the whole idea that life can be as dramatic as fiction. It’s very different than reality television, because that’s very manipulated.

The Maysles’ approach is minimal interaction and being as observational as possible. Gimme Shelter has such drama, and it’s so well-done. As are all of their films.

I also love Salesman, which also proves that their philosophy can really work, because it just has these real Bible salesmen. But to me it has as much drama and tension as Arthur Miller or Eugene O’Neill – it’s like the Death of a Salesman and The Iceman Cometh all rolled together – but it’s real! I just can’t get enough of it.


My Own Private Idaho (1992, 85% Tomatometer)



My Own Private Idaho
Even before I started acting, this was a very important film to me. Obviously I was really drawn to the performances and characters, but the whole film just kept bringing it back.

Gus has changed his style somewhat beginning with Gerry and all this Bela Tarr and Chantal Akerman influence, which I love too. But back then it was really about collage.

Idaho actually started as three different projects – three scripts – through Orson WellesChimes at Midnight, which was a distillation of Shakespeare, and this other story about street kids in Portland, and then something else about a kid finding his parents in Italy. And then this whole narcoleptic thing that was influenced by George Eliot. He’s got all that just in the script, and then there’s the way it’s shot – he had two DPs, plus time-lapse for the cloud sequences and 8mm for the dream sequences.

I love all of Gus’ movies. I think Drugstore Cowboy is a hilarious movie. I love how he can take a situation like that and make it funny. I think Matt Dillon gives one of the best comedic performances in that movie. Gus is taking a very personal approach in the film – from the look of Bob Yeoman‘s cinematography to the way Gus captures Portland on screen.


The Bicycle Thief (1948, 95% Tomatometer)



The Bicycle Thief
All of my favourite films are approaching realism in a different way. This is Italian neorealism – obviously there’s a script and a story and everything, but it’s shot in the street and it has the feel of Italy, of being in the streets and, like Idaho, a deceivingly, simply constructed narrative. But there’s so much emotion that’s evoked from these very simple stories.

4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days (2008, 97% Tomatometer)



4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
Again, a very simple approach, but there’s so much power in that film. You’re not quite sure what’s happening from the beginning, but you’re just kind of thrown into it. All you know is that these women have this mysterious meeting, and it takes you from there. The film gives you a great sense of what it was really like to live in Romania in the 1980s.

The Wrestler (2008, 98% Tomatometer)



The Wrestler
I loved this film! I really like the films of the Dardenne Brothers, like The Child and The Son, and I’m sure The Wrestler was influenced by the Dardennes, especially in the beginning when the camera is following the back of Mickey Rourke‘s head through the hallways.

I know Darren Aronofsky a little bit, and I remember meeting with him just when The Fountain was coming out, and he told me to look at the Dardenne Brothers because they were doing some really good stuff, so I know he’s a fan.


Milk opens in UK on Friday and in Australia on 29th January. It’s out now in the US.

In this week’s Ketchup, the villainous Two-Face will most likely be saved for a future "Batman" sequel, George Lucas gave some insight into the upcoming "Indiana Jones 4" project, and the lackluster opening of "Grindhouse" has the studio scrambling to repackage it.

Also, Tom Hanks is set to get even richer for the "Da Vinci Code" prequel, and we get our first look at Bumblebee after his makeover for the big screen "Transformers." Read on.

This Week’s Most Popular News:

No Two-Face Against "The Dark Knight"?

A while back we heard that the Harvey Dent character would be appearing in "The Dark Knight" (he’ll be played by Aaron Eckhart) but that his villainous alter ego (Two-Face) would be saved for the NEXT sequel. Looks like we might have some confirmation on that…

Lucas Spills a Few "Indy 4" Beans

No, nothing as juicy as, say, an actual movie title, but if, like me, you’ve been salivating over the prospect of a fourth "Indiana Jones" adventure for what feels like twenty years, you might be interested in what producer George Lucas had to say recently.

Will "Grindhouse" Split Up and Hit Theaters Again?

As far as the overseas release plans for "Grindhouse" are concerned, the Weinsteins were always planning to split the flick into two and sell ’em as solo movies. And now with the underwhelming opening weekend for the double feature behind us, it looks like they might want to do the same thing over here.

Hanks to Get Biggest Payday Ever for "Da Vinci Code 2"?

Sony was already warming up the "Da Vinci Code" follow-up when the flick opened to huge box office numbers, but the questions we still need to know are A) Who’s directing, and B) Is Tom Hanks coming back?

First Full Look at the Bumblebee "Transformer"

So far you’ve only glimpsed Autobots and Decepticons in fleeting, as they smash their way through clips and trailers or loom in the distance of production stills. Now peek at the first detailed visage of a "Transformer" online!


Side by side no more?


In Other News:

  • Award-winning short film director Phil Traill has signed on to make his feature-length debut directing the Sandra Bullock vehicle "All About Steve."
  • Rob Marshall will direct the film adaptation of the Broadway musical "Nine," in collaboration with The Weinstein Company.
  • Tony Scott will produce a film about agent-turned-pro-war documentarian Pat Dollard. The film will be based on a Vanity Fair article by Evan Wright, who will write the screenplay along with Dollard.
  • Directors Bryan Singer and Gus Van Sant are both attempting to make films about Harvey Milk, the first openly gay elected official in the U.S. who was later assassinated.
  • Italy’s RAI Cinema has acquired Italian rights to Roman Polanski‘s epic project "Pompeii" after a fierce bidding war.

King Kong got nothing on them!