In Money Monster, a financial TV host (George Clooney) gets his show taken over by an angry audience member. The twist: it’s all in real-time (i.e. the 98 minutes it takes to watch this is the exact amount of time that passes in the movie), inspiring this gallery of 24 more in-the-moment movies.

“Making a movie about the war in Iraq” is quickly turning into just another way of saying “losing tons of money at the box office,” but director Paul Greengrass isn’t letting that stop him.

Variety reports that the as-yet-untitled thriller that Greengrass is filming with Matt Damon — inspired by Rajiv Chandrasekaran’s Imperial Life in the Emerald City: Inside Iraq’s Green Zone — started shooting in Spain yesterday. Joining Damon are Amy Ryan, currently riding high on critics’ year-end best-of lists for her supporting turn in Gone Baby Gone, and Greg Kinnear. From the article:

Damon plays an officer who teams with a senior CIA officer to search for evidence of weapons of mass destruction. Ryan will play a New York Times foreign correspondent sent to Iraq to investigate the U.S. government’s WMD claims. Kinnear plays another CIA officer. Antoni Corone has been cast as a colonel.

Much has been made of the failure of Iraq-themed films to gain any traction at the box office; whether they’re framed as thoughtful character studies (In the Valley of Elah, $6.5 million box office) or popcorn action flicks (The Kingdom, $47 million), audiences seem to tune them out with equal enthusiasm. Still, Greengrass has experience turning headlines into movies — he directed United 93, after all — and his last project with Damon was a little picture called The Bourne Ultimatum.

Source: Variety

Khalid Abdalla would hardly seem a candidate to star in The Kite Runner
. He hadn’t read the source novel when he auditioned for the
role of Amir (the character’s journey back to Afghanistan to atone for childhood mistakes
is the story’s main plot), didn’t speak a word of Dari, and had acted in only one
prior film.  But that film was the Oscar-nominated United 93,
and his memorable performance as Ziad Jarrah happened to grab the right people’s
attention.

In Rotten Tomatoes’ second Kite Runner interview (you can
read our interview with author Khaled Hosseini
here,
while our interview with writer and novelist David Benioff will run later this
week), we met with Khalid Abdalla in San Francisco to discuss Afghanistan, his
relationship with the children on set, and why The Kite Runner (opening
this Friday) is quintessentially an American story.

Were you a fan of the book before auditioning for the role of Amir?

Khalid Abdalla: I always wish I could say that I read it before I was asked to audition for it, but I hadn’t. I first heard about it when I was asked to audition for it. But then I read it immediately. I went out and bought two copies, in fact. I read it in a day and thought it was an extraordinary story.

You have a strong background in theater. How does that come into play when filming a feature, like United 93 and The Kite Runner?

KA: Obviously there’s a huge difference between the mediums, but essentially you’re dealing with the same material. In some ways, it’s a different way of expressing it and you’ve got different means to do so. As an actor, it feels kind if similar. But United 93, it was a totally unorthodox filming experience. Our average take was 25 minutes and our longest take was an hour and 15 minutes, which is kind of unheard of — and it was entirely improvised. I guess a theater background helped with that because you’re running at it in long sequences, but each film comes with its own challenges. The essential thing that binds them all together is trying to tell stories for audiences, whether it’s for theater or film. Being able to share my experience with people is what I love.


Amir is such a well-known character from the novel. How did you approach portraying him on-screen?

KA: I guess it really started for me after the first audition. Marc Forster called me to tell me, “It’s you, it’s you. But first, we have to go to Afghanistan to find someone to play the younger Amir.” So they went to Afghanistan for three months to search for as many people as they could, and a month and a half later, they found the boys. During that time I didn’t want to get into the role, I was being held back like a bull. I really wanted to go at it, but I felt that if I did, I wouldn’t get the part — kind of a superstitious feeling. Then finally with six days notice I got a call saying, “We’ve found the boys. Get on the plane.” Six days later, I’m in Kabul.

I spent a month in Afghanistan and that month was absolutely extraordinary and crucial. I was born in Scotland, brought up in London, my parents are Egyptian, my father was born in Illinois. I’d never been to Afghanistan. In that month, I was in total immersion. I banished English completely, had Dari lessons five hours a day. I ate everything I had never eaten before, I went everywhere that was referenced in the book, I built my relationship of love with Afghanistan during that period. I did everything I could and the reward I got at the end was being able to speak the language, which I managed to do in a month somehow.

I’ve heard that people who are completely fluent in Dari have seen the film and think you are totally conversant.

KA: I had to take on that responsibility, it wasn’t a question. I know what it feels like to be misrepresented on-screen. This is an opportunity. This is the first film for the region, and particularly for Afghanistan, where the first point of contact is a human family story instead of what everyone’s used to with political violence and bombs. To go in and not to do that as authentically as possible would be absurd. It would be so wrong. That’s why everyone gave as much as they could to it. That was part of my responsibility. I could never forgive myself if at the end of the film, Afghans would walk out feeling misrepresented.

Marc Forster has a beautiful phrase that this film is “a love letter to Afghanistan.” If I didn’t commit myself completely I would feel like I had destroyed it. It hurts to be misrepresented, that’s why I gave everything that I could. It’s really beautiful to be part of something which is, as well as being a great story, a cultural project. It’s giving in so many directions, which is part of the pride. Hopefully that’s what translates onto film. The film is made by people who love the book. People came from 26 different countries and we had 46 languages on average to translate from on the set each day. It was about people, not borders, and it’s that spirit that’s in the approach.

Do you think the film will help some people’s preconceived notions about Afghanistan?

KA: I certainly hope so. That is definitely what the book is about. So many people say that in reading the book, they thought of Afghanistan in a totally different way. I hope that when people see the film, they feel like they traveled to Afghanistan. When you have a meeting with someone you’ve never met before from a different country, you never meet them through a bomb. You meet them through their own stories and hopefully that’s what the film does.


A lot of the appeal of the book has to do with the fact that this friendship could take place anywhere. Many readers can relate to the story, no matter where they come from.

KA: It’s a quintessentially American story, just 100 years late. It’s a story of leaving your homeland to come and make a life in America. It is a story that so many immigrants in this country have lived through. With my background, and this opportunity to travel to Afghanistan, I like to think of myself as a person who is not so interested in borders. I’m interested in people and their stories.

One of the things that struck me about The Kite Runner is how many Afghan refugees live in this country.

KA: Absolutely. Afghanistan is a country that had at one point over six million refugees. When you think of the traumas that means for a whole country, the journeys they’ve had to make, the family members who have died along the way, a story like The Kite Runner becomes a drop in a nation. Most people don’t associate that with Afghanistan, they think of the people that brutalized the country rather than the people who were brutalized.

The friendship between young Amir and Hassan plays an integral part in the story, but as the adult Amir, you don’t have any scenes with them. Did you watch their scenes being filmed?

KA: I was there every day. I think there were only ten shots that I missed. I met the boys for the first time in Kabul. We learned how to fly kites together. I was there each day supporting them and they came to support me as well. We developed a special relationship.

The children in the film were incredible.

KA: They were extraordinary. It’s a really special age as well. It’s an incredible act of casting of well. It’s kind of there in the book, that final moment of childhood. A year-and-a-half later, they start becoming teenagers. And that’s a very different age.

Universal looks to score its first number one hit in nearly a year this weekend with the new Steve Carell comedy "Evan Almighty" which hits the multiplexes on Friday targeting a broad family audience.

Reaching out to adult moviegoers are MGM with the John Cusack chiller "1408" and Paramount Vantage with the Angelina Jolie starrer "A Mighty Heart." Overall, the marketplace could slow down a bit this weekend before another wave of high-profile summer blockbusters arrives towards the end of June.

The sixth consecutive sequel to open at number one has a different formula up its sleeve. "Evan Almighty" loses Jim Carrey from "Bruce Almighty," drops the rating from PG-13 to PG, and shifts the plot over to a Biblical story while courting family audiences. Michael Bay isn’t the only one with a transformer at the box office this summer. Universal’s big-budget comedy offering should easily top the charts, however the financial picture will be very different. Steve Carell, whose starpower has blossomed since the 2003’s "Bruce," takes over as the lead playing a TV anchorman-turned-congressman who is told by God to build an ark because a mighty flood is coming. Morgan Freeman reprises his supporting role as the big G.

On a budget rumored to have ballooned to $175M thanks to extensive special effects and overages, "Evan Almighty" stands as one of the priciest comedies ever. The loss of Jim Carrey means it has almost no chance of reaching the $68M three-day opening weekend gross of "Bruce" from four years ago when it shocked the film industry by kicking "The Matrix Reloaded" out of the top spot in only its second frame. It reached a domestic haul of $242.8M. "Evan Almighty" could conceivably gross half the amount of "Bruce," while costing twice as much to produce. Does that mean it will lose money? Not necessarily. "Evan" would love nothing more than to follow in the footsteps of "Night at the Museum," another effects-driven comedy led by a popular comedian aimed at families, which has grossed over $570M worldwide. If it can tap into that crowd, then it will be a divine road ahead.

"Evan"’s trim running time of about 90 minutes will help since multiplexes can schedule numerous showtimes per day. Competition will come from current chart-topper "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer," another action-comedy sequel tamed down to a PG to cater to eight-year-old boys on summer vacation. Teens and young adults who have to wait until the fall to see new episodes of Carell’s "The Office" may line up for "Evan" and give it a try, despite the negative reviews. There’s not much else exciting that demo right now. And given its themes, moviegoers in the Bible Belt may contribute some solid sales on opening weekend as the studio is wisely targeting churches in its marketing outreach. Opening in 3,602 theaters, "Evan Almighty" could premiere to about $40M this weekend.


"Evan Almighty"

John Cusack hopes to avoid the current horror curse at the box office with his new psychological thriller "1408." The MGM release finds the actor playing a writer who checks into a haunted hotel room that many have died in. Samuel L. Jackson co-stars in the PG-13 pic. Scary movies have been slaughtered at the cash registers lately. Even star-driven adult thrillers have struggled as witnessed by openings of $11.2M for "Perfect Stranger" starring Halle Berry and Bruce Willis, $10M for Hilary Swank‘s "The Reaping," $10M for Kevin Costner‘s "Mr. Brooks," and $7.6M for Luke Wilson‘s hotel-themed "Vacancy." Managing to surge a bit higher were Sandra Bullock‘s "Premonition" with $17.6M and Jim Carrey’s "The Number 23" with $14.6M. "1408" may not scare up that much business given consumer apathy towards fright flicks right now. Plus Cusack and Jackson are not really known for packing them in on opening weekend unless there are bigger stars present. Checking into 2,678 theaters, "1408" might take in about $12M this weekend.


John Cusack in "1408"

Angelina Jolie headlines this weekend’s serious offering for adult audiences, "A Mighty Heart." Directed by Michael Winterbottom ("The Road to Guantanamo," "Welcome to Sarajevo"), the R-rated film finds the Oscar-winning actress playing Mariane Pearl, wife of slain Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, and documents her struggle to find her kidnapped husband in Pakistan. In a summer of sequels and effects-driven action pictures for kids on vacation, Paramount Vantage is going after the adults that are often neglected at this time of year. Reviews for "Heart" have been strong with Jolie already earning kudos buzz and the film should appeal to the same audiences that came out for other acclaimed political thrillers like "United 93" ($11.5M, $6,395 average), "The Constant Gardener" ($8.7M, $6,444), and "Syriana" ($11.7M, $6,699). Competition will come from "Ocean’s Thirteen" and "Knocked Up" which have both been playing well with the 30-plus crowd. Debuting in about 1,350 theaters, "A Mighty Heart" might open in the vicinity of $7M.


Angelina Jolie in "A Mighty Heart"

Last weekend, Fox’s "Fantastic Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer" opened at the top and was just one of six sequels to land in the top ten. Its 2005 predecessor tumbled 59% in its second weekend thanks to poor word-of-mouth and intense competition from newcomers "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" and "Wedding Crashers" which stole over $90M worth of ticket sales away from holdover pics. "Silver Surfer" has been greeted with marginally better responses and will not face as much competition from the incoming class this weekend, although "Evan Almighty" will be gunning for that PG-loving family crowd. A drop of 55% would give the new "Fantastic Four" saga around $25M for the frame and a ten-day cume of $103M.

"Ocean’s Thirteen" will see some of its adult audience get pulled away by the weekend’s two new mature-skewing flicks. A 40% decline will leave the caper sequel with roughly $12M pushing the total to $91M after 17 days for Warner Bros. Universal’s comedy sensation "Knocked Up" will smash through the $100M mark this weekend, probably on Friday. Look for a 30% fall to around $10M boosting the cume to $108M.

LAST YEAR: Adam Sandler scored his usual table at the top spot with his comedy "Click" which bowed to $40M for Sony on its way to $137.3M domestically and over $235M worldwide. The Disney/Pixar toon "Cars" dropped to the runnerup spot but dipped only 31% to $23.3M. Sophomores "Nacho Libre" and "The Fast and the Furious: Tokyo Drift" were both hit hard and tumbled by more than 50% each to $12.7M and $9.8M, respectively. Focus launched the Tyrese Gibson actioner "Waist Deep" to a solid $9.4M from just over 1,000 theaters on its way to $21.3M.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

For the fourth consecutive weekend, four or more new wide releases will cram into multiplexes trying to get at their piece of a dwindling box office pie.

Nicolas Cage targets his second trip to the top spot this year with the action film "Next," rival actioner "The Condemned" counters with Stone Cold Steve Austin in the lead, horror fans get yet another creepy tale with "The Invisible," and Jamie Kennedy goes for some laughs with "Kickin’ It Old Skool."

Mostly garbage titles were programmed into this weekend’s menu since any studio with a decent film would not risk getting crushed on the second weekend by the webslinger sequel. Including these newest films, the first four months of 2007 boasts 64 wide releases hitting the marketplace, up slightly from last year’s 60 but up sharply from the 42 over the same period in 2005. With a mass quantity of weak April films, look for the North American box office to plunge to its lowest point of the year this weekend during what is essentially the calm before Sandman’s storm hits next Thursday night at midnight.

Following his Marvel Comics hit "Ghost Rider," Nicolas Cage once again plays the action hero card with the sci-fi thriller "Next." The PG-13 film finds the Oscar winner playing a man with the ability to see into the future who is called in to foil a terrorist plot before it happens. Directed by Lee Tamahori ("Die Another Day," "Along Came A Spider"), "Next" has the advantage of having the most screens and the most starpower of any new release this weekend. Plus with current films rotting away quickly (9 of the 16 holdovers in the Top 20 last weekend plunged by more than 55%), competition will not be too fierce. Paramount has been giving "Next" a decent amount of marketing, that is for a film being dumped into the final weekend of a month starting with the letter A. In almost any other time of year this would get clobbered, but given the current alternatives it will make for the only reasonable choice for many moviegoers. Hence, a number one opening by default and quite possibly the weakest one of the year. Crashing into over 2,500 theaters, "Next" could reach the top with around $13M.


Cage and Biel required an escort when exiting the "Next" premiere.

"The Condemned" offers a reality show idea not likely to be on any network’s fall schedule. In the weekend’s sole R-rated film, death row inmates duke it out to the death in order to avoid being executed, all while television cameras capture every brutal moment. World Wrestling Entertainment head Vince McMahon produces behind the scenes while former superstar grappler Steve Austin stars in front of the camera. Other WWE stars who headlined recent feature films include Kane in last May’s "See No Evil" ($4.6M debut) and John Cena in last fall’s "The Marine" ($7.1M bow). Both films averaged less than $4,000 on their opening weekends. Young men will make up the only audience segment for the new Lionsgate title and "Next" will provide some direct action competition. Still some hardcore wrestling fans will turn up to theaters since a movie ticket will be cheaper than ordering a pay-per-view event. But overall, prospects seem bleak. "The Condemned" will attack 2,310 theaters and may end up with $6M.


Steve Austin and some unfortunate soul in "The Condemned."

As if moviegoers don’t have enough scary films to choose from, Buena Vista offers up one more with the supernatural thriller "The Invisible." The PG-13 film follows a high school student whose spirit wanders after a brutal accident. Fright flicks have been flopping left and right recently and there is no reason to believe that this one will turn things around. The marketing volume has been stuck on low as this remake of a Swedish pic is more of a spring cleaning film tossed into the marketplace hoping to be forgotten soon. With no starpower, there will be almost nothing driving in traffic. "The Invisible" will appear in over 2,000 theaters this Friday, but might only collect roughly $5M.


One of them is "The Invisible."

Jamie Kennedy headlines the new comedy "Kickin’ It Old Skool" playing a 1980s breakdancer that falls into a coma and awakens two decades later to a much different world. Yari Film Group is targeting teenagers with this PG-13 pic which essentially offers the same laughs as the comedian’s 2003 film "Malibu’s Most Wanted." That modest hit bowed in late April to $12.6M from 2,503 theaters on its way to a $34.4M domestic final. "Skool" does not have a big studio marketing push behind it but it may grab the attention of some young dudes killing time before Peter Parker busts into theaters. DVD is where most people will find this one. Breaking into 1,600 theaters, "Kickin’ It Old Skool" could find itself with around $5M over three days.


Jamie Kennedy and Webster kick it "Old Skool."

Among holdovers, two-time champ "Disturbia" will find it difficult to hold onto its crown given the arrival of Nicolas Cage. But Paramount won’t care as it should still claim the number one film for the fifth consecutive weekend. A 40% decline would give the Shia LaBeouf pic about $8M for the frame and a healthy $51M after 17 days. The Anthony HopkinsRyan Gosling thriller "Fracture" has been well-received and competition is not too fierce so a 40% drop could be in order as well. That would leave New Line with $6.5M and a ten-day tally of $21M.

LAST YEAR: Three new flicks topped the charts led by the family comedy "RV" starring Robin Williams which opened at number one with $16.4M. The Sony hit enjoyed stellar legs and went on to collect $71.3M. Universal followed in second with the 9/11 thriller "United 93" which debuted in half as many theaters with $11.5M. The critically acclaimed pic went on to gross $31.5M. Buena Vista’s gymnastics film "Stick It" bowed in third with $10.8M on its way to $26.9M. Rounding out the top five were "Silent Hill" with $9.3M and "Scary Movie 4" with $7.8M. Also opening was the spelling drama "Akeelah and the Bee" with a weak $6M leading to a $18.8M final for Lionsgate and its promotional partner Starbucks.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

A half-dozen new soldiers enter the marketplace this weekend trying to topple the kingdom of "300" which has reigned supreme at the box office for the past two weeks.

Mark Wahlberg toplines the sniper thriller "Shooter," animated ninja turtles fight crime in "TMNT," and mutated zombies attack in "The Hills Have Eyes 2." In addition, moviegoers will get to choose from the kids adventure "The Last Mimzy," the sports saga "Pride," and the Adam Sandler drama "Reign Over Me." Holdovers should witness some large declines as these new pics all fight over the time and attention of ticket buyers. The box office may not have room for all to survive.

Seventeen years after shocking the film industry with a record March opening, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are back but in animated form in "TMNT." The Warner Bros. toon features the voices of Patrick Stewart, Sarah Michelle Gellar, and Ziyi Zhang and carries a PG rating that is friendly for kids. Given the violence, "TMNT" should skew more to boys and might even pull in those who grew up with the characters in the late 1980s and early 1990s. With all the R-rated films recently, there have not been too many choices for kids this spring. "The Last Mimzy" is the only new release that will provide direct competition for that audience. Bringing its turtle power to 3,110 theaters, "TMNT" may generate a bow of roughly $16M this weekend.


They’re back.

Hot off his recent Oscar nomination, Mark Wahlberg hits the big screen in the action thriller "Shooter" playing a former Marine sniper trying to clear his name after being wrongly accused of trying to assassinate the U.S. President. The R-rated film comes from "Training Day" director Antoine Fuqua and co-stars Danny Glover and Michael Peña. The film is banking on the starpower of Wahlberg who has been able to anchor hits in recent years. Late summer pics like last year’s "Invincible" and 2005’s "Four Brothers" opened to $17M and $21.2M, respectively, and brought in solid sales overall. "Shooter" is targeting the adult action crowd with appeal that will reach both men and women. Certainly "300" will play to much of the same audience and be a factor. Though no Damon or Cruise, Wahlberg has indeed become a believable action hero and is in a role that audiences will buy him in. Plus his Academy nod for "The Departed" has only increased audience respect for the former rapper. Opening in 2,600 theaters, "Shooter" might take in about $16M for the weekend.


Mark Wahlberg, playing a guy named Swagger, in a movie called "Shooter."

Last March, Fox Searchlight hit gold with the horror remake "The Hills Have Eyes" which bowed to $15.7M and grossed $41.8M overall. A year later, the sequel is born this time coming out through Fox Atomic, the studio’s new division geared towards young adult audiences with genre fare. "Eyes 2" once again is targeting the horror crowd with slick marketing hoping to lure in those seeking R-rated gore and violence. Plus the distributor is premiering the trailer to the upcoming fright sequel "28 Weeks Later" with the new "Hills" installment to help give moviegoers more for their money. Much of the audience for the first pic will probably return, although the sequel will face more competition as "300" and "Shooter" will both be drawing in young men. Attacking 2,500 theaters, "The Hills Have Eyes 2" could open to around $13M this weekend.


"The Hills Have Eyes, Too."

New Line studio chief Bob Shaye steps back into the director’s chair with the family adventure "The Last Mimzy" based on a popular short story. The "E.T."-like film about a boy and a girl who find a mysterious animal with mystical powers hopes to attract an audience of kids and parents, but will have to face some stiff competition from its studio’s former heroes, the Ninja Turtles. That toon should take away more boys than girls so "Mimzy" may end up skewing a bit more female. New Line hopes that much of the crowd that spent $75M and counting on "Bridge to Terabithia" will take a spin with this new effects-filled fantasy so sneak previews were held to help raise awareness and get buzz spreading. Still, a competitive environment will probably cut into its potential. Landing in over 3,000 sites, "The Last Mimzy" might gross about $12M this weekend.


"The Last Mimzy."

Targeting the African American audience this weekend is Lionsgate with its swim team drama "Pride" starring Terrence Howard. The PG-rated film will try to appeal to males with the sports saga and females with its human drama and half-nude muscular men. But Howard has not yet proven that he can open a picture on his own and "Pride" may not be the one to increase his future salary demands. "Remember the Titans" and "Coach Carter" both opened north of $20M and much of that was due to starpower. Plus Chris Rock found out last week that African Americans will not just show up for any film with a predominantly black cast. Diving into 1,518 theaters, "Pride" could swim to a weekend gross of about $7M.


Terrence Howard in "Pride."

Adam Sandler goes back to serious territory with the R-rated drama "Reign Over Me" playing a man whose life fell apart after his wife and kids were killed on 9/11. It’s no surprise Sony is releasing the film given all the cash the comedian has made for the studio over the years. Don Cheadle and Jada Pinkett Smith co-star. Given the subject matter, the rating, and Sandler’s Bob Dylan haircut, the actor’s core audience of immature young males will not be lining up this time. Remember "Spanglish‘"s $8.8M bow? Well, it could get worse for "Reign." After "United 93" and "World Trade Center," demand isn’t very high for yet another look at September 11. Given all the choices in the marketplace, adult audiences will be divided between many films so only a small slice might go this way. Debuting in 1,671 venues, "Reign Over Me" could open with about $6M.


Sandler and Cheadle in "Reign Over Me."

The mighty King Leonidas barely broke a sweat over the last two weeks in his box office victories. But the invading armies this weekend will pose a great threat to "300"’s rule. "Shooter" and "Hills" will provide the most direct competition. A 50% drop may be in order which would leave the Warner Bros. epic with roughly $16.5M for the frame and an impressive $157M in 17 days.

"Wild Hogs" may finally see a normal drop and slide by 40% to $11M giving Buena Vista $121M to date. "Premonition" should lose half of its audience and fall to $9M for a ten-day cume of $30M.

LAST YEAR: Spike Lee and Denzel Washington joined forces for the heist thriller "Inside Man" and found themselves at number one with a potent $29M opening. Universal went on to collect $88.5M domestically and $183M worldwide. The competing actioner "V for Vendetta" dropped from first to second with $12.3M falling 52% in its second weekend. Debuting in third was the horror flick "Stay Alive" with $10.7M on its way to $23.1M for Buena Vista. Rounding out the top five were "Failure to Launch" with $10.5M and "The Shaggy Dog" with $9M, both in their third weekends. Bowing in seventh place was the blue collar comedy "Larry the Cable Guy" with $6.9M leading to a $15.7M final.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

The Orange British Academy Film Awards 2007 took place tonight at the Royal Opera House in London’s trendy Covent Garden and Rotten Tomatoes UK were there to sip champagne and do our very best to stay sober enough to report back to you. And it was a ceremony full of surprises; an open field outside of Best Actor and Actress (which went to Forest Whitaker for Last King of Scotland and Helen Mirren for The Queen respectively) with no one film winning more than three awards.

Last King of Scotland and, somewhat surprisingly, Pan’s Labyrinth shared that honour while Little Miss Sunshine and United 93 took two awards each. Jennifer Hudson took home Best Supporting Actress for her performance in Dreamgirls, and Alan Arkin snagged Best Supporting Actor for Little Miss Sunshine.

Casino Royale, which had snagged eight nominations, took home only one award – for Best Sound – though its star Eva Green nabbed Orange’s Rising Star award; the only award

Andrea Arnold won the Carl Foreman Award for Special Achievement by a British Director, Writer or Producer in their First Feature Film for her direction of Red Road. In the broader Director category, the honour went to Paul Greengrass for United 93. Special awards were presented to Anne V Coates – recipient of the Academy Fellowship – and Nick Daubeny who took home The Michael Balcon Award for Oustanding British Contribution to Cinema.

We’ll have more from the BAFTAs for you very soon, but for now… onto the winners list!

FILM
The Queen

ALEXANDER KORDA AWARD for Best British Film
Last King of Scotland

THE CARL FOREMAN AWARD for Special Achievement by a British Director, Writer or Producer in their First Feature Film
Andrea Arnold – Red Road

DIRECTION
Paul Greengrass – United 93

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Little Miss Sunshine

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
The Last King of Scotland

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
Pan’s Labyrinth

ANIMATED FEATURE
Happy Feet

ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE
Forest Whitaker – The Last King of Scotland

ACTRESS IN A LEADING ROLE
Helen Mirren – The Queen

ACTOR IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Alan Arkin – Little Miss Sunshine

ACTRESS IN A SUPPORTING ROLE
Jennifer Hudson – Dreamgirls

THE ANTHONY ASQUITH AWARD for Achievement in Film Music
Babel

CINEMATOGRAPHY
Children of Men

EDITING
United 93

PRODUCTION DESIGN
Children of Men

COSTUME DESIGN
Pan’s Labyrinth

SOUND
Casino Royale

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
Pirates of the Caribbean – Dead Man’s Chest

MAKE-UP AND HAIR
Pan’s Labyrinth

SHORT FILM
Do Not Erase

ANIMATED SHORT
Guy 101

ORANGE RISING STAR AWARD
Eva Green

THE ACADEMY FELLOWSHIP: Anne V Coates

THE MICHAEL BALCON AWARD: Nick Daubeny

The expected heavy hitters made the grade — Scorsese, Whitaker, "Dreamgirls" — but there were a handful of surprises…let’s just say, if you thought you’d never read "the Oscar-nominated ‘Borat’" in print, think again! The nominees for the 79th annual Academy Awards are in!

Yes, "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" stole a nomination for best adapted screenplay, and will compete against "Children of Men," "Notes on a Scandal," "The Departed," and "Little Children" in that category. High Five!

Fans of Ryan Gosling will be happy to know that he made the Oscar list for his work in "Half Nelson," joining company like Leonardo DiCaprio ("The Departed"), Peter O’Toole ("Venus") and Forest Whitaker ("Last King of Scotland") in the lead actor category. The fifth nominee? The Fresh Prince himself, Will Smith ("Pursuit of Happiness").

Golden Globe winner Martin Scorsese is also up for the best director Oscar in a near-rematch of that race. This time, the Academy’s given only one nod to Clint Eastwood ("Letters From Iwo Jima") to make room for "United 93" director Paul Greengrass.

"Little Miss Sunshine" tot Abigail Breslin has a nomination for supporting actress and will face off with "Babel" twosome Adriana Barraza and Rinko Kikuchi, "Notes on a Scandal"’s Cate Blanchett, and "Dreamgirls" star Jennifer Hudson. Breslin’s ten years old. Is that a new youngest-ever nominee?

"Dreamgirls" nabbed noms in both supporting categories (Golden Globe winners Jennifer Hudson and Eddie Murphy, respectively), as well as art direction, costume design, and three of the five Best Song nominations. We’ll see if voters can differentiate between "Listen," "Love You I Do," and "Patience" or if they’ll split their "Dreamgirls" votes and send the Oscar to Melissa Etheridge’s "Inconvenient Truth" song or Randy Newman’s ditty from "Cars."

And then, the other awards. Those categories that enable certain sub-performing films to call themselves "Oscar-nominated."

  • The Oscar-nominated "Black Dahlia" (36 percent Tomatometer), for best cinematography
  • The Oscar-nominated "Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest (53 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in sound mixing and visual effects
  • The Oscar-nominated "Poseidon" (32 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in visual effects
  • The Oscar-nominated "Click" (31 percent Tomatometer), for achievement in make-up

Tune in Sunday, February 25 at 5pm PST/8 pm EST for the awards ceremony telecast on ABC!

Read on for the full list of Oscar Nominations!

Performance by an actor in a leading role

Leonardo DiCaprio in "Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Ryan Gosling in "Half Nelson" (THINKFilm)
Peter O’Toole in "Venus" (Miramax, Filmfour and UK Council)
Will Smith in "The Pursuit of Happyness" (Sony Pictures Releasing)
Forest Whitaker in "The Last King of Scotland" (Fox Searchlight)

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

Alan Arkin in "Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Jackie Earle Haley in "Little Children" (New Line)
Djimon Hounsou in "Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Eddie Murphy in "Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Mark Wahlberg in "The Departed" (Warner Bros.)

Performance by an actress in a leading role

Penélope Cruz in "Volver" (Sony Pictures Classics)
Judi Dench in "Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Helen Mirren in "The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
Meryl Streep in "The Devil Wears Prada" (20th Century Fox)
Kate Winslet in "Little Children" (New Line)

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

Adriana Barraza in "Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Cate Blanchett in "Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Abigail Breslin in "Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Jennifer Hudson in "Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Rinko Kikuchi in "Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)

Achievement in directing

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage) Alejandro González Iñárritu
"The Departed" (Warner Bros.) Martin Scorsese
"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.) Clint Eastwood
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Stephen Frears
"United 93" (Universal and StudioCanal) Paul Greengrass

Best animated feature film of the year

"Cars" (Buena Vista) John Lasseter
"Happy Feet" (Warner Bros.) George Miller
"Monster House" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Gil Kenan

Achievement in art direction

"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Art Direction: John Myhre
Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh

"The Good Shepherd" (Universal)
Art Direction: Jeannine Oppewall
Set Decoration: Gretchen Rau and Leslie E. Rollins

"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse)
Art Direction: Eugenio Caballero
Set Decoration: Pilar Revuelta

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Art Direction: Rick Heinrichs
Set Decoration: Cheryl A. Carasik

"The Prestige" (Buena Vista)
Art Direction: Nathan Crowley
Set Decoration: Julie Ochipinti

Achievement in cinematography

"The Black Dahlia" (Universal) Vilmos Zsigmond
"Children of Men" (Universal) Emmanuel Lubezki
"The Illusionist" (Yari Film Group) Dick Pope
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) Guillermo Navarro
"The Prestige" (Buena Vista) Wally Pfister

Achievement in costume design

"Curse of the Golden Flower" (Sony Pictures Classics) Yee Chung Man
"The Devil Wears Prada" (20th Century Fox) Patricia Field
"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount) Sharen Davis
"Marie Antoinette" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Milena Canonero
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Consolata Boyle

Best documentary feature

"Deliver Us from Evil" (Lionsgate)
A Disarming Films Production
Amy Berg and Frank Donner

"An Inconvenient Truth" (Paramount Classics and Participant Productions)
A Lawrence Bender/Laurie David Production
Davis Guggenheim

"Iraq in Fragments" (Typecast Releasing)
A Typecast Pictures/Daylight Factory Production
James Longley and John Sinno

"Jesus Camp" (Magnolia Pictures)
A Loki Films Production
Heidi Ewing and Rachel Grady

"My Country, My Country" (Zeitgeist Films)
A Praxis Films Production
Laura Poitras and Jocelyn Glatzer

Best documentary short subject

"The Blood of Yingzhou District"
A Thomas Lennon Films Production
Ruby Yang and Thomas Lennon

"Recycled Life"
An Iwerks/Glad Production
Leslie Iwerks and Mike Glad

"Rehearsing a Dream"
A Simon & Goodman Picture Company Production
Karen Goodman and Kirk Simon

"Two Hands"
A Crazy Boat Pictures Production
Nathaniel Kahn and Susan Rose Behr

Achievement in film editing

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Stephen Mirrione and Douglas Crise

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Steven Rosenblum

"Children of Men" (Universal)
Alex Rodríguez and Alfonso Cuarón

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
Thelma Schoonmaker

"United 93" (Universal and StudioCanal)
Clare Douglas, Christopher Rouse and Richard Pearson

Best foreign language film of the year

"After the Wedding" A Zentropa Entertainments 16 Production
Denmark
"Days of Glory (Indigènes)" A Tessalit Production
Algeria
"The Lives of Others" A Wiedemann & Berg Production
Germany
"Pan’s Labyrinth" A Tequila Gang/Esperanto Filmoj/Estudios Picasso Production
Mexico
"Water" A Hamilton-Mehta Production
Canada

Achievement in makeup

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista) Aldo Signoretti and Vittorio Sodano
"Click" (Sony Pictures Releasing) Kazuhiro Tsuji and Bill Corso
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) David Marti and Montse Ribe

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage) Gustavo Santaolalla
"The Good German" (Warner Bros.) Thomas Newman
"Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight) Philip Glass
"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse) Javier Navarrete
"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada) Alexandre Desplat

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)

"I Need to Wake Up" from "An Inconvenient Truth"
(Paramount Classics and Participant Productions)
Music and Lyric by Melissa Etheridge

"Listen" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger and Scott Cutler
Lyric by Anne Preven

"Love You I Do" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger
Lyric by Siedah Garrett

"Our Town" from "Cars"
(Buena Vista)
Music and Lyric by Randy Newman

"Patience" from "Dreamgirls"
(DreamWorks and Paramount)
Music by Henry Krieger
Lyric by Willie Reale

Best motion picture of the year

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
An Anonymous Content/Zeta Film/Central Films Production
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Jon Kilik and Steve Golin, Producers

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
A Warner Bros. Pictures Production
Nominees to be determined

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
A DreamWorks Pictures/Warner Bros. Pictures Production
Clint Eastwood, Steven Spielberg and Robert Lorenz, Producers

"Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
A Big Beach/Bona Fide Production
Nominees to be determined

"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
A Granada Production
Andy Harries, Christine Langan and Tracey Seaward, Producers

Best animated short film

"The Danish Poet" (National Film Board of Canada)
A Mikrofilm and National Film Board of Canada Production
Torill Kove

"Lifted" (Buena Vista)
A Pixar Animation Studios Production
Gary Rydstrom

"The Little Matchgirl" (Buena Vista)
A Walt Disney Pictures Production
Roger Allers and Don Hahn

"Maestro" (Szimplafilm)
A Kedd Production
Geza M. Toth

"No Time for Nuts" (20th Century Fox)
A Blue Sky Studios Production
Chris Renaud and Michael Thurmeier

Best live action short film

"Binta and the Great Idea (Binta Y La Gran Idea)"
A Peliculas Pendelton and Tus Ojos Production
Javier Fesser and Luis Manso

"Éramos Pocos (One Too Many)" (Kimuak)
An Altube Filmeak Production
Borja Cobeaga

"Helmer & Son"
A Nordisk Film Production
Soren Pilmark and Kim Magnusson

"The Saviour" (Australian Film Television and Radio School)
An Australian Film Television and Radio School Production
Peter Templeman and Stuart Parkyn

"West Bank Story"
An Ari Sandel, Pascal Vaguelsy, Amy Kim, Ravi Malhotra and Ashley Jordan Production
Ari Sandel

Achievement in sound editing

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista)
Sean McCormack and Kami Asgar

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Lon Bender

"Flags of Our Fathers" (DreamWorks and Warner Bros., Distributed by Paramount)
Alan Robert Murray and Bub Asman

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
Alan Robert Murray

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Christopher Boyes and George Watters II

Achievement in sound mixing

"Apocalypto" (Buena Vista)
Kevin O’Connell, Greg P. Russell and Fernando Camara

"Blood Diamond" (Warner Bros.)
Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer and Ivan Sharrock

"Dreamgirls" (DreamWorks and Paramount)
Michael Minkler, Bob Beemer and Willie Burton

"Flags of Our Fathers" (DreamWorks and Warner Bros., Distributed by Paramount)
John Reitz, Dave Campbell, Gregg Rudloff and Walt Martin

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
Paul Massey, Christopher Boyes and Lee Orloff

Achievement in visual effects

"Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest" (Buena Vista)
John Knoll, Hal Hickel, Charles Gibson and Allen Hall

"Poseidon" (Warner Bros.)
Boyd Shermis, Kim Libreri, Chaz Jarrett and John Frazier

"Superman Returns" (Warner Bros.)
Mark Stetson, Neil Corbould, Richard R. Hoover and Jon Thum

Adapted screenplay

"Borat Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan" (20th Century Fox)
Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Peter Baynham & Dan Mazer
Story by Sacha Baron Cohen & Peter Baynham & Anthony Hines & Todd Phillips

"Children of Men" (Universal)
Screenplay by Alfonso Cuarón & Timothy J. Sexton and David Arata and Mark Fergus & Hawk Ostby

"The Departed" (Warner Bros.)
Screenplay by William Monahan

"Little Children" (New Line)
Screenplay by Todd Field & Tom Perrotta

"Notes on a Scandal" (Fox Searchlight)
Screenplay by Patrick Marber

Original screenplay

"Babel" (Paramount and Paramount Vantage)
Written by Guillermo Arriaga

"Letters from Iwo Jima" (Warner Bros.)
Screenplay by Iris Yamashita
Story by Iris Yamashita & Paul Haggis

"Little Miss Sunshine" (Fox Searchlight)
Written by Michael Arndt

"Pan’s Labyrinth" (Picturehouse)
Written by Guillermo del Toro

"The Queen" (Miramax, Pathé and Granada)
Written by Peter Morgan

Stephen Frears’ drama "The Queen" came out on top with 10 nominations for this year’s Orange British Academy Film Awards, including Best Actress for Helen Mirren and nods for both Best Film and Outstanding British film. The other top-nominated films are the latest James Bond adventure, "Casino Royale", with nine nominations, and the Spanish thriller "Pan’s Labyrinth", with eight.

The awards ceremony will be held on Sunday, 11 February, at the Royal Opera House in London.

"The Queen" is up against Kevin Macdonald’s Idi Amin drama "The Last King of Scotland" for both Best Film and Outstanding British Film. Also nominated for Best Film are Martin Scorsese’s mob thriller "The Departed", the multi-strand international drama "Babel" and the ensemble comedy "Little Miss Sunshine". While the other British Film nominees are Casino Royale, "Notes on a Scandal" and the acclaimed 9/11 thriller "United 93".

Helen Mirren’s competition for Best Actress includes two fellow Brits: Judi Dench for "Notes on a Scandal" and Kate Winslet for "Little Children". They’ll be contending against Meryl Streep in "The Devil Wears Prada" and Penelope Cruz in Pedro Almodovar’s "Volver".

Meanwhile, in the Best Actor category, Daniel Craig is the first James Bond to be nominated for the award. His competitors are British actors Peter O’Toole for "Venus" and Richard Griffiths for "The History Boys", as well as Forest Whitaker for "The Last King of Scotland" and Leonardo DiCaprio for The Departed.

And Bond Girl Eva Green has also been nominated — in the Orange Rising Star category alongside Emily Blunt (also nominated for Best Supporting Actress in "The Devil Wears Prada"), Naomie Harris, Cillian Murphy and Ben Whishaw. The winner will be decided by a public vote.

The full list of nominees:

FILM
BABEL – Alejandro González Iñárritu/Jon Kilik/Steve Golin
THE DEPARTED – Brad Pitt/Brad Grey/Graham King
THE LAST KING OF SCOTLAND – Andrea Calderwood/Lisa Bryer/Charles Steel
LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE – credits to be confirmed
THE QUEEN – Tracey Seaward/Christine Langan/Andy Harries

THE ALEXANDER KORDA AWARD for the Outstanding British Film of the Year
CASINO ROYALE – Michael G Wilson/Barbara Broccoli/Martin Campbell/Neal Purvis/Robert Wade/Paul Haggis
THE LAST KING OF SCOTLAND – Andrea Calderwood/Lisa Bryer/Charles Steel/Kevin Macdonald/Peter Morgan/Jeremy Brock
NOTES ON A SCANDAL – Scott Rudin/Robert Fox/Richard Eyre/Patrick Marber
THE QUEEN – Tracey Seaward/Christine Langan/Andy Harries/Stephen Frears/Peter Morgan
UNITED 93 – Tim Bevan/Lloyd Levin/Paul Greengrass

THE CARL FOREMAN AWARD for Special Achievement by a British Director, Writer or Producer in their First Feature Film
ANDREA ARNOLD (Director) – Red Road
JULIAN GILBEY (Director) – Rollin’ with the Nines
CHRISTINE LANGAN (Producer) – Pierrepoint
GARY TARN (Director) – Black Sun
PAUL ANDREW WILLIAMS (Director) – London to Brighton

THE DAVID LEAN AWARD for Achievement in Direction
BABEL – Alejandro González Iñárritu
THE DEPARTED – Martin Scorsese
LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE – Jonathan Dayton/Valerie Faris
THE QUEEN – Stephen Frears
UNITED 93 – Paul Greengrass

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
BABEL – Guillermo Arriaga
LITTLE MISS SUNSHINE – Michael Arndt
PAN’S LABYRINTH – Guillermo del Toro
THE QUEEN – Peter Morgan
UNITED 93 – Paul Greengrass

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
CASINO ROYALE – Neal Purvis/Robert Wade/Paul Haggis
THE DEPARTED – William Monahan
THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA – Aline Brosh McKenna
THE LAST KING OF SCOTLAND – Peter Morgan/Jeremy Brock
NOTES ON A SCANDAL – Patrick Marber

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE
APOCALYPTO – Mel Gibson/Bruce Davey
BLACK BOOK (ZWARTBOEK) – Teun Hilte/San Fu Maltha/Jens Meurer/Paul Verhoeven
PAN’S LABYRINTH – Alfonso Cuarón/Bertha Navarro/Frida Torresblanco/Guillermo del Toro
RANG DE BASANTI (PAINT IT YELLOW) – Ronnie Screwvala/Rakeysh Omprakash Mehra
VOLVER – Agustín Almodóvar/Pedro Almodóvar

ANIMATED FEATURE FILM
CARS – John Lasseter
FLUSHED AWAY – David Bowers/Sam Fell
HAPPY FEET – George Miller

ACTOR in a LEADING ROLE
DANIEL CRAIG – Casino Royale
LEONARDO DICAPRIO – The Departed
RICHARD GRIFFITHS – The History Boys
PETER O’TOOLE – Venus
FOREST WHITAKER – The Last King of Scotland

ACTRESS in a LEADING ROLE
PENELOPE CRUZ – Volver
JUDI DENCH – Notes on a Scandal
HELEN MIRREN – The Queen
MERYL STREEP – The Devil Wears Prada
KATE WINSLET – Little Children

ACTOR in a SUPPORTING ROLE
ALAN ARKIN – Little Miss Sunshine
JAMES MCAVOY – The Last King of Scotland
JACK NICHOLSON – The Departed
LESLIE PHILLIPS – Venus
MICHAEL SHEEN – The Queen

ACTRESS in a SUPPORTING ROLE
EMILY BLUNT – The Devil Wears Prada
ABIGAIL BRESLIN – Little Miss Sunshine
TONI COLETTE – Little Miss Sunshine
FRANCES DE LA TOUR – The History Boys
JENNIFER HUDSON – Dreamgirls

THE ANTHONY ASQUITH AWARD for Achievement in Film Music
BABEL – Gustavo Santaolalla
CASINO ROYALE – David Arnold
DREAMGIRLS – Henry Krieger
HAPPY FEET – John Powell
THE QUEEN – Alexandre Desplat

CINEMATOGRAPHY
BABEL – Rodrigo Prieto
CASINO ROYALE – Phil Meheux
CHILDREN OF MEN – Emmanuel Lubezki
PAN’S LABYRINTH – Guillermo Navarro
UNITED 93 – Barry Ackroyd

EDITING
BABEL – Stephen Mirrione/Douglas Crise
CASINO ROYALE – Stuart Baird
THE DEPARTED – Thelma Schoonmaker
THE QUEEN – Lucia Zucchetti
UNITED 93 – Clare Douglas/Christopher Rouse/Richard Pearson

PRODUCTION DESIGN
CASINO ROYALE – Peter Lamont/Simon Wakefield
CHILDREN OF MEN – Geoffrey Kirkland/Jim Clay/Jennifer Williams
MARIE ANTOINETTE – K K Barrett/Véronique Melery
PAN’S LABYRINTH – Eugenio Caballero/Pilar Revuelta
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MAN’S CHEST – Rick Heinrichs/Cheryl A Carasik

COSTUME DESIGN
THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA – Patricia Field
MARIE ANTOINETTE – Milena Canonero
PAN’S LABYRINTH – Lala Huete
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MAN’S CHEST – Penny Rose
THE QUEEN – Consolata Boyle

SOUND
BABEL – José García/Jon Taylor/Chris Minkler/Martín Hernández
CASINO ROYALE – Chris Munro/Eddy Joseph/Mike Prestwood Smith/Martin Cantwell/Mark Taylor
PAN’S LABYRINTH – Martín Hernández/Jamie Bashkt
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MAN’S CHEST – Christopher Boyes/George Watters II/ Paul Massey/Lee Orloff
UNITED 93 – Chris Munro/Mike Prestwood Smith/Douglas Cooper/Oliver Tarney/Eddy Joseph

ACHIEVEMENT IN SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS
CASINO ROYALE – Steve Begg/Chris Corbould
CHILDREN OF MEN – Frazer Churchill/Tim Webber/Michael Eames/Paul Corbould
PAN’S LABYRINTH – Edward Irastorza/Everett Burrell
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MAN’S CHEST – John Knoll/Hal Hickel/Charles Gibson
SUPERMAN RETURNS – Mark Stetson

MAKE UP & HAIR
THE DEVIL WEARS PRADA – Nicki Ledermann/Angel De Angelis
MARIE ANTOINETTE – Jean-Luc Russier/Desiree Corridoni
PAN’S LABYRINTH – credits to be confirmed
PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MAN’S CHEST – Ve Neill/Martin Samuel
THE QUEEN – Daniel Phillips

SHORT ANIMATION FILM
DREAMS AND DESIRES – FAMILY TIES – Les Mills/Joanna Quinn
GUY 101 – Ian Gouldstone
PETER AND THE WOLF – Hugh Welchman/Alan Dewhurst/Suzie Templeton

SHORT FILM
CARE – Rachel Bailey/Corinna Faith
CUBS – Lisa Williams/Tom Harper
DO NOT ERASE – Asitha Ameresekere
HIKIKOMORI – Karley Duffy/Paul Wright
KISSING, TICKLING AND BEING BORED – David Smith/Jim McRoberts

THE ORANGE RISING STAR AWARD (nominees announced on 8 Jan 2007)
EMILY BLUNT
EVA GREEN
NAOMIE HARRIS
CILLIAN MURPHY
BEN WHISHAW

Report by Rich Cline.

Hosted right here at the illustrious Rotten Tomatoes is the official website of the Online Film Critics Society, an international group of flick analyzers who put their heads together every December to come up with their favorite films, performances and components of the year. And as a proud member of the OFCS, I’m pretty happy with our picks this year … even if (almost) none of my choices happened to win.

BEST PICTURE: "United 93"

BEST DIRECTOR: Martin Scorsese – "The Departed"

BEST ACTOR: Forest Whitaker – "The Last King of Scotland"

BEST ACTRESS: Helen Mirren – "The Queen"

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR: Jackie Earle Haley – "Little Children"

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS: Abigail Breslin – "Little Miss Sunshine"

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY: Guillermo del Toro – "Pan’s Labyrinth"

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY: Alfonso Cuaron, Timothy J. Sexton, David Arata, Mark Fergus and Hawk Ostby – "Children of Men"

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY: Emmanuel Lubeski – "Children of Men"

BEST EDITING: Clare Douglas, Richard Pearson and Christopher Rouse – "United 93"

BEST ORIGINAL SCORE: Clint Mansell – "The Fountain"

BEST DOCUMENTARY: "An Inconvenient Truth"

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM: "Pan’s Labyrinth" (Mexico)

BEST ANIMATED FILM: "A Scanner Darkly"

BREAKTHROUGH FILMMAKER: Jonathan Dayton & Valerie Faris – "Little Miss Sunshine"

BREAKTHROUGH PERFORMER: Sacha Baron Cohen – "Borat"

(So what do you guys think? Good picks or lame?)

It’s no secret that Helen Mirren and "The Queen" are primed to reap big time this awards season, but are the Hollywood Foreign Press and their Oscar-influencing Golden Globes headed towards indie-land and the art house?

Maybe, maybe not. But the fact is that in recent years, the HFPA has begun to trend away from Oscar-type nominees in favor of those critical darlings — gilding Felicity Huffman Best Actress last year for "Transamerica" and agreeing with (most) critics that "Brokeback Mountain" deserved top honors. The year before, the Golden Globes for Best Comedy and Screenplay went to "Sideways," another favorite across the board among many prominent critical groups (including the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, the New York Film Critics, and more).


2004’s critical fave, "Sideways"


Variety’s Steve Chagollan writes
that this trend is partly due to an evolution within the HFPA, a collection of 90-odd film journalists representing markets all over the world, whose awards voting have historically been both influential and eccentric. The HFPA’s membership has been increasingly younger, says Chagollan, and their voting responsibilities subsequently taken more seriously; whereas many Academy (Oscar) voters are film industry professionals with less time to spend watching "For Your Consideration" screeners or attending screenings, HPFA voters — journalists covering said films — see "99 percent of the films, if not 100 percent."

So will the Golden Globes start mirroring the preferences of critics? And how will such a trend affect the composition of the Oscars, which historically take at least some cues from the nominations/winners of the Globes?


Ken Watanabe in Best Pic contender "Letters From Iwo Jima"

This week a handful of critics associations weighed in with their end-of-year honors, with a few notable patterns. As expected, there were some disparities: both the LA Film Critics Association and the National Board of Review named Clint Eastwood‘s "Letters From Iwo Jima" as the year’s Best Picture, while the New York and Washington D.C. critics went regional with "United 93." Bostonian critics went the homegrown route as well, picking Martin Scorsese‘s "The Departed" for the top honor.

There was a bit more consensus choosing Best Director, as four of six lists named Scorsese (NY, DC, Boston, and the NBoR); California critics in LA and San Francisco went with Paul Greengrass for "United 93."

But when it came to naming the year’s best performances, there’s even more agreement. Five of the six groups chose Forest Whitaker as Best Actor for his portrayal of Ugandan dictator Idi Amin in "The Last King of Scotland," a Fox Searchlight release filmed for a paltry $6 million.


Whitaker in "The Last King of Scotland;" Mirren in "The Queen"

More impressively, all six groups chose awards season-dominatrix Helen Mirren as their unanimous Best Actress pick for her role as Queen Elizabeth II in "The Queen," a well-performing Miramax acquisition filmed for an estimated $15 million.

Other critics picks that could translate into Golden Globes are Al Gore‘s global warming flick, "An Inconvenient Truth" (picked as Best Documentary by four of the six groups) and Guillermo del Toro‘s Spanish language fantasy "Pan’s Labyrinth," which garnered three groups’ awards for Best Foreign Film and two for Guillermo Navarro’s cinematography. Both are modestly budgeted, by Hollywood standards — with "Pan" estimated at $14.5 million and "Truth" at a cheap $1 million.

The HFPA will announce its nominations this Thursday, with the awards ceremony broadcast live on January 15, 2007.

ELSEWHERE IN INDIE NEWS THIS WEEK:

InDigEnt To Cease Production in January


Fairuza Balk in InDiGent’s "Personal Velocity" (2002)

Even tiny budgets are too high if there’s a low rate of return. InDigEnt, the company that brought you such films as "Tape" and "Pieces of April," will shut down in January. Producer-Director Gary Winick said the company, which championed edgy projects shot on digital for generally under $1 million, was still having trouble getting backing for projects. "The studios want the ‘Capotes’ and the ‘Sideways,’" he said. "They want the $8-million film to make a $100 million instead of the $1 million to make $10 (million). That’s the problem." InDigEnt, short for Independent Digital Entertainment was founded in 1999; Winick’s latest project is "Charlotte’s Web."

Kelly Says "Southland Tales" Cuts Completed


Sarah Michelle Gellar as a porn star on a date with destiny in "Southland Tales"

It looks as if "Southland Tales," Richard Kelly‘s followup to "Donnie Darko," will see the light of day after all. A 160-minute cut of the film had a disastrous premiere at Cannes, but Kelly said he’s trimmed nearly a half hour from "Southland" and kept some sense of narrative cohesion as well. "We still have some visual-effects work to do, but expect a release date and a trailer soon," Kelly wrote on his MySpace blog. "Expect some big announcements soon!" The film, a sci fi/fantasy/musical/comedy, stars Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Justin Timberlake, and half the population of California. It will likely hit theaters in April of next year.

Von Trier Pioneers New Cinematic Concept: Find The Mistakes


"Manderlay" is 49 percent on the Tomatometer: where was the ‘lookey’ then?

With the creation of Dogma 95, Danish auteur Lars Von Trier challenged filmmakers to make movies with more purity and no special effects. Now he’s issuing a challenge to audiences: find the mistakes. In his latest, "The Boss of It All," Von Trier says he’s created a new concept, "lookey," in which intentional mistakes have been placed into the film. But that’s not all: the first Dane to find all the mistakes wins 30,000 Danish kroner (roughly equivalent to $5,300). Von Trier is best known for "Breaking the Waves" and "Dogville"; the trailer for "The Boss of All" is online here.

Tomatometers For Last Week’s Limited Releases

Opening last week in limited release: "Bergman Island," a feature-length interview with Ingmar Bergman, arguably the world’s greatest living director, is at 83 percent with six reviews; "Days of Glory," an Algerian World War II film, is at 80 percent with 15 reviews; the Argentine import "Family Law," about the trials and tribulations of a father-son relationship, is at 76 percent with 17 reviews; "Screamers," a doc about System of a Down’s efforts to stop genocide, is at 75 percent with eight reviews; "The Empire in Africa," a doc about civil war in Sierra Leone, is at 63 percent with eight reviews; "Off the Black," starring Nick Nolte as an alcoholic baseball umpire, is at 61 percent with 23 reviews; "Ever Again," a doc about contemporary anti-Semitism, is at 54 percent with 13 reviews; and "Inland Empire," David Lynch‘s latest assault on cinematic convention starring Laura Dern, is at 53 percent with 30 reviews.


"Days of Glory"’s cast, whose five leading actors shared this year’s Cannes honors

Top Performing Limiteds

"Volver" held onto the top spot in last week’s indie box office battle. Pedro Almodovar‘s meditation on womanhood made $8,450 per screen in 44 theaters, pushing its six-week total to $2.76 million. The runner up was Jean-Luc Godard‘s nouvelle vague classic "Two or Three Things I Know About Her," which raked in $5,905 on one screen; it’s made $57,700 in its four weeks in re-release. In third was the debut "Screamers," at $5,902 per on four screens, for a total of $23,609. Rounding out the top five were "The History Boys," which made $4,036 per on 50 screens (its total is $500,432 in three weeks of release); and "Flannel Pajamas," which took in $3,994 on one screen, for a total of $49,279 in four weeks since its debut.


Carmen and Penelope, women on top (of the indie box office)

This week at the movies brings us the profound discoveries of a great Kazak journalist ("Borat," starring Sacha Baron Cohen), a battle between Santa and Jack Frost ("The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause," starring Tim Allen), and a tale of rats in the sewer ("Flushed Away," featuring the voice work of Kate Winslet and Hugh Jackman). What do the critics have to say?

Jagshemash! Here in U.S and A., what do critic say about "Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan?" They like! In fact, the scribes are almost universally pleased with the film, and some are going as far as calling it one of the funniest comedies ever. Part satire, part shockumentary, "Borat" follows the gleefully sexist, homophobic, and anti-Semitic title character (Cohen) on a cross-country trek to learn more about our strange nation; along the way he dredges up the seamy underbelly of American prejudice and ignorance. At 95 percent on the Tomatometer, "Borat" is not only Certified Fresh, it’s the best reviewed wide release of the year, topping such acclaimed movies as "Dave Chappelle’s Block Party," "The Departed," and "United 93." That’s a good thing, since Borat himself has said if the movie doesn’t do well, he will be execute.


Borat loves the U.S. and A.

It doesn’t sound like the most auspicious subject for a film: mice and rats are flushed down a toilet, where they find a bustling municipality in the sewer. However, in the hands of Aardman Productions, the endlessly imaginative company responsible for "Chicken Run" and "Wallace and Gromit," anything is possible. And so it is with "Flushed Away," which tells the upstairs-downstairs tale of a coddled mouse who finds action and adventure after a trip through the plumbing. Critics say that while "Flushed Away" may not achieve the dizzying heights of "Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit" (which scored 95 percent on the Tomatometer), it’s an eccentric, inventive family film with plenty of laughs. At 76 percent on the Tomatometer, "Flushed Away" is critically sanitized for your viewing pleasure.


Dive in! It’s fresh!

"The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause," was barely screened for critics, much like star Tim Allen‘s last flick, "Zoom." The big difference is that "Clause" at least has a couple good reviews, whereas "Zoom" had none. The story of Santa’s duel with Jack Frost for control over Christmas, "Clause" hasn’t exactly enchanted the critics who have seen it; they say the movie is labored and mostly mirthless. It’s currently at 29 percent on the Tomatometer.


Yes, Virginia, there is a "Santa Clause 3."

Also opening this week in limited release: "Commune," a documentary about the Black Bear Ranch in California, is at 100 percent; "Romantico," a heartbreaking documentary about a musician working illegally in the U.S., is at 100 percent; Pedro Almodovar‘s "Volver," starring Penelope Cruz in a complex tale of womanhood, is Certified Fresh at 90 percent; "Wondrous Oblivion," the story of a boy and his neighbor who bond over the game of cricket, is at 60 percent; "Death & Texas," a death penalty satire, is at 60 percent; the twisty thriller "Unknown," starring Greg Kinnear, is at 29 percent; "Shottas," a based-on-true-events Jamaican crime flick, is at 20 percent; and "Zerophilia," a gender-bending rom-com, is at 18 percent.


Pedro Almodovar and Penelope Cruz take a spectral walk down memory lane with "Volver." Check out our retrospective of the Spanish director’s work here.

Finally, we’d like to bestow props upon the whimsically monikered killthemall4444, who correctly predicted that the equally whimsical "Saw III" would wind up with a Tomatometer of 28 percent. Congrats, ktm4444.

Best Reviewed Wide Releases of 2006:
————————————————
95% — Borat: Cultural Learnings of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan
93% — Dave Chappelle’s Block Party
93% — The Departed
90% — United 93
88% — Inside Man
84%– Akeelah and the Bee
83% — Slither
83% — The Descent
80% — A Prairie Home Companion
79% — Catch a Fire

Recent Tim Allen Movies:
——————————–
0% — Zoom (2006)
28% — The Shaggy Dog (2006)
4% — Christmas with the Kranks (2004)
55% — The Santa Clause 2 (2002)
22% — Who Is Cletis Tout? (2002)

Recent Sacha Baron Cohen Movies:
———————————————
72% — Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby (2006)
55% — Madagascar (2005)
55% — Ali G Indahouse: The Movie (2002)

The first set pics from "The Bourne Ultimatum" are online at Reel Movie News (via Comingsoon.net). See! Matt Damon on a scooter! Thrill! As Julia Stiles walks down the street!

"The Bourne Ultimatum," helmed by Paul Greengrass ("United 93"), also stars Joan Allen, David Strathairn (and, rumor has it, Gael Garcia Bernal as a bad guy). The third in the "Bourne" series, it is scheduled for a 2007 release.


Matt Damon: Back in action as Jason Bourne

This week at the movies, we’ve got cops and robbers in Boston ("The Departed," starring Jack Nicholson, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Matt Damon), chainsaw massacres in Texas ("The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning," starring Jordana Brewster), and retail employees in New Mexico ("Employee of the Month," starring Jessica Simpson and Dane Cook). What do the critics have to say?

Is Martin Scorsese America’s greatest living filmmaker? He’s certainly bolstering his case with "The Departed." The film, which is a loose remake of the Hong Kong thriller "Infernal Affairs," tells the story of two moles, one of whom (DiCaprio) a cop undercover within a Boston crime family led by Jack Nicholson, and the other (Damon) a hood who has infiltrated the police department. Critics say Scorsese has created a crime drama with the gritty authenticity and soupy morality that infused such past triumphs as "GoodFellas," with outstanding work from an excellent cast. At 96 percent on the Tomatometer, "The Departed" may signify a new arrival for the master director; Scorsese’s best reviewed wide release since "GoodFellas." And it’s not only Certified Fresh, but it’s also the best reviewed wide release of the year.


"Wait a minute… you’re telling me I ripped that ‘how do you like them apples’ line off from you?"

The lives of wage slaves are often grist for the cinema’s mill, whether comic ("Clerks"), dramatic ("One Hour Photo") or both ("The Good Girl"). Now comes "Employee of the Month," starring Cook as a slacker at a Costco-like box store who whips himself into shape when attractive new hire (Simpson) comes on board. Critics say the movie has a few good laughs, but Cook and Simpson lack chemistry, and the film doesn’t do much beyond showing employee antics. At 25 percent on the Tomatometer, audiences may want to hire a different "Employee."


"And these are called ‘numbers.’ I know, it’s confusing."

For horror fans who are interested in the origin of Leatherface, "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning" provides some back story on the Lone Star State’s scariest resident. It also provides oodles of gore, and a style reminiscent of the original. Unfortunately, the critics say it doesn’t provide enough scares to make the experience worthwhile. The plot involves a group of young adults headed to Mexico for a good time before two brothers go to fight in Vietnam; naturally, Leatherface curtails their enjoyment in a hurry. The scribes say the film is a little too rote, and at 14 percent on the Tomatometer, this "Chainsaw" doesn’t cut very deep. (Read RT’s interview with director Jonathan Liebesman here.)


"The unsuspecting teenagers wail/ along the trail/ deep in the heart of Texas"

Also opening this week in limited release: "Blood Tea and Red String," a handmade stop-motion fairy tale 13 years in the making, is at 100 percent on the Tomatometer; "So Goes the Nation," a documentary about the 2004 election season in Ohio, is at 100 percent; "49 Up," the latest in Michael Apted‘s remarkable documentary series about growing and changing in England, is at 94 percent; "Black Gold," a documentary about the global effects of the coffee trade, is at 88 percent; "Little Children," a tale of suburban angst starring Kate Winslet, Patrick Wilson and Jennifer Connelly, is at 79 percent; "Shortbus," John Cameron Mitchell‘s warmhearted exploration of unconventional sexuality, is at 68 percent; and "Wrestling with Angels: Playwright Tony Kushner," a documentary about the eponymous Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winning scribe, is at 55 percent. And "The Queen," which is expanding this week, is at 98 percent, making it the third best reviewed limited release of the year.


"Blood Tea and Red String":"The King of Cartoons!"

Recent Martin Scorsese Movies:
—————————————
92% — No Direction Home: Bob Dylan (2005)
89% — The Aviator (2004)
77% — Gangs of New York (2002)
100% — My Voyage to Italy (2001)
72% — Bringing Out the Dead (1999)

Texas Chainsaw Massacres:
———————————-
86% — The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1974)
50% — The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986)
23% — Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 3 (1989)
16% — The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Next Generation (1994)
37% — The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (2003)

Best Reviewed Wide Releases Of 2006
————————————-
(Releases with at least 40 reviews)
96% — The Departed
93% — Dave Chappelle’s Block Party
93% — Little Miss Sunshine
90% — United 93
88% — Inside Man
84% — Akeelah and the Bee
83% — Slither
83% — The Descent
80% — A Prairie Home Companion
78% — The Devil Wears Prada

Best Reviewed Limited Releases Of 2006
—————————————
(Releases with at least 40 reviews)
98% — Kekexeli: Mountain Patrol
98% — The War Tapes
98% — The Queen
96% — Army of Shadows
95% — Wordplay
93% — Fateless
93% — Little Miss Sunshine
92% — The Death of Mr. Lazarescu
92% — An Inconvenient Truth
92% — Lassie

Tag Cloud

technology aapi Star Trek Mystery First Look slasher batman Schedule Nickelodeon wonder woman stop motion doctor who LGBTQ mcc Sundance Star Wars cooking Television Critics Association marvel comics godzilla transformers The Walking Dead Toys Family crime VOD young adult television Comedy Central trophy Arrowverse Comic-Con@Home 2021 science fiction supernatural Elton John video on demand remakes Pirates slashers MSNBC TCM Lionsgate Tags: Comedy Sundance Now historical drama 72 Emmy Awards italian FX politics A24 BAFTA new zealand Premiere Dates VICE blockbusters Pop Britbox YouTube Premium japanese book anthology New York Comic Con 78th Annual Golden Globe Awards medical drama australia FOX spider-verse Starz royal family Adult Swim composers south america period drama PBS children's TV diversity suspense dark breaking bad social media Alien olympics Winners National Geographic Disney political drama BBC VH1 aliens BET game show Trophy Talk Sci-Fi APB Red Carpet X-Men spider-man GLAAD Polls and Games adaptation Instagram Live Mudbound harry potter ESPN Pride Month ID binge Warner Bros. movie elevated horror critics Showtime 2017 TCA documentaries gangster canceled screenings Marvel Television Biopics ViacomCBS The Walt Disney Company theme song 2015 foreign Film RT21 Netflix Christmas movies independent Certified Fresh women blaxploitation Amazon Prime venice rom-coms ABC Family spanish language Spike directors DC Universe TV One thriller rt labs rt labs critics edition Funimation Spring TV parents Shondaland mob dramedy Hallmark Christmas movies Hollywood Foreign Press Association Tumblr Fargo halloween tv james bond The Arrangement art house YA OneApp Paramount zero dark thirty Peacock Trivia travel marvel cinematic universe Amazon Bravo Emmys asian-american CW Seed Quiz Travel Channel Endgame Chernobyl Marvel Studios 90s festival cancelled TV series saw scene in color biography christmas movies cinemax cartoon The Witch Thanksgiving Mary Tyler Moore CBS romantic comedy Avengers Cartoon Network Music rotten Neflix 4/20 Fox Searchlight Mary Poppins Returns franchise docudrama Amazon Prime Video target best spinoff Nat Geo Food Network kong scary movies PaleyFest Logo discovery Stephen King vs. Holidays feel good joker news Emmy Nominations GoT name the review heist movie Netflix Animation DC streaming service Horror HBO Go chucky hollywood TV Land Anna Paquin a nightmare on elm street TLC YouTube Red MTV Super Bowl Paramount Network USA LGBT boxing docuseries comics YouTube El Rey video CBS All Access President strong female leads know your critic laika vampires Martial Arts sag awards 79th Golden Globes Awards 2021 all-time Tarantino anime The Academy zombies HFPA IFC Films Marvel free movies psychological thriller superhero spy thriller sitcom Spectrum Originals Awards Classic Film BET Awards mission: impossible TNT Video Games police drama Rocketman Masterpiece Lifetime Christmas movies TCA Awards kaiju MCU casting miniseries mutant Summer Infographic canceled TV shows book adaptation based on movie king arthur nbcuniversal Comic Book comic book movies Tomatazos Pet Sematary Prime Video Disney streaming service biopic NYCC Broadway sports new york AMC Plus DirecTV dexter Teen ABC TCA 2017 Musical Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt Black Mirror war cars space cancelled documentary ABC Signature criterion WGN golden globes Winter TV Paramount Plus Columbia Pictures series Captain marvel Rom-Com USA Network Image Comics WarnerMedia comiccon talk show hispanic Academy Awards 1990s comedies CMT comic books ratings spain stoner IFC revenge Crackle Drama classics 2020 Extras new star wars movies boxoffice Reality toy story hidden camera action-comedy scary Fall TV Universal Pictures versus reboot superman Television Academy sequels CNN sopranos natural history pirates of the caribbean prank nfl 73rd Emmy Awards black Wes Anderson SundanceTV Comics on TV First Reviews Pacific Islander Rocky comic Character Guide what to watch Song of Ice and Fire San Diego Comic-Con concert crime thriller Trailer live event green book Legendary worst 24 frames Ovation 2018 live action indie Heroines See It Skip It GIFs reviews Nominations golden globe awards telelvision richard e. Grant serial killer Chilling Adventures of Sabrina trailers justice league Disney+ Disney Plus Watching Series TIFF black comedy Women's History Month hispanic heritage month The Purge TV History scorecard 99% adventure unscripted Walt Disney Pictures Acorn TV 71st Emmy Awards dceu dreamworks Black History Month facebook nature Epix japan indiana jones Universal Set visit Syfy Tubi E3 Mindy Kaling animated child's play DGA debate international BBC America Apple Mary poppins Sundance TV crossover latino Baby Yoda psycho Film Festival Sony Pictures legend Musicals 20th Century Fox Pixar ghosts Disney Channel Crunchyroll 2019 popular Interview Dark Horse Comics Sneak Peek halloween Cosplay NBC spanish Countdown TV movies SDCC Brie Larson teaser TBS Rock Discovery Channel Disney Plus Hallmark cancelled TV shows lord of the rings worst movies die hard award winner universal monsters movies Exclusive Video cats Apple TV Plus Lifetime Cannes football PlayStation werewolf 21st Century Fox razzies dogs AMC streaming movies films Awards Tour critic resources zombie Ghostbusters game of thrones Tokyo Olympics Best and Worst comic book movie 45 satire hist streaming obituary robots BBC One disaster fresh fast and furious American Society of Cinematographers basketball mockumentary blockbuster Valentine's Day SXSW king kong finale sequel TruTV archives E! Kids & Family renewed TV shows Christmas The CW kids romance HBO Max TV renewals Shudder Apple TV+ genre stand-up comedy Action Oscars 2016 Calendar 007 emmy awards IMDb TV tv talk deadpool Hulu Fox News ITV high school Marathons FX on Hulu Election Freeform FXX cops Holiday Photos Writers Guild of America quibi monster movies Turner Classic Movies witnail singing competition Year in Review Binge Guide rotten movies we love dragons Reality Competition Podcast Box Office posters Amazon Studios Hear Us Out Western Superheroe Superheroes RT History cancelled television rt archives Country Turner jamie lee curtis NBA Ellie Kemper Fantasy toronto Pop TV Vudu A&E crime drama 93rd Oscars Creative Arts Emmys Lucasfilm cults Opinion festivals twilight screen actors guild HBO Grammys Comedy OWN DC Comics french true crime dc Esquire adenture leaderboard jurassic park TCA Winter 2020