Noomi Rapace rose to international stardom as Lisbeth Salander in the original adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and its sequels, success she parlayed into roles in Sherlock Holmes: Game of Shadows and Ridley Scott’s hit Alien prequel, Prometheus. With a sequel to the latter in the works and two movies opposite Tom Hardy on the horizon, Rapace is balancing a burgeoning Hollywood career with acclaimed roles in her native Sweden. This week, she stars opposite Colin Farrell, Terrence Howard and Isabelle Huppert in the action thriller Dead Man Down, which reunites her with Dragon Tattoo director Niels Arden Oplev for his English-language debut. We spoke with the actress recently and got the scoop on her all-time favorite films.

True Romance (Tony Scott, 1993; 91% Tomatometer)

I love True Romance. When I read the script for Dead Man Down, it kind of reminded me a little bit of that one. It’s like some kind of thing similar to that crazy world around them: the violence, the criminals, the macho culture, and those two main characters with very complicated souls. So that one is one of my favorites.

Raging Bull (Martin Scorsese, 1980; 98% Tomatometer)

Of course, I love Raging Bull. And I love The Godfather. [Laughs] Maybe I need to find something a little fresher. But Raging Bull, you can always feel when an actor kind of goes into — I don’t know Robert De Niro, but I kind of get this feeling that he went really deep into it, and that the character and he melded together. I can feel like he’s not pretending. He’s actually living it. That’s always something that hits me, and I forget about the outside world; it’s almost like the movie I’m watching takes over and becomes my reality. I’ve seen Raging Bull so many times and it feels so pure and real. It’s beautiful and sexy and rough, and there’s so much pain in it at the same time. I think it always attracts me, you know, with people struggling and people fighting and people wanting to become something, wanting to change their lives or change who they are; people fighting with their own demons. For me, that’s such a beautiful example of that — someone who was really focused on being something, and becoming something, and how hard it is and how much you need to fight.

When we interviewed Ray Winstone recently, he picked Raging Bull as one of his favorites, too.

I love him, by the way, in Gary Oldman’s movie Nil by Mouth.

Nil by Mouth (Gary Oldman, 1997; 65% Tomatometer)

That’s one of my favorites. That one is on my list, too. When I saw it, it just blew me away completely. I saw it when I was quite young, and I remember thinking, “My god, are these really actors? Could a movie be done this way?” It was something I’d never seen before, and it was so brutal and so real; just like watching a documentary. Those kinds of filmmakers and actors kind of opened up things in me that gave me hope and inspired me. I felt less lonely in a way, because I thought, “Okay, there’s people out there exploring things that I would like to do.” People who were not afraid of darkness; people who were not afraid of going into things that were not charming and easy and, you know, sweet and cute. That one made a very strong impression on me.

Frances (Graeme Clifford, 1982; 93% Tomatometer)

And then Frances — do you remember the movie Frances, with Jessica Lange? I love that movie, too. It’s such an amazing portrait of a woman losing herself into a different reality. I did a movie called Babycall and it’s also about a woman with two realities, in a way, and she’s kind of drifting in and out. She knows that she should stay in this world and that she should be focused; she needs to pull herself together and sort out her brain, but at the same time she can’t control it. I think that Jessica did it beautiful and so strong. It just broke my heart, that movie. So when I did Babycall, I revisited Frances. So that one is a movie that I love. It always inspires me.

Bullhead (Michael R. Roskam, 2011; 87% Tomatometer)

I love the movie Bullhead. I’m working with the director now. He’s kind of putting the light into a business, a very dirty business — it’s not the cool gangsters, it’s not the kind of sexy gangster world; it’s the gritty, very uncharming world of criminals working in the meat industry in Belgium. And the whole backstory to this lead guy is so incredible. I was in tears a couple of times when I saw it. And now I’m gonna work with Matthias [Schoenaerts] and with Michaël R. Roskam, who directed it.


Dead Man Down opens in theaters this week.


Jaime Winstone

If you flick through the celebrity pages of most British newspapers — particularly the free sheets — you’ll likely recognise Jaime Winstone. As Ray Winstone‘s daughter she’s part of that select set of star children — think Peaches and Pixie, Lily and Alfie, Kelly and Jack — with whom the tabloid press seem to have a keen fascination; especially when it comes to photographing them on nights out at hip London clubs. At 23 years old, it’s no surprise Winstone enjoys having a good time of an evening, but it’s her daytime activities which are becoming increasingly more interesting.

As an actress, she made her debut only 5 years ago, alongside Ashley Walters in powerful Brit drama Bullet Boy, and she’s been quietly building a solid body of work ever since. She played as part of the ensemble cast of Noel Clarke‘s Kidulthood, tried her hand at horror with Donkey Punch and Dead Set, and shared the screen with David Suchet in Poirot.

Her five favourite films reveal her passions, her upbringing and the steps that brought her into the industry, and her latest project, Boogie Woogie, released later in the year, promises to continue her quest to be taken seriously as an actress, not just a celebrity. Co-starring Gillian Anderson, Heather Graham and Danny Huston, Winstone plays a manipulative young British artist, and recently attended the film’s premiere at the Edinburgh Film Festival, where RT sat down with her.


Jaime Winstone

La Haine

La Haine

“It’s definitely up there because of the cinematography, the cultural references, the graffiti, and the art. It’s that kind of high-standard indie film and the French make such beautiful films anyway. They seem to be in a league of their own. All the references to the riots and the times and what was going on, that’s particularly why I love that film.”

Click on a thumbnail below.

La Haine
La Haine

The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia

Total Recall
Total Recall

Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction


Jaime Winstone

The Big Lebowski

The Big Lebowski

Jeff Bridges is amazing. The cast, the script; it’s written so well in terms of characters. It’s genius, it’s funny, and it’s wacky. It’s about a big stoner, man, and it’s just really great.”

Click on a thumbnail below.

La Haine
La Haine

The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia

Total Recall
Total Recall

Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction


Jaime Winstone

Lawrence of Arabia

Lawrence of Arabia

“It was one of the first films I ever watched when I was young. It really had impact. The music just carries you while you’re sitting there watching it. I remember watching it with my dad, actually sat on my dad’s belly, and saying to him how much I loved it!”

Click on a thumbnail below.

La Haine
La Haine

The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia

Total Recall
Total Recall

Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction


Jaime Winstone

Total Recall

Total Recall

“I’m a total sci-fi freak, particularly when it comes to Arnie and machine guns. It’s just brilliant — genius. ‘Give those people air,’ and all that. I just love it. I love the mutants too. It’s like an old comic book that’s been turned into a film.”

Click on a thumbnail below.

La Haine
La Haine

The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia

Total Recall
Total Recall

Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction


Jaime Winstone

Pulp Fiction

Pulp Fiction

“I’m thinking of a bunch of gangster films I’d like to include, like Bronx Tale is a particular favourite, but my final choice is Pulp Fiction. It’s a film I never get bored watching. It’s shocking, it’s stylised, it’s clever and the soundtrack is kickass.”

Click on a thumbnail below.

La Haine
La Haine

The Big Lebowski
The Big Lebowski

Lawrence of Arabia
Lawrence of Arabia

Total Recall
Total Recall

Pulp Fiction
Pulp Fiction


Continue onto the next page for our exclusive interview with Jaime as she talks about spending time on sets with dad and how she got into acting.

Jaime Winstone


Bullet Boy

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Were these the films that got you interested in doing what you do? What made you want to become an actress?

Jaime Winstone: I don’t really know, to be honest. When I was younger I never said, “I want to be an actress.” I always wanted to be involved in the production side — putting on a play or getting involved with the clothes or whatever — but I could never really see myself acting. I’d do creative stuff, in drama class, but I’d never be the one to say, “Oh, can I be up front,” because that’d make me cringe. But Des Hamilton, the casting director, got me in for Bullet Boy, and it just went from there. The illusion of being an actress and being completely dramatic and loving the attention is not that true, you know, there are a lot of actors I know who are extremely shy. And I sometimes fit into that bracket, when it comes to acting I love it and I take it very seriously. I knew as soon as I was in front of the camera that it was right and I was in my right shoes.

I grew up heavily into horror films. When I was younger, that was basically all I watched. And Lawrence of Arabia! [laughs] I was really into my Freddy Kruegers and my zombie films and I was always fascinated with moving image and movies. With the escapism you get when you go to the cinema, when you sit in your darkened room and watch a film. It can take you out of your world for a little bit, and I think that’s the extended passion of why I do it, because I get to become someone else for however long. You can experiment in another world and find what you can draw from a particular character. I think we’re very lucky to be able to do that for a career. Some might take it for granted, but I love it.

Kidulthood

Winstone in Noel Clarke’s Kidulthood.

Did you spend much time on film sets with your dad growing up?

JW: Quite a bit, actually. When I was younger I remember spending a lot of time in theatres watching my dad, because he went through a bit of a theatre stage. I was completely on set throughout most of my dad’s career. I was heavily involved in Nil by Mouth and I was living with my dad and Gary Oldman while we were shooting that. It was a bit bizarre and weird and I didn’t really know what was going on!

I went to do a bit of work experience in Prague Film Festival and got a bit of a view on how the big machine turns and how films are actually made on set. How that runner rigs that certain light and how that light affects that certain area. I was educated when it comes to film. I think that’s why I’m so confident that this is what I want to do. I’ve been lucky enough to experience the full effect of filmmaking. Some people come out of drama school and think, “Right, I’m off to be a big star,” and hardly any of them have stepped foot in a studio before.

I guess I don’t really have that fear, you know. I did running on a Scorsese film, getting people teas and coffees. I spent time on the Indiana Jones set with my dad. You get a sense that on those giant films, the scale of it is so huge but it still ticks like any other films. It’s still a group of people getting together; it’s just that they have a lot more money, a lot more power and a lot more time, which a lot of films I’ve done haven’t. I’ve seen quick, short independent film sets with British money where the turnaround is very quick, and then watching a massive film with Spielberg planning two days for one scene.

I do feel I’ve had a lot of experience and influence that’s helped me, not necessarily get my foot in the door, but helped me understand what it is I want to do.

Continue as Winstone talks about her latest film, Boogie Woogie, and working with Hollywood’s finest.

Jaime Winstone


Kidulthood

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Has that sense of the industry helped you understand the offers and affected your choices since Bullet Boy?

JW: Definitely. You’ve got to work, at the end of the day, and this year’s been tough for the industry I think, but it’s still going. In terms of making choices, I’ve always had that support from my dad and my family and my agent to stick to what I want to do and not sell out and take the next big film that comes along. Don’t get me wrong, that can be great, to do a really big film, but at the moment I think it’s time that I carve out my career and the make the films people will remember. I hope I’ve got a good body of work already.

It’s quite an important stage for me. I’m 23 and I’m making that transition from a girl to a woman and I want to have some good stuff under my belt. It means holding your breath a little bit and being a bit patient — going a bit insane — but it’s worth it because when you get that good job, you feel it’s right.

Everything that’s happened in my career up until now has been very organic and it’s happened naturally through meeting someone and really hitting it off and then going off to do a film with them. I feel my conscience is quite clear with that and I’m confident about the work.

You have Boogie Woogie in the festival here in Edinburgh, can you walk us through the film a little?

JW: Boogie Woogie is about the art scene in London as a whole. It explores the lives of art dealers, art exhibitors, art buyers, art victims. It’s about the characters in that art world. I play a young artist, kind-of a Tracey Emin vibe. It’s a complete ensemble piece, so it goes through all these different people’s lives and the ups and downs of the fierce art world. It’s amazing how a piece of art is supposed to be moving and touching but when you get to the core of it it’s just fucking expensive.

I play a young video artist who self-documents her life and exposes everybody she comes across. She’s a fierce and completely sexual lesbian. She uses her sexual aura to draw people in and uses it as a weapon. Documents their feelings and her feelings and is looked upon as a dedicated artist. It’s quite clever and conniving of her. A lot of time art doesn’t have room for humanity, it just is. If it’s disgusting, that’s the art — it’s supposed to make you feel sick. Her pieces have a lot of those sorts of moments. She goes deep with it, exposes her girlfriend’s life, makes her look like a fool and sells it on and gets picked up by Vanity Fair. That’s the way it goes, usually. You know, the tough guys, the nasty guys in art tend to come out shining. It’s not like the real world.

Kidulthood

With co-stars Alan Cumming and Jack Huston at the Edinburgh photocall for Boogie Woogie.

You’ve got a great cast around you. When you’re working with actors like that, do you learn from them?

JW: Totally. To work with Danny [Huston] was pretty amazing. He’s got a great energy. He’s the main art dealer in town, Art Spindle. Amanda [Seyfried] is really sweet and very nice. I really got on with Heather [Graham], she’s a lovely, lovely girl and totally beautiful. Jack [Huston] was so funny and Gillian [Anderson] I just think is fantastic. She’s got such a great range. I was a huge fan of hers from The X-Files! To be on the same screen as Sir Christopher Lee and Joanna Lumley was just amazing. Alan Cumming and I are very close in the film, and we got on really well.

I’ve also just worked with David Suchet on Poirot, and yeah, when you’re working with people like that they draw you in and you draw from them. You’re in awe — they’ve been doing this for years and they still have the same passion. And they’re not, you know, thespians; they’re real actors. Just by watching the way they stand, they know what they’re doing, and it’s really inspirational. You have to up the standards, too. If you don’t know your lines and David Suchet’s standing there, you’re going to look like an absolute idiot! But, you know, I’m ready to meet that challenge now and I’m ready to up my game a little bit.

Boogie Woogie will be out later this year.

Fancy yourself a screenwriter? Got some dialogue that you think would be just perfect for Optimus Prime? Well, get ready for your big break, because Paramount is apparently holding a contest in which YOU can pen some banter for the giant robot to speak.

Thanks to ComingSoon.net for the tip: "Paramount Pictures has updated the official website for the live-action "Transformers" movie with a contest which you can enter for a chance to have your line of dialogue spoken by Optimus Prime (Peter Cullen).

Ten winners will have their winning line voiced and recorded by Cullen, with first place becoming a line in the movie. You can enter now here!

Opening July 4, 2007, "Transformers" is directed by Michael Bay and stars Cullen, Shia LaBeouf, Megan Fox, Josh Duhamel, Jon Voight, Bernie Mac, Tyrese Gibson, Rachael Taylor, Amaury Nolasco, Kevin Dunn, Ronnie Sperling and Dane Cook."