Jumanji

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All Coen Brothers Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Since their 1984 neo-noir debut Blood Simple, brother directors Joel and Ethan Coen have danced amok across American cinema with mordant tales of wayward souls and their crimes and misdemeanors. Among their achievements include making a generation-defining comedy (The Big Lebowski), revitalizing the Western (True Grit), and winning Best Picture (No Country For Old Men). They even brought back bluegrass, achieved through cultural Trojan horse O Brother, Where Are Thou?. Recently, Joel Coen struck out on his own with The Tragedy of Macbeth, included in this guide to all Coen brothers movies ranked by Tomatometer!

#19

The Ladykillers (2004)
54%

#19
Adjusted Score: 60979%
Critics Consensus: Hanks' performance in the lead role is inspired, but this is a relatively minor offering from the Coen brothers.
Synopsis: Professor G.H. Dorr (Tom Hanks), a courtly Southern gentleman, arrives at the home of devout, elderly Marva Munson (Irma P.... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 60643%
Critics Consensus: Intriguingly strange and visually distinctive, The Hudsucker Proxy is ultimately almost -- but not quite -- as smart and absorbing as it needs to be.
Synopsis: Greedy executive Sidney J. Mussburger (Paul Newman) hopes to take control of the company he works for by purchasing a... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 81382%
Critics Consensus: Though more mainstream than other Coen films, there are still funny oddball touches, and Clooney and Zeta-Jones sizzle like old-time movie stars.
Synopsis: Miles Massey (George Clooney) is an exceptional divorce lawyer who specializes in saving cheating husbands from having to pay expensive... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#16
Adjusted Score: 82824%
Critics Consensus: Though not as good as Coen brothers' classics such as Blood Simple, the delightfully loopy O Brother, Where Art Thou? is still a lot of fun.
Synopsis: Ulysses Everett McGill (George Clooney) is having difficulty adjusting to his hard-labor sentence in Mississippi. He scams his way off... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#15
#15
Adjusted Score: 88209%
Critics Consensus: With Burn After Reading, the Coen Brothers have crafted another clever comedy/thriller with an outlandish plot and memorable characters.
Synopsis: When a disc containing memoirs of a former CIA analyst (John Malkovich) falls into the hands of Linda Litzke (Frances... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 87178%
Critics Consensus: Stylish but emotionally distant, The Man Who Wasn't There is a clever tribute to the film noir genre.
Synopsis: A dark tale of infidelity and murder, crime and punishment. Set in a small northern California town of the late... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#13

The Big Lebowski (1998)
83%

#13
Adjusted Score: 89049%
Critics Consensus: Typically stunning visuals and sharp dialogue from the Coen Brothers, brought to life with strong performances from Goodman and Bridges.
Synopsis: Jeff Bridges plays Jeff Lebowski who insists on being called "the Dude," a laid-back, easygoing burnout who happens to have... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#12

Hail, Caesar! (2016)
85%

#12
Adjusted Score: 108004%
Critics Consensus: Packed with period detail and perfectly cast, Hail, Caesar! finds the Coen brothers delivering an agreeably lightweight love letter to post-war Hollywood.
Synopsis: In the early 1950s, Eddie Mannix is busy at work trying to solve all the problems of the actors and... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#11

A Serious Man (2009)
89%

#11
Adjusted Score: 97606%
Critics Consensus: Blending dark humor with profoundly personal themes, the Coen brothers deliver what might be their most mature -- if not their best -- film to date.
Synopsis: Larry Gopnik (Michael Stuhlbarg) is a physics professor at a 1960s university, but his life is coming apart at the... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#10
Adjusted Score: 103035%
Critics Consensus: The Ballad of Buster Scruggs avoids anthology pitfalls with a consistent collection tied together by the Coen brothers' signature blend of dark drama and black humor.
Synopsis: An anthology of six short films that take place in 19th-century post-Civil War era during the settling of the Old... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#9

Barton Fink (1991)
90%

#9
Adjusted Score: 94552%
Critics Consensus: Twisty and unsettling, the Coen brothers' satirical tale of a 1940s playwright struggling with writer's block is packed with their trademark sense of humor and terrific performances from its cast.
Synopsis: Set in 1941, an intellectual New York playwright Barton Fink (John Turturro) accepts an offer to write movie scripts in... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#8

Raising Arizona (1987)
91%

#8
Adjusted Score: 95570%
Critics Consensus: A terrifically original, eccentric screwball comedy, Raising Arizona may not be the Coens' most disciplined movie, but it's one of their most purely entertaining.
Synopsis: An ex-con and an ex-cop meet, marry and long for a child of their own. When it is discovered that... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 95306%
Critics Consensus: Though possibly more notable for its distinctive style than an airtight story, this Coen brothers take on the classic gangster flick features sharp dialogue, impressive cinematography, and a typically quirky cast of characters.
Synopsis: When the Italian Mafia threatens to kill a crooked bookie (John Turturro), Irish mob boss Leo O'Bannon (Albert Finney) refuses... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#6
#6
Adjusted Score: 102850%
Critics Consensus: Smart, funny, and profoundly melancholy, Inside Llewyn Davis finds the Coen brothers in fine form.
Synopsis: In 1961 New York City, folk singer Llewyn Davis (Oscar Isaac) is at a crossroads. Guitar in hand, he struggles... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 105946%
Critics Consensus: Led by a stellar Denzel Washington, The Tragedy of Macbeth strips the classic story down to its visual and narrative essentials.
Synopsis: Power-hungry Macbeth sets his sights on the Scottish throne after receiving a prophecy from three witches.... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 105781%
Critics Consensus: Bolstered by powerful lead performances from Javier Bardem, Josh Brolin, and Tommy Lee Jones, No Country for Old Men finds the Coen brothers spinning cinematic gold out of Cormac McCarthy's grim, darkly funny novel.
Synopsis: While out hunting, Llewelyn Moss (Josh Brolin) finds the grisly aftermath of a drug deal. Though he knows better, he... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#3

Fargo (1996)
94%

#3
Adjusted Score: 100374%
Critics Consensus: Violent, quirky, and darkly funny, Fargo delivers an original crime story and a wonderful performance by McDormand.
Synopsis: "Fargo" is a reality-based crime drama set in Minnesota in 1987. Jerry Lundegaard (William H. Macy) is a car salesman... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#2

Blood Simple (1984)
94%

#2
Adjusted Score: 102881%
Critics Consensus: Brutally violent and shockingly funny in equal measure, Blood Simple offers early evidence of the Coen Brothers' twisted sensibilities and filmmaking ingenuity.
Synopsis: "Blood Simple" was the first feature film from Joel and Ethan Coen. This is the newly restored and re-edited director's... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#1

True Grit (2010)
95%

#1
Adjusted Score: 105673%
Critics Consensus: Girded by strong performances from Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, and newcomer Hailee Steinfeld, and lifted by some of the Coens' most finely tuned, unaffected work, True Grit is a worthy companion to the Charles Portis book.
Synopsis: After an outlaw named Tom Chaney (Josh Brolin) murders her father, feisty 14-year-old farm girl Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld) hires... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

Crazy Heart

(Photo by Fox Searchlight/courtesy Everett Collection. Thumbnail: Gramercy Pictures.)

All Jeff Bridges Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Jeff Bridges, son of Lloyd, struck it big with his first major role in 1971’s The Last Picture Show, where he was Oscar-nominated for his role as a graduating high school student in a prospectless Texas town. Afterwards, Bridges became a steady, comforting fixture in American cinema, appearing across action-thrillers (Thunderbolt & Lightfoot, Cutter’s Way), big-budget remakes (1975’s King Kong, The Vanishing), magnificent bombs (Heaven’s Gate), science-fiction (TRON, Starman), theater adaptations (The Iceman Cometh), and additional fine-tuned dramas (The Fisher King).

Bridges’ eclectic career choices primed him to become a beloved Hollywood statesman, all but confirmed with 1998’s The Big Lebowski. Wearing his personal wardrobe on-screen (including the jelly sandals) and directed by the Coen brothers, Bridges as Jeff “The Dude” Lebowski in a state of perpetual befuddled zen has rooted himself into pop culture with his generation-defining comedy performance. And Lebowski has only paved the way for later milestones and hits, including True Grit, Hell or High Water, and a take-home Best Actor Oscar for Crazy Heart, his big win out of seven nominations overall.

And now we do believe you shall abide as we take a trip through all Jeff Bridges movies, ranked by Tomatometer.

#62
#62
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Matt Scudder (Jeff Bridges) is a depressed and hard-drinking Los Angeles cop troubled by a shooting that occurred in the... [More]
Directed By: Hal Ashby

#61

R.I.P.D. (2013)
12%

#61
Adjusted Score: 15699%
Critics Consensus: It has its moments -- most of them courtesy of Jeff Bridges' rootin' tootin' performance as an undead Wild West sheriff -- but R.I.P.D. is ultimately too dim-witted and formulaic to satisfy.
Synopsis: Veteran lawman Roy Pulsifer (Jeff Bridges) works for the R.I.P.D., a legendary police force charged with finding monstrous spirits who... [More]
Directed By: Robert Schwentke

#60

Seventh Son (2014)
12%

#60
Adjusted Score: 16423%
Critics Consensus: Seventh Son squanders an excellent cast and some strange storyline ingredients, leaving audiences with one disappointingly dull fantasy adventure.
Synopsis: Centuries ago, a supernatural champion named Master Gregory (Jeff Bridges) defeated Mother Malkin (Julianne Moore), a malevolent witch. Now, she... [More]
Directed By: Sergei Bodrov

#59
#59
Adjusted Score: 26220%
Critics Consensus: Unintelligible and self-indulgent Bob Dylan vehicle.
Synopsis: A nation wracked with civil war and social unrest is looking forward to a giant charity concert, organized by deceptive... [More]
Directed By: Larry Charles

#58

Simpatico (1999)
25%

#58
Adjusted Score: 26138%
Critics Consensus: Critics say Simpatico's lengthy plot is too unfocused; the movie becomes confusing and tedious to watch.
Synopsis: Carter receives a collect call from Vinnie, and a dark event from the past threatens to destroy his current success.... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Warchus

#57

The Open Road (2009)
29%

#57
Adjusted Score: 8918%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: While playing minor league baseball in Texas, Carlton Garrett (Justin Timberlake) receives word from his grandfather (Harry Dean Stanton) that... [More]
Directed By: Michael Meredith

#56

Tideland (2005)
30%

#56
Adjusted Score: 31686%
Critics Consensus: Tideland is a disturbing, and mostly unwatchable effort from Terry Gilliam.
Synopsis: Little Jeliza-Rose (Jodelle Ferland) has a very warped childhood. Her parents (Jeff Bridges, Jennifer Tilly) are both drug addicts, and... [More]
Directed By: Terry Gilliam

#55

Stick It (2006)
31%

#55
Adjusted Score: 34716%
Critics Consensus: Director Jessica Bendinger is unable to transfer her winning Bring It On formula to the world of gymnastics, despite Missy Peregrym's strong lead performance.
Synopsis: Haley (Missy Peregrym) is a naturally gifted athlete but, with her social behavior, the teen seems intent on squandering her... [More]
Directed By: Jessica Bendinger

#54
Adjusted Score: 38146%
Critics Consensus: Narratively messy and cloying, The Only Living Boy in New York is a romantic trifle that audiences won't want to give a second date.
Synopsis: After graduating from college and moving into an apartment, young Thomas Webb befriends an alcoholic neighbor who dispenses worldly wisdom... [More]
Directed By: Marc Webb

#53

The Giver (2014)
35%

#53
Adjusted Score: 40988%
Critics Consensus: Phillip Noyce directs The Giver with visual grace, but the movie doesn't dig deep enough into the classic source material's thought-provoking ideas.
Synopsis: Jonas (Brenton Thwaites) lives in a seemingly idyllic world of conformity and contentment. When he begins to spend time with... [More]
Directed By: Phillip Noyce

#52
Adjusted Score: 40066%
Critics Consensus: A decent performance from Pegg in a disappointing film. Neither sharp nor satirical, Weide's adaptation relies too heavily on slapstick, and misses the point of the source material in the process.
Synopsis: Sidney Young is a down-on-his-luck journalist. Thanks to a stint involving a pig and a glitzy awards ceremony, Sidney turns... [More]
Directed By: Robert Weide

#51

Blown Away (1994)
38%

#51
Adjusted Score: 35798%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: After staging a particularly gory jailbreak, Irish Republican Army agent Ryan Gaerity (Tommy Lee Jones) makes his way to Boston... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Hopkins

#50

Wild Bill (1995)
42%

#50
Adjusted Score: 43019%
Critics Consensus: Crowded with talent on either side of the camera, Wild Bill shoots itself in the foot with a surprisingly muddled take on the story of the titular folk hero.
Synopsis: Gunfighter Wild Bill Hickok (Jeff Bridges) travels the frontier, gaining fame and enemies in roughly equal measure. He sometimes meets... [More]
Directed By: Walter Hill

#49

K-PAX (2001)
42%

#49
Adjusted Score: 47370%
Critics Consensus: For those who have seen One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest or Starman, K-Pax may not hold anything new. The movie works best as a showcase for Kevin Spacey and Jeff Bridges.
Synopsis: Tells the story of a mysterious patient (Kevin Spacey) at a mental hospital who claims to be from a distant... [More]
Directed By: Iain Softley

#48

Nadine (1987)
45%

#48
Adjusted Score: 45056%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Hairdresser Nadine Hightower (Kim Basinger) wants to retrieve the risqué photos she once posed for, but when she visits the... [More]
Directed By: Robert Benton

#47

The Vanishing (1993)
49%

#47
Adjusted Score: 50585%
Critics Consensus: The Vanishing copies the form of its pulse-pounding predecessor but loses much of its thrilling function along the way, leaving American audiences with one more rote remake.
Synopsis: Barney (Jeff Bridges) is a disturbed man intent on abducting a woman. After numerous failed attempts, he manages to kidnap... [More]
Directed By: George Sluizer

#46
#46
Adjusted Score: 11780%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: In need of money for his upcoming wedding, Lenny (Jon Abrahams) agrees to help Rick (Peter Greene) with some work.... [More]
Directed By: Dominique Forma

#45
Adjusted Score: 58922%
Critics Consensus: Though The Men Who Stare at Goats is a mostly entertaining, farcical glimpse of men at war, some may find its satire and dark humor less than edgy.
Synopsis: Struggling reporter Bob Wilton (Ewan McGregor) gets the scoop of a lifetime when he meets Lyn Cassady (George Clooney), who... [More]
Directed By: Grant Heslov

#44

Tron: Legacy (2010)
51%

#44
Adjusted Score: 59485%
Critics Consensus: Tron Legacy boasts dazzling visuals, but its human characters and story get lost amidst its state-of-the-art production design.
Synopsis: Sam (Garrett Hedlund), the son of famous video-game developer Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges), has been haunted for a long time... [More]
Directed By: Joseph Kosinski

#43
Adjusted Score: 73259%
Critics Consensus: Kingsman: The Golden Circle offers more of everything that made its predecessor so much fun, but lacks the original's wild creative spark.
Synopsis: With their headquarters destroyed and the world held hostage, members of Kingsman find new allies when they discover a spy... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Vaughn

#42

The Muse (1999)
53%

#42
Adjusted Score: 55011%
Critics Consensus: Despite quirky and original writing, the subject matter feels too removed to produce laughs.
Synopsis: Screenwriter Steven Phillips (Albert Brooks) seemingly has it all, including an Academy Award for his latest script. But he's hit... [More]
Directed By: Albert Brooks

#41
#41
Adjusted Score: 26992%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A Manhattan psychiatrist (Jeff Bridges) shuttles from his second wife (Alice Krige) to his ex-wife (Farrah Fawcett), with children in... [More]
Directed By: Alan J. Pakula

#40

Texasville (1990)
55%

#40
Adjusted Score: 54913%
Critics Consensus: An impressive array of talent on either side of the camera helps compensate for Texasville's inability to live up to its classic predecessor, but it isn't quite enough.
Synopsis: 1950s lovers (Jeff Bridges, Cybill Shepherd) meet in the 1980s in this sequel to "The Last Picture Show."... [More]
Directed By: Peter Bogdanovich

#39
#39
Adjusted Score: 55362%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Comic tale about the relationship between a frumpy college lecturer specializing in romantic literature and a fellow professor who wants... [More]
Directed By: Barbra Streisand

#38

King Kong (1976)
55%

#38
Adjusted Score: 57937%
Critics Consensus: King Kong represents a significant visual upgrade over the original, but falls short of its classic predecessor in virtually every other respect.
Synopsis: When a research ship is sent to explore an island thought to be rich in oil, paleontologist Jack Prescott (Jeff... [More]
Directed By: John Guillermin

#37

White Squall (1996)
58%

#37
Adjusted Score: 59577%
Critics Consensus: Though it gets occasionally bogged down by touchy-feely sentiment, White Squall benefits greatly from Jeff Bridges' assured lead performance and Ridley Scott's visceral, exciting direction.
Synopsis: In 1960, a hardy group of prep school students boards an old-fashioned sailing ship. With Capt. Christopher Sheldon (Jeff Bridges)... [More]
Directed By: Ridley Scott

#36

Heaven's Gate (1980)
59%

#36
Adjusted Score: 61920%
Critics Consensus: Heaven's Gate contains too many ideas and striking spectacle to be a disaster, but this western buckles under the weight of its own sprawl.
Synopsis: Harvard graduate James Averill (Kris Kristofferson) is the sheriff of prosperous Jackson County, Wyo., when a battle erupts between the... [More]
Directed By: Michael Cimino

#35
#35
Adjusted Score: 64060%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Failed actress Alex Sternbergen (Jane Fonda) wakes up hungover one morning in an apartment she does not recognize, unable to... [More]
Directed By: Sidney Lumet

#34

Arlington Road (1999)
63%

#34
Adjusted Score: 66730%
Critics Consensus: A suspenseful thriller led by strong cast performances built around a somewhat implausible story.
Synopsis: Widowed when his FBI agent wife is killed by an extremist group, college professor Michael Faraday (Jeff Bridges) becomes obsessed... [More]
Directed By: Mark Pellington

#33

Against All Odds (1984)
64%

#33
Adjusted Score: 64331%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Having been cut from his professional football team, down-and-out athlete Terry Brogan (Jeff Bridges) is in desperate need of money.... [More]
Directed By: Taylor Hackford

#32

Stay Hungry (1976)
67%

#32
Adjusted Score: 66681%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A dishonest businessman asks rich layabout Craig Blake (Jeff Bridges) to help him buy a gym, which will be demolished... [More]
Directed By: Bob Rafelson

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 70951%
Critics Consensus: Though uneven in tone, this is one of the better adaptations of John Irving's novels, with Jeff Bridges giving one of his best performances.
Synopsis: The lives of Ted (Jeff Bridges) and Marion Cole (Kim Basinger) are thrown into disarray when their two adolescent sons... [More]
Directed By: Tod Williams

#30

Rancho Deluxe (1975)
70%

#30
Adjusted Score: 71169%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Cattle rustlers Jack McKee (Jeff Bridges) and Cecil Colson (Sam Waterston) steadily steal cows from wealthy rancher John Brown (Clifton... [More]
Directed By: Frank Perry

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 23674%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Junior Jackson (Jeff Bridges) is a Southern boy with a penchant for driving too fast along his native North Carolina... [More]
Directed By: Lamont Johnson

#28

Tron (1982)
71%

#28
Adjusted Score: 76697%
Critics Consensus: Though perhaps not as strong dramatically as it is technologically, TRON is an original and visually stunning piece of science fiction that represents a landmark work in the history of computer animation.
Synopsis: When talented computer engineer Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges) finds out that Ed Dillinger (David Warner), an executive at his company,... [More]
Directed By: Steven Lisberger

#27

The Last Unicorn (1982)
73%

#27
Adjusted Score: 73232%
Critics Consensus: The Last Unicorn lacks the fluid animation to truly sparkle as an animated epic, but offbeat characters and an affecting story make it one of a kind for the true believers.
Synopsis: In this animated musical, the villainous King Haggard (Christopher Lee) plots to destroy all the world's unicorns. When a young... [More]

#26
Adjusted Score: 89448%
Critics Consensus: Smart, stylish, and packed with solid performances, Bad Times at the El Royale delivers pure popcorn fun with the salty tang of social subtext.
Synopsis: The El Royale is run-down hotel that sits on the border between California and Nevada. It soon becomes a seedy... [More]
Directed By: Drew Goddard

#25

The Contender (2000)
76%

#25
Adjusted Score: 80805%
Critics Consensus: The Contender wears its political heart on its sleeve, but strong performances and a solid screenplay help the end result add up to a gripping drama from either side of the aisle.
Synopsis: When the sitting Vice President dies, Senator Laine Hanson is chosen by the President to be the first woman to... [More]
Directed By: Rod Lurie

#24

Seabiscuit (2003)
77%

#24
Adjusted Score: 84128%
Critics Consensus: A life-affirming, if saccharine, epic treatment of a spirit-lifting figure in sports history.
Synopsis: In the midst of the Great Depression, a businessman (Jeff Bridges) coping with the tragic death of his son, a... [More]
Directed By: Gary Ross

#23

Surf's Up (2007)
79%

#23
Adjusted Score: 84037%
Critics Consensus: Surf's Up is a laid back, visually stunning animated movie that brings a fresh twist to some familiar conventions. Its witty mockumentary format is fun and inventive, and the CGI is breathtakingly realistic.
Synopsis: Surfing means everything to teenage penguin Cody Maverick (Shia LaBeouf). Followed by a documentary film crew, he leaves his home... [More]
Directed By: Ash Brannon, Chris Buck

#22

American Heart (1992)
80%

#22
Adjusted Score: 80453%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: This unflinching drama tells the story of recently released ex-convict Jack Kelson (Jeff Bridges) as he struggles to begin a... [More]
Directed By: Martin Bell

#21

Jagged Edge (1985)
81%

#21
Adjusted Score: 82021%
Critics Consensus: Coolly performed and suspenseful, Jagged Edge is a satisfying enough potboiler that most audiences won't mind if the twists don't quite add up.
Synopsis: Lawyer Teddy Barnes reluctantly takes up the case of publisher Jack Forrester, who is accused of murdering his wife for... [More]
Directed By: Richard Marquand

#20
Adjusted Score: 85026%
Critics Consensus: Though it may not be as comprehensive as some would like, Francis Ford Coppola's cheerful biopic of the failed automotive designer features sparkling direction and a strong central performance from Jeff Bridges.
Synopsis: Obsessed with cars since childhood, inventor Preston Tucker (Jeff Bridges) has his first successful auto design partnership in the 1930s... [More]
Directed By: Francis Ford Coppola

#19

The Big Lebowski (1998)
83%

#19
Adjusted Score: 89049%
Critics Consensus: Typically stunning visuals and sharp dialogue from the Coen Brothers, brought to life with strong performances from Goodman and Bridges.
Synopsis: Jeff Bridges plays Jeff Lebowski who insists on being called "the Dude," a laid-back, easygoing burnout who happens to have... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#18

The Fisher King (1991)
84%

#18
Adjusted Score: 87557%
Critics Consensus: An odd but affecting mixture of drama, comedy and fantasy, The Fisher King manages to balance moving performances from Robin Williams and Jeff Bridges with director Terry Gilliam's typically askew universe.
Synopsis: After shock jock Jack Lucas (Jeff Bridges) inadvertently provokes a caller into murdering a group of innocent people in a... [More]
Directed By: Terry Gilliam

#17

Starman (1984)
85%

#17
Adjusted Score: 86137%
Critics Consensus: What initially begins as sci-fi transforms into a surprisingly sweet, offbeat drama, courtesy of John Carpenter's careful direction.
Synopsis: Answering a NASA message intended for aliens, a space being tries to contact mankind, but an American missile grounds his... [More]
Directed By: John Carpenter

#16

Fearless (1993)
85%

#16
Adjusted Score: 87974%
Critics Consensus: This underrated gem from director Peter Weir features an outstanding performance from Jeff Bridges as a man dealing with profound grief.
Synopsis: When Max Klein (Jeff Bridges) survives a plane crash that kills many others, his last-minute epiphanies bring him a sense... [More]
Directed By: Peter Weir

#15

Bad Company (1972)
86%

#15
Adjusted Score: 86612%
Critics Consensus: Well-acted and pleasantly gritty, Bad Company is one of the more authentic Westerns of its era -- and an auspicious debut for director Robert Benton.
Synopsis: Out of the frying pan and into the fire: Civil War draft dodger Drew Dixon (Barry Brown) avoids the horrors... [More]
Directed By: Robert Benton

#14
#14
Adjusted Score: 89613%
Critics Consensus: This likable buddy/road picture deftly mixes action and comedy, and features excellent work from stars Clint Eastwood and Jeff Bridges and first-time director Michael Cimino.
Synopsis: While stealing a car, free-spirited drifter Lightfoot (Jeff Bridges) crosses paths with legendary thief Thunderbolt (Clint Eastwood) in the midst... [More]
Directed By: Michael Cimino

#13

Only the Brave (2017)
87%

#13
Adjusted Score: 98875%
Critics Consensus: Only the Brave's impressive veteran cast and affecting fact-based story add up to a no-frills drama that's just as stolidly powerful as the real-life heroes it honors.
Synopsis: Through hope, determination, sacrifice and the drive to protect families and communities, the Granite Mountain Hotshots become one of the... [More]
Directed By: Joseph Kosinski

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 31626%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: During the 1930s, endearingly naïve Lewis Tater (Jeff Bridges) aspires to be the next great American Western writer. But when... [More]
Directed By: Howard Zieff

#11

Winter Kills (1979)
88%

#11
Adjusted Score: 88730%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Inspired by the conspiracy theories surrounding John F. Kennedy's assassination, this comic thriller follows Nick Kegan (Jeff Bridges), the younger... [More]
Directed By: William Richert

#10

Crazy Heart (2009)
90%

#10
Adjusted Score: 96999%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a captivating performance from Jeff Bridges, Crazy Heart transcends its overly familiar origins and finds new meaning in an old story.
Synopsis: With too many years of hazy days and boozy nights,former country-music legend Bad Blake (Jeff Bridges) is reduced to playing... [More]
Directed By: Scott Cooper

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 90221%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Based on the play by Eugene O'Neill, this drama begins as the sad-sack patrons of a New York City bar... [More]
Directed By: John Frankenheimer

#8

Cutter's Way (1981)
91%

#8
Adjusted Score: 92199%
Critics Consensus: A suitably cynical neo-noir that echoes the disillusionment of its era, Cutter's Way relies on character-driven drama further elevated by the work of an outstanding cast.
Synopsis: Best friends Richard Bone (Jeff Bridges) and Alex Cutter (John Heard) are two middle-class guys living in an upper-class town.... [More]
Directed By: Ivan Passer

#7
#7
Adjusted Score: 97517%
Critics Consensus: Beautifully animated and faithful to the spirit of its classic source material, The Little Prince is a family-friendly treat that anchors thrilling visuals with a satisfying story.
Synopsis: The Aviator introduces a girl to a world where she rediscovers her childhood and learns that it's human connections that... [More]
Directed By: Mark Osborne

#6

Iron Man (2008)
94%

#6
Adjusted Score: 104568%
Critics Consensus: Powered by Robert Downey Jr.'s vibrant charm, Iron Man turbo-charges the superhero genre with a deft intelligence and infectious sense of fun.
Synopsis: A billionaire industrialist and genius inventor, Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.), is conducting weapons tests overseas, but terrorists kidnap him... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#5

True Grit (2010)
95%

#5
Adjusted Score: 105673%
Critics Consensus: Girded by strong performances from Jeff Bridges, Matt Damon, and newcomer Hailee Steinfeld, and lifted by some of the Coens' most finely tuned, unaffected work, True Grit is a worthy companion to the Charles Portis book.
Synopsis: After an outlaw named Tom Chaney (Josh Brolin) murders her father, feisty 14-year-old farm girl Mattie Ross (Hailee Steinfeld) hires... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#4
#4
Adjusted Score: 97716%
Critics Consensus: Its story is nothing special, but The Fabulous Baker Boys glows beneath luminous performances from its perfectly cast stars.
Synopsis: Frank (Beau Bridges) and Jack Baker (Jeff Bridges) are brothers who have performed together in a small but successful piano... [More]
Directed By: Steve Kloves

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 114020%
Critics Consensus: Hell or High Water offers a solidly crafted, well-acted Western heist thriller that eschews mindless gunplay in favor of confident pacing and full-bodied characters.
Synopsis: Toby is a divorced father who's trying to make a better life for his son. His brother Tanner is an... [More]
Directed By: David Mackenzie

#2

Fat City (1972)
100%

#2
Adjusted Score: 102110%
Critics Consensus: Fat City is a bleak, mordant, slice of life boxing drama that doesn't pull its punches.
Synopsis: Washed-up boxer Tully (Stacy Keach) is inspired to restart his career after seeing potential in a teenager, Ernie (Jeff Bridges),... [More]
Directed By: John Huston

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 106111%
Critics Consensus: Making excellent use of its period and setting, Peter Bogdanovich's small town coming-of-age story is a sad but moving classic filled with impressive performances.
Synopsis: High school seniors and best friends, Sonny (Timothy Bottoms) and Duane (Jeff Bridges), live in a dying Texas town. The... [More]
Directed By: Peter Bogdanovich

150 Essential Comedy Movies To Watch Now

What makes a comedy a classic? Something that floats on the changing tides of time and taste, remaining relevant – and hilarious? It probably takes more than a football to the groin or a juiced-up fart on the audio track. (Though we’re not not saying those can sometimes be the pinnacle of professional-grade jokes.) We don’t have the answer, but with our Essential list assembling 150 of the best comedies ever made, we’re getting closer to laugh-out-loud enlightenment than humanly thought possible. We’re melting minds, splitting sides, and slapping knees here.

To that end, we’ve included all forms of the comedy movie. From slapstick (Dumb & Dumber, It’s a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World) to silent (The General, Modern Times). Rom-coms (Moonstruck, Annie Hall) to screwball (It Happened One Night, Bringing Up Baby). Parody (Airplane!, Scary Movie) to postmodern (Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Galaxy Quest). These 150 movies will take you to college (Animal House), past some fan favorites (Step Brothers, Super Troopers), and all around the globe (Kung Fu Hustle, Amelie).

There’s no minimum review count for this list. We opened it up to movies of yesteryear, which typically don’t get as many reviews as their modern comedy rivals. Many of these inducted films have high Tomatometer scores and are Certified Fresh, but the Tomatometer was not our only guide. Some comedies that stand the test of time did not necessarily pass the critical test on release, and we’re honoring those here. These are not the best-reviewed comedy films ever released, but they are the essential comedies, movies that broke the Laugh-O-Meter – we’ll totally trademark that soon, so dibs – shaped the genre, molded generations, and which audiences return to time and again, to lift the spirits.

And with our most recent updates, we’ve added the latest and greatest in new funny movies (Booksmart, Blockers, Game Night), and some more comedy classics that have definitely earned their place in the pantheon of guffaws (Four Weddings and a Funeral, Harold & Maude).

Ready to whip out your funny bone and bash it violently on the nearest flat surface? Then you’re ready for our list of the best comedy movies ever: Rotten Tomatoes’ 150 Essential Comedies!

#150

Hot Rod (2007)
39%

#150
Adjusted Score: 42697%
Critics Consensus: Hot Rod has brazen silliness and a few humorous set pieces on its side, but it's far too inconsistent to satisfy all but the least demanding slapstick lovers.
Synopsis: For Rod Kimball (Andy Samberg), performing stunts is a way of life, even though he is rather accident-prone. Poor Rod... [More]
Directed By: Akiva Schaffer

#149

Game Night (2018)
85%

#149
Adjusted Score: 99575%
Critics Consensus: With a talented cast turned loose on a loaded premise -- and a sharp script loaded with dark comedy and unexpected twists -- Game Night might be more fun than the real thing.
Synopsis: Max and Annie's weekly game night gets kicked up a notch when Max's brother Brooks arranges a murder mystery party... [More]

#148
#148
Adjusted Score: 53225%
Critics Consensus: First Wives Club is headlined by a trio of comedic dynamos, but the script lets them down with tepid plotting and a fatal lack of satirical bite.
Synopsis: Despondent over the marriage of her ex-husband to a younger woman, a middle-aged divorcée plunges to her death from her... [More]
Directed By: Hugh Wilson

#147

Scary Movie (2000)
52%

#147
Adjusted Score: 56184%
Critics Consensus: Critics say Scary Movie overloads on crudity and grossness to get its laughs.
Synopsis: Defying the very notion of good taste, Scary Movie out-parodies the pop culture parodies with a no-holds barred assault on... [More]
Directed By: Keenen Ivory Wayans

#146

Blockers (2018)
84%

#146
Adjusted Score: 96713%
Critics Consensus: Blockers puts a gender-swapped spin on the teen sex comedy -- one elevated by strong performances, a smartly funny script, and a surprisingly enlightened perspective.
Synopsis: Julie, Kayla and Sam are three high school seniors who make a pact to lose their virginity on prom night.... [More]
Directed By: Kay Cannon

#145

The Bank Dick (1940)
100%

#145
Adjusted Score: 102075%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Egbert Sousé (W.C. Fields) becomes an unexpected hero when a bank robber falls over a bench he's occupying. Now considered... [More]
Directed By: Edward F. Cline

#144

Mrs. Doubtfire (1993)
72%

#144
Adjusted Score: 75136%
Critics Consensus: On paper, Mrs. Doubtfire might seem excessively broad or sentimental, but Robin Williams shines so brightly in the title role that the end result is difficult to resist.
Synopsis: Troubled that he has little access to his children, divorced Daniel Hillard (Robin Williams) hatches an elaborate plan. With help... [More]
Directed By: Chris Columbus

#143

Pitch Perfect (2012)
81%

#143
Adjusted Score: 86241%
Critics Consensus: Pitch Perfect's plot is formulaic, but the performances are excellent and the musical numbers are toe-tapping as well.
Synopsis: College student Beca (Anna Kendrick) knows she does not want to be part of a clique, but that's exactly where... [More]
Directed By: Jason Moore

#142

Four Lions (2009)
83%

#142
Adjusted Score: 86988%
Critics Consensus: Its premise suggests brazenly tasteless humor, but Four Lions is actually a smart, pitch-black comedy that carries the unmistakable ring of truth.
Synopsis: A group of young Muslim men living in Sheffield decide to wage jihad, and they hatch an inept plan to... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Morris

#141

Safety Last (1923)
97%

#141
Adjusted Score: 102844%
Critics Consensus: Persuasive enough to give audiences acrophobia when they aren't laughing at Harold Lloyd's antics, Safety Last! is a marvel of visual effects and slapstick comedy.
Synopsis: A boy (Harold Lloyd) moves to New York City to make enough money to support his loving girlfriend (Mildred Davis),... [More]

#140

Big (1988)
97%

#140
Adjusted Score: 102803%
Critics Consensus: Refreshingly sweet and undeniably funny, Big is a showcase for Tom Hanks, who dives into his role and infuses it with charm and surprising poignancy.
Synopsis: After a wish turns 12-year-old Josh Baskin (David Moscow) into a 30-year-old man (Tom Hanks), he heads to New York... [More]
Directed By: Penny Marshall

#139
#139
Adjusted Score: 40409%
Critics Consensus: Wet Hot American Summer's incredibly talented cast is too often outmatched by a deeply silly script that misses its targets at least as often as it skewers them.
Synopsis: Set on the last day of camp, in the hot summer of 1981, "Wet Hot American Summer" follows a group... [More]
Directed By: David Wain

#138

Barbershop (2002)
83%

#138
Adjusted Score: 85777%
Critics Consensus: Besides bringing on the laughs, Barbershop displays a big heart and demonstrates the value of community.
Synopsis: A smart comedy about a day in the life of a barbershop on the south side of Chicago. Calvin (Ice... [More]
Directed By: Tim Story

#137
#137
Adjusted Score: 96009%
Critics Consensus: Featuring an excellent ensemble cast, a precise feel for the 1970s, and a killer soundtrack, Dazed and Confused is a funny, affectionate, and clear-eyed look at high school life.
Synopsis: This coming-of-age film follows the mayhem of group of rowdy teenagers in Austin, Texas, celebrating the last day of high... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#136
#136
Adjusted Score: 52830%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's twitchy antics and gross-out humor are on full, bombastic display in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, which is great news for fans of his particular brand of comedy but likely unsatisfying for anyone else.
Synopsis: When the dolphin mascot of Miami's NFL team is abducted, Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey), a zany private investigator who specializes... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#135

Idiocracy (2006)
73%

#135
Adjusted Score: 73429%
Critics Consensus: Frustratingly uneven yet enjoyable overall, Idiocracy skewers society's devolution with an amiably goofy yet deceptively barbed wit.
Synopsis: In 2005, average in every way private Joe Bowers (Luke Wilson) is selected to take part in a secret military... [More]
Directed By: Mike Judge

#134
#134
Adjusted Score: 83185%
Critics Consensus: Team America will either offend you or leave you in stitches. It'll probably do both.
Synopsis: When North Korean ruler Kim Jong-il (Trey Parker) orchestrates a global terrorist plot, it's up to the heavily armed marionettes... [More]
Directed By: Trey Parker, Matt Stone

#133
#133
Adjusted Score: 86591%
Critics Consensus: A trite but refreshing and comical spin on nature of love.
Synopsis: Jessica (Jennifer Westfeldt) is at the end of her emotional rope. She happens upon an intriguing personal ad, whose only... [More]

#132

Trainwreck (2015)
84%

#132
Adjusted Score: 95000%
Critics Consensus: Trainwreck drags commitment out of all but the most rom-com-phobic filmgoers with sharp humor, relatable characters, and hilarious work from Amy Schumer.
Synopsis: Ever since her father drilled into her head that monogamy isn't realistic, magazine writer Amy (Amy Schumer) has made promiscuity... [More]
Directed By: Judd Apatow

#131
#131
Adjusted Score: 89484%
Critics Consensus: Pee-Wee's Big Adventure brings Paul Reubens' famous character to the big screen intact, along with enough inspired silliness to dazzle children of all ages.
Synopsis: Pee-wee Herman (Paul Reubens), an eccentric child-like man, loves his red bicycle and will not sell it to his envious... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#130

Tommy Boy (1995)
42%

#130
Adjusted Score: 43340%
Critics Consensus: Though it benefits from the comic charms of its two leads, Tommy Boy too often feels like a familiar sketch stretched thin.
Synopsis: After his beloved father (Brian Dennehy) dies, dimwitted Tommy Callahan (Chris Farley) inherits a near-bankrupt automobile parts factory in Sandusky,... [More]
Directed By: Peter Segal

#129

Life (1999)
51%

#129
Adjusted Score: 51828%
Critics Consensus: Entertaining if not over-the-top humor from a solid comic duo provides plenty of laughs.
Synopsis: During Prohibition, loudmouth Harlem grifter Ray (Eddie Murphy) and the no-nonsense Claude (Martin Lawrence) team up on a bootlegging mission... [More]
Directed By: Ted Demme

#128

Zoolander (2001)
64%

#128
Adjusted Score: 68325%
Critics Consensus: A wacky satire on the fashion industry, Zoolander is one of those deliberately dumb comedies that can deliver genuine laughs.
Synopsis: Propelled to the top of the fashion world by a photogenic gaze he calls "Blue Steel," dimwitted male model Derek... [More]
Directed By: Ben Stiller

#127

Super Troopers (2001)
35%

#127
Adjusted Score: 36375%
Critics Consensus: A more-miss -than-hit affair, Super Troopers will most likely appeal to those looking for something silly.
Synopsis: Always looking for action, five over-enthusiastic but under-stimulated Vermont State Troopers raise hell on the highway, keeping motorists anxiously looking... [More]
Directed By: Jay Chandrasekhar

#126

Happy Gilmore (1996)
61%

#126
Adjusted Score: 63865%
Critics Consensus: Those who enjoy Adam Sandler's schtick will find plenty to love in this gleefully juvenile take on professional golf; those who don't, however, will find it unfunny and forgettable.
Synopsis: All Happy Gilmore (Adam Sandler) has ever wanted is to be a professional hockey player. But he soon discovers he... [More]
Directed By: Dennis Dugan

#125

21 Jump Street (2012)
85%

#125
Adjusted Score: 93633%
Critics Consensus: A smart, affectionate satire of '80s nostalgia and teen movie tropes, 21 Jump Street offers rowdy mainstream comedy with a surprisingly satisfying bite.
Synopsis: When cops Schmidt (Jonah Hill) and Jenko (Channing Tatum) join the secret Jump Street unit, they use their youthful appearances... [More]

#124
Adjusted Score: 85237%
Critics Consensus: Keanu Reeves and Alex Winter are just charming, goofy, and silly enough to make this fluffy time-travel Adventure work.
Synopsis: Bill (Alex Winter) and Ted (Keanu Reeves) are high school buddies starting a band. However, they are about to fail... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Herek

#123

Broadcast News (1987)
98%

#123
Adjusted Score: 102089%
Critics Consensus: Blockbuster dramatist James L. Brooks delivers with Broadcast News, fully entertaining with deft, deep characterization.
Synopsis: Intelligent satire of American television news. A highly strung news producer finds herself strangely attracted to a vapid anchorman even... [More]
Directed By: James L. Brooks

#122

Lost in America (1985)
97%

#122
Adjusted Score: 99606%
Critics Consensus: A satire of the American fantasy of leaving it all behind, Lost in America features some of Albert Brooks' best, most consistent writing and cultural jabs.
Synopsis: After being snubbed at his advertising job, Los Angeles yuppie David Howard (Albert Brooks) convinces his wife, Linda (Julie Hagerty),... [More]
Directed By: Albert Brooks

#121

In the Loop (2009)
94%

#121
Adjusted Score: 99598%
Critics Consensus: In the Loop is an uncommonly funny political satire that blends Dr. Strangelove with Spinal Tap for the Iraq war era.
Synopsis: During an interview, British Cabinet Minister Simon Foster (Tom Hollander) delivers an off-the-cuff remark that war in the Middle East... [More]
Directed By: Armando Iannucci

#120
#120
Adjusted Score: 112581%
Critics Consensus: With a terrific cast and a surfeit of visual razzle dazzle, Crazy Rich Asians takes a satisfying step forward for screen representation while deftly drawing inspiration from the classic -- and still effective -- rom-com formula.
Synopsis: Rachel Chu is happy to accompany her longtime boyfriend, Nick, to his best friend's wedding in Singapore. She's also surprised... [More]
Directed By: Jon M. Chu

#119

Shaolin Soccer (2001)
90%

#119
Adjusted Score: 93172%
Critics Consensus: The plot is utterly ridiculous, and the soccer in the movie is unlike any ever played anywhere on Earth, but watching Shaolin Soccer, you will probably find it impossible to care.
Synopsis: All his life, an ordinary young man (Stephen Chow) has been treated like dirt. Still, he's never given up believing... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Chow, Lik-Chi Lee

#118

Top Five (2014)
86%

#118
Adjusted Score: 92785%
Critics Consensus: As smart, funny, and trenchant as writer-director-star Chris Rock's best standup work, Top Five is a career highlight for its creator -- and one of the comedy standouts of 2014.
Synopsis: Though he began in stand-up comedy, Andre Allen (Chris Rock) hit the big-time as the star of a trilogy of... [More]
Directed By: Chris Rock

#117

Road to Morocco (1942)
86%

#117
Adjusted Score: 85879%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Starving vagabond Jeff (Bing Crosby) sells best friend Orville (Bob Hope) into slavery in a Moroccan marketplace to buy food.... [More]
Directed By: David Butler

#116

Up in Smoke (1978)
47%

#116
Adjusted Score: 48204%
Critics Consensus: Oft-quoted but undeniably flawed, Up In Smoke is a seminal piece of stoner cinema thanks to the likability of its two counterculture icons.
Synopsis: An unemployed pot-smoking slacker and amateur drummer, Anthony Stoner (Tommy Chong) ditches his strict parents and hits the road, eventually... [More]
Directed By: Lou Adler

#115
#115
Adjusted Score: 92444%
Critics Consensus: Steve Carell's first star turn scores big with a tender treatment of its titular underdog, using raunchy but realistically funny comedy to connect with adult audiences.
Synopsis: Andy Stitzer (Steve Carell) is an amiable single guy who works at a big-box store. Living alone, 40-year-old Andy spends... [More]
Directed By: Judd Apatow

#114
#114
Adjusted Score: 104614%
Critics Consensus: Typically stylish but deceptively thoughtful, The Grand Budapest Hotel finds Wes Anderson once again using ornate visual environments to explore deeply emotional ideas.
Synopsis: In the 1930s, the Grand Budapest Hotel is a popular European ski resort, presided over by concierge Gustave H. (Ralph... [More]
Directed By: Wes Anderson

#113

In Bruges (2008)
84%

#113
Adjusted Score: 91012%
Critics Consensus: Featuring witty dialogue and deft performances, In Bruges is an effective mix of dark comedy and crime thriller elements.
Synopsis: After a particularly difficult job, hit men Ray (Colin Farrell) and Ken (Brendan Gleeson) head to Belgium to hide out... [More]
Directed By: Martin McDonagh

#112

American Pie (1999)
61%

#112
Adjusted Score: 66633%
Critics Consensus: So embarrassing it's believable, American Pie succeeds in bringing back the teen movie genre.
Synopsis: A riotous and raunchy exploration of the most eagerly anticipated -- and most humiliating -- rite of adulthood, known as... [More]
Directed By: Paul Weitz

#111
#111
Adjusted Score: 100679%
Critics Consensus: Almodovar weaves together a magnificent tapestry of femininity with an affectionate wink to classics of theater and cinema in this poignant story of love, loss and compassion.
Synopsis: A Greek saying states that only women who have washed their eyes with tears can see clearly. This saying does... [More]
Directed By: Pedro Almodóvar

#110
#110
Adjusted Score: 88209%
Critics Consensus: With Burn After Reading, the Coen Brothers have crafted another clever comedy/thriller with an outlandish plot and memorable characters.
Synopsis: When a disc containing memoirs of a former CIA analyst (John Malkovich) falls into the hands of Linda Litzke (Frances... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen, Ethan Coen

#109

Legally Blonde (2001)
70%

#109
Adjusted Score: 75639%
Critics Consensus: Though the material is predictable and formulaic, Reese Witherspoon's funny, nuanced performance makes this movie better than it would have been otherwise.
Synopsis: Elle Woods (Reese Witherspoon) has it all. She wants nothing more than to be Mrs. Warner Huntington III. But there... [More]
Directed By: Robert Luketic

#108

Pride (2014)
92%

#108
Adjusted Score: 98186%
Critics Consensus: Earnest without being didactic and uplifting without stooping to sentimentality, Pride is a joyous crowd-pleaser that genuinely works.
Synopsis: Realizing that they share common foes in Margaret Thatcher, the police and the conservative press, London-based gays and lesbians lend... [More]
Directed By: Matthew Warchus

#107
Adjusted Score: 73376%
Critics Consensus: It's long, frantic, and stuffed to the gills with comic actors and set pieces -- and that's exactly its charm.
Synopsis: The story begins during a massive traffic jam, caused by reckless driver Smiler Grogan (Jimmy Durante), who, before kicking the... [More]
Directed By: Stanley Kramer

#106

Beetlejuice (1988)
85%

#106
Adjusted Score: 89469%
Critics Consensus: Brilliantly bizarre and overflowing with ideas, Beetlejuice offers some of Michael Keaton's most deliciously manic work - and creepy, funny fun for the whole family.
Synopsis: After Barbara (Geena Davis) and Adam Maitland (Alec Baldwin) die in a car accident, they find themselves stuck haunting their... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#105

House Party (1990)
93%

#105
Adjusted Score: 94522%
Critics Consensus: House Party is a light, entertaining teen comedy with an infectious energy.
Synopsis: Play's parents are out of town, and he's planning the house party to end all house parties. His best friend,... [More]
Directed By: Reginald Hudlin

#104

The Birdcage (1996)
81%

#104
Adjusted Score: 83794%
Critics Consensus: Mike Nichols wrangles agreeably amusing performances from Robin Williams and Nathan Lane in this fun, if not quite essential, remake of the French comedy La Cage aux Folles.
Synopsis: In this remake of the classic French farce "La Cage aux Folles," engaged couple Val Goldman (Dan Futterman) and Barbara... [More]
Directed By: Mike Nichols

#103

City Slickers (1991)
91%

#103
Adjusted Score: 92853%
Critics Consensus: With a supremely talented cast and just enough midlife drama to add weight to its wildly silly overtones, City Slickers uses universal themes to earn big laughs.
Synopsis: Every year, three friends take a vacation away from their wives. This year, henpecked Phil (Daniel Stern), newly married Ed... [More]
Directed By: Ron Underwood

#102

Stripes (1981)
88%

#102
Adjusted Score: 89921%
Critics Consensus: A raucous military comedy that features Bill Murray and his merry cohorts approaching the peak of their talents.
Synopsis: Hard-luck cabbie John Winger (Bill Murray) -- directionless after being fired from his job and dumped by his girlfriend --... [More]
Directed By: Ivan Reitman

#101
Adjusted Score: 92019%
Critics Consensus: A zany horror spoof that plays up and then plays into the best of Universal horror cliches.
Synopsis: In the first of Bud Abbott and Lou Costello's horror vehicles for Universal Pictures, the inimitable comic duo star as... [More]
Directed By: Charles Barton

#100

Clue (1985)
68%

#100
Adjusted Score: 69314%
Critics Consensus: A robust ensemble of game actors elevate Clue above its schematic source material, but this farce's reliance on novelty over organic wit makes its entertainment value a roll of the dice.
Synopsis: Based on the popular board game, this comedy begins at a dinner party hosted by Mr. Boddy, where he admits... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Lynn

#99

Spy (2015)
95%

#99
Adjusted Score: 104610%
Critics Consensus: Simultaneously broad and progressive, Spy offers further proof that Melissa McCarthy and writer-director Paul Feig bring out the best in one another -- and delivers scores of belly laughs along the way.
Synopsis: Despite having solid field training, CIA analyst Susan Cooper (Melissa McCarthy) has spent her entire career as a desk jockey,... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

#98
#98
Adjusted Score: 70553%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Chino (Jon Seda) isn't the best husband to Lisette (Lauren Vélez). His job as a bicycle messenger can barely support... [More]
Directed By: Darnell Martin

#97
#97
Adjusted Score: 85312%
Critics Consensus: Though there was controversy over the choice of casting, Zellweger's Bridget Jones is a sympathetic, likable, funny character, giving this romantic comedy a lot of charm.
Synopsis: At the start of the New Year, 32-year-old Bridget (Renée Zellweger) decides it's time to take control of her life... [More]
Directed By: Sharon Maguire

#96
#96
Adjusted Score: 97892%
Critics Consensus: Black's exuberant, gleeful performance turns School of Rock into a hilarious, rocking good time.
Synopsis: Overly enthusiastic guitarist Dewey Finn (Jack Black) gets thrown out of his bar band and finds himself in desperate need... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

#95

Moonstruck (1987)
94%

#95
Adjusted Score: 98239%
Critics Consensus: Led by energetic performances from Nicolas Cage and Cher, Moonstruck is an exuberantly funny tribute to love and one of the decade's most appealing comedies.
Synopsis: No sooner does Italian-American widow Loretta (Cher) accept a marriage proposal from her doltish boyfriend, Johnny (Danny Aiello), than she... [More]
Directed By: Norman Jewison

#94

The In-Laws (1979)
88%

#94
Adjusted Score: 88443%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Mild-mannered dentist Sheldon Kornpett (Alan Arkin) is uncomfortable with his daughter's marriage after meeting her future father-in-law, Vincent Ricardo (Peter... [More]
Directed By: Arthur Hiller

#93

The Ladykillers (1955)
100%

#93
Adjusted Score: 102466%
Critics Consensus: The Ladykillers is a macabre slow-burn with quirky performances of even quirkier characters.
Synopsis: Mrs. Wilberforce (Katie Johnson) likes to report suspicious behavior to the police. Unaware of her reputation, the dapper thief Professor... [More]
Directed By: Alexander Mackendrick

#92
#92
Adjusted Score: 85168%
Critics Consensus: Sentimental and light, but still thoroughly charming, A League of Their Own is buoyed by solid performances from a wonderful cast.
Synopsis: As America's stock of athletic young men is depleted during World War II, a professional all-female baseball league springs up... [More]
Directed By: Penny Marshall

#91
#91
Adjusted Score: 90854%
Critics Consensus: A buoyant, clever update of the conman flick Bedtime Story, with plenty of comedic jousting resulting from a winning chemistry between Michael Caine and Steve Martin.
Synopsis: Con artist Lawrence Jamieson (Michael Caine) is a longtime resident of a luxurious coastal resort, where he enjoys the fruits... [More]
Directed By: Frank Oz

#90
#90
Adjusted Score: 93129%
Critics Consensus: A well-calibrated blend of manic comedy and poignant drama, Good Morning, Vietnam offers a captivating look at a wide range of Robin Williams' cinematic gifts.
Synopsis: Radio funny man Adrian Cronauer (Robin Williams) is sent to Vietnam to bring a little comedy back into the lives... [More]
Directed By: Barry Levinson

#89

M*A*S*H (1970)
84%

#89
Adjusted Score: 88751%
Critics Consensus: Bold, timely, subversive, and above all funny, M*A*S*H remains a high point in Robert Altman's distinguished filmography.
Synopsis: Based on the novel by Richard Hooker, "M*A*S*H" follows a group of Mobile Army Surgical Hospital officers at they perform... [More]
Directed By: Robert Altman

#88
#88
Adjusted Score: 96274%
Critics Consensus: Rob Reiner's touching, funny film set a new standard for romantic comedies, and he was ably abetted by the sharp interplay between Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan.
Synopsis: In 1977, college graduates Harry Burns (Billy Crystal) and Sally Albright (Meg Ryan) share a contentious car ride from Chicago... [More]
Directed By: Rob Reiner

#87
Adjusted Score: 78160%
Critics Consensus: The likable leads and subversion of racial stereotypes elevate Harold and Kumar above the typical stoner comedy.
Synopsis: Nerdy accountant Harold (John Cho) and his irrepressible friend, Kumar (Kal Penn), get stoned watching television and find themselves utterly... [More]
Directed By: Danny Leiner

#86
#86
Adjusted Score: 78234%
Critics Consensus: A charming, quirky, and often funny comedy.
Synopsis: In small-town Preston, Idaho, awkward teen Napoleon Dynamite (Jon Heder) has trouble fitting in. After his grandmother is injured in... [More]
Directed By: Jared Hess

#85

Arthur (1981)
88%

#85
Adjusted Score: 90250%
Critics Consensus: Dudley Moore brings a boozy charm to Arthur, a coming of age tale for a wayward millionaire that deploys energetic cast chemistry and spiffy humor to jovial effect.
Synopsis: Wealthy New York City playboy Arthur Bach (Dudley Moore) is perpetually drunk and completely rudderless. Dutifully supported by his sharp-tongued... [More]
Directed By: Steve Gordon

#84

Tootsie (1982)
90%

#84
Adjusted Score: 94182%
Critics Consensus: Tootsie doesn't squander its high-concept comedy premise with fine dialogue and sympathetic treatment of the characters.
Synopsis: New York actor Michael Dorsey (Dustin Hoffman) is a talented perfectionist who is so hard on himself and others that... [More]
Directed By: Sydney Pollack

#83

Best in Show (2000)
93%

#83
Adjusted Score: 97140%
Critics Consensus: A fine example of writer-director-star Christopher Guest's gift for improv comedy, Best in Show boasts an appealingly quirky premise and a brilliantly talented cast.
Synopsis: The tension is palpable, the excitement is mounting and the heady scent of competition is in the air as hundreds... [More]
Directed By: Christopher Guest

#82
Adjusted Score: 97562%
Critics Consensus: While its premise is ripe for comedy -- and it certainly delivers its fair share of laughs -- Priscilla is also a surprisingly tender and thoughtful road movie with some outstanding performances.
Synopsis: When drag queen Anthony (Hugo Weaving) agrees to take his act on the road, he invites fellow cross-dresser Adam (Guy... [More]
Directed By: Stephan Elliott

#81

Mean Girls (2004)
84%

#81
Adjusted Score: 90854%
Critics Consensus: Elevated by a brilliant screenplay and outstanding ensemble cast, Mean Girls finds fresh, female-fronted humor in the high school experience.
Synopsis: Teenage Cady Heron (Lindsay Lohan) was educated in Africa by her scientist parents. When her family moves to the suburbs... [More]
Directed By: Mark Waters

#80

Spaceballs (1987)
56%

#80
Adjusted Score: 58128%
Critics Consensus: There's fine spoofery and amusing characters in Spaceballs, though it's a far cry from Mel Brooks' peak era.
Synopsis: In a distant galaxy, planet Spaceball has depleted its air supply, leaving its citizens reliant on a product called "Perri-Air."... [More]
Directed By: Mel Brooks

#79

Sister Act (1992)
74%

#79
Adjusted Score: 75616%
Critics Consensus: Looking for a sweet musical comedy about a witness to a crime hiding out from killers in a convent? There's nun better than Sister Act.
Synopsis: When lively lounge singer Deloris Van Cartier (Whoopi Goldberg) sees her mobster beau, Vince LaRocca (Harvey Keitel), commit murder, she... [More]
Directed By: Emile Ardolino

#78

Step Brothers (2008)
55%

#78
Adjusted Score: 63169%
Critics Consensus: Step Brothers indulges in a cheerfully relentless immaturity that will quickly turn off viewers unamused by Ferrell and Reilly -- and delight those who find their antics hilarious.
Synopsis: Brennan Huff (Will Ferrell) and Dale Doback (John C. Reilly) have one thing in common: they are both lazy, unemployed... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#77

UHF (1989)
61%

#77
Adjusted Score: 61231%
Critics Consensus: UHF is bizarre, freewheeling, and spotty, though its anarchic spirit cannot be denied.
Synopsis: After losing yet another job, George (Weird Al Yankovic) wonders if there is any career that can handle his outrageous... [More]
Directed By: Jay Levey

#76
Adjusted Score: 96762%
Critics Consensus: Blessed by a brilliantly befuddled star turn from Chevy Chase, National Lampoon's Vacation is one of the more consistent -- and thoroughly quotable -- screwball comedies of the 1980s.
Synopsis: Accompanied by their children (Dana Barron, Anthony Michael Hall), Clark Griswold (Chevy Chase) and his wife, Ellen (Beverly D'Angelo), are... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#75

Galaxy Quest (1999)
90%

#75
Adjusted Score: 94479%
Critics Consensus: Intelligent and humorous satire with an excellent cast -- no previous Trekkie knowledge needed to enjoy this one.
Synopsis: The stars of a 1970s sci-fi show - now scraping a living through re-runs and sci-fi conventions - are beamed... [More]
Directed By: Dean Parisot

#74

Harold and Maude (1971)
85%

#74
Adjusted Score: 89691%
Critics Consensus: Hal Ashby's comedy is too dark and twisted for some, and occasionally oversteps its bounds, but there's no denying the film's warm humor and big heart.
Synopsis: Cult classic pairs Cort as a dead-pan disillusioned 20-year-old obsessed with suicide and a loveable Gordon as a fun-loving 80-year-old... [More]
Directed By: Hal Ashby

#73

Meet the Parents (2000)
84%

#73
Adjusted Score: 88602%
Critics Consensus: Despite sometimes sitcom-like execution, Meet the Parents is a hilarious look at familial relationships that works mostly because the chemistry between its two leads is so effective.
Synopsis: Everything that can possibly go wrong for groom-to-be Greg Focker (Ben Stiller) does. The problems begin with Greg's disastrous first... [More]
Directed By: Jay Roach

#72

Girls Trip (2017)
92%

#72
Adjusted Score: 103896%
Critics Consensus: Girls Trip is the rare R-rated comedy that pushes boundaries to truly comedic effect -- and anchors its laughs in compelling characters brought to life by a brilliantly assembled cast.
Synopsis: Best friends Ryan, Sasha, Lisa and Dina are in for the adventure of a lifetime when they travel to New... [More]
Directed By: Malcolm D. Lee

#71

Being There (1979)
95%

#71
Adjusted Score: 98802%
Critics Consensus: Smart, sophisticated, and refreshingly subtle, Being There soars behind sensitive direction from Hal Ashby and a stellar Peter Sellers performance.
Synopsis: Simple-minded Chance (Peter Sellers), a gardener who has resided in the Washington, D.C., townhouse of his wealthy employer for his... [More]
Directed By: Hal Ashby

#70

Wayne's World (1992)
79%

#70
Adjusted Score: 85621%
Critics Consensus: An oddball comedy that revels in its silliness and memorable catch phrases, Wayne's World is also fondly regarded because of its endearing characters.
Synopsis: A big screen spin-off of the "Saturday Night Live" skit. Rob Lowe plays a producer that wants to take the... [More]
Directed By: Penelope Spheeris

#69
Adjusted Score: 82581%
Critics Consensus: While Fast Times at Ridgemont High features Sean Penn's legendary performance, the film endures because it accurately captured the small details of school, work, and teenage life.
Synopsis: Stacy Hamilton (Jennifer Jason Leigh) is a pretty, but inexperienced, teen interested in dating. Given advice by her uninhibited friend,... [More]
Directed By: Amy Heckerling

#68
#68
Adjusted Score: 85400%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Writer and notorious marriage detractor Mortimer Brewster (Cary Grant) falls for girl-next-door Elaine Harper (Priscilla Lane), and they tie the... [More]
Directed By: Frank Capra

#67

Kung Fu Hustle (2004)
91%

#67
Adjusted Score: 97488%
Critics Consensus: Kung Fu Hustle blends special effects, martial arts, and the Looney Toons to hilarious effect.
Synopsis: When the hapless Sing (Stephen Chow) and his dim-witted pal, Bone (Feng Xiaogang), try to scam the residents of Pig... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Chow

#66

Booksmart (2019)
96%

#66
Adjusted Score: 119752%
Critics Consensus: Fast-paced, funny, and fresh, Booksmart does the seemingly impossible by adding a smart new spin to the coming-of-age comedy.
Synopsis: Academic overachievers Amy and Molly thought keeping their noses to the grindstone gave them a leg up on their high... [More]
Directed By: Olivia Wilde

#65

Heathers (1989)
93%

#65
Adjusted Score: 96433%
Critics Consensus: Dark, cynical, and subversive, Heathers gently applies a chainsaw to the conventions of the high school movie -- changing the game for teen comedies to follow.
Synopsis: Veronica (Winona Ryder) is part of the most popular clique at her high school, but she disapproves of the other... [More]
Directed By: Michael Lehmann

#64

Playtime (1967)
98%

#64
Adjusted Score: 103726%
Critics Consensus: A remarkable achievement, Playtime's packs every scene with sight gags and characters that both celebrates and satirizes the urbanization of modern life.
Synopsis: Clumsy Monsieur Hulot (Jacques Tati) finds himself perplexed by the intimidating complexity of a gadget-filled Paris. He attempts to meet... [More]
Directed By: Jacques Tati

#63
#63
Adjusted Score: 87038%
Critics Consensus: The buddy cop movie continues its evolution unabated with this Eddie Murphy vehicle that's fast, furious, and funny.
Synopsis: After his childhood buddy is murdered while visiting Detroit, rebellious cop Axel Foley (Eddie Murphy) follows the leads to Beverly... [More]
Directed By: Martin Brest

#62

Office Space (1999)
80%

#62
Adjusted Score: 84246%
Critics Consensus: Mike Judge lampoons the office grind with its inspired mix of sharp dialogue and witty one-liners.
Synopsis: Corporate drone Peter Gibbons (Ron Livingston) hates his soul-killing job at software company Initech. While undergoing hypnotherapy, Peter is left... [More]
Directed By: Mike Judge

#61
Adjusted Score: 99542%
Critics Consensus: While frothy to a fault, Four Weddings and a Funeral features irresistibly breezy humor, and winsome performances from Hugh Grant and Andie MacDowell.
Synopsis: Lovable Englishman Charles (Hugh Grant) and his group of friends seem to be unlucky in love. When Charles meets a... [More]
Directed By: Mike Newell

#60

The Graduate (1967)
87%

#60
Adjusted Score: 94127%
Critics Consensus: The music, the performances, the precision in capturing the post-college malaise -- The Graduate's coming-of-age story is indeed one for the ages.
Synopsis: Benjamin Braddock (Dustin Hoffman) has just finished college and, back at his parents' house, he's trying to avoid the one... [More]
Directed By: Mike Nichols

#59
#59
Adjusted Score: 86807%
Critics Consensus: Matthew Broderick charms in Ferris Bueller's Day Off, a light and irrepressibly fun movie about being young and having fun.
Synopsis: Ferris Bueller (Matthew Broderick) has an uncanny skill at cutting classes and getting away with it. Intending to make one... [More]
Directed By: John Hughes

#58
Adjusted Score: 87433%
Critics Consensus: There's Something About Mary proves that unrelentingly, unabashedly peurile humor doesn't necessarily come at the expense of a film's heart.
Synopsis: Ted's (Ben Stiller) dream prom date with Mary (Cameron Diaz) never happens due to an embarrassing injury at her home.... [More]

#57
Adjusted Score: 99576%
Critics Consensus: Part satire, part shockumentary,Borat gets high-fives almost all-around for being offensive in the funniest possible way. Jagshemash!
Synopsis: Outrageous situations occur when Borat, a popular reporter (Sacha Baron Cohen) from Kazakhstan, comes to the United States to film... [More]
Directed By: Larry Charles

#56

Sherlock, Jr. (1924)
92%

#56
Adjusted Score: 95361%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A kindly movie projectionist (Buster Keaton) longs to be a detective. When his fiancée (Kathryn McGuire) is robbed by a... [More]
Directed By: Buster Keaton

#55

Friday (1995)
78%

#55
Adjusted Score: 78097%
Critics Consensus: What Friday might lack in taut construction or directorial flair, it more than makes up with its vibrant (albeit consistently crass) humor and the charming, energetic performances of its leads.
Synopsis: It's Friday and Craig Jones (Ice Cube) has just gotten fired for stealing cardboard boxes. To make matters worse, rent... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#54

Superbad (2007)
88%

#54
Adjusted Score: 96006%
Critics Consensus: Deftly balancing vulgarity and sincerity while placing its protagonists in excessive situations, Superbad is an authentic take on friendship and the overarching awkwardness of the high school experience.
Synopsis: High-school seniors Seth (Jonah Hill) and Evan (Michael Cera) have high hopes for a graduation party: The co-dependent teens plan... [More]
Directed By: Greg Mottola

#53

Hot Fuzz (2007)
91%

#53
Adjusted Score: 99758%
Critics Consensus: The brilliant minds behind Shaun of the Dead successfully take a shot at the buddy cop genre with Hot Fuzz. The result is a bitingly satiric and hugely entertaining parody.
Synopsis: As a former London constable, Nicholas Angel (Simon Pegg) finds if difficult to adapt to his new assignment in the... [More]
Directed By: Edgar Wright

#52

The Hangover (2009)
78%

#52
Adjusted Score: 87951%
Critics Consensus: With a clever script and hilarious interplay among the cast, The Hangover nails just the right tone of raunchy humor, and the non-stop laughs overshadow any flaw.
Synopsis: Two days before his wedding, Doug (Justin Bartha) and three friends (Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, Zach Galifianakis) drive to Las... [More]
Directed By: Todd Phillips

#51

Elf (2003)
85%

#51
Adjusted Score: 90696%
Critics Consensus: A movie full of Yuletide cheer, Elf is a spirited, good-natured family comedy, and it benefits greatly from Will Ferrell's funny and charming performance as one of Santa's biggest helpers.
Synopsis: Buddy (Will Ferrell) was accidentally transported to the North Pole as a toddler and raised to adulthood among Santa's elves.... [More]
Directed By: Jon Favreau

#50
Adjusted Score: 95951%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to the impeccable chemistry between Steve Martin and John Candy, as well as a deft mix of humor and heart, Planes, Trains and Automobiles is a hilarious, heartfelt holiday classic.
Synopsis: Easily excitable Neal Page (Steve Martin) is somewhat of a control freak. Trying to get home to Chicago to spend... [More]
Directed By: John Hughes

#49
#49
Adjusted Score: 100087%
Critics Consensus: Smartly written, smoothly directed, and solidly cast, A Fish Called Wanda offers a classic example of a brainy comedy with widespread appeal.
Synopsis: British gangster George Thomason (Tom Georgeson) and his hapless aide, Ken Pile (Michael Palin), draft a pair of arrogant Americans,... [More]

#48
Adjusted Score: 73351%
Critics Consensus: Filled with inspired silliness and quotable lines, Anchorman isn't the most consistent comedy in the world, but Will Ferrell's buffoonish central performance helps keep this portrait of a clueless newsman from going off the rails.
Synopsis: Hotshot television anchorman Ron Burgundy (Will Ferrell) welcomes upstart reporter Veronica Corningstone (Christina Applegate) into the male-dominated world of 1970s... [More]
Directed By: Adam McKay

#47

Ghostbusters (1984)
97%

#47
Adjusted Score: 103035%
Critics Consensus: An infectiously fun blend of special effects and comedy, with Bill Murray's hilarious deadpan performance leading a cast of great comic turns.
Synopsis: After the members of a team of scientists (Harold Ramis, Dan Aykroyd, Bill Murray) lose their cushy positions at a... [More]
Directed By: Ivan Reitman

#46
Adjusted Score: 75935%
Critics Consensus: A light and goofy comedy which provides laughs, largely due to performances and screenwriting by Myers.
Synopsis: A world-class playboy and part-time special agent, Powers is defrosted after 30 years in a cryogenic freeze to match wits... [More]
Directed By: Jay Roach

#45

Dumb & Dumber (1994)
68%

#45
Adjusted Score: 70196%
Critics Consensus: A relentlessly stupid comedy elevated by its main actors: Jim Carrey goes bonkers and Jeff Daniels carries himself admirably in an against-type performance.
Synopsis: Imbecilic best friends Lloyd Christmas (Jim Carrey) and Harry Dunne (Jeff Daniels) stumble across a suitcase full of money left... [More]

#44

The Odd Couple (1968)
97%

#44
Adjusted Score: 101012%
Critics Consensus: Enlivening Neil Simon's crackerjack script with their harmonious rapport, Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau are a perfect pairing as The Odd Couple.
Synopsis: When fussy Felix (Jack Lemmon) becomes suicidal over his impending divorce, he accepts an offer to move in with his... [More]
Directed By: Gene Saks

#43

The Producers (1968)
90%

#43
Adjusted Score: 98628%
Critics Consensus: A hilarious satire of the business side of Hollywood, The Producers is one of Mel Brooks' finest, as well as funniest films, featuring standout performances by Gene Wilder and Zero Mostel.
Synopsis: Down and out producer Max Bialystock (Zero Mostel), who was once the toast of Broadway, trades sexual favors with old... [More]
Directed By: Mel Brooks

#42

Clerks (1994)
89%

#42
Adjusted Score: 92513%
Critics Consensus: With its quirky characters and clever, quotable dialogue, Clerks is the ultimate clarion call for slackers everywhere to unite and, uh, do something we guess?
Synopsis: Dante (Brian O'Halloran) is called in to cover a shift at his New Jersey convenience store on his day off.... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Smith

#41
#41
Adjusted Score: 103461%
Critics Consensus: Smarter, fresher, and funnier than a modern vampire movie has any right to be, What We Do in the Shadows is bloody good fun.
Synopsis: Vampire housemates (Jemaine Clement, Taika Waititi, Jonathan Brugh) try to cope with the complexities of modern life and show a... [More]

#40

The Lady Eve (1941)
100%

#40
Adjusted Score: 106003%
Critics Consensus: A career highlight for Preston Sturges, The Lady Eve benefits from Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda's sparkling chemistry -- and a script that inspired countless battle-of-the-sexes comedies.
Synopsis: It's no accident when wealthy Charles (Henry Fonda) falls for Jean (Barbara Stanwyck). Jean is a con artist with her... [More]
Directed By: Preston Sturges

#39

What's Up, Doc? (1972)
89%

#39
Adjusted Score: 92466%
Critics Consensus: Barbra Streisand was never more likable than in this energetic, often hilarious screwball farce from director Peter Bogdanovich.
Synopsis: Two researchers have come to San Francisco to compete for a research grant in music. The man seems a bit... [More]
Directed By: Peter Bogdanovich

#38
#38
Adjusted Score: 109261%
Critics Consensus: Watermelons may go out of season, but in A Night at the Opera, the Marx Brothers' daffy laughs are never anything less than uproariously fresh.
Synopsis: The Marx Brothers run amuck in the world of opera when Otis B. Driftwood (Groucho Marx) meets aspiring singer Ricardo... [More]
Directed By: Sam Wood

#37

Adam's Rib (1949)
96%

#37
Adjusted Score: 99919%
Critics Consensus: Matched by Garson Kanin's witty, sophisticated screenplay, George Cukor, Spencer Tracy, and Katherine Hepburn are all in top form in the classic comedy Adam's Rib.
Synopsis: A courtroom rivalry finds its way into the household when prosecuting lawyer Adam Bonner (Spencer Tracy) faces off against his... [More]
Directed By: George Cukor

#36

Sullivan's Travels (1941)
100%

#36
Adjusted Score: 103833%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Successful movie director John L. Sullivan (Joel McCrea), convinced he won't be able to film his ambitious masterpiece until he... [More]
Directed By: Preston Sturges

#35

Caddyshack (1980)
73%

#35
Adjusted Score: 77298%
Critics Consensus: Though unabashedly crude and juvenile, Caddyshack nevertheless scores with its classic slapstick, unforgettable characters, and endlessly quotable dialogue.
Synopsis: Danny Noonan (Michael O'Keefe), a teen down on his luck, works as a caddy at the snob-infested Bushwood Country Club... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#34
#34
Adjusted Score: 97766%
Critics Consensus: Charlie Chaplin demonstrates that his comedic voice is undiminished by dialogue in this rousing satire of tyranny, which may be more distinguished by its uplifting humanism than its gags.
Synopsis: After dedicated service in the Great War, a Jewish barber (Charles Chaplin) spends years in an army hospital recovering from... [More]
Directed By: Charles Chaplin

#33
#33
Adjusted Score: 112061%
Critics Consensus: Offering a wonderfully witty script, spotless direction from George Cukor, and typically excellent lead performances, The Philadelphia Story is an unqualified classic.
Synopsis: This classic romantic comedy focuses on Tracy Lord (Katharine Hepburn), a Philadelphia socialite who has split from her husband, C.K.... [More]
Directed By: George Cukor

#32

Raising Arizona (1987)
91%

#32
Adjusted Score: 95570%
Critics Consensus: A terrifically original, eccentric screwball comedy, Raising Arizona may not be the Coens' most disciplined movie, but it's one of their most purely entertaining.
Synopsis: An ex-con and an ex-cop meet, marry and long for a child of their own. When it is discovered that... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#31

Clueless (1995)
81%

#31
Adjusted Score: 89087%
Critics Consensus: A funny and clever reshaping of Emma, Clueless offers a soft satire that pokes as much fun at teen films as it does at the Beverly Hills glitterati.
Synopsis: Shallow, rich and socially successful Cher (Alicia Silverstone) is at the top of her Beverly Hills high school's pecking scale.... [More]
Directed By: Amy Heckerling

#30

Annie Hall (1977)
96%

#30
Adjusted Score: 104369%
Critics Consensus: Filled with poignant performances and devastating humor, Annie Hall represents a quantum leap for Woody Allen and remains an American classic.
Synopsis: Comedian Alvy Singer (Woody Allen) examines the rise and fall of his relationship with struggling nightclub singer Annie Hall (Diane... [More]
Directed By: Woody Allen

#29

His Girl Friday (1940)
99%

#29
Adjusted Score: 110805%
Critics Consensus: Anchored by stellar performances from Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell, His Girl Friday is possibly the definitive screwball romantic comedy.
Synopsis: When hard-charging New York newspaper editor Walter Burns discovers that his ex-wife, investigative reporter Hildy Johnson, has gotten engaged to... [More]
Directed By: Howard Hawks

#28

Withnail and I (1987)
94%

#28
Adjusted Score: 94615%
Critics Consensus: Richard E. Grant and Paul McGann prove irresistibly hilarious as two misanthropic slackers in Withnail and I, a biting examination of artists living on the fringes of prosperity and good taste.
Synopsis: Two out-of-work actors -- the anxious, luckless Marwood (Paul McGann) and his acerbic, alcoholic friend, Withnail (Richard E. Grant) --... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Robinson

#27

Trading Places (1983)
88%

#27
Adjusted Score: 88934%
Critics Consensus: Featuring deft interplay between Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd, Trading Places is an immensely appealing social satire.
Synopsis: Upper-crust executive Louis Winthorpe III (Dan Aykroyd) and down-and-out hustler Billy Ray Valentine (Eddie Murphy) are the subjects of a... [More]
Directed By: John Landis

#26

Bridesmaids (2011)
90%

#26
Adjusted Score: 100623%
Critics Consensus: A marriage of genuine characters, gross out gags, and pathos, Bridesmaids is a female-driven comedy that refuses to be boxed in as Kristen Wiig emerges as a real star.
Synopsis: Annie (Kristen Wiig) is a single woman whose own life is a mess, but when she learns that her lifelong... [More]
Directed By: Paul Feig

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 101045%
Critics Consensus: Made with obvious affection for the original, Young Frankenstein is a riotously silly spoof featuring a fantastic performance by Gene Wilder.
Synopsis: Respected medical lecturer Dr. Frederick Frankenstein (Gene Wilder) learns that he has inherited his infamous grandfather's estate in Transylvania. Arriving... [More]
Directed By: Mel Brooks

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 98888%
Critics Consensus: Shaun of the Dead cleverly balances scares and witty satire, making for a bloody good zombie movie with loads of wit.
Synopsis: Shaun (Simon Pegg) is a 30-something loser with a dull, easy existence. When he's not working at the electronics store,... [More]
Directed By: Edgar Wright

#23

The Naked Gun (1988)
88%

#23
Adjusted Score: 91019%
Critics Consensus: The Naked Gun is loaded chock full of gags that are goofy, unapologetically crass, and ultimately hilarious.
Synopsis: Frank Drebin (Leslie Nielsen), a rather clueless police detective, tries to foil a plot to turn innocent people into assassins... [More]
Directed By: David Zucker

#22
#22
Adjusted Score: 81626%
Critics Consensus: Too over the top for its own good, but ultimately rescued by the cast's charm, director John Landis' grace, and several soul-stirring musical numbers.
Synopsis: After his release from prison, Jake (John Belushi) reunites with his brother, Elwood (Dan Aykroyd) -- collectively known as the... [More]
Directed By: John Landis

#21
#21
Adjusted Score: 75831%
Critics Consensus: Eddie Murphy was in full control at this point, starkly evident in Coming to America's John Landis' coasting direction.
Synopsis: Prince Akeem (Eddie Murphy) is the prince of a wealthy African country and wants for nothing, except a wife who... [More]
Directed By: John Landis

#20

Life of Brian (1979)
95%

#20
Adjusted Score: 100718%
Critics Consensus: One of the more cutting-edge films of the 1970s, this religious farce from the classic comedy troupe is as poignant as it is funny and satirical.
Synopsis: Brian Cohen (Graham Chapman) is an average young Jewish man, but through a series of ridiculous events, he gains a... [More]
Directed By: Terry Jones

#19

The Jerk (1979)
83%

#19
Adjusted Score: 85173%
Critics Consensus: Crude, crass, and oh so quotable, The Jerk is nothing short of an all-out comedic showcase for Steve Martin.
Synopsis: Navin (Steve Martin) believes he was born a poor black child in Mississippi. He is, however, actually white. Upon figuring... [More]
Directed By: Carl Reiner

#18

The General (1926)
92%

#18
Adjusted Score: 96429%
Critics Consensus: Brilliantly filmed and fueled with classic physical comedy, The General captures Buster Keaton at his timeless best.
Synopsis: One of the most revered comedies of the silent era, this film finds hapless Southern railroad engineer Johnny Gray (Buster... [More]

#17

The Thin Man (1934)
98%

#17
Adjusted Score: 104467%
Critics Consensus: Featuring an involving mystery and sparkling repartee between William Powell and Myrna Loy, The Thin Man is an endlessly charming romp.
Synopsis: The recently divorced Clyde Wynant discovers that his new girlfriend has stolen $50,000 and is carrying on with other men.... [More]
Directed By: W. S. Van Dyke

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 100271%
Critics Consensus: Smartly directed, brilliantly acted, and packed with endlessly quotable moments, This Is Spinal Tap is an all-time comedy classic.
Synopsis: "This Is Spinal Tap" shines a light on the self-contained universe of a metal band struggling to get back on... [More]
Directed By: Rob Reiner

#15
Adjusted Score: 95016%
Critics Consensus: The talents of director John Landis and Saturday Night Live's irrepressible John Belushi conspired to create a rambunctious, subversive college comedy that continues to resonate.
Synopsis: When they arrive at college, socially inept freshmen Larry (Thomas Hulce) and Kent (Stephen Furst) attempt to pledge the snooty... [More]
Directed By: John Landis

#14

Blazing Saddles (1974)
88%

#14
Adjusted Score: 93998%
Critics Consensus: Daring, provocative, and laugh-out-loud funny, Blazing Saddles is a gleefully vulgar spoof of Westerns that marks a high point in Mel Brooks' storied career.
Synopsis: In this satirical take on Westerns, crafty railroad worker Bart (Cleavon Little) becomes the first black sheriff of Rock Ridge,... [More]
Directed By: Mel Brooks

#13

Bringing Up Baby (1938)
94%

#13
Adjusted Score: 103633%
Critics Consensus: With Katharine Hepburn and Cary Grant at their effervescent best, Bringing Up Baby is a seamlessly assembled comedy with enduring appeal.
Synopsis: Harried paleontologist David Huxley (Cary Grant) has to make a good impression on society matron Mrs. Random (May Robson), who... [More]
Directed By: Howard Hawks

#12

Modern Times (1936)
98%

#12
Adjusted Score: 116439%
Critics Consensus: A slapstick skewering of industrialized America, Modern Times is as politically incisive as it is laugh-out-loud hilarious.
Synopsis: This comedic masterpiece finds the iconic Little Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) employed at a state-of-the-art factory where the inescapable machinery completely... [More]
Directed By: Charlie Chaplin

#11

The Apartment (1960)
93%

#11
Adjusted Score: 100882%
Critics Consensus: Director Billy Wilder's customary cynicism is leavened here by tender humor, romance, and genuine pathos.
Synopsis: Insurance worker C.C. Baxter (Jack Lemmon) lends his Upper West Side apartment to company bosses to use for extramarital affairs.... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#10

Groundhog Day (1993)
97%

#10
Adjusted Score: 103334%
Critics Consensus: Smart, sweet, and inventive, Groundhog Day highlights Murray's dramatic gifts while still leaving plenty of room for laughs.
Synopsis: Phil (Bill Murray), a weatherman, is out to cover the annual emergence of the groundhog from its hole. He gets... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 103679%
Critics Consensus: A delightfully postmodern fairy tale, The Princess Bride is a deft, intelligent mix of swashbuckling, romance, and comedy that takes an age-old damsel-in-distress story and makes it fresh.
Synopsis: A fairy tale adventure about a beautiful young woman and her one true love. He must find her after a... [More]
Directed By: Rob Reiner

#8
Adjusted Score: 106024%
Critics Consensus: Stanley Kubrick's brilliant Cold War satire remains as funny and razor-sharp today as it was in 1964.
Synopsis: A film about what could happen if the wrong person pushed the wrong button -- and it played the situation... [More]
Directed By: Stanley Kubrick

#7

Duck Soup (1933)
91%

#7
Adjusted Score: 97982%
Critics Consensus: Fueled by inspired silliness and blessed with some of the Marx brothers' most brilliant work, Duck Soup is one of its -- or any -- era's finest comedies.
Synopsis: When the tiny nation of Freedonia goes bankrupt, its wealthy benefactor, Mrs. Teasdale (Margaret Dumont), insists that the wacky Rufus... [More]
Directed By: Leo McCarey

#6

The Big Lebowski (1998)
83%

#6
Adjusted Score: 89049%
Critics Consensus: Typically stunning visuals and sharp dialogue from the Coen Brothers, brought to life with strong performances from Goodman and Bridges.
Synopsis: Jeff Bridges plays Jeff Lebowski who insists on being called "the Dude," a laid-back, easygoing burnout who happens to have... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 116297%
Critics Consensus: Capturing its stars and director at their finest, It Happened One Night remains unsurpassed by the countless romantic comedies it has inspired.
Synopsis: In Frank Capra's acclaimed romantic comedy, spoiled heiress Ellie Andrews (Claudette Colbert) impetuously marries the scheming King Westley, leading her... [More]
Directed By: Frank Capra

#4

Some Like It Hot (1959)
94%

#4
Adjusted Score: 99216%
Critics Consensus: Some Like It Hot: A spry, quick-witted farce that never drags.
Synopsis: After witnessing a Mafia murder, slick saxophone player Joe (Tony Curtis) and his long-suffering buddy, Jerry (Jack Lemmon), improvise a... [More]
Directed By: Billy Wilder

#3
Adjusted Score: 104447%
Critics Consensus: A cult classic as gut-bustingly hilarious as it is blithely ridiculous, Monty Python and the Holy Grail has lost none of its exceedingly silly charm.
Synopsis: A comedic send-up of the grim circumstances of the Middle Ages as told through the story of King Arthur and... [More]
Directed By: Terry Gilliam, Terry Jones

#2

Airplane! (1980)
97%

#2
Adjusted Score: 103491%
Critics Consensus: Though unabashedly juvenile and silly, Airplane! is nevertheless an uproarious spoof comedy full of quotable lines and slapstick gags that endure to this day.
Synopsis: This spoof comedy takes shots at the slew of disaster movies that were released in the 70s. When the passengers... [More]

#1

City Lights (1931)
96%

#1
Adjusted Score: 103109%
Critics Consensus: One of the best underdog romance movies ever, with an ending that will light up any heart.
Synopsis: A hapless but resilient tramp (Charlie Chaplin) falls in love with a blind flower girl (Virginia Cherrill) on the tough... [More]
Directed By: Charles Chaplin

Half Baked

(Photo by Gramercy Pictures/courtesy Everett Collection. Thumbnail image: Columbia Pictures / courtesy Everett Collection; Universal/courtesy Everett Collection.)

25 Essential Stoner Movies Ranked

If your movie nights could take a few more hits, check out our guide to the best stoner movies! These are essential movies to the marijuana experience, ranging from counterculture classics (Up in Smoke, Easy Rider), top-shelf mainstream films (Pineapple Express, Friday), and cult comedies (Grandma’s Boy, Super Troopers), all featuring icons like Jeff Spicoli and The Dude. Then we took all the movies and sorted them by Tomatometer, lowest to highest.

If you’re seeking a trip guide, something to pair with whatever state you’re in, check out the 25 Essential Stoner Movies! (And don’t forget the 20 best movies to watch high.)

#25

Grandma's Boy (2006)
16%

#25
Adjusted Score: 17953%
Critics Consensus: A gross-out comedy that's more gross than comedic, Grandma's Boy is lazy and unrewarding.
Synopsis: When he and his roommate can't pay their rent, video game creator Alex (Allen Covert) finds himself homeless and moves... [More]
Directed By: Nicholaus Goossen

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 18570%
Critics Consensus: The movie isn't funny, the plot is too thin, and the production values feel more like a TV sitcom than a movie.
Synopsis: Last night, two party-hearty Dudes had an unbelievably sweet time. Too bad, they can't remember a thing, including where they... [More]
Directed By: Danny Leiner

#23

Soul Plane (2004)
18%

#23
Adjusted Score: 20175%
Critics Consensus: A raunchy sendup of Airplane! that never really takes off.
Synopsis: Following a ridiculously awful flight that leads to his pet's death, Nashawn Wade (Kevin Hart) files a lawsuit against the... [More]
Directed By: Jessy Terrero

#22

How High (2001)
26%

#22
Adjusted Score: 27553%
Critics Consensus: How High is a sloppily constructed stoner movie filled with lame, vulgar jokes.
Synopsis: Multi-platinum rap superstars Redman and Method Man star as Jamal and Silas, two regular guys who smoke something magical, ace... [More]
Directed By: Jesse Dylan

#21

Half Baked (1998)
29%

#21
Adjusted Score: 29552%
Critics Consensus: You'd have to be high to dig Half Baked's half baked production and scattershot sense of humor -- although maybe that was the point of this Dave Chapelle-led joint.
Synopsis: When a member of their crew gets arrested for killing a New York City police horse by feeding it junk... [More]
Directed By: Tamra Davis

#20

Super Troopers (2001)
35%

#20
Adjusted Score: 36375%
Critics Consensus: A more-miss -than-hit affair, Super Troopers will most likely appeal to those looking for something silly.
Synopsis: Always looking for action, five over-enthusiastic but under-stimulated Vermont State Troopers raise hell on the highway, keeping motorists anxiously looking... [More]
Directed By: Jay Chandrasekhar

#19

Reefer Madness (1936)
39%

#19
Adjusted Score: 42994%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: High-school principal Dr. Alfred Carroll (Josef Forte) relates to an audience of parents that marijuana can have devastating effects on... [More]
Directed By: Louis J. Gasnier

#18
Adjusted Score: 28106%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: Superlative stoners Cheech (Cheech Marin) and Chong (Tommy Chong) realize that one of their pals is developing a strain of... [More]
Directed By: Thomas Chong

#17

Up in Smoke (1978)
47%

#17
Adjusted Score: 48204%
Critics Consensus: Oft-quoted but undeniably flawed, Up In Smoke is a seminal piece of stoner cinema thanks to the likability of its two counterculture icons.
Synopsis: An unemployed pot-smoking slacker and amateur drummer, Anthony Stoner (Tommy Chong) ditches his strict parents and hits the road, eventually... [More]
Directed By: Lou Adler

#16
#16
Adjusted Score: 54164%
Critics Consensus: We're the Millers squanders its potential with an uneven, lazily assembled story..
Synopsis: Small-time pot dealer David (Jason Sudeikis) learns the hard way that no good deed goes unpunished; trying to help some... [More]

#15
Adjusted Score: 53527%
Critics Consensus: Visually creative, but also aimless, repetitive, and devoid of character development.
Synopsis: Raoul Duke (Johnny Depp) and his attorney Dr. Gonzo (Benicio Del Toro) drive a red convertible across the Mojave desert... [More]
Directed By: Terry Gilliam

#14
Adjusted Score: 56907%
Critics Consensus: Tenacious D fan will find this movie hilarious; everybody else will see only a low-brow concept movie and a small assembly of jokes stretched past the 100 minute mark.
Synopsis: Musicians JB (Jack Black) and KG (Kyle Gass) begin a friendship that could lead to the formation of the greatest... [More]
Directed By: Liam Lynch

#13

Scary Movie (2000)
52%

#13
Adjusted Score: 56184%
Critics Consensus: Critics say Scary Movie overloads on crudity and grossness to get its laughs.
Synopsis: Defying the very notion of good taste, Scary Movie out-parodies the pop culture parodies with a no-holds barred assault on... [More]
Directed By: Keenen Ivory Wayans

#12
Adjusted Score: 57819%
Critics Consensus: Fans can expect a good laugh as the cast from Smith's previous films reunite for Jay and Silent Bob's last bow. The loose plotting and crude language may be too much for others though.
Synopsis: When Jay and Silent Bob learn that a "Bluntman and Chronic" movie is being made featuring their comic book counterparts,... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Smith

#11

Smiley Face (2007)
68%

#11
Adjusted Score: 67659%
Critics Consensus: Although many of the jokes have been done before, Anna Faris's bright performance and Gregg Araki's sharp direction make Smiley Face more than your average stoner comedy.
Synopsis: Jane (Anna Faris), a struggling but perpetually stoned actress, has a busy day ahead. She has several important tasks on... [More]
Directed By: Gregg Araki

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 76191%
Critics Consensus: Both funny and scattershot, this loose-knit action/buddy/stoner comedy bridges genres and keeps a steady tempo of low-ball laughs.
Synopsis: Stoner Dale Denton's (Seth Rogen) enjoyment of a rare strain of marijuana may prove fatal when he drops his roach... [More]
Directed By: David Gordon Green

#9

Ted (2012)
69%

#9
Adjusted Score: 77406%
Critics Consensus: Ted's "romance versus bromance" plot is familiar, but the film's held aloft by the high-concept central premise and a very funny (albeit inconsistent) script.
Synopsis: When John Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) was a little boy, he made a wish that Ted (Seth MacFarlane), his beloved teddy... [More]
Directed By: Seth MacFarlane

#8

Inherent Vice (2014)
73%

#8
Adjusted Score: 83383%
Critics Consensus: Inherent Vice may prove frustrating for viewers who demand absolute coherence, but it does justice to its acclaimed source material -- and should satisfy fans of director P.T. Anderson.
Synopsis: In a California beach community, private detective Larry "Doc" Sportello (Joaquin Phoenix) tends to work his cases through a smoky... [More]
Directed By: Paul Thomas Anderson

#7
Adjusted Score: 78160%
Critics Consensus: The likable leads and subversion of racial stereotypes elevate Harold and Kumar above the typical stoner comedy.
Synopsis: Nerdy accountant Harold (John Cho) and his irrepressible friend, Kumar (Kal Penn), get stoned watching television and find themselves utterly... [More]
Directed By: Danny Leiner

#6
Adjusted Score: 82581%
Critics Consensus: While Fast Times at Ridgemont High features Sean Penn's legendary performance, the film endures because it accurately captured the small details of school, work, and teenage life.
Synopsis: Stacy Hamilton (Jennifer Jason Leigh) is a pretty, but inexperienced, teen interested in dating. Given advice by her uninhibited friend,... [More]
Directed By: Amy Heckerling

#5

Friday (1995)
78%

#5
Adjusted Score: 78097%
Critics Consensus: What Friday might lack in taut construction or directorial flair, it more than makes up with its vibrant (albeit consistently crass) humor and the charming, energetic performances of its leads.
Synopsis: It's Friday and Craig Jones (Ice Cube) has just gotten fired for stealing cardboard boxes. To make matters worse, rent... [More]
Directed By: F. Gary Gray

#4

The Big Lebowski (1998)
83%

#4
Adjusted Score: 89049%
Critics Consensus: Typically stunning visuals and sharp dialogue from the Coen Brothers, brought to life with strong performances from Goodman and Bridges.
Synopsis: Jeff Bridges plays Jeff Lebowski who insists on being called "the Dude," a laid-back, easygoing burnout who happens to have... [More]
Directed By: Joel Coen

#3

This Is the End (2013)
83%

#3
Adjusted Score: 91203%
Critics Consensus: Energetic, self-deprecating performances and enough guffaw-inducing humor make up for the flaws in This Is the End loosely written script.
Synopsis: In Hollywood, actor James Franco is throwing a party with a slew of celebrity pals. Among those in attendance are... [More]
Directed By: Seth Rogen, Evan Goldberg

#2

Easy Rider (1969)
83%

#2
Adjusted Score: 89836%
Critics Consensus: Edgy and seminal, Easy Rider encapsulates the dreams, hopes, and hopelessness of 1960s counterculture.
Synopsis: Wyatt (Peter Fonda) and Billy (Dennis Hopper), two Harley-riding hippies, complete a drug deal in Southern California and decide to... [More]
Directed By: Dennis Hopper

#1
#1
Adjusted Score: 96009%
Critics Consensus: Featuring an excellent ensemble cast, a precise feel for the 1970s, and a killer soundtrack, Dazed and Confused is a funny, affectionate, and clear-eyed look at high school life.
Synopsis: This coming-of-age film follows the mayhem of group of rowdy teenagers in Austin, Texas, celebrating the last day of high... [More]
Directed By: Richard Linklater

Noam Galai/Getty Images

(Photo by Noam Galai/Getty Images)

Accomplished character actor Judy Greer‘s filmography is, fittingly enough, best summed up by the title of her 2014 autobiography: I Don’t Know What You Know Me From: Confessions of a Co-Star. You may recall her as the recipient of an amazing makeover in Jawbreaker, as the timid, lonely office girl from What Women Want, or in the recurring role as George Sr.’s awkward, unhinged assistant Kitty Sanchez in Arrested Development, all early in her career. That was before she moved on to stealing scenes in sitcoms like Modern Family and It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and landing supporting roles in movies like The Descendants, 2013’s Carrie, and franchises as big as Planet of the Apes, Jurassic World, and the Ant-Man movies. Later this year, Greer will even appear alongside Jamie Lee Curtis as Laurie Strode’s daughter in Halloween.

This week, however, marks another milestone for Greer, as she makes her directorial debut with A Happening of Monumental Proportions. It’s an ensemble comedy of intersecting stories that take place over the course of an elementary school’s Career Day, with an impressive cast that includes Common, Allison Janney, Jennifer Garner, John Cho, Kumail Nanjiani, Bradley Whitford, Katie Holmes, and Rob Riggle, just to name a few. She spoke with RT and offered up her Five Favorite Films, then talked about why she could never direct herself, explained how helpful Jason Reitman and Mitch Hurwitz were to her, and even gave us a taste of what it was like on the set of Halloween.


Tootsie (1982) 90%

I think my favorite movie ever in the world might be Tootsie. I love that movie. It’s just got everything. I mean, I guess it doesn’t have murder, but you know what I mean. Like, for me, it’s so smart, it’s so dry, it’s so f—ing funny. And the performances — every single role is so good, and so important. And it made me fall in love with the idea of New York City, and it made me fall in love with actors and what they do. I thought it was so funny when I saw it the first time, but you know, now I’m a real live actor. As I was studying acting and stuff, and started to relate to it on that level, I think it’s a great show about actors without being about the business, because it’s about an actor wanting to be an artist, and he learns how to use the business to make art. And then there’s Bill Murray, who could fart and just be the greatest. Everything, everything about that movie just tickles me to no end.

Moonstruck (1987) 94%

I also love the movie Moonstruck. I just think, again, it’s so brilliantly performed. I think Moonstruck and Tootsie are perfect movies. Like, I can’t find a flaw in them, and I’ve watched them countless times. I just think that they are perfect films. And in Moonstruck, what they’re dealing with is death, and loneliness, and loving the wrong person, and a family tie, and infidelity. And yet, it’s the most charming, uplifting, happy movie.

I mean, the soundtrack, the score. There’s a makeover in it. I mean, come on, I love a makeover. And again, you have New York, you have Brooklyn, you have this wonderful city. You have this culture of this Italian family. It’s just wonderful. And Nicolas Cage gives the most insane performance I’ve ever seen. When he is screaming about his hand in the bakery, I’m like, “What is that? Who does it that way?” Nobody would do that. Only Nicolas Cage would just scream at the top of his lungs, like, “I lost my hand! I lost my bride!” I marvel at the balls, and that performance just wrecked me. Then her, of course, smacking him — we’ll never forget it.

When Harry Met Sally... (1989) 91%

I love When Harry Met Sally. Every girl actress is like, “I’m looking for my Annie Hall.” But I’ve always looked for my Sally. That’s been my favorite. I prefer it, I have to say. I just think, again, it’s dry, it’s funny, the characters are layered and interesting. All the supporting characters in that film have great moments and great roles, and you remember every single one of them. It always makes me laugh, and I feel like it’s timeless. And who doesn’t fantasize about falling in love with their best friend? Isn’t that the whole point? And I loved all the intertwining stories of the old people, and their little stories of how they met and fell in love. What a great idea; it’s so cool. And, of course, Nora Ephron’s the best. And that famous scene where she has the fake orgasm — I mean, the balls of that performance. Just great, it’s really great.

It’s also kind of grown-up. I remember watching it when I was younger, thinking, “God I hope I’m like them.” Now I’m so much older than they are. [laughs] But they all were moving to New York City to try to make it in Manhattan, so there was that element to it that I loved. And then the settling in, and realizing that life is different than you thought it would be. I just think it’s a perfect romantic comedy, and it is different than the usual formula, because you do have these sort of interstitial moments that are so funny, with these couples describing how they met and fell and love.

The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

I would say The Big Lebowski, because I’ve always felt like John Goodman should have gotten an Oscar for his performance in that movie. He’s perfect and brilliant. And it’s so weird and so funny, and takes all these turns. And we got to meet Phillip Seymour Hoffman and be like, “Brandt? Who the f— is that guy? He’s hilarious.” So, thanks for that, Coen brothers. It’s so weird. It’s so hard to make a movie with such extreme characters and keep it tonally so grounded. I don’t feel like it’s ever over the top, but all the performances are over the top, but it’s just so perfectly directed. Plus it makes me laugh, always, even though I’ve seen it so many times. God, really, I just love it. I think there’s something in it for everyone.

Singles (1992) 79%

I think I’m going to go with Singles, and it’s because of a very specific time in my life. Soundtrack is really important to me, and I’m a child of ’90s grunge. That movie was Seattle, Nirvana, Pearl Jam — it’s the greatest soundtrack. My favorite band was Smashing Pumpkins and my favorite song by Smashing Pumpkins is “Drown,” and that’s on there. Plus, I loved all the different storylines being woven together. I love Cameron Crowe, and the idea of these people living in Seattle and looking for love.

I was a senior in high school when it came out. I mean, I saw it in the theater like three times. I was like, “Oh my God, this is gonna be my life. I’m gonna move out of my parents’ house, and I’m gonna go and try to make it in the city somewhere, and it’s gonna be like this.” And, you know, Bridget Fonda as Janet was just the greatest character. I was like, “I’m gonna be like her. I am kind of like her. But not the pathetic parts of her, the great parts of her.” But everyone was just was trying to find themselves, find love, find a career, find a path, find their life. It was really aspirational for me at the time that it came out, so it really scratches that itch that I had then, and it will always be that meaningful to me.

I recently made my husband watch it. I can’t remember if he had seen it or if he just didn’t remember it, but I just could tell, even though he loved it and appreciated it, like, it didn’t kill him the way it killed me. And you know, he was like, “Yeah, no, it’s good. I like it.” But he is obsessed with Almost Famous, and I love Almost Famous, but that was more meaningful for him. Singles is just… the movie, the music, the time, the look, the actors, the wardrobe, the backdrop of Seattle. Just all of it.


Ryan Fujitani for Rotten Tomatoes: So I understand it was your manager who really pushed for you to make the jump behind the camera and move into directing. What was it about this project that made you think, “You know what? This is the one I’m going to direct?”

Judy Greer: Well, I loved the script. I mean, I have to give up a year of my life to direct a movie, and not make any money doing it, and it has to be something… My manager has always said this, and he still does: If you’re not dying to tell this story, it’s not worth it. And he doesn’t even mean financially; he means heart and soul. It’s such an undertaking to direct independent movies, so, in that sense, it has to really be something I can’t not do.

That was how I felt when I read this script, finally. I had read several, and a lot of the ones that came to me wanted me to also play roles in them, and I really didn’t want to do that. I did not want to have to direct myself. I didn’t want to have to be directing other actors but then also being like, “Yeah, but I nailed that scene, so we can move on.” I just felt so weird about it. And I’ve worked with people who’ve done it, and they do it well, and it doesn’t bother me. I just couldn’t do it. I couldn’t look at Common and say, “Can you do it again, but like, this time do it like this?” I feel like I would have had to tell myself my direction out loud so he could hear it.

Also, the second answer is that I got people way more famous and cool than me to be in my movie, so it was great, because I didn’t even have to. I was like, “Worst case scenario, I could play these five roles. But, I don’t know, if Allison Janney’s going to do it, then why would I ever?” So they made it easy for me. I’m legit impressed by people who can, but I couldn’t.

RT: You’ve also said that you’re drawn to stories that take place in “normal” office settings and things like that, because you’ve never quite had a job like that. What’s the trick to making something that’s ostensibly normal and familiar to most audiences into something that’s special and engaging, but also still relatable, if that makes sense?

Greer: No, I think I know what you mean. Yeah, I think what you’re saying is, how do you not make it boring? Well, I don’t know, maybe you’re not. But Office Space, maybe if I could list a top 10 list, would maybe be on it. I loved that movie, and I was so intrigued, because I’ve always been fascinated with a schedule. Like, I’ve never had a schedule. It’s always different and changing, and I’m in different places, and I’m doing different things. I think the grass is always greener, a little bit, with having a regular job and a regular life, where I thought, “Oh, you can actually plan a vacation and take it? That would be cool. My husband would love that.”

But I just thought it was cool to see the ins and outs of that world, and I hoped I made it interesting and fascinating. What I really wanted to do was, I have this fantasy about showing how these big buildings, they’re these big businesses and cubicles, and you have to walk so far to just get anything done. You have to walk so far to just go to the bathroom and to get a cup of coffee. And if you’re running to someone’s office, basically it’s like half your day is just walking around these buildings. It’s just my fantasy of what it’s like. Some of my friends have said, “No, no one has that much space.” But I’m like, “I don’t know. In my world, they do, and that’s the story I want to tell.” Direct your own movies! But yeah, I was always intrigued by it.

RT: If it’s any consolation, a lot of my day is actually very much like that, so you kind of nailed it for me, anyway.

Greer: Oh, I’m sorry? [laughs]

RT: You’ve been part of some really big franchises, and you’ve worked with a lot of amazing people, both in front of and behind the camera. Specifically with regard to directors, is there one in particular who especially inspired your own approach, or from whom you felt like you learned a significant deal?

Greer: Well, I learned a lot from Jason Reitman, because he is my friend and he was nice enough to go to lunch with me before I directed my movie, and sat down with me at Hugo’s for like two hours, where I had a notebook and a pen, and he told me things, and I wrote as much as I could down. He was really inspiring in that way. Plus, I love working with him. I love the way he directs, and I love his movies and the stories he chooses to tell. I have so much respect for him. I also got so much help from, obviously Paul Weitz, who’s an executive producer of my movie. He was someone who was a total mentor. But kind of outside the process, I should say, it was Jason Reitman, who didn’t have to ever do anything or sit down with me.

Paul was great. I mean, Paul helped me all along the way, because he was a part of the process from the very beginning, and we started by just going over the script together. Then we talked about casting. Then we talked about crew to hire. Then we talked about edit, and what I should do on set. I’ve sort of taken him for granted because he’s a producer on the movie, and haven’t really spoken as much about him as I should have. But definitely him. Definitely him.

And also, towards the end in the editing process, you know who I feel like I couldn’t have finished the movie without was Mitch Hurwitz. You know, he’s just always been there for me, throughout my career, when I’ve needed help or advice. With this, you know, we got to a point in the editing room where we were like, “I don’t know what else to do. And there are some things that need to be fixed.” And I sent him a link, and he watched it and gave me the greatest notes. It was really just something that was so above and beyond. I just wanted a new, fresh pair of eyes, someone who, I thought, was clearly a comedic genius. But the thing about Mitch that I don’t know if people all know is what a giant heart he has. You know, my movie ended up, I think, having a lot of heart to it. I had plenty of jokes — a lot of jokes had to end up being cut — but I wanted to make sure I was telling the right story, too. So Mitch was a real asset.

RT: Speaking of jokes, you’ve proven how reliably funny you are in the past, and now you’re directing this kind of quirky comedy. What do you think about possibly directing in other genres? Maybe drama, or horror?

Greer: Definitely, horror would be dope. That would be so fun, and I would never have said that until working with David Gordon Green on Halloween. I had so much fun on set. We had the best time. And again, that could just be him, because he just wants to have fun and laugh. He always says, “I just want to party,” and he doesn’t mean drink. He wants to just have fun all the time. Like, “Let’s party, let’s party! We have to party!” It’s so fun. He’s like, “Oh Judy, wouldn’t it be cool if you did this? What if you did that?” It was so fun. And after doing that, I thought, “Oh my God, this is a horror movie? I want to direct a horror movie. That would be cool.”

I would also say that working with Peyton Reed on Ant-Man was so cool, because… Again, Paul [Rudd] is just hilarious, and he’s never not funny. But to make that kind of genre movie, and make it as fun and funny as I think Ant-Man, both of them, turned out to be, seems really fun, too. As far as drama’s concerned, I just don’t know. I love acting in dramas, and I love watching dramas, but I get nervous because I feel like I have a tendency to — you’ll never believe this, maybe — but I can go to pretty dark places, and I would be nervous about tone. Tone is so important. I’m so constantly feeling heartbroken by humanity, and especially now. But I’m never going to say no. I read all kinds of scripts.

RT: You mentioned Halloween, and I feel like I can’t not ask about it…

Greer: Dude…

RT: Without spoiling anything, is there something like a passing of the torch going on?

Greer: I don’t know, man. I don’t know what I’m even allowed to say. Let me just say that if I could do these movies with Jamie Lee Curtis and Andi Matichak, if we could make these movies, this gang of, as Jamie Lee Curtis calls us, three tall women… It was so fun. I hope we get the opportunity to go back to Haddonfield, because it was… It was major. And I feel like Jamie Lee’s love and ownership — and I don’t mean it literally — of this franchise is such an inspiration. I love how seriously she and David took the telling of this story. And while it was so fun and wonderful to do, it was, I felt, such important work to get right. For the fans, you know? It’s all about the people who love it. And people love Halloween.


A Happening of Monumental Proportions opens in limited release on Friday, September 21.

(Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

The artist formally known, and credited, as “MILF guy,” has come a long way since his American Pie days. The last decade has seen John Cho shed his goofy teen comedy stylings – has it really been seven years since Harold and Kumar were on our big screens? – to forge two striking career paths: One as a key part of a mega mainstream franchise in the Star Trek movies, the other as a lead in some of the most interesting breakout indie films of recent years. If you haven’t seen him in 2017’s moving and visually singular Columbus, you really should.

This month he runs straight through the middle of those two paths with Searching, a missing-child thriller full of mainstream pleasures – big twists, edge-of-your-seat suspense – told with indie innovation: The movie takes place entirely on screens, with FaceTime conversations, YouTube clips, Venmo accounts, and Google search bars somehow coming miraculously together to propel the story forward. None of it would work without a performance like Cho’s, who plays the father of the missing girl with a mix of determination and woundedness that never lets you forget the human story at the center of the technical wizardry.

Ahead of Searching’s release, Cho spoke with Rotten Tomatoes about his Five Favorite Films, which themselves mix very real emotion with innovative storytelling. He stressed that there were “25 I could have picked from,” but settled – at least on the day we spoke – for the five films below.


Sideways (2004) 97%

I hadn’t seen Sideways in a number of years, and recently saw it again, and sat down with it and was overwhelmed at how much more meaningful it had become in the years since I had seen it. I don’t know why – I guess it’s just really cheesy: Like wine, it had aged for me. (I’d take that out, that was so cheesy!). But it had matured for me as a story, or perhaps I had grownup to meet the story – it was so lyrical and so authentic in every moment. Stories about failure, to me, are more meaningful as I get older.

That movie also swings big, and that’s another thing that I like about it. That monologue, Virginia Madsen’s monologue… it’s just achingly romantic. [And] the end, where he drives up, sort of mirroring The Graduate, but it’s Dustin Hoffman, the loser version, which is way closer to me than the heroic version in The Graduate. [The movie] just keeps curving into itself, and out of itself, and it’s just an incredibly satisfying, enjoyable, meditative movie.

It’s got some incredible performances – everyone is a delight, everyone is just incredibly fun, and each scene has something interesting happening in it. [Sandra Oh] was another inspired bit of casting. Her mother, and the kid, and she’s amazing, and the motorcycle helmet rage was one of the most terrifying things I’ve seen on film – and a flopping penis, that’s always good.

The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

The Big Lebowski is like a bowl of noodles I could eat every single day, and it would be endlessly emitting new flavors. It’s just incredible. There is like an academic reading of Big Lebowski that you could go about on forever…this polemic about war, maybe specifically World War II, and then it’s like this commentary on Hollywood, like a spoof. Then, it’s just a great weed movie. And then the performances are just ridiculous. Jeff Bridges is doing, I mean, Olivier level acting.

It’s ridiculous that there’s a monologue in the limousine… he comes out of the limo that Maude sent him, and then another driver immediately – ­which is just the most hilarious visual, just going from one limo to another limo. Then, he gets in there holding his White Russian, and then has to explain himself, and he stammers, and each thought is so clear, but leads nowhere.

There are no scenes that aren’t fun. Also, I don’t understand the movie, which is kind of a great feeling to have. I don’t fully understand the plot, and I’ve seen it 100 times. It’s a very unique movie in the sense that I don’t know what’s going on every time I see it.

Goodfellas (1990) 96%

That’s sort of the oldest movie I still love, meaning a movie from my youth that I still can’t get enough of. It’s just so exciting, and – this is gonna sound douchey – there’s more propulsion to that movie than any movie that’s ever been made, it feels like. It’s just so fast. It’s like a car accelerating, and it just never stops accelerating. I mean, think about the beginning sequence of that movie: It’s so fun, and it ends with the coke sequence. I can’t imagine a movie that just keeps going that hard. It’s tremendous.

Obviously, [there’s] such a performance from Pesci. I am deathly afraid of this small man. And Bracco: She’s amazing. That to me is another thing – I love portrayals of weird marriages. I feel like Husbands and Wives is my favorite Woody Allen movie. [Goodfellas] is a perverse love story at the end of the day, and I love it.

Pulp Fiction (1994) 92%

It was such an important part of my youth. I think more than any other movie, it changed my idea of what movies were. I wasn’t an actor then, but Pulp Fiction sort of…How do I put it? It was what, as a young actor, [showed me] this is what we’re trying to do. We’re trying to be this vital. We’re trying to be this fun. We’re trying to break the rules this much. I think it changed American independent filmmaking.

For me, it was Travolta [who stood out]. I don’t know why. When I think of Pulp Fiction, the image I think about most is him getting blown away while reading Modesty Blaise on the can. Of all the images in Pulp Fiction, that’s the one that sticks in my head the most. We spent this whole movie falling in love with him, dancing with Uma Thurman, and accidentally blowing a guy’s head off. There’s so much going on, and then he meets his demise while reading a book while taking a shit, and there’s so much pathos in that image.

Lost in Translation (2003) 95%

Bill Murray, Scarlett Johansson. I was secretly thrilled that Sofia Coppola, who was panned for Godfather III, made such a triumphant movie so – it was so cool. I think it’s the single coolest movie I’ve ever seen. I haven’t revisited it in a long time, it just meant a lot to me at the time.

Partially, I think it’s like I identified very strongly with the idea of being a stranger. I could talk to my therapist for a long time about this, but for me, it was like an Asian-American movie, because the idea of being a stranger in Asia was, to me, more of an Asian-American experience than it was a white American experience. That portrayal felt very inside baseball to me, and I identified very strongly with it.

Perhaps it really is psychologically a commentary on me feeling Asian in white America, but I identified with that situation in a very personal way. It always meant more to me than I think the film should have, but I really have a lot of affection for it. I should revisit it, and I wonder if it’ll remain on my list, but I suspect it would.

Have you Googled around to find out what is said at the end, or all of the theories? 

There’s a French movie called La Belle Noiseuse. The movie is about the abusive relationship between a painter and his muse, and model. It’s a four-hour movie with a cigarette intermission, and they battle through the whole movie. He’s trying to make this painting that he was commissioned to make, and you never see what he’s painting, and at the end of the movie he delivers the painting to his patron, and it’s a beautiful painting, but then the filmmaker reveals that he has the real painting bricked up behind a wall, because the truth is that terrible, and you should not see the truth.

 

The Oscar nominations have just been announced, which means our long annual awards-season debate surrounding who should win, who might surprise us, and who got snubbed is just getting started. In anticipation of that mother of all awards ceremonies, let’s take an appreciative look back at some of the greatest films in Hollywood history that didn’t receive a single Oscar nomination — a list that, as you’ll see, includes more than a few timeless classics. No envelope, please… it’s time for Total Recall!


The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

In a filmography studded with cult classics, the Coen brothers’ The Big Lebowski might be the cultiest — which is to say that when it arrived in theaters, it landed with nowhere near the impact you might suspect today. In spite of a top-notch cast that included Jeff Bridges, John Goodman, Julianne Moore, and Philip Seymour Hoffman, as well as an eminently quotable screenplay whose storyline amiably loped between (often equally surreal) moments of comedy and drama, Lebowski eked out less than $20 million during its theatrical run, and although critics were generally kind, they weren’t exactly falling all over themselves to proclaim its everlasting virtues. The Coens had the last laugh in the long run, however — Oscars are nice, but how many movies have inspired their own religion?

Watch it here: Amazon, FandangoNOW, Google Play, iTunes


Breathless (1959) 97%

When Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless arrived in 1960, there was no way for critics to know they were witnessing one of the most influential works in all of cinema — as well as the arrival of one of the medium’s greatest auteurs. But everyone who saw it — including more than two million French filmgoers — knew they were watching something bold and new, and among cineastes, it was recognized as part of the emerging French New Wave. How it came up empty with the Academy is up for debate, but there’s no arguing its lasting impact; among directors as well as critics, Breathless is regularly cited on lists of the all-time greatest films.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


Bringing Up Baby (1938) 94%

The Oscars are traditionally fairly dismissive of comedies, and the list of classic laughers that deserved a nod from the Academy is long — but Bringing Up Baby, starring Cary Grant as an uptight zoologist and Katharine Hepburn as the ditz who turns his life upside down, belongs at or near the top. Critics were generally enthusiastic about Grant and Hepburn’s second big-screen pairing, but the audience’s response was decidedly mixed; despite strong receipts in a handful of locations, Baby landed with a thud in many parts of the country, and was only ultimately saved from the cultural dustbin thanks to a second life granted by television screenings more than a decade after it slunk out of theaters.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


Heat (1995) 87%

One of a handful of thrillers to make such stylishly effective use of its Los Angeles locations that the city is virtually a character unto itself, Michael Mann’s Heat might be hands down the sleekest cops-and-robbers suspense flick of the ’90s — which is really saying something, considering Mann had to weave a tangled web of plotlines involving a crowded, marquee-topping ensemble that included Robert De Niro and Al Pacino. Alas, not even the combined might of two of Hollywood’s greatest thespians could earn this classic heist picture any attention from the Academy. Mann’s next release, 1999’s The Insider, made up for lost opportunities with an impressive seven nominations — none of which, sadly, it won.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


King Kong (1933) 98%


A creature feature so massive that its very title can be used as a colloquialism for “big and powerful,” King Kong has been remade more than once over the years — and is being revisited again this year in Kong: Skull Island — yet the original remains one of the few classic black-and-white movies that many modern filmgoers have seen. A critical and commercial success, Kong set a thrilling new benchmark for special effects; unfortunately, the Oscars didn’t have a category for that type of achievement yet, but what it lacks in awards-season hardware, it’s clearly more than made up in lasting cultural impact.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


M (1931) 100%


The way we talk about director Fritz Lang today, you’d think he was swimming in awards during his lifetime, but in reality, he racked up an astonishing zero Oscar nominations — and that includes shameful goose eggs for his twin towers of cinematic achievement, Metropolis and M. The latter, Lang’s first talkie, uses sound in a number of inventive ways, including his enormously influential decision to make Grieg’s “In the Hall of the Mountain King” the recurring theme music for Peter Lorre’s villainous Hans Beckert. It’s gone on to be reissued numerous times, continuing all the while to enjoy near-universal critical acclaim; in fact, it’s one of a small handful of classic films to boast a 100 percent Tomatometer rating. An unfortunate oversight on the Academy’s part, but given that Lang’s name has become synonymous with groundbreaking genius among cinema buffs, it’s safe to say all’s well that ends well.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


Mean Streets (1973) 96%


Martin Scorsese’s long streak of Oscar futility really got going with 1973’s Mean Streets, which found the young director determined to make a personal film after the frustration of working for hire on Roger Corman’s Boxcar Bertha. Emboldened by disappointment and professional desperation, Scorsese drew on his roots in New York City’s Little Italy neighborhood to tell the story of an ambitious but conflicted young gangster (Harvey Keitel) and his fraught relationships with a young woman (Amy Robinson) and her brother (Robert De Niro), a small-time gambler with a volatile streak. Although Mean Streets whiffed at the Academy Awards, it started Scorsese on his way to elite filmmaker status — even if he did end up having to wait until 2007, and through five nominations, to win his first Best Director Oscar.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


Once Upon a Time in the West (1969) 95%


A mammoth revisionist Western before revisionist Westerns were cool, Sergio Leone’s Once Upon a Time in the West synthesized tropes from the already well-trod genre and fired them back at an audience not yet accustomed to seeing its frontier mythology deconstructed — and represented an artistic leap forward for Leone, who used a much slower pace and more realistic tone to tell the tale of an unsavory hired gun (Henry Fonda) whose campaign of terror against a railroad town is complicated by a lone vigilante (Charles Bronson) with a mysterious vendetta. Better late than never, West has steadily built a devoted following since its release, and influenced generations of America’s most popular filmmakers.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


The Shining (1980) 85%

Like comedy, horror hasn’t always found the warmest reception at the Academy, and a horror movie adapted from a bestseller by Stephen King — who hasn’t always been a critics’ darling himself — probably never stood a prayer of receiving Oscars recognition. On the other hand, the big-screen version of King’s The Shining boasted a stellar pedigree, both onscreen and behind the cameras; with Jack Nicholson starring opposite Shelley Duvall and Stanley Kubrick directing, this terrifying descent into snowbound madness could easily have earned a nomination or three. Alas, it came up empty, forever depriving Nicholson the opportunity to stroll up to the podium and shout, “Heeeeeeeeeeeeere’s Oscar!”

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes


Three Kings (1999) 94%

David O. Russell’s movies have piled up a number of Oscar nominations and wins over the years, and it’d be hard to argue he’s been unfairly ignored by the Academy. Still, looking back, it’s a little surprising to note that Russell’s Three Kings didn’t pick up a single nomination. A critical and commercial hit, this pitch-black satire of modern warfare and global American politics is the rare message movie that works as pure entertainment — and it found Russell employing a few nifty visual tricks, too. Any or all of the above might have been good for awards consideration; alas, Russell would have to content himself with the awards-season attention he’d generate in later years with movies like The Fighter, Silver Linings Playbook, and American Hustle.

Watch it here: AmazonFandangoNOWGoogle PlayiTunes

Photo by Rick Diamond / Getty Images

One of the films making waves at the Toronto International Film Festival this year is In the Radiant City, directed and co-written by Rachel Lambert. Having directed the short film Kin and the documentary Mom Jovi — which premiered at this year’s Nashville Film Festival — Radiant City is Lambert’s first scripted feature. Her background producing and writing for theatre doubly ensured her capacity for executing legitimate drama, be it on stage or screen. So, while her name may be new to you, her work experience is extensive and respected. Lambert is a true lover of film — something evidenced by her passion and thoughtfulness when discussing her five favorites with us. So check out the list here and get a head start on learning about this terrific up-and-coming talent:

 

The Godfather (1972) 97%

For one, I remember seeing it on the TNT marathon for a weird American holiday — a random birthday of a president or something — and they were doing this marathon, and I watched it and I watched it again and again and again on this marathon, and I couldn’t stop watching it. From that point on, I remember I went out and got the AFI top 100 list — back before you could look it up online — and I decided I was going to watch every single movie on that list.

Wonder Boys (2000) 81%

It’s dramatically different [from The Godfather] in terms of this town and the world of it. It’s a good movie, tremendously. I’m a writer, so obviously I enjoy the content because it’s about writer things and writer dramas and writer people. It’s just one of the funniest things I’ve ever seen. I can watch that movie over and over again. Robert Downey Jr. gives one of his best performances ever. And very funny. And I love Michael Douglas in it; he’s great. But it also has this wonderful capacity for pathos in this very earned way. It doesn’t feel kitsch. It feels really earned and honest, so it can play those lines really well.

The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

My remaining three I organized by directors because I was like, “OK, there are three directors that I adhere to like gospel,” and so I collected my favorite of each of theirs. The third one being The Big Lebowski by the Coen Brothers [Ethan and Joel], because I think that if you can’t enjoy that movie than I don’t think we could ever be friends. It’s like a rule in my life. There is no way I could ever be friends with someone who didn’t find that entertaining and funny.

Is that the first thing you ask when you meet somebody?

“Hi, my name is Rachel. Did you like The Big Lebowski? No? Get out of my face. Get out [laughing].” I was really, really debating between that and Inside Llewyn Davis. I went with Big Lebowski because I thought, “Which one could I not live without?” That’s the one. I couldn’t live without it. A perfect example of why that movie is just so smart and so unexpected is they found the space in the narrative to have them all go to his landlord’s dance rehearsal — or dance recital, actually. They found space and made sure to take an afternoon to go to the landlord’s dance performance! I’ve never seen a movie make time for that. I thought it was brilliant, and I’m like, “Yeah , of course he’d go. That’s the kind of guy who would go. He said he was going to go, so he’d go.” I just thought that was genius.

Magnolia (1999) 83%

Paul Thomas Anderson. Magnolia. I just really love it. I mean, yeah, There Will be Blood is also a close contender; I love that too. But Magnolia — the audacity of it. I watched that movie and it’s scary by the end of it [laughing]. You’ve gone through this sort of tapestry of humanity that I feel is very hard to match in a lot of cinema these days. He is always surprising me, but that movie just… He finds a way to get the drama — he has a moment where everyone starts breaking out in unified song. And it feels totally authentic and earned. I’ve never seen a movie that does that but didn’t feel indulgent.

Jackie Brown (1997) 87%

Since I love Quentin Tarantino, I went with Jackie Brown – that’s my favorite Quentin Tarantino film. I could go on and on about why Tarantino is a master of dialogue and writing — I mean I love The Hateful Eight; I think that’s sort of genius of him as a director — but Jackie Brown is such a perfectly contained piece. It’s exciting but also has these perfectly human moments where characters are talking about growing older, and they ally themselves in this plot not because of… I mean there is gain financially and there is gain for personal reasons, but there is also this sort of camaraderie that’s born. It’s also incredibly clever and funny. I just love that. I love the soundtrack as well. You can’t love a Tarantino film and not love the soundtrack. I’m not gonna lie, I’ve strutted down New York City streets to Quentin Tarantino soundtracks! That’s for real. But I mean Jackie Brown is amazing, centered, and  [has] these unexpected characters. Samuel Jackson gives the performance of a lifetime.


In the Radiant City is premiering at the Toronto International Film Festival.

This week’s Ketchup brings you another ten headlines from the world of film development news (those stories about what movies Hollywood is working on for you next). Included in the mix this time around are stories about such titles as The Little Mermaid, the Blade Runner sequel, and remakes of both Clue and Witness for the Prosecution.


This WEEK’S TOP STORY

FERRELL AND REILLY TO REUNITE AS SLEUTHS HOLMES AND WATSON

August 4th, 2016 marked the 10th anniversary of the release of Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby, starring Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly, who also costarred together in 2008’s Step Brothers. Over the last eight years, Ferrell and Reilly have considered other projects to be their third movie together (including the possibility of a Step Brothers sequel), but none of them have come to fruition yet. Based on the language in this week’s announcement, it’s sounding like that third Ferrell/Reilly movie will be a detective comedy called Holmes and Watson. As the title suggests, Holmes and Watson will be based upon the characters Sherlock Holmes and Doctor John Watson, as created by Arthur Conan Doyle, and as previously adapted to film dozens of times. John C. Reilly is actually replacing Sacha Baron Cohen (Borat, The Dictator), who had previously been attached to costar as Watson. In addition to starring, Ferrell is also producing via his Gary Sanchez production company for Sony Pictures, and filming is expected to start later this year after the Thanksgiving holiday. It’s not yet known if Holmes and Watson will retain the 19th century setting of Doyle’s stories, or if the characters will still be British (Ferrell and Reilly are both Americans, but so is Robert Downey Jr). There’s no release date for Holmes and Watson yet, but Warner Bros may give it competition relatively soon, as Robert Downey Jr, Jude Law, and director Guy Ritchie have been talking about making a third Sherlock Holmes movie for a few years now.  On TV, the fourth season of the contemporary Sherlock, starring Benedict Cumberbatch and Martin Freeman, is expected to air on BBC and PBS in 2017. Holmes and Watson will be directed by Etan Cohen (Get Hard) from his own screenplay (Cohen also previously wrote Men in Black 3, and cowrote Idiocracy, Tropic Thunder, and Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa).


Fresh Developments

1. BEN AFFLECK TO REMAKE 1957 CLASSIC WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION

Even as yet another remake (Ben-Hur) goes into the weekend with a Rotten Tomatometer score and low box office expectations, Hollywood is still developing new remakes of classic late-1950s movies. Within the larger trend of remakes, this particular story is part of a more specific group at 20th Century Fox, which has committed to remaking movies based on Agatha Christie mysteries (the first such film being next year’s Murder on the Orient Express, scheduled for November 22, 2017). The 1974 Murder on the Orient Express was nominated for six Academy Awards (and won one for Ingrid Bergman), and this week’s news concerns a remake of another film which was also nominated for six Academy Awards. 20th Century Fox is reportedly finalizing negotiations with their former Daredevil star Ben Affleck to direct and star in a remake of 1957’s Witness for the Prosecution. Although the prospect of a remake of Witness for the Prosecution doesn’t otherwise seem particularly Fresh, Affleck is currently 3-for-3 as a director (Gone Baby Gone, The Town, and Argo are all Certified Fresh). Witness for the Prosection is a legal mystery drama about a man accused of murder whose wife is called to testify against him because she was already married to someone else (making their marriage illegal, and thus, removing the marital legal protections). Sir Charles Laughton played the attorney in the original film, and Tyrone Power (in his last role) played the accused, but it’s not yet known which character Ben Affleck might be playing. Affleck’s next film as director will be Live by Night (1/13/16), and he is also expected to direct the next solo Batman movie (release date TBD), so it may be a while yet before Witness for the Prosecution gets remade.


2. JARED LETO JOINING HARRISON FORD IN BLADE RUNNER SEQUEL

If you only saw one thing in your social networking feed(s) this week about actor Jared Leto, it might have had something to do with his recent supervillain adventure, Suicide Squad. Specifically, at a fan event for his band Thirty Seconds to Mars, Leto was quoted (and caught on video) saying that he felt “tricked” into appearing in the film as the Joker, dropping an “F bomb” directed at his studio employers. All of that may eventually require Ben Affleck and Warner Bros to find a new actor to play the Joker in the solo Batman movie (a la Mark Ruffalo replacing Edward Norton as Banner/Hulk), but that remains to be seen. In the meantime, Jared Leto has joined the cast of the sequel to Blade Runner, which already included Harrison Ford, Ryan Gosling, Barkhad Abdi, Dave Bautista, Mackenzie Davis, and Robin Wright. (Back in 2014, there had been rumors that Gosling might have played the Joker in Suicide Squad before Jared Leto signed on.) Whatever this Blade Runner sequel ends up being called, it will be directed Denis Villeneuve (Sicario, The Arrival) and it is scheduled for release on October 6, 2017.


3. JOHN “JESUS” TURTURRO TO STAR IN A BIG LEBOWSKI SPINOFF

In the 18 years since the Coen brothers directed The Big Lebowski, the film —  starring Jeff Bridges as “The Dude” — has taken on a new life as one of the few true cult films of the last 20 years, including festivals devoted specifically to the film, and so, so, so much merchandising. Joel and Ethan Coen wrote, directed, and produced The Big Lebowski based on their own characters, so this week’s news comes as quite a surprise. The Coens have apparently given John Turturro their approval to write, direct, and star in a spinoff of The Big Lebowski, focused on Turturro’s “Jesus Quintana” bowling enthusiast. The independent film in question is called Going Places, and it is also an English language remake of the 1974 French sex comedy Les Valseuses (which is French slang for testicles). John Turturro is already filming Going Places, and other cast members include Bobby Cannavale, Audrey Tautou, and Susan Sarandon. It appears that Turturro is playing the character originally played by Gerard Depardieu in the sex/crime comedy about two criminals on the run who compete for the “romantic” affections of Tautou’s character (with Sarandon playing an ex-con recently out of prison). Although the original has a Fresh Tomatometer score, not all critics agreed; Roger Ebert gave it a score of just 1 star out of 5, writing that it was “the most misogynistic movie I can remember; its hatred of women is palpable and embarrassing.” John Turturro’s remake is a tentative “Fresh Development” based on the Tomatometer score for both Les Valseuses and the Coens’ fan favorite, The Big Lebowski.


4. HAMILTON STAR LIN-MANUEL MIRANDA TO WRITE NEW SONGS FOR THE LITTLE MERMAID

The 1989 animated Disney musical The Little Mermaid is widely beloved (and credited for Waking Sleeping Beauty), so it was probably inevitable that the studio’s “live action fairy tale” plans would eventually include The Little Mermaid. We heard as much earlier this year, but this week brought the first substantial news that the studio is actively developing their new Little Mermaid. Walt Disney Pictures has hired longtime Disney composer Alan Menken (whose credits include, yes, The Little Mermaid) and Hamilton star Lin-Manuel Miranda to start work on new songs for the live-action remake. Miranda will also be producing the new film (though it’s unconfirmed whether he will also costar), and it will be the third major project at Disney for him, as he also wrote all of the songs for this year’s Moana, and he will also star in the sequel Mary Poppins Returns. British actor Ben Whishaw (the most recent “Q” from the James Bond movies) also made the news this week because he is now in talks with Disney to costar in Mary Poppins Returns as the adult version of Michael Banks. The sequel is set 25 years later after the movie starring Julie Andrews, with Emily Blunt signed to play the nanny the second time around. Walt Disney Pictures has scheduled Mary Poppins Returns for release on December 25, 2018.


5. KEIRA KNIGHTLEY CAST AS THE SUGAR PLUM FAIRY IN DISNEY’S THE NUTCRACKER AND THE FOUR REALMS

When Disney releases Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales next year (5/26/17), Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, and Geoffrey Rush are all expected to return, but one costar of the first film who will not is Keira Knightley. That doesn’t mean, however, that Knightley is any sort of persona non grata at Disney, since the actress made some pretty big casting news at the Mouse House this week. Knightley has signed with Disney to costar in The Nutcracker and the Four Realms, the studio’s live action adaptation of the 1816 fairy tale by E.T.A. Hoffman, The Nutcracker and the Mouse King. Knightley will be playing the Sugar Plum Fairy, and she will join the already cast Mackenzie Foy (as Clara), Morgan Freeman, and Misty Copeland as the lead toy dancing ballerina. Keira Knightley also made the news this week for negotiations to star in an adaptation of the bestselling novel The Aftermath, as one half of a British couple staying in the ruins of Hamburg, Germany, as the rebuilding effort begins in 1946. Alexander Skarsgard (The Legend of Tarzan) is also in talks to star in The Aftermath, as is Jason Clarke (Zero Dark Thirty, Terminator: Genisys).


6. CUE THE INTERNET OUTRAGE: ZENDAYA TO PLAY (SPOILER?) IN SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

First, we should note that this week’s news is almost certainly not a spoiler for next summer’s Spider-Man: Homecoming, as it seems extremely unlikely that the trailers wouldn’t be pretty clear about which character we’re talking about. Having said that, since Sony Pictures and Marvel Studios referred to the character in question as “Michelle” (not really her name), we want to respect whatever secrecy they’re striving for. The movie blog The Wrap has confirmed through two sources in the know that the character 19-year-old Disney star Zendaya will be playing in Spider-Man: Homecoming is none other than future romantic interest Mary Jane Watson, a role previously played by Kirsten Dunst in Sam Raimi’s trilogy. As for the expected “internet outrage,” as Devin Faraci of Birth.Movies.Death puts it, “You thought the internet got upset when they cast people with the wrong hair color, imagine how Reddit is gonna react to this.” Mary Jane Watson will not be the only traditionally white character who will be played in Spider-Man: Homecoming by an actor of a different race, as Zendaya’s costars include Tony Revolori (Flash Thompson), Jacob Batalon (Ned Leeds), and Laura Harrier (Liz Allan). Marvel and Sony have scheduled Spider-Man: Homecoming for release on July 7, 2017.


7. BAM! POW! WEST! WARD! NEWMAR! BATMAN: RETURN OF THE CAPED CRUSADERS!

After the two “grimdark” films directed by Zack Snyder (Man of Steel – 55 percent Rotten, and Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice  – 27 percent Rotten), Warner Bros and DC Comics recently gave us another grimdark film (with a few more jokes) in Suicide Squad, and critics gave it the lowest scores of the three. The verdict is (obviously) still out on the next few DC Comics movies (next year’s Wonder Woman and Justice League), but Warner Bros gave a brief theatrical release to their latest animated movie, and it was also critically ill-received. Despite its title — borrowed from Alan Moore’s 1980s story — Batman: The Killing Joke had very little humor and a tacked-on first half hour which drifted far afield from Moore’s version, and critics gave it a Rotten 48 percent score. So, since the dark and serious thing doesn’t appear to be working (at least not critically) for Warner Bros and DC Comics, perhaps that’s why the studio made the surprise announcement this week that their next animated film will see a drastic return to arguably the most lighthearted version of Batman ever. Adam West, Burt Ward, and Julie Newmar will be providing their voices for Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders, a new feature length animated adventure which will revive the 1960s TV versions of Batman, Robin, and Catwoman (with other newer actors voicing characters like the Joker, the Penguin, and the Riddler).   This decidedly lighter animated movie will premiere on digital HD on October 11th and on Blu-ray on November 1, 2016. It is not yet known if Warner Bros plans on giving Batman: Return of the Caped Crusaders a theatrical release, but we didn’t expect one for Batman: The Killing Joke either when it was first announced.


ROTTEN IDEAS OF THE WEEK

2. MOVIE PROJECTS PERRY MASON AND JACK RYAN BOTH BECOMING TV SHOWS INSTEAD

Sometimes when we set out to say movie news stories are Fresh or Rotten, it’s not exactly that simple. For example, what might be “bad” for the movie might be “good” in other ways. We’re wrapping the column this week with two announcements about projects that were formerly “movies” which will now be going to television instead (and who knows, they might be great TV shows).  The spin we’re going to put on both is that if you’re a fan who was really looking forward to seeing these as movies, then it’s bad news for you (and potentially good news for other people). First up, there’s the long-in-development adaptation of the TV series Perry Mason, which Robert Downey Jr is producing and will star in. It’s now sounding like RDJ’s Perry Mason project will instead be developed as a series for HBO, and not as a theatrical film. The first step is to write and produce a pilot for HBO, and that’s what Downey’s partners are now working on, it seems. A similar project (which is further along) concerns the future of Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan, after the relatively recent movie starring Chris Pine was something of a box office bomb. Amazon has given the greenlight to a 10-episode season of Jack Ryan, with John Krasinski the latest actor to try his hand at going where the likes of Harrison Ford, Alec Baldwin, and Ben Affleck have been in the past.


1. BOARD GAME CLUE TO GET ANOTHER MOVIE ADAPTATION

Back in 2008, Universal Pictures and Hasbro (the toy/game company) announced an ambitious development slate which included Monopoly, Candyland, Magic: The Gathering, Stretch Armstrong (all of which didn’t happen), and Battleship and Ouija (both of which did happen). Among the listed projects was also a new movie based on the board game Clue, following the popular 1985 film starring Tim Curry, Christopher Lloyd, Madeline Kahn, and several others. A few years later, however, Universal Pictures put the Clue movie into turnaround (which basically means other studios can pick up the rights, sometimes at a discount). It took a few more years, but this week, it was revealed that another studio is indeed now developing a new Clue movie. The rights to Clue have landed at Fox, but the details about what they’re planning make it difficult to exactly call their Clue a “remake.” Instead of centering on a murder mystery at a mansion (which the first movie did as a fairly direct adaptation of the game), this new project will be a “worldwide mystery… with action-adventure elements, potentially setting up a possible franchise that could play well internationally.” Put another way, this sounds like a Clue movie which is not really a Clue movie, in which the real mystery would be why it’s even called Clue.

This week on streaming video, we’ve got some beloved classics from the 1980s and 1990s, a handful of fan favorites, and some worthy recent indies, among others. Read on for the full list.


New on Netflix

 

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982) 99%

Steven Spielberg’s family classic — the tale of a young boy named Elliott who discovers an orphaned alien in his backyard — boasts one of the most beloved movie characters in history.

Available now on: Netflix


Hush (2016) 93%

This psychological thriller centers on a deaf writer who is terrorized by a masked man who traps her in her remote house in the woods.

Available now on: Netflix


The Hallow (2015) 70%

This horror film revolves around a scientist whose study of an Irish forest conjures an assortment of malevolent supernatural beings.

Available now on: Netflix


The Beauty Inside (2015) 70%

In this romantic comedy from South Korea, a man who wakes up each day in the body of a different person must figure out how to return to his own body and reunite with his beloved.

Available now on: Netflix


New on Hulu

 

The Book of Negroes: Season 1 (2015) 100%

Aunjanue Ellis stars in this BET original period miniseries about a black woman during the Revolutionary War whose help is enlisted to secure freedom and passage to Nova Scotia for British Black Loyalists.

Available now on: Hulu


New on Amazon Prime

 

Lars and the Real Girl (2007) 81%

Ryan Gosling, Emily Mortimer, Patricia Clarkson, Kelli Garner, and Paul Schneider star is this dramedy about a socially-withdrawn twentysomething who treats a life-size sex doll as his girlfriend.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

Sometimes, there’s a movie. And I’m talkin’ about The Big Lebowski here. Sometimes, there’s a movie, well, it’s the movie for its time and place. It fits right in there.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Ferris Bueller's Day Off (1986) 81%

Matthew Broderick stars in John Hughes’ 1980s classic about a teenage iconoclast who takes his best pal on a wild tour of Chicago in an effort to cheer him up.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Little Girl Who Lives Down the Lane (1976) 93%

Martin Sheen and a young Jodie Foster star in this psychological horror film about a young girl who harbors a dark secret about her absent father.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Bananas (1971) 83%

In this early comedy from Woody Allen, a neurotic New Yorker inadvertently becomes the leader of a South American country, and hilarity ensues.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Amistad (1997) 77%

Matthew McConaughey, Morgan Freeman, and Anthony Hopkins headline Steven Spielberg’s Certified Fresh historical drama about a mutiny aboard a slave ship in 1839 and the court battle that ensued.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


You've Got Mail (1998) 70%

Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan star in Nora Ephron’s romantic comedy about two rival bookstore owners who unwittingly fall in love with each other online.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


The Devil's Advocate (1997) 63%

Keanu Reeves, Al Pacino, and Charlize Theron star in this thriller about a young hotshot lawyer who suspects his new boss is more than merely an attorney.

Available now on: Amazon Prime


Available to Purchase

 

The Invitation (2015) 89%

Michiel Huisman, Tammy Blanchard, and John Carroll Lynch star in Karyn Kusama’s Certified Fresh thriller about a man who is invited to a dinner party hosted by his ex-wife and her new husband, but suspects dark ulterior motives.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu


Krampus (2015) 67%

Toni Collette, Adam Scott, Allison Tolman, and David Koechner star in a holiday horror/comedy about a Christmas spirit who bedevils anyone who refuses to participate in holiday cheer.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu


Joy (2015) 60%

Directed by David O. Russell, Joy stars Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, and Robert De Niro in a drama based on the life of Miracle Mop inventor Joy Mangano.

Available now on: AmazoniTunes, Vudu

For more than two and a half decades now, Joel and Ethan Coen have been thrilling critics — and, here and there, audiences — with their distinctive blend of dark humor, colorful violence, and singular visual flair. Not all of the Coens’ films have been critical darlings (alas, poor Ladykillers), but with lifetime Tomatometers above 80 percent, the brothers are easily two (or is that one?) of the most respected directors in the business. Their latest effort, Hail, Caesar!, hit theaters this week, and to celebrate, we’ve collected their most definitive directorial efforts, Total Recall style!


Blood Simple (1984) 94%

BloodSimple

Combining the shocks of a slasher film with the moral ambiguity and twisty plotting of film noir, the Coens’ debut, Blood Simple, shook American independent cinema to its core. Creepy and deliriously malevolent, it’s the story of a bar owner who hires a sketchy private eye to kill his cheating wife (Frances McDormand); double and triple crosses and bloody mayhem ensues. With their first film, the Coens showed an aptitude for the stylistic quirks that would become their trademark — namely, a love of the ghoulish balanced with a loopy sense of humor. The Palo Alto Weekly’s Jeanne Aufmuth identified what would become recurring themes in their work when she wrote, “The Coens’ complicated sense of the surreal is consistently entertaining, down to the fleeting, oddball cameos and distinctly weird scripting.”

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Raising Arizona (1987) 91%

RaisingArizona

The first Coen brothers film to display their knack for quirky comedy, Raising Arizona helped seal the filmmakers’ reputation and cement their loyal following. Nicolas Cage and Holly Hunter are brilliantly cast as a cop and ex-con husband/wife duo who resolve their infertility with kidnapping. Though not their biggest hit, it’s infinitely quotable (“Edwina’s insides were a rocky place where my seed could find no purchase”), and the original score by Carter Burwell is not to be ignored. As the New Times’ Luke Y. Thompson ruefully sighed, “Nic Cage may never be better.”

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Miller's Crossing (1990) 92%

MillersCrossing

As an homage to classic gangster movies, Miller’s Crossing is hypercharged; the language is harsher, the violence more brutal, the plotting more labyrinthine. Albert Finney and Gabriel Byrne star as Irish mobsters, threatened externally by the Italian mob and internally by their shared love of a woman (Marcia Gay Harden). This intriguing tale of loyalty features impeccable 1920s decor and a streak of dark humor; it’s arguably the Coens’ most straightforward work. Combustible Celluloid’s Jeffrey M. Anderson concluded, “it’s one of their best, most cohesive films and it holds up to repeated viewings.”

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Barton Fink (1991) 90%

BartonFink

Legend has it the Coens had such a bad case of writers’ block while writing Miller’s Crossing that they took three weeks off to script Barton Fink, a 1930s-set black comedy about — what else? — a Hollywood scribe with writer’s block. A fledgling New York playwright who sells out (at the cost of… his soul!) and moves to the City of Angels, Barton Fink (played marvelously by Coen regular John Turturro) holes up in the seamy Hotel Earle, where exquisitely dismal wallpaper peels off the walls as a heat wave sweats the city. The mercury rises further when Barton’s gregarious neighbor (John Goodman) is around; almost hellishly so, you might say. But as every smart filmmaker is wont to do, the Coens offer no overt explanations of what’s really going on — just a well-told tale with visual imagery aplenty, and an ode to the sometimes infernal nature of the creative process. Describing it as “gnomic, claustrophobic, hallucinatory, just plain weird,” Time’s Richard Schickel lauded Barton Fink as “the kind of movie critics can soak up thousands of words analyzing and cinephiles can soak up at least three espressos arguing their way through.”

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Fargo (1996) 94%

Fargo

Prior to No Country For Old Men, the macabre, pitch-black comedy Fargo was the Coens’ most decorated film, with seven Oscar nominations and two wins: Best Actress (Frances McDormand) and Best Original Screenplay. Fargo details a ransom kidnap scheme gone wrong, with very pregnant cop McDormand investigating the crime as the bumbling perpetrators attempt to cover their tracks. The Coens’ bleak humor and taste for blood and violence never mixed as well as it did in Minnesota, so the people over at FX decided to create an offshoot television series — with the Coens on board as executvie producers — and it’s gone on to win some awards of its own. According to Kevin N. Laforest of the Montreal Film Journal, “This is truly a brilliant film, the kind you don’t see often. Intelligent, raw, funny, daring and unique, pure cinematic delight from start to end.”

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The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

BigLebowski

Though many of the Coens’ films can be labeled cult classics, perhaps none embody the term more than The Big Lebowski. Jeff Bridges stars as pot-smoking slacker hero Jeffrey “The Dude” Lebowski, who seeks restitution for his rug, urinated on by a pair of gangsters who mistook him for a different Lebowski — namely, the “big” one (played by David Huddleston). Along with his bowling buddies, The Dude embarks on a wild chase that’s as funny, depraved, and plain unpredictable as Los Angeles always feels like it should be. Not all critics were willing to join The Dude’s steadily growing cult — Todd McCarthy of Variety sniffed that the movie “Adds up to considerably less than the sum of its often scintillating parts” — but in the end, as Chuck O’Leary of FulvueDrive-in.com wrote, “It’s pretty much impossible not to love The Dude.”

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O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000) 78%

Obrother2

With O Brother, Where Art Thou?, the Coen brothers took their thriller tropes (ill-fated criminal plans, ironic stereotypes, and a detached tone) and magically applied it towards an Odyssey-inspired farce. Starring George Clooney as the beleaguered but resourceful Odysseus, O Brother is a sepia-toned fantasia of throwaway jokes, slapstick, and killer bluegrass. In fact, the music proved popular enough to spawn a virtual cottage industry with multiple soundtracks, a documentary, and even a national tour. “The surprise is how much fruitful digression such plotlessness makes possible,” quipped Geoff Pevere of the Toronto Star. “With no particular place to go, this hobo of a movie is free to roam the damnedest places.”

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No Country for Old Men (2007) 93%

NoCountryOldMen

Though the Coens have long been revered for their intermittently manic and macabre storylines, they’ve never made Oscar bait. It’s perhaps logical, then, that the massive Academy sweep they enjoyed with No Country for Old Men seemed like overdue praise. In No Country, based on the stoic anti-western novel by Cormack McCarthy, Josh Brolin’s protagonist sees a way out of his trailer in a bag of bloodied bills. Chance and destiny are invoked in the most resonant, least pretentious way in the sinister form of Anton Chigurh (Best Supporting Actor Javier Bardem), the hit man who coldly and relentlessly hunts Brolin’s Llewelyn. No Country is impeccable: the cinematography is breathtaking, the dialogue efficient, and the direction assured. Yet instead of the terse comic punch we’ve come to expect from the Coens, No Country takes a more dangerous tack with its morbid themes. With all the cards (and coins) falling tidily into place, this film presented the brothers as a truly mature filmmaking team, possibly at the peak of their careers — a sentiment echoed by Peter Keough of the Boston Phoenix, who proclaimed, “No Country for Old Men is the brothers at their most polished, austere, and humorless.”

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True Grit (2010) 95%

TrueGritStars

It takes some major stones to step into John Wayne’s boots for a remake of one of the Duke’s classic pictures, so even if the Coen brothers’ True Grit had well and truly stunk, we’d have to give their version credit for having something extra in its saddlebag — namely Jeff Bridges, who took the role of the cantankerous Rooster Cogburn and made it his own. Of course, it didn’t hurt that Bridges (in vintage late-period marble-mouthed form) was surrounded by an ace supporting cast that included Matt Damon and Hailee Steinfeld, or that the Coens went back to Charles Portis’ original novel for inspiration; in the end, the result was a career-launching hit for Steinfeld, a mainstream hit for the Coens, and another critically acclaimed outing for Bridges — all of whom earned Oscar nominations for their work. As Claudia Puig observed for USA Today, “Joel and Ethan Coen have pulled off an impressive feat: repurposing a classic film with their idiosyncratic blend of dark, deadpan humor and palpable suspense, while remaining ultra-faithful to the novel.”

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Inside Llewyn Davis (2013) 92%

InsideLlewynDavis

A brilliantly cast ensemble period drama shot through with pitch-black, borderline misanthropic humor and topped off with a killer soundtrack, Inside Llewyn Davis checks off any number of the boxes filmgoers have learned to associate with the Coen brothers, so it’s very much to the film’s credit that it somehow manages to feel fresh anyway. This is due in no small part to the work of Oscar Isaac, who plays the titular struggling folk musician with an utter lack of vanity while infusing the character with enough essential humanity to temper his overall lack of likability — and to the Coens’ screenplay, which serves as a savagely honest, yet ultimately affectionate, look at the self-delusional struggle for artistic purity as a means to its own end. “It may be the Coen Brothers playing well inside their comfort zone,” wrote Scott Mendelson for Forbes, “but what a fine and thoughtful comfort zone it is.”

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ColinHanksFFF

(Photo by Andrew H. Walker / Staff / Getty Images)

He’s the son of the nicest guy in Hollywood, Tom Hanks, but Colin Hanks has carved out a distinctive niche of his own in the movie business. He made his debut in That Thing You Do! and broke out as a star in his own right in 2002’s Orange County. He’s worked steadily in film and television, including gigs on Roswell, The Good Guys, Dexter, and Fargo, and he can currently be seen on the sitcom Life In Pieces. After directing a documentary short last year, Hanks’ first documentary feature film, All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records, opens this Friday. We spoke with Hanks about his Five Favorite Films and the allure of Tower Records.

The Big Lebowski (1998) 83%

Let’s start with The Big Lebowski. I remember seeing this film. I was studying in Germany at the time, and I remember loving Fargo so much — that was my first introduction to the Coen brothers — and I was so excited that they had a new movie out. So I went to some German cinema to go see The Big Lebowski. It was in English, but with German subtitles. I remember watching the movie and just being incredibly disappointed. I really did not like the movie. Probably about four years later, I rewatched it and I instantly said, “I’ve never been so wrong in my entire life.This is one of the funniest films I’ve ever seen.” It’s incredibly well-written, the characters are hilarious, the performances are so nuanced and so deep it’s almost mind-boggling. A lot of the times you do scenes and you just sort of come up with these happy accidents and it just seems like almost everything in there could not have been a happy accident; surely it must have been thought out. I just think it is such an original, fun film and it is quite honestly one of the most quotable films of the last fifty years in my opinion. I think there are so many quotes in there that I realized how foolish I was that first time. I think maybe I was just so excited that I was drinking a beer in a movie theater; maybe that’s why.

Pulp Fiction (1994) 92%

Pulp Fiction was a very big deal for me. That was the first film I remember seeing where I felt compelled to have a conversation afterwards with anyone who saw it. Prior to that, I was still a young kid; I was still in high school, and I would see movies and I would be like, “Oh that was great,” and move on. But that was one that stuck with me for so long; the performances and the dialogue were just so memorable. I just wanted to talk to whoever had seen it. I just felt like it was something you needed to talk about. And obviously that was a film that really changed the direction of film history for a great many people, myself included.  

Star Wars: Episode V -- The Empire Strikes Back (1980) 94%

I really, genuinely don’t like favorite lists because you always leave stuff out. So there are a lot of important films I could put in like The Godfather Part II, perhaps, or The Godfather Part I, but I’m going to go with The Empire Strikes Back for number three only because it’s Empire Strikes Back! I don’t think I need to say why. It’s so good. It takes what arguably could be just a simple science fiction movie and really takes it to this other place that is just so engaging and so believable and dramatic as well. Not overly dramatic, but dramatic. I love that film a great deal.

Dazed and Confused (1993) 92%

Number four would be Dazed and Confused. That was the movie that you saw and you wished it were your life. [laughs] That was a movie that I would watch all the time. I had it on VHS and whenever I was lonely, I’d throw it on. Whenever I wished I was out and about with friends from school, I would just throw that on and felt like I knew [the characters]. That was just one of those films that I just related to at that time. It was incredibly important and it’s another quotable film. I love it.

Red Hot Chili Peppers - Off the Map (2001)

The last film I’m going to list is a documentary about Red Hot Chili Peppers recording Blood Sugar Sex Magik that was called Funky Monks. It’s about an hour long, it’s shot in black and white, and it’s about them recording Blood Sugar Sex Magik in this house in Beverly Hills. Blood Sugar Sex Magik was arguably the most important album of my young adult life. It sort of put me on my musical path. I guess now, looking back on it, it’s not at all ironic that Funky Monks was the first documentary that I ever watched. It sort of set me on a documentary path, where it wasn’t just narrative movies that interested me, but also real-life stories told in documentary form were now available to me. It greatly influenced me, not only in the Tower Records documentary, but also in all the documentary work that I’ve done. It is, I find, an incredibly engaging film about a subject that I am very passionate about, which is that particular record, and that particular time, not only for that band, but for music in general.


Marya E. Gates for Rotten Tomatoes: What is it about Tower Records that moved you to make a documentary on the company?

Colin Hanks: I spent a lot of time at Tower Records. I bought the Red Hot Chili Peppers doc there. I bought albums there. It was very instrumental for me growing up. I didn’t have a sweet tooth, so I spent all my money at the record shop, not at the candy store. So Tower was one of those places where you could really discover yourself and decide who you wanted to be. I was able to do that at Tower Records, and although I have a deep connection to the store, there was a lot about it’s history that I didn’t know and I saw an opportunity here in which here’s this incredibly beloved company, that everyone sort of thinks they know what the history is, and chances are they don’t. Chances are, there’s a lot about its history that people are not aware of, that is not only engaging storytelling, but also the characters that worked at Tower, the people that shopped at Tower, the people that spent 30, 40 years of their life working at this company, they’re all incredibly engaging, fun people to speak with. I hope that when people see the film, they not only learn a little bit about a company that they thought they knew a lot about, but hopefully they realize that Tower closing its doors wasn’t just a big company, some faceless corporation, but it was actually people that had spent 30, 40 years of their lives getting to know each other, getting married, having kids, getting divorced, going through all of the big moments of their lives and then all having to fire each other, and how difficult that was. Hopefully it puts a little personal perspective onto a company that a lot of people have a great affinity for.


All Things Must Pass: The Rise and Fall of Tower Records opens this weekend in limited release.

Life in Pieces airs on CBS at 8:30/7:30c on Mondays.

Marjane Satrapi’s dark comedy starring Ryan Reynolds is the only brand new release available to stream this week, but the entire Star Wars series is also newly available, as well as some choice selections on Netflix, like The Big Lebowski, Gladiator, and American Psycho, just to name a few. Read on for the full list.


Star Wars: The Digital Movie Collection

If you’re looking forward to the new chapter in the Star Wars saga coming this year, you might be interested in rewatching all six previous installments. And now you can, thanks to a few streaming providers. (Available beginning on April 10.)

Available now on: Amazon, iTunes, Vudu, Google Play


The Voices
74%

Ryan Reynolds, Gemma Arterton, and Anna Kendrick star in this pitch-black comedy about an oddball factory worker with a collection of severed heads in his freezer.

Available now on: iTunes, Vudu, Google Play


Louie: Season Four

In this quasi-autobiographical FX series, Louis CK plays himself, a stand-up comedian and single dad living in New York City.

Available now on: Netflix


Titanic
89%

In James Cameron’s multiple Oscar-winning romance, Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet play star-crossed lovers who meet aboard the ill-fated ocean liner. He teachers her how to spit.

Available now on: Netflix


The Big Lebowski
83%

Sometimes, there’s a movie. And I’m talkin’ about The Big Lebowski here. Sometimes, there’s a movie, well, it’s the movie for its time and place. It fits right in there.

Available now on: Netflix