(Photo by Warner Bros. / courtesy Everett Collection)

All Jim Carrey Movies Ranked by Tomatometer

Earth Girls Are Easy sounds like one of those debased projects that occur either at the beginning of a career, out of naivete, or at the end of one, out of desperation. But we doubt Jim Carrey looks back on the 1988 comedy with embarassment, and probably not his co-stars Jeff Goldblum, Damon Wayans, and Geena Davis either. It’s silly, it’s Fresh, and it helped Carrey land In Living Color. And that show helped make the man who would talk out of his ass on the big screen, to the delight of millions. Ace Ventura: Pet Detective made over $100 million, and that was the lowest-grossing of Carrey’s comedies that year, behind Dumb & Dumber and The Mask.

After that breakout in 1994, Carrey was locked and loaded to be the manic centerpiece of 1995’s summer blockbuster event: Playing the Riddler in Batman Forever. The comic book caper was the highest-grossing movie of the year… the same couldn’t be said about 1996’s The Cable Guy, Carrey’s first box office bomb. Fret not: He sprung back in 1997 with Liar Liar, and The Truman Show in 1998.

Part of Carrey’s early enduring quality was a subtle sensitivity hiding beneath the flailing limbs and facial contortions, and the sudden pathos that could erupt from his oddball characters. Carrey began displaying this knack for drama more nakedly in serious projects like Man on the Moon, where he transformed into his comedy idol Andy Kaufman, and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, the most memorably melancholic romance of recent decades. Of course, Carrey continued to crowd-please with slapstick like Fun With Dick and Jane, Bruce Almighty, Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas, and Yes Man.

After a quiet decade pursuing personal hobbies and middling movie work, Carrey spin-dashed into the 2020s with Sonic the Hedgehog, playing iconic villain Dr. Robotnik (see where it landed on the video game movies list). Today, though, we celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Cable Guy, which rebounded from its lowly box office performance to become a cult classic. See where it ranks in his filmography as we rank Jim Carrey movies by Tomatometer!

#28

Dark Crimes (2016)
0%

#28
Adjusted Score: 1378%
Critics Consensus: Dark Crimes is a rote, unpleasant thriller that fails to parlay its compelling true story and a committed Jim Carrey performance into even modest chills.
Synopsis: A hard-boiled detective becomes suspicious of an author when the incidents described in his hit novel resemble the inner-workings of... [More]
Directed By: Alexandros Avranas

#27

Once Bitten (1985)
10%

#27
Adjusted Score: 9746%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: A centuries-old vampire, the countess (Lauren Hutton) has kept her youthful look by drinking the blood of male virgins. Since... [More]
Directed By: Howard Storm

#26
Adjusted Score: 26175%
Critics Consensus: Nature Calls in this Ace Ventura sequel, and it's answered by the law of diminishing returns.
Synopsis: Legendary pet detective Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey) returns for another adventure when he's coerced out of retirement while on a... [More]
Directed By: Steve Oedekerk

#25
#25
Adjusted Score: 33033%
Critics Consensus: This muddled comedy has a few laughs, but never sustains a consistent tone.
Synopsis: After Dick Harper (Jim Carrey) loses his job at Globodyne in an Enron-esque collapse, he and his wife, Jane (Téa... [More]
Directed By: Dean Parisot

#24
#24
Adjusted Score: 35235%
Critics Consensus: Dumb and Dumber To does have its moments, but not enough of them -- and the Farrelly brothers' brand of humor is nowhere near as refreshingly transgressive as it once seemed.
Synopsis: In need of a new kidney and having learned that he has a long-lost daughter, dimwit Harry Dunne (Jeff Daniels)... [More]

#23

Kick-Ass 2 (2013)
32%

#23
Adjusted Score: 40447%
Critics Consensus: Kick-Ass 2 falls short in its attempt to emulate the original's unique blend of ultra-violence and ironic humor.
Synopsis: Dave (Aaron Taylor-Johnson), aka Kick-Ass, and Mindy (Chloë Grace Moretz), aka Hit Girl, are trying to live as normal teenagers... [More]
Directed By: Jeff Wadlow

#22
Adjusted Score: 44765%
Critics Consensus: The Incredible Burt Wonderstone serves up some goofy laughs, but given its outrageous conceit, it's surprisingly safe and predictable.
Synopsis: Superstar magicians Burt Wonderstone (Steve Carell) and his partner, Anton Marvelton (Steve Buscemi), have reigned as kings of the Las... [More]
Directed By: Don Scardino

#21

Batman Forever (1995)
38%

#21
Adjusted Score: 42282%
Critics Consensus: Loud, excessively busy, and often boring, Batman Forever nonetheless has the charisma of Jim Carrey and Tommy Lee Jones to offer mild relief.
Synopsis: Batman (Val Kilmer) faces off against two foes: the schizophrenic, horribly scarred former District Attorney Harvey Dent, aka Two-Face (Tommy... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#20

The Majestic (2001)
42%

#20
Adjusted Score: 46415%
Critics Consensus: Ponderous and overlong, The Majestic drowns in forced sentimentality and resembles a mish-mash of other, better films.
Synopsis: Rising Hollywood screenwriter Peter Appleton (Jim Carrey) is blacklisted in the early 1950s Red Scare. Following a drunken car accident,... [More]
Directed By: Frank Darabont

#19

Yes Man (2008)
46%

#19
Adjusted Score: 51994%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's comic convulsions are the only bright spots in this otherwise dim and predictable comedy.
Synopsis: Carl Allen (Jim Carrey) is stuck in a rut with his negative ways. Then he goes to a self-help seminar... [More]
Directed By: Peyton Reed

#18
#18
Adjusted Score: 50475%
Critics Consensus: While Jim Carrey's comedic skills earn some laughs, Me, Myself and Irene sports a tired, unsatisfying plot.
Synopsis: Meet Charlie Baileygates, a 17-year veteran of the Rhode Island police force. Charlie is mild-mannered, hard-working, always helpful, and a... [More]

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 51247%
Critics Consensus: Blandly inoffensive and thoroughly predictable, Mr. Popper's Penguins could have been worse -- but it should have been better.
Synopsis: Mr. Popper (Jim Carrey) is a successful real estate developer in Manhattan. He lives in a posh apartment on Park... [More]
Directed By: Mark Waters

#16

Bruce Almighty (2003)
48%

#16
Adjusted Score: 54578%
Critics Consensus: Carrey is hilarious in the slapstick scenes, but Bruce Almighty gets bogged down in treacle.
Synopsis: Bruce Nolan's (Jim Carrey) career in TV has been stalled for a while, and when he's passed over for a... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#15
Adjusted Score: 52830%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey's twitchy antics and gross-out humor are on full, bombastic display in Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, which is great news for fans of his particular brand of comedy but likely unsatisfying for anyone else.
Synopsis: When the dolphin mascot of Miami's NFL team is abducted, Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey), a zany private investigator who specializes... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#14
Adjusted Score: 54292%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey shines as the Grinch. Unfortunately, it's not enough to save this movie. You'd be better off watching the TV cartoon.
Synopsis: In this live-action adaptation of the beloved children's tale by Dr. Seuss, the reclusive green Grinch (Jim Carrey) decides to... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#13
Adjusted Score: 60193%
Critics Consensus: Robert Zemeckis' 3-D animated take on the Dickens classic tries hard, but its dazzling special effects distract from an array of fine performances from Jim Carrey and Gary Oldman.
Synopsis: Though London awaits the joyful arrival of Christmas, miserly Ebenezer Scrooge (Jim Carrey) thinks it's all humbug, berating his faithful... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#12

The Cable Guy (1996)
54%

#12
Adjusted Score: 57583%
Critics Consensus: The Cable Guy's dark flashes of thought-provoking, subversive wit are often -- but not always -- enough to counter its frustratingly uneven storytelling approach.
Synopsis: Oddball cable installer Chip Douglas (Jim Carrey) attempts to strike up a friendship with customer Steven Kovacs (Matthew Broderick) by... [More]
Directed By: Ben Stiller

#11

Man on the Moon (1999)
64%

#11
Adjusted Score: 68222%
Critics Consensus: Jim Carrey is eerily dead-on in his portrayal of Andy Kaufman, which helps to elevate Man on the Moon above the script's formulaic biopic cliches.
Synopsis: Jim Carrey stars as the late Andy Kaufman, who was considered one of the most innovative, eccentric and enigmatic performers... [More]
Directed By: Milos Forman

#10
#10
Adjusted Score: 79105%
Critics Consensus: Fittingly fleet and frequently fun, Sonic the Hedgehog is a video game-inspired adventure the whole family can enjoy -- and a fine excuse for Jim Carrey to tap into the manic energy that launched his career.
Synopsis: The world needed a hero -- it got a hedgehog. Powered with incredible speed, Sonic embraces his new home on... [More]
Directed By: Jeff Fowler

#9
#9
Adjusted Score: 71491%
Critics Consensus: Earth Girls Are Easy is messy, silly, and not particularly bright -- qualities it comes by honestly and deliberately.
Synopsis: In this musical comedy, Valerie (Geena Davis) is dealing with her philandering fiancé, Ted (Charles Rocket), when she finds that... [More]
Directed By: Julien Temple

#8

Dumb & Dumber (1994)
68%

#8
Adjusted Score: 70196%
Critics Consensus: A relentlessly stupid comedy elevated by its main actors: Jim Carrey goes bonkers and Jeff Daniels carries himself admirably in an against-type performance.
Synopsis: Imbecilic best friends Lloyd Christmas (Jim Carrey) and Harry Dunne (Jeff Daniels) stumble across a suitcase full of money left... [More]

#7
Adjusted Score: 76749%
Critics Consensus: This fact-based romantic comedy has its flaws, but they're mostly overcome by its consistently sweet, funny tone and one of the best performances of Jim Carrey's career.
Synopsis: Steven Russell (Jim Carrey) becomes a cop, gets married and starts a family, but after a terrible car accident, he... [More]
Directed By: Glenn Ficarra, John Requa

#6
Adjusted Score: 76697%
Critics Consensus: Although it softens the nasty edges of its source material, Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events is a gothic visual treat, and it features a hilariously manic turn from Jim Carrey as the evil Count Olaf.
Synopsis: After the three young Baudelaire siblings are left orphaned by a fire in their mansion, they are carted off to... [More]
Directed By: Brad Silberling

#5

The Mask (1994)
79%

#5
Adjusted Score: 82196%
Critics Consensus: It misses perhaps as often as it hits, but Jim Carrey's manic bombast, Cameron Diaz' blowsy appeal, and the film's overall cartoony bombast keep The Mask afloat.
Synopsis: When timid bank clerk Stanley Ipkiss (Jim Carrey) discovers a magical mask containing the spirit of the Norse god Loki,... [More]
Directed By: Charles Russell

#4
Adjusted Score: 84142%
Critics Consensus: Horton Hears A Who! is both whimsical and heartwarming, and is the rare Dr. Seuss adaptation that stays true to the spirit of the source material.
Synopsis: Animated elephant Horton (Jim Carrey) finds a speck of dust floating in the Jungle of Nool. Upon investigation of the... [More]

#3

Liar Liar (1997)
83%

#3
Adjusted Score: 85710%
Critics Consensus: Despite its thin plot, Liar Liar is elevated by Jim Carrey's exuberant brand of physical humor, and the result is a laugh riot that helped to broaden the comedian's appeal.
Synopsis: Conniving attorney Fletcher Reede (Jim Carrey) is an ace in the courtroom, but his dishonesty and devotion to work ruin... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#2
Adjusted Score: 101335%
Critics Consensus: Propelled by Charlie Kaufman's smart, imaginative script and Michel Gondry's equally daring directorial touch, Eternal Sunshine is a twisty yet heartfelt look at relationships and heartache.
Synopsis: After a painful breakup, Clementine (Kate Winslet) undergoes a procedure to erase memories of her former boyfriend Joel (Jim Carrey)... [More]
Directed By: Michel Gondry

#1

The Truman Show (1998)
95%

#1
Adjusted Score: 101730%
Critics Consensus: A funny, tender, and thought-provoking film, The Truman Show is all the more noteworthy for its remarkably prescient vision of runaway celebrity culture and a nation with an insatiable thirst for the private details of ordinary lives.
Synopsis: He doesn't know it, but everything in Truman Burbank's (Jim Carrey) life is part of a massive TV set. Executive... [More]
Directed By: Peter Weir

(Photo by Fox. Thumbnail: WB/courtesy Everett Collection)

Every ’90s Blockbuster Movie Ranked

Thirty years on, the 1990s has solidified its stature as one of the magical decades in filmmaking, much like how we view the ’30s and the ’70s. Precisely, this Gen X-decade pulled together the Hollywood studio power of the ’30s and the groundbreaking creativity of the ’70s, crocheting commercialism and art into the movie behemoths we speak of in legend as the ’90s blockbuster — which we’ve now ranked all by Tomatometer!

First off, in putting together this list, we didn’t want no scrubs: We defined the ’90s blockbuster as any film that made over $100 million at the box office — movies that had people literally lining up around the block to spend their easy-earned cash. (The economy was booming after all.) This, of course, ushers in all those films synonymous with ’90s blockbusterism, including Jurassic Park, Speed, Twister, Independence Day, Terminator 2: Judgment Day, The Phantom Menace, Armageddon, Wild wild West, and Batmans with three different guys.

But the ’90s blockbuster was more than just fast buses, exploding White Houses, and bat nipples. Audiences opened up wallets and handbags (they’re European!) on brazen independent films (Pulp Fiction, Good Will Hunting, The Blair Witch Project), big comedies (Sister Act, The Nutty Professor, The Waterboy, Dumb & Dumber, The Birdcage), and romances both funny and dramatic (Pretty Woman, Shakespeare in Love, Jerry Maguire, Ghost).

It was the era of the Disney renaissance (Aladdin, Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King), special-effects breakthroughs (Toy Story, Total Recall, The Matrix), and where the most popular movies of the year could reasonably expect a Best Picture statue come next February (Unforgiven, Titanic, Dances With Wolves). A scintillating ’90s blockbuster can transport us to that moment before cinematic universes, before CGI overload, and before ubiquitous cell phones and Internet; today, Lloyd Christmas can just DM Mary Samsonite and say “Hey, I have your briefcase :)” if he weren’t still illiterate.

Now, relive the rush of the decade without the searing sting of slap bracelets, or shotgunning Fruitopia, with our guide to every ’90s blockbuster ranked by Tomatometer!

#128

Batman & Robin (1997)
12%

#128
Adjusted Score: 17028%
Critics Consensus: Joel Schumacher's tongue-in-cheek attitude hits an unbearable limit in Batman & Robin resulting in a frantic and mindless movie that's too jokey to care much for.
Synopsis: This superhero adventure finds Batman (George Clooney) and his partner, Robin (Chris O'Donnell), attempting to the foil the sinister schemes... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#127

Godzilla (1998)
15%

#127
Adjusted Score: 19109%
Critics Consensus: Without compelling characters or heart, Godzilla stomps on everything that made the original (or any monster movie worth its salt) a classic.
Synopsis: During a nuclear test, the French government inadvertently mutates a lizard nest; years later, a giant lizard makes its way... [More]
Directed By: Roland Emmerich

#126

Wild Wild West (1999)
17%

#126
Adjusted Score: 21787%
Critics Consensus: Bombastic, manic, and largely laugh-free, Wild Wild West is a bizarre misfire in which greater care was lavished upon the special effects than on the script.
Synopsis: When President Ulysses S. Grant (Kevin Kline) learns that diabolical inventor Dr. Arliss Loveless (Kenneth Branagh) is planning to assassinate... [More]
Directed By: Barry Sonnenfeld

#125

The Flintstones (1994)
20%

#125
Adjusted Score: 22563%
Critics Consensus: The Flintstones wastes beloved source material and imaginative production design on a tepid script that plunks Bedrock's favorite family into a cynical story awash with lame puns.
Synopsis: Big-hearted, dim-witted factory worker Fred Flintstone (John Goodman) lends money to his friend Barney Rubble (Rick Moranis) so that he... [More]
Directed By: Brian Levant

#124
#124
Adjusted Score: 22133%
Critics Consensus: A game Julia Roberts gives it her all, but Sleeping with the Enemy is one stalker thriller that's unlikely to inspire many obsessions of its own.
Synopsis: After faking her death in order to flee from her violent husband, Martin (Patrick Bergin), Laura Burney (Julia Roberts) leaves... [More]
Directed By: Joseph Ruben

#123
#123
Adjusted Score: 24576%
Critics Consensus: Contrived performances and over-the-top sequences offer little real drama.
Synopsis: When the body of Army Capt. Elizabeth Campbell (Leslie Stefanson) is found on a Georgia military base, two investigators, Warrant... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#122

Patch Adams (1998)
22%

#122
Adjusted Score: 24462%
Critics Consensus: Syrupy performances and directing make this dramedy all too obvious.
Synopsis: After struggling with depression in a mental hospital, Hunter "Patch" Adams (Robin Williams) decides he wants to become a doctor.... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#121
Adjusted Score: 26175%
Critics Consensus: Nature Calls in this Ace Ventura sequel, and it's answered by the law of diminishing returns.
Synopsis: Legendary pet detective Ace Ventura (Jim Carrey) returns for another adventure when he's coerced out of retirement while on a... [More]
Directed By: Steve Oedekerk

#120

Double Jeopardy (1999)
27%

#120
Adjusted Score: 29422%
Critics Consensus: A talented cast fails to save this unremarkable thriller.
Synopsis: Framed for the murder of her husband, Libby Parsons (Ashley Judd) survives the long years in prison with two burning... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#119

Hook (1991)
29%

#119
Adjusted Score: 32909%
Critics Consensus: The look of Hook is lively indeed but Steven Spielberg directs on autopilot here, giving in too quickly to his sentimental, syrupy qualities.
Synopsis: When his young children are abducted by his old nemesis, Capt. Hook (Dustin Hoffman), middle-aged lawyer Peter Banning (Robin Williams)... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#118

The Bodyguard (1992)
34%

#118
Adjusted Score: 37552%
Critics Consensus: The Bodyguard is a cheesy, melodramatic potboiler with occasional moments of electricity from Whitney Houston.
Synopsis: Best-selling pop diva Rachel Marron (Whitney Houston) has a stalker whose obsession has risen to the level of disturbing threats.... [More]
Directed By: Mick Jackson

#117

The Waterboy (1998)
34%

#117
Adjusted Score: 37915%
Critics Consensus: This is an insult to its genre with low humor and cheap gags.
Synopsis: Raised by his overprotective mother, Helen (Kathy Bates), Bobby Boucher Jr. (Adam Sandler) is the water boy for a successful... [More]
Directed By: Frank Coraci

#116
Adjusted Score: 39521%
Critics Consensus: A change of venue -- and more sentimentality and violence -- can't obscure the fact that Home Alone 2: Lost in New York is a less inspired facsimile of its predecessor.
Synopsis: After snarky youth Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) loses track of his father at the airport, he mistakenly gets on a... [More]
Directed By: Chris Columbus

#115
#115
Adjusted Score: 37556%
Critics Consensus: Lurid but acted with gusto, Indecent Proposal has difficulty keeping it up beyond its initial titillating premise.
Synopsis: David (Woody Harrelson) and Diana Murphy (Demi Moore) are a loving couple with a bright future. David is a talented... [More]
Directed By: Adrian Lyne

#114

Armageddon (1998)
38%

#114
Adjusted Score: 44954%
Critics Consensus: Lovely to look at but about as intelligent as the asteroid that serves as the movie's antagonist, Armageddon slickly sums up the cinematic legacies of producer Jerry Bruckheimer and director Michael Bay.
Synopsis: When an asteroid threatens to collide with Earth, NASA honcho Dan Truman (Billy Bob Thornton) determines the only way to... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#113

Eraser (1996)
39%

#113
Adjusted Score: 41650%
Critics Consensus: Eraser's shoot-'em-up action might show off some cutting edge weaponry, but its rote story is embarrassingly obsolete.
Synopsis: John "The Eraser" Kruger is the top gun in the US Marshall Witness Protection scheme; he erases their past and... [More]
Directed By: Charles Russell

#112

Batman Forever (1995)
38%

#112
Adjusted Score: 42282%
Critics Consensus: Loud, excessively busy, and often boring, Batman Forever nonetheless has the charisma of Jim Carrey and Tommy Lee Jones to offer mild relief.
Synopsis: Batman (Val Kilmer) faces off against two foes: the schizophrenic, horribly scarred former District Attorney Harvey Dent, aka Two-Face (Tommy... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#111

Big Daddy (1999)
39%

#111
Adjusted Score: 42837%
Critics Consensus: Adam Sandler acquits himself admirably, but his charm isn't enough to make up for Big Daddy's jarring shifts between crude humor and mawkish sentimentality.
Synopsis: Thirty-two-year-old Sonny Koufax (Adam Sandler) has spent his whole life avoiding responsibility. But when his girlfriend dumps him for an... [More]
Directed By: Dennis Dugan

#110
Adjusted Score: 43699%
Critics Consensus: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is exactly as advertised: one-liners, brawls, and general silliness. Good for the young at heart, irritating for everyone else.
Synopsis: In New York, mysterious radioactive ooze has mutated four sewer turtles into talking, upright-walking, crime-fighting ninjas. The intrepid heroes --... [More]
Directed By: Steve Barron

#109

101 Dalmatians (1996)
41%

#109
Adjusted Score: 41648%
Critics Consensus: Neat performance from Glenn Close aside, 101 Dalmatians is a bland, pointless remake.
Synopsis: Fashion designer Anita and computer-game writer Roger meet, fall in love and marry along with their dalmatians Perdita and Pongo.... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Herek

#108

Dr. Dolittle (1998)
42%

#108
Adjusted Score: 44363%
Critics Consensus: Doctor Dolittle finds some mirth in the novelty of wisecracking critters, but this family feature's treacly tone is made queasy by a reliance on scatological gags that undercut the intended warmth.
Synopsis: After a fender bender, Dr. John Dolittle (Eddie Murphy) gets back his childhood ability to converse with animals. But the... [More]
Directed By: Betty Thomas

#107

Deep Impact (1998)
45%

#107
Adjusted Score: 46597%
Critics Consensus: A tidal wave of melodrama sinks Deep Impact's chance at being the memorable disaster flick it aspires to be.
Synopsis: A comet is hurtling toward Earth and could mean the end of all human life. The U.S. government keeps the... [More]
Directed By: Mimi Leder

#106

Runaway Bride (1999)
46%

#106
Adjusted Score: 48473%
Critics Consensus: Cliche story with lack of chemistry between Richard Gere and Julia Roberts.
Synopsis: Having already left three grooms at the altar, Maggie Carpenter (Julia Roberts) is branded "the runaway bride" by jaded city... [More]
Directed By: Garry Marshall

#105
#105
Adjusted Score: 53204%
Critics Consensus: First Wives Club is headlined by a trio of comedic dynamos, but the script lets them down with tepid plotting and a fatal lack of satirical bite.
Synopsis: Despondent over the marriage of her ex-husband to a younger woman, a middle-aged divorcée plunges to her death from her... [More]
Directed By: Hugh Wilson

#104

Phenomenon (1996)
50%

#104
Adjusted Score: 51577%
Critics Consensus: No consensus yet.
Synopsis: On his birthday, mechanic George Malley (John Travolta) sees a flash of light and proceeds to exhibit extraordinary mental abilities.... [More]
Directed By: Jon Turteltaub

#103

Casper (1995)
51%

#103
Adjusted Score: 53184%
Critics Consensus: A meandering, mindless family movie that frequently resorts to special effects and transparent sappiness.
Synopsis: Casper (voiced by Malachi Pearson) is a kind young ghost who peacefully haunts a mansion in Maine. When specialist James... [More]
Directed By: Brad Silberling

#102
Adjusted Score: 55014%
Critics Consensus: Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves brings a wonderfully villainous Alan Rickman to this oft-adapted tale, but he's robbed by big-budget bombast and a muddled screenplay.
Synopsis: Nobleman crusader Robin of Locksley (Kevin Costner) breaks out of a Jerusalem prison with the help of Moorish fellow prisoner... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Reynolds

#101
Adjusted Score: 62032%
Critics Consensus: Burdened by exposition and populated with stock characters, The Phantom Menace gets the Star Wars prequels off to a bumpy -- albeit visually dazzling -- start.
Synopsis: Obi-Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor) is a young apprentice Jedi knight under the tutelage of Qui-Gon Jinn (Liam Neeson) ; Anakin... [More]
Directed By: George Lucas

#100
Adjusted Score: 55628%
Critics Consensus: Provides lots of laughs with Myers at the healm; as funny or funnier than the original.
Synopsis: In his second screen adventure, British super spy Austin Powers must return to 1969, as arch-nemesis Dr. Evil has ventured... [More]
Directed By: Jay Roach

#99
#99
Adjusted Score: 57455%
Critics Consensus: Plagued by mediocre writing, uneven acting, and a fairly by-the-numbers plot, The World Is Not Enough is partially saved by some entertaining and truly Bond-worthy action sequences.
Synopsis: Bond (Pierce Brosnan) must race to defuse an international power struggle with the world's oil supply hanging in the balance.... [More]
Directed By: Michael Apted

#98

Lethal Weapon 4 (1998)
53%

#98
Adjusted Score: 55397%
Critics Consensus: Jet Li's arrival breathes fresh life into a tired franchise formula -- but not enough to put Lethal Weapon 4 on equal footing with its predecessors.
Synopsis: Detective Riggs (Mel Gibson) tries to settle down with his pregnant girlfriend, Lorna (Rene Russo), while his partner, Murtaugh (Danny... [More]
Directed By: Richard Donner

#97
Adjusted Score: 56831%
Critics Consensus: The Lost World demonstrates how far CG effects have come in the four years since Jurassic Park; unfortunately, it also proves how difficult it can be to put together a truly compelling sequel.
Synopsis: John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) summons chaos theorist Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) to his home with some startling information -- while... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#96
#96
Adjusted Score: 56136%
Critics Consensus: Julia Roberts and Denzel Washington are a compelling team in the overlong Pelican Brief, a pulpy thriller that doesn't quite justify the intellectual remove of Alan J. Pakula's direction.
Synopsis: Taut thriller about a young law student whose legal brief about the assassination of two Supreme Court justices causes her... [More]
Directed By: Alan J. Pakula

#95

Basic Instinct (1992)
55%

#95
Adjusted Score: 60683%
Critics Consensus: Unevenly echoing the work of Alfred Hitchcock, Basic Instinct contains a star-making performance from Sharon Stone but is ultimately undone by its problematic, overly lurid plot.
Synopsis: The mysterious Catherine Tramell (Sharon Stone), a beautiful crime novelist, becomes a suspect when she is linked to the brutal... [More]
Directed By: Paul Verhoeven

#94

Jumanji (1995)
55%

#94
Adjusted Score: 56951%
Critics Consensus: A feast for the eyes with a somewhat malnourished plot, Jumanji is an underachieving adventure that still offers a decent amount of fun for the whole family.
Synopsis: A magical board game unleashes a world of adventure on siblings Peter (Bradley Pierce) and Judy Shepherd (Kirsten Dunst). While... [More]
Directed By: Joe Johnston

#93

Pocahontas (1995)
55%

#93
Adjusted Score: 58349%
Critics Consensus: Pocahontas means well, and has moments of startling beauty, but it's largely a bland, uninspired effort, with uneven plotting and an unfortunate lack of fun.
Synopsis: This is the Disney animated tale of the romance between a young American Indian woman named Pocahontas (Irene Bedard) and... [More]

#92
#92
Adjusted Score: 56232%
Critics Consensus: George of the Jungle is faithful to its source material -- which, unfortunately, makes it a less-than-compelling feature film.
Synopsis: George (Brendan Fraser) has raised himself since since he was a baby and a plane crash stranded him in an... [More]
Directed By: Sam Weisman

#91

Con Air (1997)
56%

#91
Adjusted Score: 59935%
Critics Consensus: Con Air won't win any awards for believability - and all involved seem cheerfully aware of it, making some of this blockbuster action outing's biggest flaws fairly easy to forgive.
Synopsis: Just-paroled army ranger Cameron Poe (Nicolas Cage) is headed back to his wife (Monica Potter), but must fly home aboard... [More]
Directed By: Simon West

#90
#90
Adjusted Score: 60703%
Critics Consensus: A competent, if sometimes by-the-numbers entry to the 007 franchise, Tomorrow Never Dies may not boast the most original plot but its action sequences are genuinely thrilling.
Synopsis: Media mogul Elliot Carver (Jonathan Pryce) wants his news empire to reach every country on the globe, but the Chinese... [More]
Directed By: Roger Spottiswoode

#89
#89
Adjusted Score: 60298%
Critics Consensus: Charming characters; loads of fun for kids and adults.
Synopsis: This animated comedy finds Tommy Pickles (E.G. Daily) trying to return his baby brother to the hospital after being warned... [More]

#88
#88
Adjusted Score: 63902%
Critics Consensus: Die Hard with a Vengeance benefits from Bruce Willis and Samuel L. Jackson's barbed interplay, but clatters to a bombastic finish in a vain effort to cover for an overall lack of fresh ideas.
Synopsis: Detective John McClane (Bruce Willis) is now divorced, alcoholic and jobless after getting fired for his reckless behavior and bad... [More]
Directed By: John McTiernan

#87

Twister (1996)
61%

#87
Adjusted Score: 63725%
Critics Consensus: A high-concept blockbuster that emphasizes special effects over three-dimensional characters, Twister's visceral thrills are often offset by the film's generic plot.
Synopsis: During the approach of the most powerful storm in decades, university professor Dr. Jo Harding (Helen Hunt) and an underfunded... [More]
Directed By: Jan de Bont

#86

Lethal Weapon 3 (1992)
60%

#86
Adjusted Score: 63649%
Critics Consensus: Murtaugh and Riggs remain an appealing partnership, but Lethal Weapon 3 struggles to give them a worthy new adventure as it cranks up the camp along with the mean-spiritedness.
Synopsis: Veteran police detective Roger Murtaugh (Danny Glover) is only days away from retiring when he and his tough partner, Martin... [More]
Directed By: Richard Donner

#85

The Mummy (1999)
61%

#85
Adjusted Score: 65193%
Critics Consensus: It's difficult to make a persuasive argument for The Mummy as any kind of meaningful cinematic achievement, but it's undeniably fun to watch.
Synopsis: The Mummy is a rousing, suspenseful and horrifying epic about an expedition of treasure-seeking explorers in the Sahara Desert in... [More]
Directed By: Stephen Sommers

#84

Rush Hour (1998)
61%

#84
Adjusted Score: 63785%
Critics Consensus: A kick-ass addition to the cop-buddy film genre.
Synopsis: When a Chinese diplomat's daughter is kidnapped in Los Angeles, he calls in Hong Kong Detective Inspector Lee (Jackie Chan)... [More]
Directed By: Brett Ratner

#83

American Pie (1999)
61%

#83
Adjusted Score: 66633%
Critics Consensus: So embarrassing it's believable, American Pie succeeds in bringing back the teen movie genre.
Synopsis: A riotous and raunchy exploration of the most eagerly anticipated -- and most humiliating -- rite of adulthood, known as... [More]
Directed By: Paul Weitz

#82
Adjusted Score: 67434%
Critics Consensus: Despite lacking some of the book's subtler shadings, and suffering from some clumsy casting, Interview with a Vampire benefits from Neil Jordan's atmospheric direction and a surfeit of gothic thrills.
Synopsis: Born as an 18th-century lord, Louis is now a bicentennial vampire, telling his story to an eager biographer. Suicidal after... [More]
Directed By: Neil Jordan

#81

Dick Tracy (1990)
63%

#81
Adjusted Score: 65695%
Critics Consensus: Dick Tracy is stylish, unique, and an undeniable technical triumph, but it ultimately struggles to rise above its two-dimensional artificiality.
Synopsis: Hard-boiled detective Dick Tracy (Warren Beatty) is searching for evidence that proves Alphonse "Big Boy" Caprice is the city's most... [More]
Directed By: Warren Beatty

#80
#80
Adjusted Score: 69438%
Critics Consensus: Full of special effects, Brian DePalma's update of Mission: Impossible has a lot of sweeping spectacle, but the plot is sometimes convoluted.
Synopsis: When U.S. government operative Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) and his mentor, Jim Phelps (Jon Voight), go on a covert assignment... [More]
Directed By: Brian De Palma

#79
#79
Adjusted Score: 65940%
Critics Consensus: The Nutty Professor falls back on juvenile humor eagerly and often, but Eddie Murphy's consistently funny work in dual roles means more for audiences to love.
Synopsis: Brilliant and obese scientist Sherman Klump (Eddie Murphy) invents a miraculous weight-loss solution. After a date with chemistry student Carla... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#78
#78
Adjusted Score: 68387%
Critics Consensus: The movie is peppered with amusing sight gags and one-liners, but the disjointed script doesn't cohere into a successful whole.
Synopsis: When a man (Christopher Lloyd) claiming to be Fester, the missing brother of Gomez Addams (Raul Julia), arrives at the... [More]
Directed By: Barry Sonnenfeld

#77

Pretty Woman (1990)
65%

#77
Adjusted Score: 69173%
Critics Consensus: Pretty Woman may be a yuppie fantasy, but the film's slick comedy, soundtrack, and casting can overcome misgivings.
Synopsis: In this modern update on Cinderella, a prostitute and a wealthy businessman fall hard for one another, forming an unlikely... [More]
Directed By: Garry Marshall

#76

The Rock (1996)
68%

#76
Adjusted Score: 71940%
Critics Consensus: For visceral thrills, it can't be beat. Just don't expect The Rock to engage your brain.
Synopsis: FBI chemical warfare expert Stanley Goodspeed (Nicolas Cage) is sent on an urgent mission with a former British spy, John... [More]
Directed By: Michael Bay

#75

Contact (1997)
66%

#75
Adjusted Score: 70084%
Critics Consensus: Contact elucidates stirring scientific concepts and theological inquiry at the expense of satisfying storytelling, making for a brainy blockbuster that engages with its ideas, if not its characters.
Synopsis: In this Zemeckis-directed adaptation of the Carl Sagan novel, Dr. Ellie Arroway (Jodie Foster) races to interpret a possible message... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#74

Maverick (1994)
66%

#74
Adjusted Score: 69196%
Critics Consensus: It isn't terribly deep, but it's witty and undeniably charming, and the cast is obviously having fun.
Synopsis: This film update of the "Maverick" TV series finds the title cardsharp (Mel Gibson) hoping to join a poker contest... [More]
Directed By: Richard Donner

#73

A Time to Kill (1996)
68%

#73
Adjusted Score: 69992%
Critics Consensus: Overlong and superficial, A Time to Kill nonetheless succeeds on the strength of its skillful craftsmanship and top-notch performances.
Synopsis: Carl Lee Hailey (Samuel L. Jackson) is a heartbroken black father who avenges his daughter's brutal rape by shooting the... [More]
Directed By: Joel Schumacher

#72

Stuart Little (1999)
67%

#72
Adjusted Score: 70987%
Critics Consensus: Critics say Stuart Little is charming with kids and adults for its humor and visual effects.
Synopsis: When the Littles go to an orphanage to adopt a new family member, a charming young mouse named Stuart is... [More]
Directed By: Rob Minkoff

#71

Independence Day (1996)
68%

#71
Adjusted Score: 71582%
Critics Consensus: The plot is thin and so is character development, but as a thrilling, spectacle-filled summer movie, Independence Day delivers.
Synopsis: In the epic adventure film "Independence Day," strange phenomena surface around the globe. The skies ignite. Terror races through the... [More]
Directed By: Roland Emmerich

#70

Home Alone (1990)
68%

#70
Adjusted Score: 71390%
Critics Consensus: Home Alone uneven but frequently funny premise stretched unreasonably thin is buoyed by Macaulay Culkin's cute performance and strong supporting stars.
Synopsis: When bratty 8-year-old Kevin McCallister (Macaulay Culkin) acts out the night before a family trip to Paris, his mother (Catherine... [More]
Directed By: Chris Columbus

#69

Dumb & Dumber (1994)
68%

#69
Adjusted Score: 70196%
Critics Consensus: A relentlessly stupid comedy elevated by its main actors: Jim Carrey goes bonkers and Jeff Daniels carries himself admirably in an against-type performance.
Synopsis: Imbecilic best friends Lloyd Christmas (Jim Carrey) and Harry Dunne (Jeff Daniels) stumble across a suitcase full of money left... [More]

#68

Analyze This (1999)
69%

#68
Adjusted Score: 73502%
Critics Consensus: Analyze This is a satisfying comedy with great performances by De Niro and Crystal.
Synopsis: When doctors tell a mob boss (Robert De Niro) that he is suffering from anxiety attacks, he seeks the help... [More]
Directed By: Harold Ramis

#67

Sleepy Hollow (1999)
69%

#67
Adjusted Score: 74375%
Critics Consensus: It isn't Tim Burton's best work, but Sleepy Hollow entertains with its stunning visuals and creepy atmosphere.
Synopsis: Set in 1799, "Sleepy Hollow" is based on Washington Irving's classic tale "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow." Faithful to the... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#66

Die Hard 2 (1990)
69%

#66
Adjusted Score: 72564%
Critics Consensus: It lacks the fresh thrills of its predecessor, but Die Hard 2 still works as an over-the-top -- and reasonably taut -- big-budget sequel, with plenty of set pieces to paper over the plot deficiencies.
Synopsis: A year after his heroics in L.A, detective John McClane (Bruce Willis) is mixed up in another terrorist plot, this... [More]
Directed By: Renny Harlin

#65

You've Got Mail (1998)
70%

#65
Adjusted Score: 73755%
Critics Consensus: Great chemistry between the leads made this a warm and charming delight.
Synopsis: Struggling boutique bookseller Kathleen Kelly (Meg Ryan) hates Joe Fox (Tom Hanks), the owner of a corporate Foxbooks chain store... [More]
Directed By: Nora Ephron

#64
Adjusted Score: 73992%
Critics Consensus: Disney's take on the Victor Hugo classic is dramatically uneven, but its strong visuals, dark themes, and message of tolerance make for a more-sophisticated-than-average children's film.
Synopsis: An animated Disney adventure follows disfigured Quasimodo (Tom Hulce), the bell-ringer of Notre Dame Cathedral, who bides his time locked... [More]
Directed By: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

#63

Forrest Gump (1994)
71%

#63
Adjusted Score: 78312%
Critics Consensus: Forrest Gump may be an overly sentimental film with a somewhat problematic message, but its sweetness and charm are usually enough to approximate true depth and grace.
Synopsis: Slow-witted Forrest Gump (Tom Hanks) has never thought of himself as disadvantaged, and thanks to his supportive mother (Sally Field),... [More]
Directed By: Robert Zemeckis

#62

Mrs. Doubtfire (1993)
72%

#62
Adjusted Score: 75136%
Critics Consensus: On paper, Mrs. Doubtfire might seem excessively broad or sentimental, but Robin Williams shines so brightly in the title role that the end result is difficult to resist.
Synopsis: Troubled that he has little access to his children, divorced Daniel Hillard (Robin Williams) hatches an elaborate plan. With help... [More]
Directed By: Chris Columbus

#61

True Lies (1994)
70%

#61
Adjusted Score: 72196%
Critics Consensus: If it doesn't reach the heights of director James Cameron's and star Arnold Schwarzenegger's previous collaborations, True Lies still packs enough action and humor into its sometimes absurd plot to entertain.
Synopsis: Secretly a spy but thought by his family to be a dull salesman, Harry Tasker (Arnold Schwarzenegger) is tracking down... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#60
#60
Adjusted Score: 76561%
Critics Consensus: An entertaining, topical thriller that finds director Tony Scott on solid form and Will Smith confirming his action headliner status.
Synopsis: Corrupt National Security Agency official Thomas Reynolds (Jon Voight) has a congressman assassinated to assure the passage of expansive new... [More]
Directed By: Tony Scott

#59

The Santa Clause (1994)
72%

#59
Adjusted Score: 75592%
Critics Consensus: The Santa Clause is utterly undemanding, but it's firmly rooted in the sort of good old-fashioned holiday spirit missing from too many modern yuletide films.
Synopsis: Divorced dad Scott (Tim Allen) has custody of his son (Eric Lloyd) on Christmas Eve. After he accidentally kills a... [More]
Directed By: John Pasquin

#58
#58
Adjusted Score: 76469%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a charming performance from Julia Roberts and a subversive spin on the genre, My Best Friend's Wedding is a refreshingly entertaining romantic comedy.
Synopsis: Childhood friends Julianne Potter (Julia Roberts) and Michael O'Neal (Dermot Mulroney) had a deal to marry each other if they... [More]
Directed By: P.J. Hogan

#57

Sister Act (1992)
74%

#57
Adjusted Score: 75616%
Critics Consensus: Looking for a sweet musical comedy about a witness to a crime hiding out from killers in a convent? There's nun better than Sister Act.
Synopsis: When lively lounge singer Deloris Van Cartier (Whoopi Goldberg) sees her mobster beau, Vince LaRocca (Harvey Keitel), commit murder, she... [More]
Directed By: Emile Ardolino

#56

Ghost (1990)
75%

#56
Adjusted Score: 79521%
Critics Consensus: Ghost offers viewers a poignant romance while blending elements of comedy, horror, and mystery, all adding up to one of the more enduringly watchable hits of its era.
Synopsis: Sam Wheat (Patrick Swayze) is a banker, Molly Jensen (Demi Moore) is an artist, and the two are madly in... [More]
Directed By: Jerry Zucker

#55

Ransom (1996)
75%

#55
Adjusted Score: 79154%
Critics Consensus: Directed with propulsive intensity by Ron Howard, Ransom is a fiery thriller packed with hot-blooded performances and jolting twists.
Synopsis: Through a life of hard work, airline owner Tom Mullen (Mel Gibson) has amassed a great deal of wealth. When... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#54

The Firm (1993)
75%

#54
Adjusted Score: 79524%
Critics Consensus: The Firm is a big studio thriller that amusingly tears apart the last of 1980s boardroom culture and the false securities it represented.
Synopsis: A young lawyer joins a small but prestigious law firm only to find out that most of their clients are... [More]
Directed By: Sydney Pollack

#53
#53
Adjusted Score: 79816%
Critics Consensus: Sleepless in Seattle is a cute classic with a very light touch and real chemistry between the two leads -- even when spending an entire movie apart.
Synopsis: After the death of his wife, Sam Baldwin (Tom Hanks) moves to Seattle with his son, Jonah (Ross Mallinger). When... [More]
Directed By: Nora Ephron

#52

The Mask (1994)
79%

#52
Adjusted Score: 82196%
Critics Consensus: It misses perhaps as often as it hits, but Jim Carrey's manic bombast, Cameron Diaz' blowsy appeal, and the film's overall cartoony bombast keep The Mask afloat.
Synopsis: When timid bank clerk Stanley Ipkiss (Jim Carrey) discovers a magical mask containing the spirit of the Norse god Loki,... [More]
Directed By: Charles Russell

#51

The Green Mile (1999)
78%

#51
Adjusted Score: 83890%
Critics Consensus: Though The Green Mile is long, critics say it's an absorbing, emotionally powerful experience.
Synopsis: Paul Edgecomb (Tom Hanks) walked the mile with a variety of cons. He had never encountered someone like John Coffey... [More]
Directed By: Frank Darabont

#50

Air Force One (1997)
78%

#50
Adjusted Score: 80411%
Critics Consensus: This late-period Harrison Ford actioner is full of palpable, if not entirely seamless, thrills.
Synopsis: After making a speech in Moscow vowing to never negotiate with terrorists, President James Marshall (Harrison Ford) boards Air Force... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Petersen

#49

GoldenEye (1995)
79%

#49
Adjusted Score: 84368%
Critics Consensus: The first and best Pierce Brosnan Bond film, GoldenEye brings the series into a more modern context, and the result is a 007 entry that's high-tech, action-packed, and urbane.
Synopsis: When a powerful satellite system falls into the hands of Alec Trevelyan, AKA Agent 006 (Sean Bean), a former ally-turned-enemy,... [More]
Directed By: Martin Campbell

#48

Wayne's World (1992)
79%

#48
Adjusted Score: 85621%
Critics Consensus: An oddball comedy that revels in its silliness and memorable catch phrases, Wayne's World is also fondly regarded because of its endearing characters.
Synopsis: A big screen spin-off of the "Saturday Night Live" skit. Rob Lowe plays a producer that wants to take the... [More]
Directed By: Penelope Spheeris

#47

Scream (1996)
79%

#47
Adjusted Score: 83845%
Critics Consensus: Horror icon Wes Craven's subversive deconstruction of the genre is sly, witty, and surprisingly effective as a slasher film itself, even if it's a little too cheeky for some.
Synopsis: The sleepy little town of Woodsboro just woke up screaming. There's a killer in their midst who's seen a few... [More]
Directed By: Wes Craven

#46
#46
Adjusted Score: 85167%
Critics Consensus: Sentimental and light, but still thoroughly charming, A League of Their Own is buoyed by solid performances from a wonderful cast.
Synopsis: As America's stock of athletic young men is depleted during World War II, a professional all-female baseball league springs up... [More]
Directed By: Penny Marshall

#45
#45
Adjusted Score: 83755%
Critics Consensus: The Prince of Egypt's stunning visuals and first-rate voice cast more than compensate for the fact that it's better crafted than it is emotionally involving.
Synopsis: In this animated retelling of the Book of Exodus, Egyptian Prince Moses (Val Kilmer), upon discovering his roots as a... [More]

#44
#44
Adjusted Score: 82562%
Critics Consensus: Perfecting the formula established in earlier installments, Clear and Present Danger reunites its predecessor's creative core to solidly entertaining effect.
Synopsis: Agent Jack Ryan (Harrison Ford) becomes acting deputy director of the CIA when Admiral Greer (James Earl Jones) is diagnosed... [More]
Directed By: Phillip Noyce

#43

Batman Returns (1992)
80%

#43
Adjusted Score: 87234%
Critics Consensus: Director Tim Burton's dark, brooding atmosphere, Michael Keaton's work as the tormented hero, and the flawless casting of Danny DeVito as The Penguin and Christopher Walken as, well, Christopher Walken make the sequel better than the first.
Synopsis: The monstrous Penguin (Danny DeVito), who lives in the sewers beneath Gotham, joins up with wicked shock-headed businessman Max Shreck... [More]
Directed By: Tim Burton

#42

The Birdcage (1996)
81%

#42
Adjusted Score: 83778%
Critics Consensus: Mike Nichols wrangles agreeably amusing performances from Robin Williams and Nathan Lane in this fun, if not quite essential, remake of the French comedy La Cage aux Folles.
Synopsis: In this remake of the classic French farce "La Cage aux Folles," engaged couple Val Goldman (Dan Futterman) and Barbara... [More]
Directed By: Mike Nichols

#41

Seven (1995)
82%

#41
Adjusted Score: 86446%
Critics Consensus: A brutal, relentlessly grimy shocker with taut performances, slick gore effects, and a haunting finale.
Synopsis: When retiring police Detective William Somerset (Morgan Freeman) tackles a final case with the aid of newly transferred David Mills... [More]
Directed By: David Fincher

#40

Scream 2 (1997)
81%

#40
Adjusted Score: 86056%
Critics Consensus: As with the first film, Scream 2 is a gleeful takedown of scary movie conventions that manages to poke fun at terrible horror sequels without falling victim to the same fate.
Synopsis: Sydney (Neve Campbell) and tabloid reporter Gale Weathers (Courteney Cox) survived the events of the first "Scream," but their nightmare... [More]
Directed By: Wes Craven

#39

Liar Liar (1997)
83%

#39
Adjusted Score: 85710%
Critics Consensus: Despite its thin plot, Liar Liar is elevated by Jim Carrey's exuberant brand of physical humor, and the result is a laugh riot that helped to broaden the comedian's appeal.
Synopsis: Conniving attorney Fletcher Reede (Jim Carrey) is an ace in the courtroom, but his dishonesty and devotion to work ruin... [More]
Directed By: Tom Shadyac

#38

Total Recall (1990)
82%

#38
Adjusted Score: 87434%
Critics Consensus: Under Paul Verhoeven's frenetic direction, Total Recall is a fast-paced rush of violence, gore, and humor that never slacks.
Synopsis: Douglas Quaid (Arnold Schwarzenegger) is a bored construction worker in the year 2084 who dreams of visiting the colonized Mars.... [More]
Directed By: Paul Verhoeven

#37
#37
Adjusted Score: 86248%
Critics Consensus: While it's fueled in part by outdated stereotypes, Driving Miss Daisy takes audiences on a heartwarming journey with a pair of outstanding actors.
Synopsis: Daisy Werthan (Jessica Tandy), an elderly Jewish widow living in Atlanta, is determined to maintain her independence. However, when she... [More]
Directed By: Bruce Beresford

#36

Notting Hill (1999)
83%

#36
Adjusted Score: 87296%
Critics Consensus: A rom-com with the right ingredients, Notting Hill proves there's nothing like a love story well told -- especially when Hugh Grant and Julia Roberts are your leads.
Synopsis: William Thacker (Hugh Grant) is a London bookstore owner whose humdrum existence is thrown into romantic turmoil when famous American... [More]
Directed By: Roger Michell

#35
Adjusted Score: 87432%
Critics Consensus: There's Something About Mary proves that unrelentingly, unabashedly peurile humor doesn't necessarily come at the expense of a film's heart.
Synopsis: Ted's (Ben Stiller) dream prom date with Mary (Cameron Diaz) never happens due to an embarrassing injury at her home.... [More]

#34

Jerry Maguire (1996)
84%

#34
Adjusted Score: 89299%
Critics Consensus: Anchored by dazzling performances from Tom Cruise, Cuba Gooding Jr., and Renée Zellweger, as well as Cameron Crowe's tender direction, Jerry Maguire meshes romance and sports with panache.
Synopsis: When slick sports agent Jerry Maguire (Tom Cruise) has a crisis of conscience, he pens a heartfelt company-wide memo that... [More]
Directed By: Cameron Crowe

#33

A Few Good Men (1992)
83%

#33
Adjusted Score: 88393%
Critics Consensus: An old-fashioned courtroom drama with a contemporary edge, A Few Good Men succeeds on the strength of its stars, with Tom Cruise, Demi Moore, and especially Jack Nicholson delivering powerful performances that more than compensate for the predictable plot.
Synopsis: Lt. Daniel Kaffee (Tom Cruise) is a military lawyer defending two U.S. Marines charged with killing a fellow Marine at... [More]
Directed By: Rob Reiner

#32
#32
Adjusted Score: 87608%
Critics Consensus: Dances with Wolves suffers from a simplistic view of the culture it attempts to honor, but the end result remains a stirring western whose noble intentions are often matched by its epic grandeur.
Synopsis: A Civil War soldier develops a relationship with a band of Lakota Indians. Attracted by the simplicity of their lifestyle,... [More]
Directed By: Kevin Costner

#31
#31
Adjusted Score: 89981%
Critics Consensus: James L. Brooks and Jack Nicholson, doing what they do best, combine smart dialogue and flawless acting to squeeze fresh entertainment value out of the romantic-comedy genre.
Synopsis: Melvin Udall (Jack Nicholson) is an obsessive-compulsive writer of romantic fiction who's rude to everyone he meets, including his gay... [More]
Directed By: James L. Brooks

#30

The Sixth Sense (1999)
86%

#30
Adjusted Score: 93226%
Critics Consensus: M Night Shayamalan's The Sixth Sense is a twisty ghost story with all the style of a classical Hollywood picture, but all the chills of a modern horror flick.
Synopsis: Young Cole Sear (Haley Joel Osment) is haunted by a dark secret: he is visited by ghosts. Cole is frightened... [More]
Directed By: M. Night Shyamalan

#29
#29
Adjusted Score: 93483%
Critics Consensus: Full of creepy campfire scares, mock-doc The Blair Witch Project keeps audiences in the dark about its titular villain, proving once more that imagination can be as scary as anything onscreen.
Synopsis: Found video footage tells the tale of three film students (Heather Donahue, Joshua Leonard, Michael C. Williams) who've traveled to... [More]

#28

Mulan (1998)
86%

#28
Adjusted Score: 90109%
Critics Consensus: Exploring themes of family duty and honor, Mulan breaks new ground as a Disney film, while still bringing vibrant animation and sprightly characters to the screen.
Synopsis: Fearful that her ailing father will be drafted into the Chinese military, Mulan (Ming-Na Wen) takes his spot -- though,... [More]
Directed By: Barry Cook, Tony Bancroft

#27

American Beauty (1999)
87%

#27
Adjusted Score: 94769%
Critics Consensus: Flawlessly cast and brimming with dark, acid wit, American Beauty is a smart, provocative high point of late '90s mainstream Hollywood film.
Synopsis: Lester Burnham (Kevin Spacey) is a gainfully employed suburban husband and father. Fed up with his boring, stagnant existence, he... [More]
Directed By: Sam Mendes

#26

The Matrix (1999)
88%

#26
Adjusted Score: 95175%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to the Wachowskis' imaginative vision, The Matrix is a smartly crafted combination of spectacular action and groundbreaking special effects.
Synopsis: Neo (Keanu Reeves) believes that Morpheus (Laurence Fishburne), an elusive figure considered to be the most dangerous man alive, can... [More]

#25

Tarzan (1999)
89%

#25
Adjusted Score: 92399%
Critics Consensus: Disney's Tarzan takes the well-known story to a new level with spirited animation, a brisk pace, and some thrilling action set-pieces..
Synopsis: In this Disney animated tale, the orphaned Tarzan (Tony Goldwyn) grows up in the remote African wilderness, raised by the... [More]
Directed By: Chris Buck, Kevin Lima

#24

Titanic (1997)
89%

#24
Adjusted Score: 101429%
Critics Consensus: A mostly unqualified triumph for James Cameron, who offers a dizzying blend of spectacular visuals and old-fashioned melodrama.
Synopsis: James Cameron's "Titanic" is an epic, action-packed romance set against the ill-fated maiden voyage of the R.M.S. Titanic; the pride... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#23
#23
Adjusted Score: 92347%
Critics Consensus: Perfectly cast and packed with suspense, The Hunt for Red October is an old-fashioned submarine thriller with plenty of firepower to spare.
Synopsis: Based on the popular Tom Clancy novel, this suspenseful movie tracks Soviet submarine captain Marko Ramius (Sean Connery) as he... [More]
Directed By: John McTiernan

#22

City Slickers (1991)
91%

#22
Adjusted Score: 92853%
Critics Consensus: With a supremely talented cast and just enough midlife drama to add weight to its wildly silly overtones, City Slickers uses universal themes to earn big laughs.
Synopsis: Every year, three friends take a vacation away from their wives. This year, henpecked Phil (Daniel Stern), newly married Ed... [More]
Directed By: Ron Underwood

#21

Jurassic Park (1993)
92%

#21
Adjusted Score: 102598%
Critics Consensus: Jurassic Park is a spectacle of special effects and life-like animatronics, with some of Spielberg's best sequences of sustained awe and sheer terror since Jaws.
Synopsis: In Steven Spielberg's massive blockbuster, paleontologists Alan Grant (Sam Neill) and Ellie Sattler (Laura Dern) and mathematician Ian Malcolm (Jeff... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#20

A Bug's Life (1998)
92%

#20
Adjusted Score: 96755%
Critics Consensus: A Bug's Life is a rousing adventure that blends animated thrills with witty dialogue and memorable characters - and another smashing early success for Pixar.
Synopsis: Flik (Dave Foley) is an inventive ant who's always messing things up for his colony. His latest mishap was destroying... [More]

#19

Men in Black (1997)
92%

#19
Adjusted Score: 97654%
Critics Consensus: Thanks to a smart script, spectacular set pieces, and charismatic performances from its leads, Men in Black is an entirely satisfying summer blockbuster hit.
Synopsis: They are the best-kept secret in the universe. Working for a highly funded yet unofficial government agency, Kay (Tommy Lee... [More]
Directed By: Barry Sonnenfeld

#18

Face/Off (1997)
92%

#18
Adjusted Score: 96504%
Critics Consensus: John Travolta and Nicolas Cage play cat-and-mouse (and literally play each other) against a beautifully stylized backdrop of typically elegant, over-the-top John Woo violence.
Synopsis: Obsessed with bringing terrorist Castor Troy (Nicolas Cage) to justice, FBI agent Sean Archer (John Travolta) tracks down Troy, who... [More]
Directed By: John Woo

#17
#17
Adjusted Score: 100118%
Critics Consensus: Endlessly witty, visually rapturous, and sweetly romantic, Shakespeare in Love is a delightful romantic comedy that succeeds on nearly every level.
Synopsis: "Shakespeare in Love" is a romantic comedy for the 1990s set in the 1590s. It imaginatively unfolds the witty, sexy... [More]
Directed By: John Madden

#16

Pulp Fiction (1994)
92%

#16
Adjusted Score: 98550%
Critics Consensus: One of the most influential films of the 1990s, Pulp Fiction is a delirious post-modern mix of neo-noir thrills, pitch-black humor, and pop-culture touchstones.
Synopsis: Vincent Vega (John Travolta) and Jules Winnfield (Samuel L. Jackson) are hitmen with a penchant for philosophical discussions. In this... [More]
Directed By: Quentin Tarantino

#15

The Lion King (1994)
93%

#15
Adjusted Score: 101767%
Critics Consensus: Emotionally stirring, richly drawn, and beautifully animated, The Lion King is a pride within Disney's pantheon of classic family films.
Synopsis: This Disney animated feature follows the adventures of the young lion Simba (Jonathan Taylor Thomas), the heir of his father,... [More]
Directed By: Roger Allers, Rob Minkoff

#14
Adjusted Score: 98521%
Critics Consensus: T2 features thrilling action sequences and eye-popping visual effects, but what takes this sci-fi/ action landmark to the next level is the depth of the human (and cyborg) characters.
Synopsis: In this sequel set eleven years after "The Terminator," young John Connor (Edward Furlong), the key to civilization's victory over... [More]
Directed By: James Cameron

#13
#13
Adjusted Score: 101376%
Critics Consensus: Anchored by another winning performance from Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg's unflinchingly realistic war film virtually redefines the genre.
Synopsis: Captain John Miller (Tom Hanks) takes his men behind enemy lines to find Private James Ryan, whose three brothers have... [More]
Directed By: Steven Spielberg

#12
#12
Adjusted Score: 103564%
Critics Consensus: Enchanting, sweepingly romantic, and featuring plenty of wonderful musical numbers, Beauty and the Beast is one of Disney's most elegant animated offerings.
Synopsis: An arrogant young prince (Robby Benson) and his castle's servants fall under the spell of a wicked enchantress, who turns... [More]
Directed By: Gary Trousdale, Kirk Wise

#11

Speed (1994)
94%

#11
Adjusted Score: 98621%
Critics Consensus: A terrific popcorn thriller, Speed is taut, tense, and energetic, with outstanding performances from Keanu Reeves, Dennis Hopper, and Sandra Bullock.
Synopsis: Los Angeles police officer Jack (Keanu Reeves) angers retired bomb squad member Howard Payne (Dennis Hopper) by foiling his attempt... [More]
Directed By: Jan de Bont

#10

Aladdin (1992)
95%

#10
Adjusted Score: 100264%
Critics Consensus: A highly entertaining entry in Disney's renaissance era," Aladdin is beautifully drawn, with near-classic songs and a cast of scene-stealing characters.
Synopsis: When street rat Aladdin frees a genie from a lamp, he finds his wishes granted. However, he soon finds that... [More]
Directed By: Ron Clements, John Musker

#9

The Truman Show (1998)
95%

#9
Adjusted Score: 101730%
Critics Consensus: A funny, tender, and thought-provoking film, The Truman Show is all the more noteworthy for its remarkably prescient vision of runaway celebrity culture and a nation with an insatiable thirst for the private details of ordinary lives.
Synopsis: He doesn't know it, but everything in Truman Burbank's (Jim Carrey) life is part of a massive TV set. Executive... [More]
Directed By: Peter Weir

#8
#8
Adjusted Score: 100880%
Critics Consensus: A straightforward thriller of the highest order, In the Line of Fire benefits from Wolfgang Peterson's taut direction and charismatic performances from Clint Eastwood and John Malkovich.
Synopsis: A Secret Service agent is taunted by calls from a would-be killer who has detailed information about the agent -... [More]
Directed By: Wolfgang Petersen

#7

The Fugitive (1993)
96%

#7
Adjusted Score: 102752%
Critics Consensus: Exhilarating and intense, this high-impact chase thriller is a model of taut and efficient formula filmmaking, and it features Harrison Ford at his frantic best.
Synopsis: Wrongfully accused of murdering his wife, Richard Kimble (Harrison Ford) escapes from the law in an attempt to find her... [More]
Directed By: Andrew Davis

#6

Apollo 13 (1995)
96%

#6
Adjusted Score: 101223%
Critics Consensus: In recreating the troubled space mission, Apollo 13 pulls no punches: it's a masterfully told drama from director Ron Howard, bolstered by an ensemble of solid performances.
Synopsis: This Hollywood drama is based on the events of the Apollo 13 lunar mission, astronauts Jim Lovell (Tom Hanks), Fred... [More]
Directed By: Ron Howard

#5
#5
Adjusted Score: 104400%
Critics Consensus: Director Jonathan Demme's smart, taut thriller teeters on the edge between psychological study and all-out horror, and benefits greatly from stellar performances by Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster.
Synopsis: Jodie Foster stars as Clarice Starling, a top student at the FBI's training academy. Jack Crawford (Scott Glenn) wants Clarice... [More]
Directed By: Jonathan Demme

#4

Unforgiven (1992)
96%

#4
Adjusted Score: 105273%
Critics Consensus: As both director and star, Clint Eastwood strips away decades of Hollywood varnish applied to the Wild West, and emerges with a series of harshly eloquent statements about the nature of violence.
Synopsis: When prostitute Delilah Fitzgerald (Anna Thomson) is disfigured by a pair of cowboys in Big Whiskey, Wyoming, her fellow brothel... [More]
Directed By: Clint Eastwood

#3
#3
Adjusted Score: 101368%
Critics Consensus: It follows a predictable narrative arc, but Good Will Hunting adds enough quirks to the journey -- and is loaded with enough powerful performances -- that it remains an entertaining, emotionally rich drama.
Synopsis: Will Hunting (Matt Damon) has a genius-level IQ but chooses to work as a janitor at MIT. When he solves... [More]
Directed By: Gus Van Sant

#2

Toy Story (1995)
100%

#2
Adjusted Score: 106145%
Critics Consensus: Entertaining as it is innovative, Toy Story reinvigorated animation while heralding the arrival of Pixar as a family-friendly force to be reckoned with.
Synopsis: Woody (Tom Hanks), a good-hearted cowboy doll who belongs to a young boy named Andy (John Morris), sees his position... [More]
Directed By: John Lasseter

#1

Toy Story 2 (1999)
100%

#1
Adjusted Score: 107741%
Critics Consensus: The rare sequel that arguably improves on its predecessor, Toy Story 2 uses inventive storytelling, gorgeous animation, and a talented cast to deliver another rich moviegoing experience for all ages.
Synopsis: Woody (Tom Hanks) is stolen from his home by toy dealer Al McWhiggin (Wayne Knight), leaving Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen)... [More]

Premiere Of Open Roads Films' "Fifty Shades Of Black" - Red Carpet

(Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images)

 

Movie audiences have always been able to rely on Marlon Wayans as one of the folks who take the Movie of the Moment and skewer it with some good, old fashioned silliness. The same applies to his latest film that he wrote and stars in, Fifty Shades of Black, that takes sex, relationships, and Florence Henderson, and gives you a night to remember. When we spoke to him, he was so passionate about five films not being enough to cover it that he added honorable mentions. He also made sure to point out that he really loves his films White Chicks, Scary Movie, and Don’t Be a Menace to South Central While Drinking Your Juice in the Hood, but he decided that adding them wasn’t fair. But just know they are among his favorites.


Groundhog Day (1993) 97%

This is one of my favorite movies ever, because of the writing. I’m a big Bill Murray fan, and I just think any comedy that can last over two hours and keep your attention, even though it was the same situation over and over, and get funnier every time — this is probably my favorite movie of all time.

I'm Gonna Git You Sucka (1988) 62%

This inspired me to want to write parodies and do parodies. I read it on the bed as a kid — I was eight years old when [his brother] Keenen [Wayans] sent me that script, and I [had] never laughed so hard. It inspired me. I knew that was what I wanted to do. It’s really my number one — I mean, I think it’s crazy if I put my brother as number one. You’d think I was being biased, of which I probably am, but I’m not, because I really love that movie and my brother. I think he’s a brilliant genius.

Meet the Parents (2000) 84%

The scene with the volleyball when he [Ben Stiller] hit her in the nose and she started bleeding, that worst case scenario was one of the funniest things in the world. And I love Ben Stiller’s performance, he was so genuine, and all he wanted to do was be in the father’s good graces but he couldn’t help but [****] it up. That movie made me laugh from the inside out.

Hollywood Shuffle (1987) 85%

An African American filmmaker [Robert Townsend] and being Keenen’s little brother inspired me to want to do movies. It really told the whole truth about African-Americans in the struggle, in a funny way, without all of us banging on the door going, “Hey Hollywood, love us.” Through laughter, it erased color lines, and is one of my all time favorites. I love when you do a movie with people doing multiple characters. That’s something I do and love to do, and I find that it’s one of the hardest things to do and still be grounded as a regular person in a movie. I’m inspired to do movies like that in my next phase.

Beverly Hills Cop (1984) 83%

Eddie Murphy was so appropriate. Comedy is the magic of learning to be appropriate. In terms of his performance, he was so damn appropriate. He knew when to play what, and he let the situation lead him into being broad. Because of the situation, he did what he had to do, he was Bugs Bunny talking his way out of situations. That for me is another movie that I would like to do, it made me say, “Damn, I wanna do that.”

Honorable Mentions, to round out the Top Eleven: The Mask, There’s Something About Mary, Airplane!, Liar Liar, Austin Powers, and The Nutty Professor.


Fifty Shades of Black opens this week.

On Wednesday, Januray 7, the Writers Guild of America (WGA) released their list of nominees for their annual WGA Awards, honoring outstanding writing in film, television, radio, and new media. The ceremony itself will take place on Saturday, February 7 at the Hyatt Regency Century Plaza Hotel in Los Angeles, but you can check out a select list of the nominees below:

 

Original Screenplay

Adapted Screenplay

Documentary Screenplay

Drama Series

Comedy Series

New Series

By now, you may have heard of a little show called Breaking Bad, considered not only one of the greatest TV shows of all time, but also one of the most binge-worthy. With Breaking Bad off the air forever (and Better Call Saul not starting for another month), what’s one to do? Game of Thrones? Already did that one — twice! At Rotten Tomatoes, the staff has looked back over the past year’s shows and selected some of the best — not just because the critics loved them, but because they are one helluva way to spend a weekend in a state of binge-watching bliss.


Transparent

Beki Lane, Editorial Coordinator


What it’s about: Jeffrey Tambor plays a father who wants to live his life as a woman and needs to tell his adult children.
What makes it so binge-worthy: Tambor’s turn as Maura is award-worthy, but what is most surprising is how it is just one facet of this family dramedy. All the members of the Pfefferman clan are struggling with their own demons and each storyline is full and fascinating to follow. It is a study of faith, family, and dysfunction that is well worth the day or two it takes to binge-watch it.
Where to watch: Amazon Prime.

Commitment: One season.


Outlander

Marya E. Gates, Social Media Specialist


What it’s about: Based on the books from author Diana Gabaldon, Outlander starts off in Scotland just after World War II, where nurse Claire Beauchamp Randall and her husband Frank are trying to reconnect during a second honeymoon. After visiting an ancient set of rocks, Claire finds herself transported back in time to 1743 where she gets mixed up in civil war and finds protection from Highlander Jamie Fraser.
What makes it so binge-worthy: Since both parts of the show are set in the past, the viewer is always immersed in sensational period set pieces. But that is just the backdrop to what really makes the show so binge-able: its cast. Stars Caitriona Balfe (Claire) and Sam Heughan (Jamie) are smokin’ hot and their chemistry is undeniable. Add to that Claire’s feisty feminist ways and Jamie’s burly, but gentle manners and you’ve got the TV stuff that dreams are made of.
Where to watch: Starz Play.
Commitment: Half season.


The Knick

Matt Atchity, Editor in Chief


What it’s about: The dawn of modern medicine in the early 20th century was sometimes a grisly affair, and this series set in the fictionalized Knickerbocker Hospital in New York City doesn’t shy away from that fact. Clive Owen leads the cast as a brilliant, driven, and drug-addicted surgeon working with a staff that is creating modern medical practices as they try to save lives and heal the sick.
What makes it so binge-worthy: A hospital drama set over 100 years ago may sound less than exciting, but The Knick turned out to be a gripping and fascinating show. Viewers get a crash course in medical history, while racial, religious, and gender discrimination come into play to remind us what has and hasn’t changed through the years. Acclaimed director Steven Soderbergh co-produced and directed every episode of the first season, and this show is some of his best work.
Where to watch: Max Go.
Commitment: One season.


Jane the Virgin

Catherine Pricci, Review Aggregator


What it’s about: A young woman gets accidentally artificially inseminated when going in for a routine pap smear. The catch? She’s a virgin. And now, a pregnant virgin.
What makes it so binge-worthy: First off, it’s 100 percent certified fresh. That should be reason enough to check out this Golden Globe-nominated show. Jane the Virgin is campy, but in a fun way. The writers really know how to give you enough of the over-the-top telenovela style but with very true characterizations. Gina Rodriguez, who plays Jane, shines in this role, bringing real emotions to the table. It is escapism at its best, full of heart and comedy.
Where to watch: Vudu,
iTunes, Xbox Video,
Google Play, and Amazon.

Commitment: Half season.


The Bridge

Tim Ryan, Senior Editor


What it’s about: El Paso Police detective Sonya Cross (Diane Kruger) teams up with Ciudad Juárez detective Marco Ruiz (Demián Bichir) to solve a bizarre murder along the U.S.-Mexico border. She’s got Asperger syndrome, he’s got a host of personal problems, and they each have very different approaches to law enforcement.
What makes it so binge-worthy: The Bridge was adapted from a Danish-Swedish series, and its shaky first season shows the potential hazards of sticking too closely to the original text — its intriguing characters were shoehorned into a silly, didactic serial killer plot. When the killer was finally stopped (with two episodes left in the season!), The Bridge was able to take flight (Grantland’s Andy Greenwald wrote extensively about how the show improved by the end of its first season). What came next was pretty thrilling: a police procedural loaded with haunting atmosphere and a fantastic collection of odd personalities on various sides of the drug trade. A character like cartel assassin/bookkeeper (and former Mennonite) Eleanor Nacht (Franka Potente) is so fantastically strange that she ends up feeling more real than the typical TV cold-blooded killer; Matthew Lillard and Emily Rios share such hilarious, quirky chemistry that they easily rise above their roles as grizzled newspaper reporters. The Bridge was never going to top The Wire, but its second season was strong enough to hint at even bigger and better things, but by this point, few were watching, and FX didn’t renew the series. Still, if you’re in the mood for a different type of cop show, you’d be hard-pressed to find anything quite as off-kilter and darkly funny as this.
Where to watch: Vudu, Xbox Video,
iTunes, Sony PSN,
Google Play, and Amazon.

Commitment: Two seasons.


Orange Is the New Black

Corie Wicks Clayton, Analytics Specialist


What it’s about: Loosely centered around Piper Chapman, an unlikely resident of Litchfield federal prison, Orange is the New Black expertly unfolds the backstories of the women who populate the prison.
What makes it so binge-worthy: Darkly humorous, thoughtful and dramatic, this Netflix original reflects the complicated nature of humanity in the most inhumane of settings. With more origin stories and present-tense plot twists by season two, OITNB offers complexity, heart, and some extremely satisfying servings of revenge. It’s not quite accurate to laud the supporting cast, because it’s the outstanding ensemble who steals the show with the help of fresh writing and thoughtful character development. By the last episode you’ll be champing at the bit for season three, and extremely thankful that Netflix is rumored to once again release the full season all at once (even if it’s a few months away).
Where to watch: Netflix.
Commitment: Two seasons.


The Divide

Grae Drake, Senior Editor


What it’s about: The Divide opens 11 years after two men were convicted for brutally murdering a Philadelphia family, focusing on the impassioned case worker determined to find the truth about the crime.
What makes it so binge-worthy: Cancelled too soon, it may seem counter-intuitive to binge an incomplete show. That said, The Divide is just that good. The number of people in prison for crimes they didn’t commit is staggering, and the necessity for organizations like The Innocence Project to help them is ever-increasing. It’s with this in mind that executive producers Richard LaGravenese (The Fisher King, Beautiful Creatures) and Tony Goldwyn (Scandal) co-created The Divide, an atmospheric and nuanced melodrama about a family of African Americans murdered by two white men — or so the Philadelphia courts say. The show features incredible performances from Nia Long, Paul Schnieder, Clarke Peters, and Damon Gupton. If you love Law and Order, Scandal, and The Good Wife, then this show is for you.

Where to watch: iTunes, Amazon, and WeTV.com.
Commitment: One season.


Veep

Jeff Giles, Associate Editor


What it’s about: The trials and tribulations of Vice President Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a onetime contender forced to toil in the political shadow of a President who clearly has no real place for her in his administration. While Selina struggles to cement her legacy in an effort to set herself up for another shot at the presidency, she has to deal with a staff (including supporting players Tony Hale, Matt Walsh, and Anna Chlumsky) who are either frantically fixing her PR gaffes or making fresh blunders of their own, as well as trying to balance her all-consuming career against her responsibilities to her daughter (Sarah Sutherland) and her semi-disastrous romantic pursuits.

What makes it so binge-worthy: If all Veep had going for it was Louis-Dreyfus’ gift for embodying emotionally needy, occasionally cluelessly arrogant characters, it’d still be a pleasant watch, but the show’s never settled for an easy setup. A spiritual spinoff of Veep creator Armando Iannucci’s BBC government satire The Thick of It (which later inspired his Oscar-nominated film In the Loop), it’s a rapid-fire, densely interwoven tangle of sharp dialogue and constantly converging plot points, finely balanced between Beltway politics and good old-fashioned sitcom laffs. Louis-Dreyfus is the glue that holds the whole thing together — hence her three consecutive Primetime Emmy Awards — but Veep is a true ensemble piece, and although there’s a definite narrative arc over this HBO hit’s three seasons, the plots are secondary to the pure pleasure of watching the cast at work.
Where to watch: HBO Go.
Commitment: Three seasons.


Orphan Black

Ryan Fujitani, Editor


What it’s about: Orphan Black tells the story of a young, streetwise single mother who inadvertently thrusts herself into a vast conspiracy littered with other women who all look exactly like her.

What makes it so binge-worthy: If you know nothing else about this BBC America sci-fi mystery, you’ve probably at least heard someone bemoan the omission of star Tatiana Maslany from any sort of awards recognition, and with good reason. Maslany plays not only the lead character, Sarah Manning, but also every one of Sarah’s doppelgangers, often in the same scene. The miracle of it all is that somehow, thanks in part to some clever camera tricks but mostly due to Maslany’s remarkable performance(s), each clone feels distinctly like its own character, from the uptight soccer mom to the troubled Ukrainian assassin. Physical similarities aside, you actually forget you’re watching the same actress pull off this amazing stunt. But Tatiana Maslany is only the prime reason Orphan Black is so easily binge-able; the storytelling is twisty and propulsive, the supporting players are solid, and there’s plenty of emotional complexity to keep things interesting. Just keep your fingers crossed that the writers don’t kill off your favorite clone.
Where to watch: Vudu,
iTunes,
Xbox Video, Sony PSN,
Google Play, and Amazon.

Commitment: Two seasons.


Getting On

Kerr Lordygan, Review Aggregator


What it’s about: The adaptation of the UK BBC comedy series showcases the careers and personal lives of doctors and nurses in a Long Beach hospital extended-care wing.

What makes it so binge-worthy: Folks who like your brilliantly-delivered slapstick comedy to suddenly jolt you with shocks of empathy and grab your heart only to throw it against the wall and watch it slither to the floor where it gets rolled over by a squeaky, old wheelchair occupied by a vibrant but terminally-ill senior citizen who screams something naughty as she begins to dance naked in the hallways of the hospital wing, bringing you to tears of laughter once again, will absolutely love Getting On. Laurie Metcalf, Niecy Nash, and Alex Borstein as the three leading ladies are hysterical and heart-wrenching all at the same time. Cameos by the likes of Betty Buckley and June Squibb are an extra stellar treat.
Where to watch: HBO Go.
Commitment: Two seasons.


The Strain

Sarah Ricard, TV Editor


What it’s about: When a vampiric virus grabs New York City by the throat, it’s up to troubled CDC head Dr. Ephraim Goodweather (Corey Stoll) and his ragtag gang of civilian strigoi fighters to defend the world from utter catastrophe.
What makes it so binge-worthy: First of all, every episode of The Strain ends on a cliffhanger, so you’ll be happy you’re binging it rather than waiting a week between each installment. Then, there’s one of current TV’s best villains, the terrifying vampire/concentration camp guard Eichorst (German actor Richard Sammel — the dude has been an onscreen Nazi 22 times, so he must know a thing or two about playing bad guys). But mostly, Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, The Hobbit, Hellboy), a writer and producer known for his highly imaginative storytelling, places you in an alternate universe where New York City is overrun by no-brain vampires and Corey Stoll has hair. It’s a world you’ll want to spend a winter weekend, full of squeals and shocks. Simply put, The Strain is simultaneously campy and smart, with healthy doses of scares and heart.
Where to watch: Vudu, Sony PSN,
iTunes,
Xbox Video,
Google Play, and Amazon.

Commitment: One season.

What was your favorite binge of 2014? Tell us in the comments below!


 

 

He earned his first real success by tapping into America’s unquenchable thirst for broad slapstick comedy, but Jim Carrey always had bigger ambitions than anyone could have guessed by watching Ace Ventura: Pet Detective, and he’s proven it repeatedly by choosing projects beyond the scope of Farrelly-friendly laffers. His reach has occasionally exceeded his grasp, but few careers can boast a range extending from Dumb and Dumber to Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. And with his appearance as the Colonel in Kick-Ass 2 bowing this weekend, we decided there was no time like the present to take a look at the best-reviewed films of Jim Carrey’s career!


10. Man on the Moon (1999) 64%

man-on-the-moon

For most of the 1980s and 1990s, Andy Kaufman was a little-remembered comic, mostly known for his portrayal of dimwitted immigrant mechanic Latka Gravas on the ABC sitcom Taxi — but the late 1990s witnessed a resurgence in interest surrounding Kaufman’s often pioneering work, thanks to a pair of biographies, a handful of DVD reissues, and the R.E.M.-referencing Man on the Moon. Carrey continued his 1990s run of prestige pictures with Moon, subsuming himself so completely into the role of the inscrutable Kaufman that most critics were willing to forgive the movie’s fuzzy, weightless middle, its fudging of certain facts, and a few fumble-fingered attempts at going meta. Although many scribes were quick to point out the movie’s flaws — and Kaufman’s all-too-apparent flaws as a protagonist — praise for Moon‘s star was all but universal, typified by Jeffrey M. Anderson of Combustible Celluloid, who applauded, “Carrey gets inside Kaufman’s skin.”

Watch Trailer


9. Dumb & Dumber (1994) 68%

dumb-dumber

Sea Bass! Part of Carrey’s 1994 trilogy of broad-as-a-barn, occasionally revolting comedies, Dumb and Dumber paired the rising star with Jeff Daniels as a couple of well-meaning dimwits who stumble into a cross-country adventure involving Lauren Holly and a briefcase full of cash. While not quite the across-the-board smash that There’s Something About Mary turned out to be a few years later, Dumb and Dumber still managed to include enough charm between the goofy jokes to reach 64 percent on the Tomatometer. It didn’t win any points for smarts, obviously, but that was beside the point — as recognized by writers such as Entertainment Weekly’s Owen Gleiberman, who noted that “Carrey…does literal-minded doofdom with peerless enthusiasm.”

Watch Trailer


8. Earth Girls Are Easy (1989) 69%

You might be surprised to find this late-night cable mainstay on a list that includes cult favorites like The Cable Guy and box-office champs like Bruce Almighty, but the Tomatometer does not lie, and critics cheered loudly enough to send this 1989 cult classic all the way up to 65 percent. Although quite a few scribes sniffed at at Earth Girls are Easy‘s low ambitions and thick layer of cheese, a greater number were able to grin and bear Julien Temple’s brightly colored send-up of hokey sci-fi and 1980s life in the San Fernando Valley. As a furry red alien named Wiploc, Carrey received one of his first major chunks of screen time here, and although his efforts were rewarded with minimal box-office success, he did get to trade lines with Geena Davis and Julie Brown — and help earn some delightfully backhanded praise from the likes of Luke Y. Thompson of the New Times, who declared the film to be “stupid but wonderful.”

Watch Trailer


7. I Love You Phillip Morris (2009) 71%

phillip-morris

Between Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind in 2004 and the end of the decade, Jim Carrey had a pretty rough go of it, vacillating between rehashed broad comedies like Yes Man and ill-advised dramatic fare like The Number 23 — and the best live-action project he booked during that span, Glenn Ficarra and John Requa’s I Love You Phillip Morris, ended up gathering dust in the studio vaults for years. Given that it dramatizes the real-life, stranger-than-fiction love affair between a cop-turned-con man (Carrey) and his charismatic prison cellmate (Ewan McGregor), it’s unsurprising (but still disappointing) that Morris would have a hard time finding a spot on the release schedule — and the minimal box office returns generated by its limited theatrical run seemed to reinforce Hollywood’s belief that audiences weren’t ready for a darkly comic dramedy about a homosexual love affair. Morris resonated with most critics, however — particularly Carrey’s work, lauded by Stephen Holden of the New York Times when he wrote, “With his manic glare, ferociously eager smile, hyperkinetic body language and talent for instant self-transformation, Mr. Carrey has rarely been more charismatic on the screen.”

Watch Trailer


6. Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events (2004) 72%

It was a bit of a non-starter at the box office, failing to recoup its $140 million budget with its domestic receipts, but few roles in the history of children’s fiction have ever been better-suited to an actor than the villainous master of disguise known as Count Olaf and his on-screen counterpart, Jim Carrey. Although A Series of Unfortunate Events drew the ire of some fans of the books for softening their frequently nasty edges, it remains a visual feast, as well as a tour de force for Carrey, who was able to take advantage of his manic energy in a way not seen since his mid 1990s heyday. A sequel remains in development limbo, but don’t let Hollywood’s cold feet keep you from giving Unfortunate a rental — as the Reno Gazette-Journal’s Forrest Hartman put it, “not many children’s movies center on recently orphaned children delivered to the home of a homicidal thespian. Then again, not many children’s movies are as good as this one.”

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5. The Mask (1994) 79%

One of the only films to ever net its star nominations from both the Golden Globes and the Golden Raspberries, 1994’s The Mask presented filmgoers with something of an early 1990s trifecta: State of the art special effects, some marvelously over-the-top mugging from Jim Carrey, and a heaping helping of va-va-va-voom from instant star Cameron Diaz, who turned Carrey’s nebbishy bank clerk Stanley Ipkiss into a leering Tex Avery wolf (and had roughly the same effect on male viewers). It’s loud and far from subtle, but The Mask is also a lot of fun, not least because Carrey’s impossibly limber performance ultimately proves to be as much of a special effect as anything else on the screen. Variety’s Leonard Klady spoke for many of his peers when he summed it up as “adroitly directed, viscerally and visually dynamic and just plain fun.”

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4. Dr. Seuss' Horton Hears a Who! (2008) 80%

Carrey’s first brush with a Seuss-inspired adaptation didn’t go so well, which may have scared a few viewers away from the CG-animated Dr. Seuss’ Horton Hears a Who! — but it was their loss, as attested by the mostly quite positive reviews that greeted the second film adaptation of this timeless tale of a good-hearted elephant who teaches his detractors that “a person’s a person, no matter how small.” As Horton’s voice, Carrey did a better job of adding marquee value than bringing hidden layers of meaning to his character, and critics were quick to point out that Horton suffers most of the same difficulties that are bound to trouble a 90-minute film based on an illustrated short story, but for most, the movie’s charms proved impossible to resist — such as Brian Webster of the Apollo Guide, who happily reported that “taking on Seuss has proven a challenge for Hollywood, but a nice balance has been struck here between authenticity and new ideas. This one’s a winner.”

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3. Liar Liar (1997) 83%

Given that Carrey and Liar Liar director Tom Shadyac had previously collaborated on Ace Ventura, a person could have been forgiven for assuming that their reunion would rely on the same scatalogical humor and over-the-top physical comedy that the world’s most famous pet detective rode to box-office riches…and they would have been right, to an extent, although Liar Liar features a much softer-edged version of Carrey’s manic persona. It isn’t his sharpest comedy, but at this point, even critics who had grown accustomed to hating Carrey’s work found themselves surprisingly susceptible to his charms — most notably Roger Ebert, who wrote “I am gradually developing a suspicion, or perhaps it is a fear, that Jim Carrey is growing on me.” Filmgoers had no such fear, driving this family-friendly tale of a pathological fibber rendered unable to lie for a day to global grosses in excess of $300 million.

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2. Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) 92%

eternal-sunshine

While he spent the early 1990s mugging it up for fans of perfectly obvious comedy, few people could have guessed that Jim Carrey would wind up sharing top billing with one of the premier actresses of her generation in a mindbending, critically beloved drama about the nature of love and memory — but that’s exactly what he did in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, going toe to toe with Kate Winslet in one of the most unusual and eye-catching films of the early aughts. Armed with a script co-written by Charlie Kaufman, director Michel Gondry riddles the film with stunning visual effects that, depending on what you want out of the movie, either deepen its metaphorical layers of meaning or are simply really cool to look at. It’s admittedly too strange and/or chilly to appeal to everyone, but at its heart, the movie lives up to Mariko McDonald of Film Threat’s assessment of it as “fresh, heartfelt and ultimately heartbreaking in its honest portrayal of a modern relationship.”

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1. The Truman Show (1998) 95%

truman

Is it science fiction? A comedy? A drama? A psychiatric syndrome? Actually, 1998’s The Truman Show is all of the above — which has a lot to do with why it’s not only the best-reviewed film of Jim Carrey’s career, but a high-water mark for 1990s cinema in general. Carrey stars as Truman Burbank, the unwitting star of a wildly popular reality series engineered by a producer named Christof (played by Ed Harris), in which Truman’s life — complete with fake wife, fake friends, and a whole fake town — is lapped up by eager audiences. It didn’t net Carrey the Academy Award that many were anticipating, but The Truman Show has endured over the last 10 years, and predicted the overwhelming popularity of reality television in the years to come. In the words of Hollywood Report Card’s Ross Anthony, “this is clearly one of the decade’s cleverest, most original pictures.”

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Following a busy holiday weekend when five new releases opened nationwide, the crowded marketplace will now face another four new films invading multiplexes everywhere.

Jim Carrey tries out the horror genre in "The Number 23," TV comedy comes to the big screen in "Reno 911!: Miami," Billy Bob Thornton longs to be in outer space in "The Astronaut Farmer," and more frights pop up in "The Abandoned." Overall ticket sales should simmer down after the record Presidents’ Day holiday weekend led by "Ghost Rider" which will fight to keep its box office crown. Meanwhile, aging Oscar contenders will compete over last-minute biz ahead of Sunday’s Academy Awards which will bring some drama of its own.

After tackling comedy, drama, super hero flicks, and kids movies, Jim Carrey explores his darker side in the new psychological thriller "The Number 23." The Riddler reteams with his "Batman Forever" director Joel Schumacher in this R-rated story about a man obsessed with a book that seems to reveal mysteries about his own past. Virginia Madsen co-stars. Older teens and young adults will make up the target audience here and many in the horror camps will come out of curiosity too. The title is strong and the marketing has been solid so "23" will be able to make a serious challenge for the top spot. Jim Carrey’s starpower will be put to the test once again since this is not a "Bruce Almighty" or "Liar, Liar" situation. Actually, "23" might post one of the best openings of his career for a non-comedy. Maybe if it opens big, he’ll be cast in one of the next twenty-three "Saw" films. Opening in over 2,500 locations this weekend, the new Carrey film may end up grossing $23M – $2M – $3M.


Jim Carrey goes whacko due to "The Number 23."

After making a mint on "Borat," Fox looks to another raunchy comedy for some income. "Reno 911!: Miami" finds the cast of the popular Comedy Central series hitting the road to Florida for a national convention. The R-rated pic will play almost exclusively to fans of the show which while successful, is not really a runaway smash so the potential could be limited. Trailers and commercials actually look funny so a slightly wider crowd may come in. Though "23" could not be more different of a film, it will still offer plenty of competition for older teens and young adults. Moviegoers paying top dollar for a ticket are more likely to try out a Jim Carrey film, even if he’s testing out a new genre. By not screening for critics and releasing the film in the most theaters of any new release this weekend, Fox is basically hoping that those who have seen the show will come out and give this one a try. Steep declines in subsequent weeks are assured. But for the opening frame, a debut in 2,702 venues could lead to a weekend tally of around $14M for "Reno 911!: Miami."


Our favorite careening cops are ready to take on Miami.

Billy Bob Thornton plays an ex-astronaut who tends to his farm in the aptly-titled "The Astronaut Farmer" from Warner Bros. The PG-rated film co-stars Virginia Madsen who pulls double duty this weekend playing the wife to both a bad santa and a grinch. The former Mr. Jolie sells more tickets when he’s not the anchor of a film, so it could be a rough ride this weekend. Appeal to teens and young adults seems weak as the turnout could come from older adults who may also bring with them younger children thanks to the rating. With the violence of "Ghost Rider" and the debut of a trio of R-rated pics, there could be an opportunity with the family crowd. That is, if they already have seen "Bridge to Terabithia." The marketing push has not been too loud so don’t expect a high altitude here. "The Astronaut Farmer" opens in over 2,000 theaters on Friday and may find itself with about $8M.


Billy Bob has the right stuff in "The Astronaut Farmer."

Hitting theaters on a pitstop to what could be solid DVD revenue, the horror film "The Abandoned" enters the marketplace as the weekend’s other new scary movie. The R-rated film tells the story of an American woman who finds terror in Russia when she sets out to find her birth parents. Obviously, opening against Jim Carrey’s new spookfest will hurt the grosses for "The Abandoned." If it were a PG-13 film aimed at teenage girls, it could have been another story, but those over the age of 17 who want a fright will be thinking "23." Lionsgate is only launching "The Abandoned" in about 1,250 locations so a mild $3M gross could result.


No reviews, and no other photos for "The Abandoned."

Last weekend, Nicolas Cage enjoyed a record-breaking Presidents’ Day opening with "Ghost Rider" which grabbed $45.4M over the three-day portion of its holiday bow. The Marvel super hero flick opened much like 2003’s "Daredevil" which launched on the same frame and suffered a 55% drop on the sophomore session. "Ghost Rider" should see similar results as it also attracted much of its fan base last weekend and is facing the same level of competition that the Ben Affleck actioner saw in its second attack. Look for "Ghost Rider" to burn up another $20M which would lift its ten-day tally to $79M.

Disney’s "Bridge to Terabithia" should enjoy a better hold since there is little new competition for its family audience. A 30% decline would give the PG-rated fantasy around $16M for the weekend and a solid $48M after ten days. Aside from crossing his fingers for an Oscar, Eddie Murphy will see another sizable drop in sales for his comedy "Norbit." A 45% fall would give the Paramount release a $9M frame bumping the cume to $74M.

LAST YEAR: Tyler Perry‘s comedy "Madea’s Family Reunion" opened atop the charts with a powerful $30M debut for Lionsgate. The hit flick found its way to $63.3M. Holdovers rounded out the top five with Disney’s "Eight Below" dropping a spot to second with $15.9M in its sophomore frame. The Steve Martin remake "The Pink Panther" took in $11.1M and was followed by "Date Movie"’s $9.1M and the $7.2M of "Curious George." Opening to poor results were the animated film "Doogal" with $3.6M and New Line’s "Running Scared" with $3.4M. Final grosses reached only $7.6M and $6.9M, respectively.

Author: Gitesh Pandya, www.BoxOfficeGuru.com

When is it OK to sequelize a Jim Carrey flick without Jim Carrey? When you have someone like Steve Carell in the lead role this time around. You’ll no doubt remember Mr. Carell’s brief-yet-hilarious turn in "Bruce Almighty," which means you’ll probably be interested in the semi-sequel "Evan Almighty." And we have a few pics and set reports to mention…

Courtesy of USA Today we have some photos and the set report, and from Dark Horizons we get some reactions from a guy who worked as an extra during the flick’s Virginia shoot.

Written by the "Click" guys and directed by the man who brought you "Ace Ventura: Pet Detective," "Dragonfly," and "Liar Liar," "Evan Almighty" hits theaters next June.

While films by American directors came up empty-handed, three European entries took top honors at the end of festival awards ceremony, led by UK director Ken Loach with "The Wind That Shakes The Barley."

It was a surprising set of winners this year, as the high profile, widely lauded films in competition ("Babel," "Volver") got overlooked in favor of two smaller, intense, character-driven war dramas and a Dogme 95 thriller. With a jury of international stars — Samuel L. Jackson, Monica Bellucci, Helena Bonham Carter, Tim Roth, Zhang Ziyi, and the President, Wong Kar-Wai among them — the critical buzz was by no means an accurate predictor of winners.

First-place winner "Wind" follows a young doctor (Cillian Murphy) who joins a growing rebellion in 1920s Ireland to fight British rule in a bloody civil war. Loach, an eight-time Cannes participant, has won five previous prizes at Cannes; the Palme d’Or is the festival’s (and his) highest placing thus far.


Palme d’Or winner "The Wind That Shakes The Barley," by Ken Loach

Jury president Wong Kar-Wai confirmed that his jury awarded Loach the first-place honor in a unanimous decision. Few early betters had their money on "Wind," however, which enjoyed a lukewarm and certainly not overwhelming response from festival viewers and critics (click here to see a sampling of critics’ reviews).

Taking second place with the Grand Prix award was Bruno Dumont with "Flandres," another war-themed film that only enjoyed a moderate reception at Cannes. "Flandres" tells the story of young enlisted men sent off to fight an unidentified war, and the changes they undergo from the effects of military life.


Andrea Arnold’s "Red Road" took home the Jury Prize at Cannes

The third-place Jury Prize award went to another UK production, "Red Road." Andrea Arnold‘s first feature-length directorial effort, "Red Road" unravels a mystery as a television surveillance operator catches a glimpse of a man from her past — perhaps most interesting, the project is the first of a three-part Dogme 95 experiment to use the same characters and actors in three different films. Surprisingly, critics at Cannes seemed to take to this one a bit more than the top two winners, with The Hollywood Reporter’s Kirk Honeycutt calling "Red Road" "tense and provocative…"Rear Window" Times 100."

Other awards of the festival included the Best Director honor, bestowed upon Mexican DJ-turned-directorial darling Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, whose "Babel" was screened to great acclaim in competition. "Babel," a three-story drama about the tragic repercussions of a single gunshot, and the disconnectedness of humanity, had generated a lot of Palme d’Or buzz following its debut at Cannes; film critic Emanuel Levy calls it "more compelling than "21 Grams"" and "more involving than "Syriana.""


Pedro Almodovar’s "Volver" won Best Screenplay, as well as honors for its six main female performers

Also receiving a consolation prize was perennial director célèbre Pedro Almodovar, whose "Volver" was a widespread favorite throughout the festival, and seemed the popular favorite for top honors. Almodovar, who throughout his illustrious career has won just about every cinematic award there is (Oscar, Palme d’Or, Cesar, you name it), was awarded the Best Screenplay honor for his darkly comic multigenerational tale of women, tragedy, life, and death.

Adding more emphasis to the merits of "Volver," the jury awarded the Best Performance of an Actress honor to pretty much the entire female cast of the film: Penelope Cruz, Carmen Maura, Lola Duenas, Blanca Portillo, Yohana Cobo, and Chus Lampreave.

Similar honors were bestowed on the male stars of Algerian war tale "Indigenes," whose actors Jamel Debbouze, Samy Naceri, Roschdy Zem, Sami Bouajila, and Bernard Blancan collectively accepted Best Performance by an Actor.


The cast of "Indigenes" earned collective honors for their portrayals of WWII French-Algerian soldiers

The Un Certain Regard category also awarded its honors:

Prix Un Certain Regard — "Luxury Car," director Wang Chao
Prix Special Du Jury Un Certain Regard — "Ten Canoes," director Rolf De Heer
Acting Award — Dorothea Petre, "The Way I Spent The End Of The World"
Acting Award — Don Angel Tavira, "El Violin"
Prix du President du Jury — "Meurtrieres," director Patrick Grandperret

And lastly, the Camera d’Or (Golden Camera) awarded in the Director’s Fortnight sidebar, went to Romanian director Corneliu Porumboiu for "A Fost Sau N-A Fost?"

Filming has begun on the hilarious comedy "Evan Almighty," starring Steve Carell, Morgan Freeman and Lauren Graham. (Funny how a studio press release can call an unfinished movie "hilarious.")

Comedy director Tom Shadyac ("The Nutty Professor," "Liar Liar"), who helmed the box-office hit "Bruce Almighty," returns behind the camera for this next episode of divine intervention written by Steve Oedekerk ("The Nutty Professor," "Bruce Almighty"), Josh Stolberg and Bobby Florsheim.

Carell reprises his role as Evan Baxter — the polished, preening newscaster of the first film — who finds himself the next one anointed by God (Freeman) to accomplish a holy mission.

Newly elected to Congress, Evan leaves Buffalo behind and shepherds his family to suburban northern Virginia. Once there, his life gets turned upside-down when God appears and mysteriously commands him to build an ark. But his befuddled wife (Graham) and kids just can’t decide whether Evan is having an extraordinary mid-life crisis or is truly onto something of Biblical proportions …

"Evan Almighty" features a supporting cast that includes John Goodman, Wanda Sykes, John Michael Higgins and up-and-coming young actors Jonah Hill, Jimmy Bennett, Graham Phillips and Johnny Simmons.

Evan Almighty will be filmed in Los Angeles, Virginia and Washington, D.C.

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