Couch Tomatoes

Watchmen: Loving Remix or a Step Too Far From the Source?

Couch Tomatoes host Naz Perez is joined by Collider's Roxy Striar and Buzzfeed's Unsolved's Shane Madej and Ryan Bergara to talk Watchmen's best moments, most killer performances, and the biggest changes from the source material.

by | October 30, 2019 | Comments

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The world is currently obsessed with HBO’s Certified Fresh Watchmen, the new TV series based on Alan Moore’s landmark graphic novel of the same name. But it’s that “based on” part that has some fans engaged in feverish debates following the show’s first two episodes. Showrunner Damon Lindelof‘s series takes bold risks, extending Moore’s universe rather than recreating the novel’s narrative and characters. For some the payoffs have been rewarding: Critics are loving this interpretation, with its risky dive into current affairs, narrative switch-ups, and killer performances – especially from Regina King and Don Johnson. For some Watchmen devotees, however, eyebrows have been raised. The series has become something of an, ahem, Rorschach Test.

Who’s right? Who’s wrong? And can’t we all just get along? We’re going deep on Watchmen in the latest episode of Couch Tomatoes. Host Naz Perez is asking the big questions and talking the series’ best moments with Collider’s Roxy Striar as well as Buzzfeed’s Unsolved‘s Shane Madej and Ryan Bergara; plus the panel is poring over fan theories and Easter Eggs and sharing the directions in which they’d like to see Lindelof steer the show.

With each episode of Couch Tomatoes, we dig into a major series or event and provide Fresh picks of great shows to help you cut through the clutter and only binge the best.

Watchmen airs Sundays on HBO. 


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Watchmen: Season 1 (2019)
96%

#1
Adjusted Score: -1%
Critics Consensus: Bold and bristling, Watchmen isn't always easy viewing, but by adding new layers of cultural context and a host of complex characters it expertly builds on its source material to create an impressive identity of its own.